(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Street railway journal"

2—554 




THE 



STREET RAILWAY 



JOURNAL 




INDEX TO VOLUME III. 



ME W YORK: 
.American Railway Publishing Company, 11 .3 Liberty Street. 

18S7. 



AMERICAN RAILWAY PUBLISHING COMPANY, 
PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS, 113 LIBERTY ST., N. Y. 



INDEX TO VOLUME III 



Articles marked with an asterisk (•) are Illustrated. 



Accidents, Devices for the Prevention of 70 

Ackley, Thomas W. (Biography) *1 

Advertising:, Art of. By Wm. H. Bailey 14o 

American Grinding Mill, The *135 

American Institute Fair, The , 1059 

American Street Railway Association 2, 947 

Ammonia Motor, An 343 

" " The 674 

Angle of Sheaves to Conduit, The 1040 

Arbitration 140 

Atkinson, Edward, Street Railway Mutual In- 
surance 1041 

Atwood, D., Mechanical Motors for Street Cars 

Other Than Electric 955 

Automa 1c Gate Wanted 673 

Axles, Divided 946 

Baths for Horses 335 

Bearing, Atlas Bronze *68 

" The Chaplin Roller *858 

Birmingham Cable Tramway 138 

Bly, Myron T., Streetcars vs. Vehicles.— The 

Law of the Road 861 

Bly, Myron T. Infant Passengers 674 

*' " Settling for Injuries to Pedestrians. 1051 
Boomer, W. E., Windsor Electric Street Rail- 
way Co 426 

Boston's Street Railway Combination 759 

Broad Distances— Pavements— Electric Rail- 
ways. Wm. P. Craig 343 

Broad Gauge Lines 2C3 

Broadway Car, Stephenson's 17 

Building of Cars by Railway Companies 846 

" " Street Railway Companies. 

By William White 859 

Bureaus and Statistics of Labor 846 

Business Notes 156, 211, 219, 292, 366, 530, 607, 780, 8 69 
978, 1060. 

Cabling the Eighth Avenue Line In New York . . 334 
Cable Accident, The Cincinnati By G. B. 

Kerper 1041 

Cable Accident, The Cincinnati 949 

" Buildings, Tenth Avenue *130 

" Car, Gould *260 

" Cars, Tenth Avenue 74 

" Conduit, A New *853 

" " The Gibbon *263 

" Engineers, A Conundrum for 946 

" Grip, Anders' *134 

" " Ryland's «336 

'• or Electricity, Steam vs. Horse. By Louis 

Ransom 1041 

" Railroad, Elevated "765 

" Railway, A New English *764 

" " Puller and His Lecture 861 

" Railways. By Wm. H. Searles. . ....... 210, 417 

" Road Bed, Isaacs' *264 

" Roads, Crossing for "1050 

" " Danger Signals for *857 

" " EncouraglDg (?) 502 

" " in the United States 342 

" " Julius S. Walsh on 779 

" Roadot St. Louis, The Citizens' *498 

" Splice 135 

" " The 1 

" System, Claims for the Falrchild 428 

" " New 197 

" Traction for Heavy Grades. By D. J. 

Miller 1041 

" Tramway, Birmingham 138 

" Tramways, Comparison of Electric and. . 427 

Calculation of Running Time 426 

Can't Dismount from a Street Car 144 

Cantor Law, The 850 

Car Decoration. By E. W. Selkirk *492 

Card, Joseph P. The Preservation of Railroad 

Ties by the Use of Antiseptics 852 

Car Heater, The Root *965 

" Horse's Soliloquy, A 965 

" Horse, The Life of a 693 

" Licenses in New York city 21 

"Lubrication, By W.E.Hall 415 



Car Starter, Vail '835 

" Stove and Coal Box, Fowler's *855 

" Stable Disinfecting. By Joshua Crandall.. 853 
" Wheels and Axles, Peckham's Improved 

System for Interchangeable "677 

Cars, Seatless 74 

'• The Building of, by Street Railway Com- 
panies. By Win. White 859 

Cauldwell, William. Fares in New York 342 

care of t he Hoof, The 336 

Certain Elements in the Mechanical Traction 

Problem 670 

Change Belt, Martin's *135 

" of Form, Our 581 

Chicago City Railway Co '494 

China, A Tramway In 156 

Cincinnati Cable Accident. 946 

" Convention, At the 15 

Citizens' Cable Road of St. Louis *498 

City Traffic, The Growth of 1047 

Claims for the Daft System. By Thomas White- 
side Rae 763 

Claims for the Falrchild Cable System 428 

Clean Stables 502 

Clippings. 139 

Collecting Fares, A. Picturesque System of 1048 

Comparative Popularity of Street Cars. 759 

Comparison of Electric and Cable Tramways. . . 427 

Concerning Concrete 496 

Conductors and Drivers, Training for 503 

Conductor's Duty, A 413 

Conductors' Recommendations 1038 

Conductors' Returns, Best System of Checking. 

By J. A. Bonnell 855 

Conductors, Saloons and Dishonest 1033 

Conductor, The 9*2 

Conductors. Women as Street Car 1050 

Conduit for Electric Street Railways, Ries' 

"Combination" *964 

Conduit, The Angle of Sheaves to 1040 

Connelly Motor, The *329 

Contents, Table Of. 344, 414, 502, 577, 665, 753, 841, 937 
1033. 

Continuous Ralls 845 

Conundrum for Cable Engineers, A 946 

Convention, At the 944 

" Briefs 17 

'« The 16 

" Friday, after the 944 

Correction. A 672 

Cost of Feeding Horses. By C. M. Davis 138 

" " Grinding Feed 418 

" " Running Steam Motors. By Moses Hum- 
phrey 672 

Cost of Street Railway Operation 415 

Craig, Wm. P. Broad Distance— Pavements- 
Electric Railways 343 

Crandall, Joshua. Car Stable Disinfecting 853 

Crime of Dividends, The . . .: 942 

Crossing for Cable Roads. *1050 

Crowding the Cars • 204 

Cushioned Wheel, Peckham's 491 

Daft Overhead System at Los Angeles. By T. 

W. Rae *587 

Daft Road at Pittsburgh, The 762 

Daft System, Claims for the. By T. W. Rae .... 763 

Danger Signals for Cable Roads *857 

Decoration, Car. By E. W. Selkirk *492 

Detection and Punishment of Dishonest Em- 
ployees. By J. B. Hanna 1043 

Devices for the Prevention of Accidents 70 

Diamond Metal 260 

Directory, Our Street Railway 268 

Discipline, Uniforms, etc 1046 

Dishonest Employees, Detection and Punish- 
ment of. By J. B. Hanna 1043 

Distance Between Switches 341 

Divided Axles 946 

" and Track Obstructions 1041 

Dividends, The Crime of. 942 

Doer Hanger, The Prescott Truss *855 



Double-Decker Cars 

" " Society 

Drivers, Training for Conductors and 

Driving, Rudiments of. By W. E. Partridge.. . . 

Drunkard's Haven, The 

Early Construction of Street Railways In Europe. 
" Methods of Supplying Electricity to Street 
Cars 

Eighth Avenue Line In New York, Cabling the 

Electric and Cable Tramways, Comparison of.. 

" Car, A Novel 

" Motor, Daft 

" " The Sprague., 269, 

" Motors on Third Avenue 

" •« Under Cars 

" Propulsion at Southwlck 

" Railroads. By Geo. W. Mansfield 

' " in the United States 

" Railway & Power Co.'s System, Safety 
" •' at the R. I. Locomotive Works, 

Test of 

" " Short and Nesmlth. 

" " system, The Series 

" •* TheAppleton •. 

" " The Bentley-Knlght 

" " The Orange 

" Railways 

" " In America 

•' « statistics of. By T. C. Martin 

" " a Success, Are? 

" Road at Columbus, O., S. H. Short's... 

" Roads 

" " The New York Sun on 

*' Street Cars. By T. C. Martin 198, 

" " Spur Gearing for. By F. 
J. Sprague 

Electric Street Railroads. By Geo. W. Mans- 
field 

Electric Street Railway System, The Euphrat... 
" «' " Ries' "Combination " 
Conduit for 

Electric Tramway in Paris. A New 

Electric Tramway, The Brussels 

Electric Welding and Tempering System, The 

Ries * 

" Wires, Iron Poles for 

Electricity as a Motive Power. By Wm. Whar- 
ton, Jr 

Electricity in Scranton, Success of 

" The Tangible in 

" Steam vs. Cable or. By Louis Ran- 
som 

Elevated Cable Railroad 

" Electric Railways. By J. H. Lawrence 

Employee's position, The 

Employees' Savings Deposit System 

Encouraging (?) Cable Roads. 

Enemies of Labor 

"Engineers Must Oil Travelers" 

English Street Car Wheel, An 

" Tramway Rail Cleaner, An 

European City and Suburban Tramway Con- 
struction 

Exhibit at Convention 

Facts and Opinions 760, 847, 943, 

Fare-Box Episode, A 

■i n Tne B eaman 

" Boxes 

" Receivers, The 

Fares In New York. J. L. D., E. V. w. Ros- 
slter, Thos. H. McLean, D. B. Hasbrouck, 
Waler L. McCorkle, Wm. Cauldwell, C. D. 

Wyman, G. W. Lynch 

Fares, The Reduction of 

Feed Cutter, Belle City 

Feeding Horses, Cost of 

Fitting of Horse Collars 

Financial Report of the Metropolitan Railroad 

of Boston 

Forty Horses Unwinding a Wire Rope 

Four Hundred Nickels in change 



763 
677 
503 
16 
194 
200 

767 
384 
427 
763 
•330 
•489 
265 
582 
767 
266 
499 
277 

146 
•589 
1040 
■66 
•331 
•409 
66 
681 
582 
693 
963 
415 
765 



972 

338 
•858 

•964 
672 
1052 

1049 
337 

949 
89 
942 

1041 
•765 

S50 
81 
501 
502 
512 
5S8 
•677 
268 

•584 

758 
1039 
89 
'413 
268 
412 



342 
262 
•211 

138 
262 

210 
1040 
1043 



IV 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL INDEX. 



Fowler, George L. The Horses of the 1 arts 

Tramways 689 

Friday, after the Convention 944 

Funeral Street Cars 763 

Fowler, George L. The Paris Omnibus System 674 

Franchise, Fight for a 767 

French Tramways 138 

German Street Hallways, Prevention of Acci- 
dents on 683 

Glimpse of the " New South " 490 

Grinding Feed, Cost of 418 

Grinding Mill, The American *135 

Grist Mill, Kaestner's Portable *89 

Grooved Rails, Horse Power on T and. By F. 

Serafon 427 

Growth of city Traffic, The 1047 

Haines Brothers *202 

Hall, W. E., Car Lubrication 41j 

Hanna, J. B. Detection and Punishment of 

Dishonest Employees 1043 

Harness, Street Railroad 491 

Harris, John. Horses— Purchase, Disposition 

and Relative Value with Mules 1043 

Hasbrouck, D. B. Fares In New York. 342 

Headlight, Smith's Street Car *265 

HeatlngCars with Electricity 758 

" Street Cars 341 

His Plan Worked Well 1060 

Holmes, Charles B., (Biography) *945 

Hoof, The Care of the 336 

Horse Collars, The Fitting of 262 

Nails, champion *75 

•' " The Manufacture of *68 

" Home of the, The original 139 

<■ Power on r and Grooved Ralls. By F. 

Seraton 427 

Horse Railroads, Shall the city Own? 89 

" Stioe, Bryden Forged 144 

" Shoeing 70, 512 

Horse's Age by the Teeth, How to Telia 68 

Horses, Bath for 335 

" of the Paris Tramways. By George L. 

Fowler 6S9 

Horses— Purchase, Disposition and Relative 

Value wltli Mules. By John Harris 1043 

Horses, Sunstroke In 779 

How a Man Came to Pay Double Fare 1060 

Humphrey, Moses. Cost of Running Steam Mo- 

tois 672 

Improved Power— Taxation— Labor. By G. 

Hilton scnbner 861 

Increasing Traction Adhesion by Electricity. 

By Ellas K. Rles 766 

Infant Passengers. By Myron T.Bly 674 

Injuries to Pedestrians, Settling for. 1051 

Institute Fair, The American 1059 

International Exposition of RallwayAppliances. 201 

" Railway Exposition at Paris 145 

Iron Poles for Electric Wires 337 

" " Protection to 146 

Kerper, G.B. The Cincinnati Cable Accident.. 1041 

" Knocking Down" is Stealing WA* 

Labor, Bui eaus and Statistics of 846 

" Enemies of 512 

" Improved Power— Taxation. By G. 

Hilton Scribner 861 

Lamp, Post's Center »68 

Lang, A. E. The Street Railway Patron 428 

Lawrence, J. H. Elevated Electric Railways 850 

Lazarus, Alfred. Street Railway Fares of New 

York 456 

Legal Decision, Important 678 

Life of a Car Horse, The 697 

London Railway System 71,136 

Loog Street Car, A *6 3 

Loose Wheel and Truck, White's. '145 

Louisville Street Cars 779 

Low-Pressure Air as a Propelling Power. By 

George Pardy 673 

Lvnch, G. W. Fares in New York 342 

Magulre, John. Mutual Fire Insurance for 

Street Railways 959 

Mall Routes, street Railways as F46 

Managed for Profit 942 

Mansfield, Geo. W. Electric Railroads 266 

" " " Electric Street Railroads.... 333 
Manufacturers and Dealers in Street Railway 

Appliances. 28, 90, 154, 219, 291, 365, 533, 578, 

666, 751, 842, 938, 1034. 

Manufacturers and the Association, The 942 

Manufacture of Horse Nails, The *68 

Martin, T. C. Electric Street Cars 198, 339 

" "" Statistics of Electric Railways 582 

McCorkle, Walter L. Fares in New York 342 

McLean, Thos. H. Fares in New York 342 

Mechanical Motors for Street Cars Other Than 

Electric. By D. Atwood 955 

Mechanical Traction Problem, Certain Ele- 
ments in the 670 

Metallic Ties, Precautions to be Taken in Put- 
ting In 203 

Metropolitan Railroad, Boston, Annual Report 205 
Metropolitan Railroad.Boston, Financial Report 210 

Mexican Street Railways 213 

Miller, D. J. Traction Rope Railways.. .*496, »591, 678 
" Cable Traction for Heavy Grades. 1041 

Motor Problem, The 270 

•' The Reckenzaun. By Wm. Wharton, Jr! 1040 
Motors, Mechanical, for Street Cars, Other Than 

Electric. By D. Atwood. 955 

Mutual Benefit Organizations. By H. A. Ever- 
ett *4U 

Mutual Fire Insurance for Street Railways. By 

JohnMaeulre '. 959 

Mutual Insurance, Street Railway. By Edward 

Atkinson jn41 

Mutual Insurance, Advantages of. io38 

Nash, Thos. C. The Nash Splice "' 70 

New Advertispments, 344, 414, 502, 577, 665, 753, 

841, 937, 1033. 

New Cable Conduit, A *853 

" " System 197 

" Catalogues 444 

" English Cable Railway, A «764 

" Form of Street Rail and Track . . . • *854 

" Publications 17, 203, 426, 779, 963, 

' 1 New South," Glimpse of the 490 



New York Labor Bureau on Street Railway Em- 
ployees 

New York Sun on Electric Roads, The 

Notes and Items, (See Street Railway News). . . 

Novel Collection of Tram Cars for So. America. 

Novel Electric Car, A 

Ohio State Tramway Association 73, 963, 

One Thankful One 

Orange Electric Railway, The 

Original Home of the Horse 

Organize a Small Company, How to 

Overcrowding, A Remedy for 

Palace Street Car, The Stephenson 

Pardy, George. Low-Pressure Air as a Propel- 
ling Power 

Paris omnibus System, The. By George L. Fow- 
ler 

Paris Tramway. . 

" Tramways, The Uses of the. By George 
L. Fowler 

Parry, Charles T 

Partridge, W. E. Street Car Improvements 

Patents, Recent 290, 429, 530, 624. 

Pavements 195 

" Wm. P. Craig 

Personal Directory of Street Railway Supply 
Men. 29, 91, 155, 221, 290, 364, 532, 5S0, 663,756, 
844, 940, 1036. 

Personal Mention. 7, 81, 205, 271, 845, 415, 501, 
582, 750, 847, 943, 1039. 

Picturesque System of collecting Fares, A 

Points and Suggestions 

Pole Motor, The 

" Street Car Motor, The 

Pollieness Is its Own Rewaid 

Power Needed for Different Grades 

Precautions to be Taken in Putting in Metallic 
Ties 

Preservation of Railroad Ties by the Use of An- 
tiseptics, The. By Joseph P. Card 

Preservation of Wood by a Simple Method of In- 
jection, The .■ 

Progress in the Power Question 

Prevention of Accidents, Devices for the 

" " " on German Street Rail- 
ways 

Protection to Iron 

Quaterly Reports 438, 513 

Rae, Thomas Whiteside, Daft Overhead System 
at Los Angeles 

Rae, Thomas Whiteside. Claims for the Daft 
System 

Rail Cleaner, An English Tramway 

*' Sander, Jordan 

Railroad Ties, The Prevention of, by the Use of 
Antiseptics. By Joseph P. Card 

Hall Without Joints 

Railway Appliances, International Exhibition 
of 



671 
765 

342 
763 
1043 
263 
•409 
139 
673 
1040 
*491 

673 

674 
946 

687 
690 
503 
, 713 
,512 
313 



1018 
606 
t>74 
*193 
1060 
673 

203 

852 

146 
581 
70 

603 
146 
604 



763 
263 
*412 

852 
1037 

204 

Railway Exposition at Paris, International 145 

Official With a Soul, A 416 

" System, London 71, 136 

Ransom, Louis. Steam vs. Horse, Cable or 

Electricity 1041 

Reckenzaun Motor, The. By Wm. Wharton, Jr. 1040 

Reduction of Fares, The 262 

Requirements of the Street Railway Motor, The 501 

Reversible Seats, Vis-a-vls vs 942 

Richards, C. A. Roadway Construction 956 

" C A., Views of ,1048 

" President, on Consolidation 690 

Richardson, William J n29 

Ries Electric Welding and Tempering System, 

The «i049 

Ries, Ellas E. Increasing Traction Adhesion by 

Electricity 766 

Right of Wages, The Immediate 74 

Roadway Construction, c. A. Richards 956 

Roller Bearing, The Chaplin *858 

Room for All 199 

Rossi ter, E. V. W. Fares in New York 342 

Rowan's Tram Cars »i!58 

Rudiments of Driving. By W. E. Partridge 16 

Running Gear, Stephenson's *7o 

Sale of Franchise. By G. Hilton Scribner 850 

" " Legal Points 758 

Saloons and Dishonest Conductors 1038 

Sand Box, The Reliable «8i 

Savings Deposit System, Employees' 501 

Scranton Street Railway *28l 

Scribner, G. Hilton. Improved Power— Taxa- 
tion— Labor 861 

Scribner, G. Hilton. Sale of Franchises 850 

" " (Biography) *849 

Searles, Wm. B. Cable Railways 210,417 

season's Growth, The 846 

" In Street Railway Business 852 

Seat less cars 74 

Selkirk, E. W. Car Decoration «492 

Serafon, F. Horse Power on T and Grooved 

Rails 427 

Series Electric Railway System, The 1040 

Shall the City Own the Horse Railroads? 89 

Sharp, Jacob. A Catechism 670 

Smith, Charles G. Street Car Lighting 21 

Smoking on Street Cars 1037 

Soap. 



_ 345 

Softening Leather 144 

Special Notices 30, 92, 156. 222, 292, 366, 444, 531, 

607, 695, 781, 870. 973, 1061. 

Sprague, F. J. Spur Gearing for Electric Street 

Cars 972 

Sprague, Mr., on Electric Roads 954 

Spring, The Vose Graduated Taper Bar *912 

Spur Gearing for Electric Street Cars. By F. J. 

Sprague P72 

St. Louis Matters 156 

" " Traffic 846 

Stable Floor, Vermont Mil 

" Pall, A *i048 

stables. Clean 502 

Statistics of Electric Railways. By T. C. Mar- 
tin 582 

Steam vs. Horse, Cable or Electricity. By Louis 

Ransom 1041 

Step, The First 270 

Stephenson's Broadway Car 17 



Stephenson, Running Gear "75 

" John. Wheel vs. Track Brakes.... 850 

" " Palace Street Car, The »49i 

Stines, W. M. To Prevent the Cracking of Var- 
nished Surfaces 196 

Storage Battery Car, The 759 

" " for street Car Propulhlon 603 

" Batteries on Street Cars 582 

Stove Box, A «2i 

Strike and a Moral, A ^ 

Stub-'l ailed M ule, The 

Street Car Conductors in Mexico u . 

Street Car Conductors, Women as. 1050 

Street Cars, Smoking on 1037 

" " A Long «603 

" " Improvements. By W. E. Partridge 503 

" •' Lighting. By Charles I. Smith 21 

" " Motor. Julien *257 

" " Motor. The Pole «193 

" " Propulsion, The Storage Battery for 603 

" " Replacer. A ii 

•1 11 Travel In Boston 6 

" " The Stephenson Palace 1 

" " Wheel. An English n 

" " Peckham's Elastic j65 

" " Early Methods of Supplying Elec- 
tricity to 767 

" " Funeral 763 

" Louisville 779 

" " The Eames Brake for '410 

" " Storage Batteries on 582 

" " Vacuum Brake 271 

" " Vs. Vehicles. The Law of the Road. 

By Myron T. Bly 861 

Street Rail and Track. A New Form of *854 

Street Railway Advertising 11138 

" Railroad Harness 491 

" Railroads Elecrric. By Geo. W. Mansfield i38 
" Railway Association of the State or New 

York t. 

Street R ilway Clubs, Local 10. 

Street Railway Construction, some Curious 

Systems of 210 

Street Railway Directory. 22, 82, 147, 212, 273, 
351. 430, 516, 6u8, 696. 782, 872, 976, 1064. 

Street Railway Directory, Our 268 

" " Employees. New York Labor 

Bureau on 671 

Street Railway Fares of New York. By Alfred 

L' zarus 426 

Street Railway Franchise 412 

" '• Motor, Requirments of the 501 

" " " Question, The 17, 75, 141, 

219, 267, 271, 315, 419, 505, 513, 594, 681, 691, 769, 
8C2j 966. 

Street Railway Mutual Insurance. By Edward 

Atkinson 41 

Street Railway operation. Cost of 415 

" " Patron, The. By A E. Lang 428 

" " Scranton *281 

" " Stock. Quotations. 27, 88, 153, 222, 
277. 362, 429, 545, 606 694, 781, 869, 973. 

Street Railway Traffic in New York 194 

«' " " in Paris 262 

" Railways as Mail Routes t-64 

" " In Europe, Early Construction of 200 

" " Mexico 203 

" " Mutual Fire Insurance for. By 

John Magulre 959 

Streets, Exclusive Right In 670 

success of Electricity in Scranton 89 

Sunday Cars. A Catechism 758 

Sunstroke in Horses 779 

Superintendent, The , 74 

T and Grooved Ralls, Horse Power on. By F. 

Serafon 427 

Tangible In Electricity. The 942 

Taxation— Labor— Improved Power. By G. Hil- 
ton Scribner 861 

Tenth Avenue Cable Building, The *130 

Test of an Electric Railway at the R. 1. Loco- 
motive Works 146 

Timber vs. Metallic Track 194 

Traction Rope Railways. By D. J. Miller *496, 
*591, 678. 

Track Brakes 672 

" Cleaner, Gibson «J95 

Traction Adhesion by Electricity, Increasing. 

By Ellas E. Rles 766 

Training for Conductors and Drivers 50s 

Tram Cars, Rowan's *258 

Tramway construction, European City and Sub- 
urban *5? " 

Tramway In China, A 1 56 

Tramways, Paris 946 

French 138 

Travel in Boston, Street Car 846 

Truck Poles 203 

Twelve Hour Bill, The 492 

Uniforms, Discipline, etc 1046 

Vacuum Brake for Street Car 271, 341 

Varnished surfaces, To Prevent the Cracking of. 

By W. M. Stines 196 

Veterinary Notes 197 

" practice 1 

" suggestions. 512 

views of C. A. Richards, of Boston 1048 

Vis-a-vis vs . Reversible Seats 948 

wages. The Immediate Right of 74 

Wagon Track, Whalen's "602 

Walsh, Julius S., on Cable Roads 779 

Wall Street Express Trains 856 

Warming Street Cars »194 

Wharton, Wm. J., Electricity as a Motive 

Power 949 

Wharton, Wm., Jr. The Reckenzaun Motor. .. . 1040 
Wheel vs. Track Brakes. By John Stephenson 850 
White. William. The Building of Cars by Street 

Railway Companies 859 

Windsor Electric Street Railway Co. By W. M. 

Boomer 426 

Wire Rope splice *67 

Women as Street Car Conductors i05t 

Wood, of Boston, Did It 135 

Wood worth, C. C. Heating Street Car 34* 

Working Expenses U 

Wyman, C. D. Fares In New York 34!. 




OCT 2 1890 






VOL- III. 


1 NEW YORK: t 
1 32 Liberty Street.) 


NOVEMBER, 1 886. 


f CHICAGO: > 
(Lakeside Building.) 


No. 1 . 



Thomas W. Ackley. 

Mr. Thomns W. Ackley, who was elected 
President of the Street Railway Association 
at the recent convention in Cincinnati, was 
born in New Jersey, but went at the age of 
fourteen to Philadelphia. There he was 
engaged r in the retail dry- 
goods business until the 
year 1843. 

At that time he went into 
the wholesale dry-goods 
trade, becoming a junior 
partner in the firm in 
1847. 

He remained in this busi- 
ness until 1853, at which 
time the business was chang- 
ed to the wholesale cloth- 
ing trade. Mr. Ackley re- 
mained in this business for 
about twelve years. 

Having become interest- 
ed in street railway matters 
in the sixties, he was elect- 
ed a director of the Thir- 
teenth Street and Fifteenth 
Street Railway Co. in 
1869, and President in 1870, 
which latter position he 
now holds. 

Mr. Ackley succeeded 
Mr. George Williams as 
President of the Board of 
Presidents of the City Pas- 
senger Railways, and is the 
present incumbent of that 
position. 

Besides being a large 
stockholder in the Thir- 
teenth and Fifteenth street road, of which 
he is President, he is largely interested in 
other street railways of Philadelphia. This 
brings him in contact with a large circle of 
street railway men, where he is very popu- 
lar and influential. 



application of the tincture of iodine twice a 
day for the preliminary treatment. If at 
the end of a few days the enlargement does 
not subside, or become soft, it should be 
opened up freely with a knife and all the 
pus allowed to escape. The wound should 
then be injected with a carbolic lotion com 




Veterinary Practice. 

Dr. Farr, in a recent number of the Ohio 
Farmer, gives some further directions for 
veterinary practice that may be of benefit to 
our readers. In a case where a colt was 
bruised back of the ears, and a swelling took 
place forming abscesses, he recommends the 



THOMAS W. ACKLEY, PRESIDENT AMERICAN STREET RAIL 
WAY ASSOCIATION. 



posed of one part of acid to twenty of water. 

A horse that had strained a fetlock while 
running and had been allowed to stand in the 
stable and had his ankle treated with a so- 
lution of salt and vinegar, he gave a regular 
walking exercise, increasing the length of 
the walks as the difficulty became less. This 
prepared him for the heavier exertions that 
were required of him. While this treat- 
ment was going on, a liniment was applied, 
composed of tincture of camphor three 
ounces, alcohol six ounces, aqua ammonia 
one ounce, water one quart. This applica- 
tion was made twice a day. 



The Cable Splice. 

Editok of the Street Railway JouNiun : 

Sib — In your issue of this month you 
have an article on Mr. Thomas Nash's 
"cable splice" and therein Mr. Holmes 
concludes what he has to say thus "For it is 
vital to the success of cable 
roads;" and Mr. Hovey says 
"that with this invention 
cable railways are a perfect 
success, no cable road can 
be operated successfully 
without this splice." To 
this we take exception ; ca- 
ble roads have been run- 
ning fourteen years in San 
Francisco and do not use 
the Nash splice, though one 
road tried it once, and 
found no benefit from its 
use. 

The Presidio & Ferries 
company run a cable two 
years until it is worn out, 
and never hear from the 
splice. The Clay Street Co. 
run a cable fifteen months, 
wear out the cable and nev- 
er hear from the splice; and 
all the roads in San Francis- 
co run without the Nash 
splice and are doing well — 
nine roads, and most of 
them overcome very bad 
hills, some of them one foot 
in five. 

In describing the splice 
you say "the cable is unlaid 
for a distance of seventeen 
feet; " that would make a splice 34 feet long. 
Now we never unlay our cable for less than 
50 feet, often more, making a splice not 
less than 100 feet long, and that seems to 
be what is the matter, tryiug to make a 
short splice do the work of a long one. As 
for the creeping of the strands, I never 
knew it to occur excepting once in an 
improperly made'cable butnever in a splice 
and I have been connected with this busi- 
ness since its beginning. B. 
San Francisco, Sept. 24, 1886. 



Toe horses should be blanketed now. 



2 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886. 




The A. S. R. A. Convention. 



The Fifth Aunual Convention of the 
American Street Railway Association was 
called to order in Cincinnati, at ten o'clock 
a. m., October 20th, by President Walsh. 
The roll was called by the Secretary, and 
the following gentlemen were present. 

Augusta, Ga. Superintendent, E. J. 
Mosher. 

Boston, Mass. Presidents, C. A. Rich- 
ards, Moody Merrill; Superintendents, J. E. 
Rugg, Daniel Coolidge; Master Mechanic, 
I. H. Randall; Vice-President, Walter A. 
Jones. 

Brooklyn. Secretary, Wm. J. Richard- 
son; Superintendents, Joshua Crandall, 
William N. Morrison. 

Buffalo. President, Henry M. Watson, 
Samuel S. Spaulding. 

Cambridge, Mass. President, Prentiss 
W. Cummiiigs, Director, Brown. 

Cape Mat, N. J. President, William 
Wharton, Jr. 

Chicago. President, Charles B. Holmes; 
Secretary, Henry H. Winsor; General Su- 
perintendent, De Witt C. Cregier. 

Cincinnati. Presidents, John Kilgour, 
George B. Kerper; Vice-President, A. G. 
Clark; Secretary, Jas. M. Dougherty, J. A. 
Collins. 

Cleveland. Vice-Presidents, A. J. 
Moxham, John Koch, Jr., Charles Hatha- 
way; Superintendent, M. S. Robinson, Jr. 

Columbus, O. President, A. D. Rogers; 
Secretary and Treasurer, E. R. Stewart, R. 
E. Sheldon. 

Dayton, O. Presidents, W. W. Bean, 
Charles B. Clegg. 

Denver, Col. Vice-President, Benj. A. 
Jackson. 

Des Moines, Ia. President, M. P. Tur- 
ner. 

Detroit. Secretary, C. Currie; General 
Manager, George Hendrie; Superintend- 
ent, George S. Hazard. 

Easton, Pa. President, Henry A. Sage. 

East Saginaw, Mich. President, Jones. 

Hartford, Conn. President, E. S. 
Goodrich. 

Kansas City. Superintendent, Edward 
J. Lawless. 

Keokuk, Ia. President, James H. An- 
derson. 

Louisville. Superintendent, H. H. Lit- 
tell. 

Memphis. President, R. Dudley Frayser. 

Milwaukee. General Manager, D. At- 
w md, Mr. ; Director, C. E. Guun. 

Newburyport. Treasurer, H. N. Shep- 
ard. 

Niagara Falls. President, Benjamin 
Flagler; Treasurer, Arthur Schoellkopf. 
Pawtucket. D. F. Longstreet. 



Peoria. President H. R. Woodward, J. 
H. Hall; Secretary, H. W. Wells; Superin- 
tendent, John Strong. 

Philadelphia. President, Thomas W. 
Ackley; Director, W. R. Warren. 

Pittsburg. President, Chas. Atwell; 
Auditor, J. W. Reed; Secretary, Charles 
Seibert. 

Providence. Vice-President and Gen- 
eral Manager, D. F . Longstreet. 

Richmond, Va. President, J. L. School- 
craft; Treasurer, F. D. Miller. 

Rochester. Secretary, C. C. Wood- 
worth. 

Salem, Mass. Presidents, Charles Odell, 
Benj. W. Russell; General Superintendent, 
William B. Ferguson. 

Springfield, O. President, D. W. 
Stroud. 

St. Louis. Presidents, J S.Walsh, John 
H. Maxon, Charles Green; General Mana- 
ger, William L. Johnson. 

Troy, N. Y. Vice-President, Charles 
Cleminshaw. 

Washington, D. C. President, Henry 
Hurt. 

Letters of regret were announced, from 
a number of delegates, on account of their 
inability to be present. An opportunity 
was then given for the enrollment of new 
members, and the following companies 
joined the Association. 

Augusta & Somerville St. Ry. Co., Aug- 
usta, Ga., E. G. Mosher, Superintendent; 
Canton St. Ry. Co., Canton, O., George 
Cook, President and Treasurer; Chicago 
Passenger Ry. Co.. Chicago, 111., H. L. 
W eks, President; College City St. Ry. Co., 
Galesburg, 111., George S. Clayton, Secre- 
tary and Superintendent; City St. Ry. Co., 
St. Joseph, Mo., R. E Turner, President; 
Dubuque St. Ry. Co., Dubuque, Ia., J. J. 
Liunehan, Superintendent; Galveston City 
Ry. Co., Galveston, Tex., William H. Sin- 
clair, President; Gloucester St. Ry. Co., 
Gloucester, Mass., Walter A. Jones, Vice- 
President; Lincoln St. Ry. Co., Lincoln, 
Neb.. L. P. Young, Superintendent; Met- 
ropolitan St. Ry. Co., Kansas City, Mo., 
E. J. Lawless, Superintendent; Utica Belt 
Line St. Ry. Co., Utica, N. Y., Walter A. 
Jones, Vice-President. 

The reading of the minutes of the last 
meeting was on motion dispensed with. 
The President then made the following ad- 
dress. 

president's address. 

Gentlemen: — The annual meeting of the 
American Street Railway Association has 
been convened to-day, the fifth consecu- 
tive year, and I beg to express my sincere 
pleasure in meeting you, and congratulate 
you upon the large attendance and influen- 
tial accessions to membership. It is an in- 
dication that there has been no miscon- 
ception about the benefit flowii g from an 
organization whose members meet ai d con- 
fer in the spirit of justice, fairness and en- 
terprise: fully recognizing the several re- 
lations of the public, the stockholder and 
the employee. 

The business of the past year has been 
generally prosperous, interrupted occa- 
sionally by labor disturbances, and it is to 



be regretted tliat many grave problems 
pertaining to that systc m still remain un- 
solved. The scale of wages and hours iu 
the street railway si rvice, has been regu- 
lated by the financial ability of each indi- 
vidual company and in no other unskilled 
business has there been paid such a uni- 
formity of high wages. 

It has come within the observation of 
all, that mechanics frequently abandon a 
profitable but varying trade to engage in 
a service where wages are promptly paid, 
with the occupation steady. 

Designing men have attempted to es- 
trange the loyalty of our employees and 
hive succeeded in many cases in arraign- 
ing them against the companies. The 
weakness and inaction of constituted au- 
thority has permitted doctrines to be 
enunciated and disseminated, so monstrous, 
that if practiced, the perpetrators would be 
convicted of the grave orime of felony. 
To remedy the apathy of authority it be- 
hooves us to exercise in every legitimate 
manner, the full rigor of the franchise of 
American citizenship, and I feel confident 
that if we called our employees to assist in 
the work of purification, from the ranks of 
the thoughtful, a generous response would 
be heard. 

With regard to progress in motors as a 
substitute for animal power and other per- 
tinent topics, your committees have con- 
sented to submit in writing to the conven- 
tion, their conclusions, and I feel that if I 
made any extended remarks upon such sub- 
jects, I would be trespassing upon their 
domain. 

Gentlemen, I commit the business of the 
convention to your hands, and trust that 
when the hour of adjournment arrives we 
wili be amply repaid, instructed and en- 
riched by the free interchange of thought 
and experience. 

The report of the Executive Committee 
was then read by the Secretary, which was 
as follows : 

Gentlemen : The Executive Committee 
respectfully submits the following report : 
appointment of committees. 

Directly upon the close of the last meet- 
ing of the Association, theExecutive Com- 
mittee met and selected the following sub- 
jects, upon which papers should be prepar- 
ed for consideration at the next meeting. 
" Cause, Prevention and Settlement of Ac- 
cidents;" " Sanitary Condition of Street 
Cars;" " Ventilation, Lighting and Care of 
Cars;" " Progress of Cable Motive Pow- 
er," and " Progress of Electric Motive 
Power." Committees were duly appointed, 
and are, doubtless, ready with their papers. 
Although there are not as many subjects 
this year as formerly, the range of topics 
is broad enough to serve as a very generous 
basis for the interchange of thought rela- 
tive to important branches of our business, 
and sufficient to make this meeting of great 
interest to us all. 

new members. 

The Association entered St. Louis last 
year with a membership of one hundred 
and twenty -three companies. At that meet- 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



3 



ing and since, eighteen companies have 
joined, as follows : 

Dayton Street Railroad Company, Day- 
ton, Ohio. 

Newburyport & Ameslmry Horse R. R. 
Co., Newburyport, Mass. 

Washington & Georgetown R. R. Co., 
Washington, D. C. 

Kansas City Cable Railway Co., Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Union Depot R R. Co. , St. Louis, Mo. 

Cass Avenue & Fair Grounds Railway Co., 
St. Louis, Mo. 

St. Louis R. R Co , St. Louis, Mo. 

Cream City R. R. Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

South Boston R. R. Co. , Boston, Mass. 

Des Moines Street Railway Compauy, 
Des Moines, Iowa. 

Knoxville Street R. R. Company, Knox- 
ville, Tenn. 

Metropolitan R. R. Company, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Duluth Street Railway Company, Du- 
luth, Minn. 

People's Railway Company, Baltimore, 
Md. 

Pawtucket Street Railway Company, 
Pawtucket, R. I. 

Milwaukee City Railway Company, Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 

Reading City Passenger Railway Co., 
Reading, Pa. 

The total number is now one hundred 
and forty companies, and embraces most 
of the largest in America, as well as many 
of the smaller roads. 

members' names changed. 

During the year, two companies in the 
city of Boston, prominent members, have 
consolidated, forming one company under 
.a new corporate name. The following cor- 
respondence in reference thereto explains 
itself : 

Boston Consolidated St. Railway Co., 
Boston, September 28, 1886. 
Dear Sir : I desire to officially inform 
you that on the 21st of August, last, the 
Middlesex Railroad Company of this city, 
of which I was the President, was consoli- 
dated with the Highland Street Railway 
Company, under the name of the " Boston 
Consolidated Street Railway Company," 
the said new company acquiring all the 
powers, privileges, rights, franchises, prop- 
erty and estate held, possessed or enjoyed 
by the old Middlesex and Highland com- 
panies. Will you please, therefore, strike 
from the list of members of the American 
Street Railway Association the Middlesex 
Railroad Company and the Highland Street 
Railway Company, and substitute the name 
of the new company, the "Boston Con- 
solidated Railway Company," in place of 
,the former companies. 

Charles E. Powers, President. 
Office of 

The American Street R vilway Association 
Brooklyn, September 29, 1886. 

Charles E. Powers, Esq., President, 
Boston Consolidated St. Ry. Co. 

Dear Sir : — In reply to yours of the 28th 
instant would say that the name of the 
"Middlesex Railroad Company " and the 



" Highland Street Railway Company " have 
been struck from the roll of members of 
this association, and the name of the "Bos- 
ton Consolidated Street Railway Company" 
has been substituted in lieu thereof, and I 
remain, very truly yours, 

William J. Richardson, Secretary. 

Three other companies have changed 
their names during the year, as follows : 

The Easton and South Easton Passenger 
Railway Company, of Easton, Pa., to the 
Easton, South Easton and West End Pas- 
senger Railway Company. 

The Orange and Newark Horse Railroad 
Company, at Newark, N. J. , to the Essex 
Passenger Railway Company ; and theStreet 
Railroad Company of East Saginaw, Mich- 
igan, to the East Saginaw Street R dlway 
Company. 

LEGAL OPINIONS. 

The following legal papers have been 
issued during the year, namely : 

November— Brooklyn Crosstown Rail- 
road Company against the City of Brooklyn. 

December — John B. Conner against the 
Citizens' Street Railway Company, of In- 
dianapolis. 

January — Timothy Dixon against the 
Brooklyn City and Newtown Railroad Com- 
pany. 

February— Edwin P. Griswold against 
the New York and New England Railroad 
Company. 

March — John Scheid against the Third 
Avenue Railroad Company, New York 
City. 

April — John A. Stewart against the 
Brooklyn Crosstown Railroad Company. 

May — John Dunn against the Cass Av- 
enue and Fair Grounds Railway Company. 

June — Mary Laughlin against the Street 
Railway Company of Grand Rapids, Mich- 
igan. 

July — Jersey City and Bergen Railro.id 
Company against John C. Ostigan and 
Thos. Egan. 

August — Mary Coddington against Brook- 
lyn Crosstown Railroad Company. 

It will be seen that no opinion has yet 
been issued for either September or Octo- 
ber, none having yet beeu received there- 
for by the Secretary. We take occasion to 
urge upon the members the importance of 
forwarding promptly opinions in reference 
to suits against the companies, as the latest 
law concerning our business is what we are 
all anxious to obtain. 

FIRE INSURANCE. 

In our last report we dwelt at consider- 
able length upon what had been done rela- 
tive to the formation of The American 
Street Railway Mutual Insurance Com- 
pany, setting forth the broad basis upon 
which the projectors of the company had 
planned to do the business of insuring 
street railway property substantially at 
cost. 

Inquiries have been made during the 
year as to whether the company was in a 
position to take risks. From the lessons 
gained by losses sust ained by some com- 
panies during the past year, usually but 
trilling, and the vexations delays and an- 



noyances resulting from the adjustment of 
the losses, it is to be hoped that the scheme 
which had beeu so carefully planned and 
wisely undertaken will not fail of realiza- 
tion by lack of courage on the part of the 
companies to embark in the enterprise. 

We C ommend, therefore, mutual street- 
railway insurance as worthy of earnest 
consideration as a means of reducing a 
costly department of our business and at 
the same time of avoiding intensely annoy- 
ing delays and difficulties in the adjustment 
of losses, when losses occur, and which, in 
case of loss, will inevitably result. 

STREET RAILROAD TAXATION. 

A very important subject which closely 
an l deeply concerns the streetjrailroad bus- 
iness is the taxation by the government in 
many varied forms of our property and bus- 
iness. Upon the subject of street railroad 
taxation a very valuable paper has recently 
been prepared by the Hon. G. Hilton Scrib- 
ner, President of the Central Park, North 
and East River Railroad Company of New 
York City, and now President of the Street 
Railway Association of the State of New 
York. This paper is accessible to all. 
Owing to the ingenuity of the government 
to unjustly tax and increase the burdens of 
corporations, it behooves us to oppose by 
every honorable means within our power, 
further aggressions, which, though accord- 
ing to law, are thoroughly lawless in con- 
ception. 

KNIGHTS OF LABOR. 

Oar business is a perfect financial meter 
by which to measure the prosperity of the 
country; there being no industry that is af- 
fected more delicately than our own; ac- 
cording as is the business of the country 
prosperous or depressed. 

At about the same period in the Spring, 
all over the country, " strikes " occurred on 
the street railroads; causing in many cases 
an entire stoppage of the business. This 
was brought about by an organization 
called the " Knights of Labor," a secret so- 
ciety, which required absolute obedience 
to the mandates of the few who controlled 
it. The injustice of the orders that our 
employees were required to obey was in 
many cases admitted by them, but so pow- 
erful was the organization at that time that 
no slavery could hive beeu more abject, 
aud it would seem more humiliating, than 
that to which the employees of the street 
railroads had become the willing subjects. 
The tyranny of the order was manifestly so 
un-American that the absolute power which 
it had shown at the outset soon waned. 
Exceedingly unwise and even foolish action 
followed their first efforts, and as the result 
what little respect the order had enlisted in 
the minds of the people was materially les- 
sened, by reason of its reckless disregard 
of public convenience in wholly unwar- 
ranted stoppage of the great business of 
city passenger transportation. We believe 
the public would not tolerate a repetition of 
its discomforting experiences by the stop- 
page of our cars; and we are personally as- 
sured that only the most foolhardy in the 
organization would attempt to repeat the 



4 



" strikes" of the Springtime. In this con- 
nection we can but commend that principle 
in our relations with our employees which 
is embodied in the maxim — " Do unto 
others as you would that they should do 
unto you." When a man treats his em- 
ployees in such a way as he would wish to 
be treated, were their places changed, his 
action cannot be far removed from fair, 
honest and upright dealing. In this, we 
contend, the managers of street railroad 
companies will compare favorably with any 
of the other great business enterprises in 
the country. The year which had opened 
so promisingly was, therefore, beclouded; 
the strikes extending to all branches of 
business until, in the aggregate, many mil- 
lions of dollars were lost to the laboring 
classes. We believe that the lesson learned 
by our employees will be lasting; and that 
they will not soon again attempt to do what 
could have been so much better obtained by 
direct personal and manly application to 
their employers, and without loss to them- 
selves. 

REDUCED FARES TO MEETING. 

The Central Traffic Association and the 
main trunk lines from the East having last 
year generously granted to the delegates of 
this Association reduced rates of fare to the 
St. Louis Convention, it was believed 
the same privilege would be extended to 
the delegates of this year. For some rea- 
son, the concession this year was refused 
by the Central Traffic Association. We de- 
sire to acknowledge appreciation of the 
kindness of the Trunk Line Passenger 
Committee in their desire to secure us the 
reduced rates, and we trust the Central 
Traffic Association will next year extend 
the courtesies of last year, if for no other 
reason than that of the natural sympathy 
which exists between our businesses. 

INVITATIONS TO MEETING. 

Invitations to this meeting have been 
sent to all the street railway companies in 
the United States and Canada; and we be- 
lieve that the attendance will be sufficiently 
large to make this meeting one of unusual 
interest. 

AN OBITUARY. 

In closing we are called upon to record 
the death of the President of one of our 
members, — Mr. John B. Slawson, at the 
time of his death President of the Cross- 
town Railroad Company, of New York City. 
Mr. Slawson was for many years promi- 
nently known as the leading street railroad 
inventor and business manager. It is with 
deep regret that we are called upon to 
make this record of the loss of an esteemed 
friend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Julius S. Walsh, 
C. B. Holmes, 
C. A. Richards, 
John Kilgour, 
Thomas W. Acklex, 
C. C. Woodworth, 
William Richardson, 
treasurer's report. 
The Treasurer then read his report, the 
summary of which is as follows ; 



RECEIPTS. 




.oaiance in x>anK L^cr. zu, 1000, 




Annual Dues, 134 companies 


at 


$15 each, 


2010 


Admission Fees 17 companies 


■±zo 


Salt Pamphlets, 


5 


Annual Reports, 


12 




$3,244.70 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Salary Secretary and Treasurer, 

$1,000 

Type Writer, 80 
Printing Annual Report, 550 
Miscellaneous Running Expeuses, 

596.63 

$2,226.63 

$1,018.67 

The reports of committees were then call- 
ed for; the first being that of Mr. C. A. 
Richards, on the Cause, Prevention and Set- 
tlement of Accidents. 

ACCIDENTS, THEIR CAUSES, PREVENTION AND 
SETTLEMENT. 

In considering the first clause of this sub- 
ject, viz., the causes of accidents upon 
street railways, a valuable comparison can 
be made between transportation of passen- 
gers by steam cars and street cars. When 
a passenger takes his seat in a steam rail- 
road car, he, as a general thing, has made 
up his mind upon two very important sub- 
jects. First, he has determined just where 
he desires to go, the distance he is to travel, 
and the point at which his journey will end. 
Second, he is aware that the car in which 
he is seated will come to a full stop, at that 
place, without his interference, and plenty 
of time will be given him to leave the car in 
safety. Then there is a very peculiar cha- 
racteristic in human nature, in that the 
majority of all travelers are naturally under 
a certain nervous excitement upon these 
points. It will consequently be seen that 
the steam railroad company have a decided 
advantage over the street railroad compan- 
ies in this respect. 

The street car is used for a different pur- 
pose. It collects its passengers almost en- 
tirely as way travel, the percentage of those 
who enter its cars with the intention of rid- 
ing from one terminus to another being a 
very low average. Mauy people get on to 
ride but a short distance, and then perhaps 
to jump on and off as their convenience or 
fancy dictates; others ride who are entirely 
ignorant of the locality, either of the street 
or number of their desired destination, and 
feel it entirely incumbent upon themselves 
to carefully guard against being taken be- 
yond the place where they want to go. Pas- 
sengers of this latter class always work their 
minds into a state of nervous apprehension, 
and after numerous and frantic altercations 
with the conductors, who find it impossible 
to gain their confidence, they jump off the 
car without giving any notice, or leave it 
before the conductor has time to stop it in 
accordance with his instructions. 

Many other passengers acquire another 
dangerous habit of jumping from the car 
while it is in motion, and without notifying 



the conductor of such an intention. This 
custom springs undoubtedly from a familia- 
rity, by a daily use of the car to transport 
them from one point to another. 

There is still another class of passengers, 
those who are not much accustomed to the 
use of street cars, who are taken up at the 
depots, and who become distracted with the 
confusion and bustle of the streets of our 
great cities, and who jump almost headlong 
from the ear, when they think they have 
come to their point of destination. 

Then again there is still another very ser- 
ious difficulty we have to contend with, 
that is the manner of exit of different pas- 
sengers, both in age and sex. An aged per- 
son feels the necessity of time, and the im- 
prudence of haste. They leave the car by 
degrees, carefully looking all ways, and 
grasping with timid clutch everything to 
support and steady their motion, and often 
consume what seems to be an unnecessary 
amount of time. A cause of accidents in 
these cases often arises from the careless 
impatience of conductors in starting their 
cars before such a passenger has entirely 
left it. Again, the younger passenger, re- 
lying upon the agility of youth, takes the 
matter of leaving the car entirely within 
his own hands, and springs from his seat, 
and darts off the car, with all the pride and 
careless confidence of his age. 

It will probably be conceded that in the 
larger cities and towns there is a greater 
percentage of accidents to females, and that 
the precediug statements will apply with 
stronger force to them. Naturally of a 
more nervous temperament, and not as 
much accustomed to the use of the street 
car as the opposite sex, they require con- 
stant care from the conductor while they 
are getting on or off the car. Then again 
their methods are almost entirely different. 
Notice a lady of mature years leave a street 
car, and you will see that almost invariably 
she gets off one foot at a time, and either 
faces the rear or side of the car instead of 
the front, thereby placing herself in ex- 
actly the position to fall if the car starts up, 
or has not come to a full stop. .Her young- 
er and more active sister either steps off the 
car facing the sidewalk, or waltzes off with 
her face turned to the remaining passen- 
gers, so that she may be sure they notice 
her graceful exit. One and all seemingly 
utterly unconscious that to enter or leave 
a street car is a matter of some danger, and 
calls for the due care on the part of the 
passenger that the law expressly requires. 

Accidents sometimes occur to passengers 
after they have got inside the car by the 
sudden starting of the horses, which throws 
the passenger off his balance, and causes 
him to pitch backward or forward as the 
case may be. It is a fact that, since the in- 
troduction of open cars, the percentage of 
accidents has largely increased upon street 
cars, owing doubtless to the fact that so 
many places of entrance and exit exist be- 
tween the seats, affording the greatest 
temptation for passengers to leave the car 
without taking the time and giving the no- 
tice safety requires. Also a custom of 
jj^^g to stand upon the outer guard or 



November, 188b. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



5 



running board of the open oars, used as a 
step to the seats, our narrow and crowded 
streets oausing them to be pressed against 
or swept off by passing vehicles. 

Accidents, or what may be called causes 
of litigation, often occur by conductors 
feeling obliged to eject passengers, who 
either from intoxication or disorderly con- 
duct are insulting or annoying the other 
passengers. Entirely another cause of 
trouble arises from the injury to foot trav- 
elers in the streets being knocked down 
and run over during the trip of the car. 
Drivers have therein the chief cause for 
the utmost care, and complete education 
for their profession. 

All that has been said about nervousness, 
carelessness, and ofttimes utter reckless- 
ness of the passenger, applies with fourfold 
effect to those who are outside and not in 
the car. A driver meets all and every class 
of people, with every possible change or 
variation of circumstances. He finds the 
lame, the blind, the old and the young, 
even from feeble old age to tottering child- 
hood, the gay and careless, the busy and 
the loitering, the intoxicated, the whole 
great stream of human life, all thronging 
across his path, all intent with their own 
purposes, and regardless of their own safety 
to a degree, that no one without exactly 
the experience of a car driver, can form any 
estimate. The certain and perhaps natural 
antagonistic opposition feeling that exists 
between the drivers of every other sort of ve- 
hicle and the street car is proverbial. Often 
will a driver of some team find his way upon 
the track of the street car, and getting 
ahead of a closely following car, persist in 
staying there. Both the driver of the car 
and the passengers become so impatient, 
that everybody becomes aware that it is 
not a Sunday school picnic out for an ex- 
cursion. Accidents sometimes follow from 
this state of affairs, from collisions. 

It is a mooted question whether it is a 
safe and profitable custom to permit pas- 
sengers to ride upon the front platforms of 
our cars, and to get on or off therefrom 
without entering the car. Accidents oc- 
curring from this cause are the most dan- 
gerous in their results because they are in 
front of the wheels, and falling under they 
receive the worst injuries. It is an un- 
doubted fact, that any profit derived from 
the revenue obtained from passengers rid- 
ing on the front platf orms of street cars, is 
more than lost by the risk and the conse- 
quences of such a custom, audit is thought 
by some that it should be abolished. 

Time, nor a proper length for this paper, 
admits of detailed description of the thous- 
and and one other causes of accidents. 
They are within the experience of us all 
whose business it is to manage a street rail- 
way, and doubtless each one of us could 
add largely to the list here submitted, of 
the causes of accidents. Let me turn now 
to the second part of the subject and dis- 
cuss the best mode of their prevention. 

PREVENTION OF ACCIDENTS ON STREET 
RAILWAYS. 

After an analyzation of the cause of acci- 



dents, the efforts for prevention are those 
that most directly apply to that class of ac- 
cidents that are the most frequent. It will 
probably be found that in a classification, 
injury to persons who are or who are desir- 
ous to be passengers, occurs most fre- 
quently when getting on or off the cars. 
Of all the claims made at law, full ninety 
per cent, will contain this allegation: "I 
was getting on or off the car, and the con- 
ductor rang the bell before I was on or off 
thecar." Not another word need be said 
or written on this point; it is the general 
experience of all of us here. It applies 
either in its truth or its falsity to the very 
case of the major part of all claims for ac- 
cidents made to the street railroads of this 
country. It has become such a familiar 
expression, and has been so often used, that 
it is now generally given as the cause of 
accidents, even if some one tumbles down 
stairs in their own house, or falls overboard 
from a pleasure yacht. "The conductor 
rung the bell before I was off the car." The 
search for the truth of this statement has 
occupied courts, juries and street railroad 
presidents in this country, to a greater ex- 
tent than any other question in modern 
times. That statement enfolds all the 
chances for accident that have been spoken 
of amongst the causes. And whether the 
experience of the nervous, the aged, the 
careless, those of feeble strength, who have 
defective hearing or eyesight, are intoxi- 
cated, and last but not least, the horse car 
accident "beat" whose business it is to get 
slightly hurt if he can, and then sue the 
company, it is an all absorbing expression, 
and is considered by members of both the 
legal and medical fraternity to be the one 
necessary statement, which, if asserted, 
will be sure to win every time, whether 
proved or not. 

Prevention of accidents must first be 
found by teaching the conductors when, 
where, and how to " ring the bell." It is 
now the rule everywhere to give one pull 
of the bell strap to stop the car, and two 
to start it. As so much depends on this ac- 
tion it is of the utmost importance that the 
conductor should know of his own knowledge 
and see with his own eyes, that before he 
gives the two-bell signal, that his passen- 
ger is fully and entirely off and away from 
the car, or inside of it. He should know 
that " off the car " means everything off. 
Often the wearing apparel of ladies can be 
found on tue car step when she is off and 
well on her way to the sidewalk. He should 
see to it that the old and feeble passenger 
has time enough for his or her slow and 
careful movement. He should see to it that 
the nervously excited do not jump off the 
car before his signal has given the driver 
time enough to stop the car. He should in 
all cases if he is inside the car when he rings 
the bell, accompany the passenger to the 
platform of his closed car, or place himself 
in a position on his open car so that he can 
see that the passenger is safely landed. 

The driver should also have his instruc- 
tions. He should take time enough before 
starting his horses, or letting off his brake, 
so that in his judgment a passenger has 



a fair chance to get off or on the car. He 
should not, as is the custom, let his horses 
jump into their collars, and plunge forward 
on tho instant the bell rings. Printed rules 
should be given them touching this matter 
and should be prepared for the study and 
careful consideration of both conductors 
and drivers. They should be kept under 
constant surveillance when on their trips, 
to the end that they act up to the positive 
requirements of this part of their duty. 
And if a conductor or driver is found habit- 
ually careless and thoughtless in this re- 
spect, he should be discharged, as no com- 
pany can afford to keep such men in their 
employ. 

A conductor on au open car should be on 
the watch, all the time, to see that passen- 
gers do not jump off the car without giv- 
ing him notice to stop, for the rule of the 
trite assertion, " that he started the car be- 
fore I was off," holds perfectly good in this 
case. He should also notify those standing 
on the running board or step of open cars 
to be careful when passing teams, etc. 
When it becomes necessary to care for an 
intoxicated passenger he should feel that he 
has a delicate business on his hands if he 
concludes to put him off the car. If he does 
not feel able to do this, and cannot allow 
the passenger to ride until he can ask the 
assistance of a police officer, he should go 
to his driver and notify him of his intended 
action, and then after the car has come to 
a full stop, he should with as little force as 
possible remove him from the car and lead 
him to the sidewalk. If necessary he should 
ask for assistance from the passengers on 
the car. It is a dangerous thing to eject 
passengers from the cars and much should 
be borne before doing it. Conductors should 
be taught that time is of no consequence, so 
far as making their trips, when compared 
with the chances for accidents to their pas- 
sengers. They should give everybody time 
enough to get safely on and off the cars in 
all cases. 

Drivers should understand that they 
should first give their attention to what is 
in front of them, or their horses, and next, 
to looking for passengers. On a trip, there 
are always dangerous places about running 
over people, particularly in streets where 
the poor live and congregate; where little 
helpless children are permitted to run about 
unattended, and where the travel of other 
teams is mostabundant. With every sense 
on the alert; with their eyes in front of, and 
around their horses, and not attracted by 
what is going on anywhere else; with firm 
hold on their brake handles, and their teams 
well in hand, even then they will still find 
people to knock down, and children to run 
over. 

Officers in charge of street rail ways should 
consider it their first duty to study the pre- 
vention of accidents. Their rules should be 
forcible, and their discipline in this respect 
unyielding and firm. They should first 
look into the cause of accidents, and then 
establish their own rules to prevent them. 
Men will be careless. But very little can 
be left to their discretion; they oftenbehave 
as though they had no discretion. This 



6 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



habit, and a careless regard for their in- 
structions, is the cause, and their removal 
from the service, the prevention, of half or 
more of all accidents. Teach your men not 
to hurry. Safety lies iu taking time enough 
to make a trip; baste does, in this case, make 
a terrible waste of money. 

When the peculiar business of transport- 
ing millions of human beings, with all the 
idiosyncrasies tbat go to make up the ex- 
pjerience of human life, through the busy 
thoroughfares of tbese great cities, and of 
tilling up and discharging these crowded 
cars, which has to be don at the will of 
each separate passenger, is considered, it 
is a fact and it is settled beyond controv- 
ersy, tbat accidents must occur. It is one 
long contest between the existing state of 
things, and the managers, how to avoid ac- 
cidents. The experience of one company 
is the same as all tbe rest, notbiugbut gen- 
eral rules can be recommended. New and 
unheard of claims are made every day; some 
are genuine and some are not. The liability 
of accidents is always with us, it accompan- 
ies every car on every trip. It is also with- 
in us, for employees are constantly pressing 
claims for remuneration and loss of time, 
caused by injuries received in their occu- 
pation, without, any regard for the fact that 
their own carelessness was the cause 
of it all. 

SETTLEMENT OF ACCIDENTS. 

There are two ways of settlement of the 
damages, either real or alleged claims for 
accidents in our business ; by arbitration 
or a resort to the courts of law. Tbere 
is no doubt but tbat the general public are 
now more desirous of a verdict from a jury 
than they are to settle their claims by ar- 
bitration. This practice receives constant 
encouragement, from the large and very 
often unjust awards given by tbe average 
jury of the present day, with the injured 
party on one side and a corporation on the 
other. With the sympathy of tbe juryman 
adroitly called up by lawyers, who know 
tbat. is their strongest point, and who know 
just how to do it, the testimony in the case 
is of but little avail when the case has been 
prepared by an unscrupulous lawyer, as- 
sisted often by an equally unscrupulous 
doctor, wherein the claimant becomes sim- 
ply a conspirator in a regularly arranged 
and preconcerted plan to defraud the com- 
pany, and to deceive the jury, by a false 
presentation of the injury for which dam- 
ages are claimed. If the writer speaks 
strongly on this point he only gives the 
facts of his own experience, and believes 
that his statements have become a general 
custom all over this country. Large ver- 
dicts are constantly being produced in all 
our courts that are but the result of false 
testimony, and from representations of in- 
juries made by tbe plaintiff, which are often 
entirely untrue, and which he has been 
told to swear to, by some members of both 
the legal and medical fraternity, who have 
carefully coached him. 

It is a gratifying fact, boWever, and with- 
in the experience of managers of street rail- 
ways, that by far the larger part of both of 
the professions mentioned are aware of this 



state of things, and have by their denunci- 
ations of such practice, and their social os 
tracism of those who resort to such methods 
to gain their cases, and defraud railroad 
comji.inies, done much to put an end to it. 
So that now both the honest and respec- 
table members of the bar and the courts 
have been, and the medical fraternity are 
awakened to tbe positive enormity and de- 
cidedly fraudulent conclusions tbat juries 
have arrived at after having been utterly 
deceived to such an extent as to dismiss all 
sense of reason, or regard for testimony, 
and to let a false and misjudged sympathy 
entirely guide their action. 

Another view of the case is that this sym- 
pathetic judgment of the case is often an 
honest one, and springs from the kindly 
nature of the juryman who cannot see any- 
thing else before him, but some poor and 
badly injured party on one side and a rich 
corporation on the other. Iu such a state 
of affairs his oath to deal justly and with- 
out prejudice is forgotten, and he becomes 
as blind to the real facts as the statue of 
justice with the scales in her hands. 

There is not time or space in a report of 
this kind to present other, perhaps ecpially 
important facts, tbat belong to the legal as- 
pect of the settlement of accidents. Enough 
has been said, at any rate, to advance an 
argument for arbitration, as the betterplan. 
There is one great advantage in arbitration 
of accidents, between tbe railroad compauy 
and the injured party; they are both, if 
they meet at all, free from the influence of 
lawyers and doctors, and are naturally dis- 
posed to do what is right and just and fair 
towards each other. The claimant may be 
very sure of receiving a very large amount 
of gratuitous advice from alibis friends and 
acquaint an c( s. Just as soon as he is hurt 
or his property damaged, he is advised to 
sue the company at once, and prospects of 
immediate riches, and the absence of any 
necessity for more exertion to obtain a 
livelihood, are presented to his mind. This 
idea is enforced by the frantic appeals of 
his then suddenly acquired friends, to go 
at once to some celebrated lawyer and leave 
it all to him. To this, the doctor, who has 
had him in his hands from the first hour of 
his misfortune (or, as he is getting ready to 
believe, his good fortune) readily assents, 
and immediately recommends his well- 
known partner in other cases. 

An early interview between the railroad 
managers and the party who is injured, 
sometimes prevents the effects of all this, 
and the parties calmly sittingtogether with 
none but an honest desire to do right, will 
in many cases settle all difficulties without 
dispute. It is then important and better 
to arbitrate at once. In any casehumanity 
and a respect for the laws of decency and 
kindness present certain duties to be per- 
formed by the railroad company. They 
should show a deep and earnest interest in 
the matter where an accident occurs from 
any cause upon their road. They should 
order their conductors to do everything 
they can do under thecircumstanc s to aid 
and assist the injured parties to their 
homes. They should then send a proper 



person accustomed to that duty, to visit 
them, and proffer the service of any doctor 
the patient desires to see; and if, as in some 
cases, they find a poor family, destitute per- 
haps of the means to live, when the injured 
party coiild not work, they should provide 
for their immediate wants, no matter who 
was to blame for the accident. 

On the other hand, there are certain pre- 
paratory arrangements that must be made 
for the advantage of the company, looking 
to a true and just understanding of the true 
cause of the accident. In preparation for 
such claims as may be made upon the com- 
pauy the writer has established upon his 
road a regular department called the Acci- 
dent Department. The officer in charge of 
it has no other duties. He is always in 
readiness to be called, and to proceed at 
once to visit the injured, night or day. 
His first duty there is to offer and provide 
all the aid, both to the injured and to the 
family, that may lie required; to get the 
name, occupation, and all else he can, so 
that he shall be thoroughly acquainted and 
familiar with all their circumstances. Then 
he examines the conductor's report of his 
evidence taken on the spot, and then inter- 
views every witness and has their account 
taken down by his stenographer, read to 
them, written out and sworn to. These 
papers are then r>ut away together, and 
marked with the day and date of the occur- 
rence. He next visits the patient, either at 
his own home or the hospital; notices who 
the attendant physician is, and keeps a gen- 
eral oversight of the patient until recovery 
and settlement is made. 

Injury to property, such as vehicles or 
their contents, are carefully examined into 
and noted, and often when found to be so 
damaged by the fault of the driver of the 
car, settlement is made as soon as possible, 
and the costpaid by the driver. A friendly 
suit brought after arbitration, and judg- 
ment entered for the plaintiff, who acknowl- 
edges satisfaction, is often resorted to as a 
sure means of final settlement. 

In concluding this part of the report too 
much cannot be said upon the importance 
of guarding against fraud in settling acci- 
dent cases. The street railroads of this 
country have come to be common game for 
accident hunters, and for "beats" of all 
kinds to try their fraudulent practices 
upon. While we are willing and ready to 
settle all cases upon a fair and equitable 
basis, let us all freshly determine that we 
will do everything we can in our power, to 
discover and root out the infamous and 
growing custom of deceit and fraud in the 
settlement, of the accidents occurring upon 
our roads. To also endeavor to expose any 
and all professional men who shall lend 
themselves to such practices, and join in 
conspiracies for the sole purpose of sharing 
iu the plunder. And also to awaken public 
sentiment to the fact that such practices do 
exist to an alarming degree, and that our 
courts are constant scenes of such attempts 
to defraud and rob the railroad companies. 
Let us also ask the- aid of all high-minded 
and honest practitioners, both in the legal 
and medical field, to aid us in this work. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



7 



Accidents we must Lave from the very 
nature of our business, and tlieir cost, 
when honestly and fairiy adjusted, is large 
euough, but when we have to add to this 
sum, the fearful amounts we are swindled 
out of, it is time to at least try and pre- 
vent it. 

For the Committee, 

C. A. Richards, 

Chairman. 

Me. Cleminshaw then spoke in heaity 
endorsement of the committee's report, 
thought that nothing could be added to it 
and that it was all true. 

Mb. Mebbill of Boston, dissented from 
the report of the committee, on the subject 
of the legal and medical profession of Mas- 
sachusetts. He thought also that accidents 
should in all cases be reported to the rail- 
road, within thirty days from the day they 
occurred, that a law should be passed to this 
effect. Said the time had come when it was 
almost futile to take the case of an accident 
before a jury, and that the poorer the case 
the better the chances of obtaining a ver- 
dict. He cited a case in which the testi- 
mony of thirteen respectable white people 
and attending circumstances were outweigh- 
ed by the testimony of two negroes who it 
cannot be ascertained were even on the 
oar. He said that a large proportion of the 
accidents for which action was brought 
against his company, were entirely unheard 
of by the company itself, until claim was 
made at a late day for damages. He thought 
that more attention should be given to the 
subject of street railroad men tliau to any 
other whatever. He spoke of the difficulty 
of dealing with drivers and conductors on 
whose cars accidents had occurred, but 
thought it was a decided mistake to keep 
employees who had had bad luck even 
though not to blame for the accident. And 
this notwithstanding the liability of adverse 
testimony being given by the discharged 
men. He thought that the railroad should 
not be responsible to one employee for an ac- 
cident which occurred through the careless- 
ness of another; that a law making them so 
was very pernicious, in causing trumped up 
cases among employees. 

Mb. Lawless said his road employed a 
regular surgeon, whose services were al- 
ways given regardless of where the respon- 
sibility rested. 

Me. Riohabdson of Brooklyn spoke of rail- 
road " beats," and cited the case of one 
George Marratt, whom he described as be- 
ing about thirty-eight or forty years of 
age, spare, clean shaveii face, of about med- 
ium height, who gave his residence as No. 
29 Prospect street, Brooklyn. Said that 
Marratt's method of operation was as fol- 
lows : He would hire out to a company as 
driver or conductor and in a short time an 
accident would happen to some one, who 
would prove to be Marratt's colleague. Mr. 
Richardson suggested that if this man's 
portrait should be printed iu the Cincin- 
nati papers, no road would ever employ him 
under any circumstances, Another gentle- 
man spoke of Marratt having turned up in 
another part of the country. 

Me. Habt said in his experience, that 



lawyers relied very largely upon the ab- 
sence of witnesses to postpone the case and 
render it more difficult for the road to de- 
fend itself. 

Mr. Richardson said, that they made it 
a point to hunt up the absent witness. 

Me. Citmmings of Boston thought that 
the attorney of one road should not take 
up cases of claims against another road. 

The report of the Committee on Sanitary 
Condition of Street Cars was then called 
for by the President, but as Mr. Edward 
Lusher of Montreal, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee, was absent, the report on " Pro- 
gress of Cable Motive Power," by Mr. 
Edward J. Lawless, was read by the Sec- 
retary. 

PEOGEESS OF CABLE MOTIVE POWEE. 

Mr. President and Gentlemen: We re- 
spectfully offer the following report. Not 
many additional cable lines have been add- 
ed to the list of those already built and 
mentioned in the repoit read at the last 
meeting of this association. But consider- 
able preparatory work for the construction 
of them, as well as additions to those already 
built, have been completed and many fran- 
chises for cable roads have been granted 
in different cities throughout the States. 

In San Francisco two miles of double 
track have been added to the Market Street 
system. This branch is built on the same 
principle as the main line. The yokes are 
iron framed, forming skeleton of conduit, 
are of wrought iron each weighing about 
27C lbs. , laid three feet apart where traffic 
is heavy, elsewhere four feet six inches 
apart. The conduit or tube in which the 
cable runs is of concrete, the cement used 
being English Portland. The slot or chan- 
nel along which the grip shank runs is 
of steel, weighs thirty-five lbs. to the yard. 
It is laid l !,- inch higher than the track rail, 
to prevent mud and water flowing into the 
conduit. 

Every eight feet a pier of concrete is laid 
reaching from bottom of conduit to lower 
level of city sewer. This was considered 
necessary, the soil being sandy and the 
sewers placed in the center of the streets. 
Where excavations are made under the 
track it is liable to settle ; moreover, should 
the sewer be damaged by heavy rain fall, 
which frequently happens in that city, the 
track above it would not be affected. 

The power house contains two engines, 
Corliss, of 250 H. P. each, three boilers, 
heaters, etc. The two drums two feet in 
diameter placed one behind the other have 
grooves lined with wood around which the 
cable forms the figure 8. The tension car- 
riage way is of sufficient length to take up 
250 feet slack cable. The carriage itself is 
weighted with about 8,000 lbs. The cable 
is 1} inch in diameter, 23,500 feet long, 
made of steel wire. 

Work was commenced the 2d of January 
and completed the 29th of May last. 

The branch line with power house and 
fully equipped for operation, cost about 
$400,000. The reasons for the heavy outlay 
are the very substantial manner in which 
the work is done, the high price of labor 
and materia], the cost of each yoke alone 



being about $10.50, and the large amount 
of concrete used. 

In Los Angeles, Cal. . two cable roads have 
been I uih, namely, "The Second Street 
Cable Road," and "The Temple Street Ca- 
ble Railway." They arc single track, 
each one and a half miles long with three 
intermediate and two terminal turnouts, 
upon which four tracks are usually oper- 
ated. The cables run in opposite directions 
in the same conduit. The grip is so con- 
structed as to release the cable at any point 
on the single track and grasp the cable run- 
ning in the opposite direction. Each road 
cost about $100,000. These have proved 
that single track cable roads do not work 
satisfactorily, and already both companies 
have determined to double tracktheirlines. 

The St. Louis cable road was completed 
and put in operation this spring. The 
yokes are of wrought iron laid four feet 
apart. Sheet iron forms the inside of the 
conduit, back of which concrete is laid. 

The slot rail is Z shaped and braced to 
yoke with £ inch iron rods. They have 
three miles double track, operated by one 
cable 1{- inch in diameter. There are a 
number of curves on this line, the wheels 
in them being about 14 inches in diameter. 
The power house contains two Corliss en- 
gines 250 H. P. each, three boilers, heater, 
etc. The drums are 10' in diameter, with 
four grooves. Some apprehension exist- 
ed that so many curves would prove a ser- 
ious obstacle to the successful operation of 
the cable, but although curves on a cable 
road are objectionable features, owing to 
extra wear on cable and machinery, still 
they are not such as to be insurmountable. 

In Cincinnati four miles of double track 
iu addition to those already operated are in 
course of construction. No material changes 
were considered necessary to be made ex- 
cept some improvements to simplify con- 
struction in curves. 

In Chicago the City Railway is adding 
several miles of cable road to its present sys- 
tem, which works very satisfactorily, the 
cable running steadily for weeks at a time 
without a break or interruption, though 
taxed severely with ever increasing busi- 
ness. 

New York and Philadelphia also contem- 
plate extensions to their present systems. 

In Omaha several miles of cable road are 
in course of construction, the plans adojjt- 
ed in Kansas City having been generally 
followed. 

In Melbourne, Australia, several miles of 
cable road have been laid and more ai e in 
course of construction. They are built on 
the same principle as those of San Francisco, 
a sample grip and grip car having been 
sent from that city, The system has prov- 
ed very successful there. 

In Kansas City, however, more work has 
been done towards the extension of this sys- 
tem than anywhere else. Two companies 
already running horse car lines, are chang- 
ing them to cable, while the cable company 
operating that system have built and are 
building several entensive additions. 

The Kansas City Cable Railway Co., last 
July, completed one mile of double track, 



8 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886 



as an extension to their present line. It is 
constructed on the same plan as that al- 
ready operated. They are now construct- 
ing two branches, one of which, it is ex- 
pected, will be completed next month. This 
last branch is somewhat different in con- 
struction from the main line, it being almost 
a copy of the Market Street line in San Fran- 
cisco, except the yokes are of cast iron, and 
concrete piers are dispensed with. These 
yokes weigh about 375. lbs. each'and are 
laid four feet apart on a concrete founda- 
tion. The conduit is formed of concrete. 
The track rail is bolted direct to the yoke; 
no stringers or chairs being used. Stone 
paving is placed between the slot and track 
rail as experience has taught that when 
paved with wood (which was done on the 
main line) it is impossible to keep the slot 
to standard gauge, viz. , § inch, it some- 
times expanding to 1\ inch, and again clos- 
ing to I inch under atmospheric influences. 
The carrying sheaves are twelve inches in 
diameter placed thirty feet apart. It is in- 
tended to operate this branch three-fourths 
of a mile in length by running main cable 
around two drums, making it form the fig- 
ure 8, thereby transmitting power to 
the branch cable. Another brauch two 
miles long is in course of construction, 
which it is expected will be completed next 
summer. 

This company is at present operating 
three miles of double track with one cable 
If inches in diameter. 

The following is an extract of test of en- 
gines and boilers, made in July last. 

Engine cylinder, 24 by 48 inches; coal 
used, nut; duration of trial, 17 hours; coal 
consumed, 14,000 lbs.; coal per H. per 
hour, 51 lbs. ; water evaporated per lb. of 
coal, 7.37 lbs.; horsepower of engine, 159.- 
7; power for cable engine and machinery, 
1 19. 0(3 ; power for cars an d passengers, 40. 64 ; 
number of trains running, 14; passengers 
carried, 15,000. 

The Grand Avenue Cable Company of 
Kansas City will change their horse line to 
cable, and are constructing 2-J- miles addi- 
tional. 

The yokes of cast iron, each weighing 
about 385 lbs. laid four feet apart on a con- 
crete foundation. The slot rail is a spec- 
ial form of angle steel leaving a friction sur- 
face of 1\ inch for grip shank. It weighs 
about 38 lbs. to the yard, and is bolted to 
yoke with counter sunk bolts, pieces of 
sheet iron being placed between slot rail 
and yoke to permit of adjustment. The 
track rail is center bearing and rests on small 
steel chairs which are bolted to the yokes. 
The conduit is formed of concrete; connec- 
tions from conduit to main sewer are made 
in such places as are necessary to carry off 
water. It is thought that portion of this 
road will be completed next spring, the bal- 
ance next fall. 

The Metropolitan Street Eailway Com- 
pany of Kansas City have obtained fran- 
chises to oonvert three of their horse lines 
into cable, and work is progressing rapidly 
on the most important one, viz. , the Fifth 
and Wyandotte hue; at present it is a dou- 
ble track, narrow gauge line. The cable is 



being placed on the same route and chang- 
ed to broad gauge. The horse line is op- 
erated while the work of construction is 
going on by laying temporary side tracks. 

The yokes are of cast iron with four feet 
two inches base, each weighing 340 lbs. laid 
four feet apart on a foundation of concrete. 
The slot rail is Z shaped fastened to the 
yokes by bolts and f inch brace rods. The 
top of the slot rail is slightly inclined from 
the outer edge to prevent horses' shoes and 
buggy wheels from entering the slot. The 
conduit is of concrete six inches thick where 
background is solid, elsewhere twelve inches 
thick, made from English Portland cement. 
The carrying sheaves are of cast iron chill- 
ed, twelve inches in diameter laid thirty 
feet apart. At crowns of hills the diameter 
of the carrying sheaves is increased to 30 
feet, to provide for angle and heavy strain 
of the cable at those points. Special sew- 
ers are made to drain the pits containing 
these large sheaves. Drain pits are also 
made at the foot of all inclines into which 
water from the conduit flows, these pits in 
turn being connected with the main sewer 
by twelveinch pipes. The following figures 
will give some idea of the amount of work 
done and material used in the construction 
of this line. 

No of yards of earth excavated per mile 

of single track 4,055 

No. of yards of concrete, per single 

track 3,000 

" " " " paving (stone) 3,130 

" " " " sand 2,050 

« << << « grave i 175 

No. of tons of yokes 225 

" " " track rail 98 

" " " slot rail 98 

No. of brace rods for slot rail f x 2' 5" 

2,640 10,890 lbs 

No. of slot rail bolts for fasteniug slot 

rail to yokes 2|*x |* 5,280 508 lbs 

No. of bolts for fastening slot rail 

splices If" x I" 704 264 lbs 

No, of bolts for fastening track rail to 

yokes 2J" x f 7,920.. 6,336 lbs 

Carrying sheaves and frames 4 tons 

Curve pulleys and frames each 175 lbs 

It is estimated that this road will cost 
$50,000 per mile of single track. The power 
house will contain two engines 400 HP. each. 
Engines, heater pipe, fittings, &c, con- 



tracted at $25, COO 

Machinery 18,000 

Boilers 13,000 

Building estimated at 15,000 



Cable roads were very successfully oper- 
ated last winter, snow being combated in 
such a manner as not to impede the run- 
ning of cars to any extent. In Kansas City, 
where grades are almost continuous, snow 
is swept away with ease. The cab cable 
line there had a snow plow and sweeper 
constructed to carry a grip between the 
axles, and one trip at full speed of the cable 
was generally sufficient to clear the track 
of snow, and in no instance was the plow 
ever stalled. When the thermometer fell 
several degrees below zero, it was not ne- 
cessary to keep the cable running all night, 
but the tension carriage was loosened, and 
sufficient slack allowed for contraction of 
the cable. 



There are numerous parties who claim to 
have systems of operating cable roads, su- 
perior and more economical than those al- 
ready in use, but as so far, they have not 
been put into practical operation to any 
reasonable extent, your committee did not 
deem it advisable to discuss them in this 
paper, but rather report on those roads 
that are operated under a system that has 
proved itself, beyond a doubt, a complete 
success. 

Your committee here considers it inter- 
esting to call attention to the large increase 
in the value of property wherever cable 
roads are laid down. Even on those routes 
where horse cars have been running some 
time, a mere grant of a franchise to change 
them to cable has caused a material rise in 
the price of property. 

The following figures are taken from ac- 
tual sales. Before the Ninth street line of 
Kansas City started semi-business property 
along that route was valued at $500 per 
front foot, and is now worth $1,250. Re- 
sidence property from one-half to two miles 
from center of city the average value of 
which was $65 per front foot, is now worth 
$200. First class residence property two and 
one-half to three miles from center of city, 
held at $100 per front foot, now brings $200. 

Me. C. B. Holmes of the Chicago Cable 
Railway, being called upon, made some 
very forcible remarks in favor of the cable 
system; citing the fact that in the five 
years of their experience of the cable road, 
their traffic had increased seventeen mill- 
ion of passengers per year . Said that the 
cable system afforded the best possible 
means of dealing with snow, that they had 
had no trouble from that source and had 
run the road frequently when it would have 
been impossible to do so with horses. He 
said that it would now be impossible to 
handle their traffic with horses, to the sat- 
isfaction of the public, and he had no doubt 
that had not the cable been introduced an 
elevated road would have been completed 
before this time. They now run their cars 
nine and a half to ten and a half miles per 
hour, and that there was no increase of ac- 
cidents over the time when slower speed 
was run. They had twenty miles of cable 
road, accommodating the heaviest traffic, 
and sixty-seven miles of horse railroad, and 
three- fourths of theiraccidents occur on the 
horse railroad. Said that safeguards could 
be used on the cable road which were not 
applicable to horse cars. He substantiated 
the committee's report relative to the in- 
crease of the value of real estate resulting 
from the cable road. Said that property in 
Chicago had increased from fifty to one 
hundred per cent, as the result of its sys- 
tem. They are now adding six miles of 
single track, and the cable system is thor- 
oughly satisfactory in Chicago. It would 
be impossible to do the work with horses. 
The first cost of the road was indeed large 
but the diminished expenses for running 
would amply repay the interest on the in- 
vestment. Stated that the expense per car 
mile by the cable system was ten to eleven 
cents, while with horses it was twenty to 
twenty-five. He gave as the life of a cable 



of any merit not less than sixty thousand 
miles. Said that he had no doubt the new 
lines adopting the cable would introduce 
many improvements, and he believed the 
cable system to be far ahead of any other 
motor now in sight. 

At the conclusion of his remarks, he in- 
troduced Mr. Cregier of Chicago. Mr. 
Cregier spoke of a small experiment now 
being made on his road with au i aiprove- 
ment of the Rasmeson system of cable rail- 
way as improved by Mr. Merrill. He also 
endorsed the remarks made by Mr. Holmes 
as to the success of the cable system in 
Chicago. 

Me. Wm. Wharton, Jr., thought the high 
speed of the carriage wheels of this system 
must be a serious trouble. With regard 
to the Philadelphia system of cable roads 
he said that the difficulty under which they 
formerly labored had been partly obviated 
and that the system is now a success. That 
accidents were now no more frequent 
than formerly with the horse system. 
Speaking of the cost of that road, he said 
that it was difficult to give, owing to the 
circumstances under which it had been 
built, but he should estimate that it could 
be duplicated, including the track and im- 
proved pavement, for from fifty to sixty 
thousand dollars. 

Mr. Holmes later speaking of the ex- 
pense of renewal, said, he considered the 
conduit made of English Portland concrete 
was good for five hundred years. He said 
the cable system was best so far as width 
and crowding of streets was concerned, 
wherever horses could be used; and in re- 
sponse to a question of Mr. Merrill, of Bos- 
ton, said that the cable car had a great ad- 
vantage over horses in that obstructing 
teams, etc. , would get off from the track 
ahead of it much quicker than out of the 
way of horses. 

Mr. Wharton said that the streets 
in Philadelphia were twenty-six feet 
from curb to curb, and that their narrow- 
ness caused no obstacle to, the use of the 
cable system. Said that an improved pave- 
ment was being put down outside of the 
tracks, leaving no excuse for driving on the 
track, and allowing agoodroad outside of it. 

Mr. Kerper, of the Cincinnati cable 
road, made some interesting remarks con- 
cerning their road and their experience in 
building it. This system will be described 
in a later issue of the Steeet Railway 
Jouenal. 

Mr. Wharton in response to a question 
as to the waste power in driving the ma- 
chinery with the cable system, elicited 
from Mr. Holmes of Chicago the fact that 
355 horse power were used in driving their 
twenty miles of cable and its machinery, 
and that 700 to 750 horse power were re- 
quired to run 300 cars, that is, one horse 
power per car was required. Gave 
as the cost of furnishing steam for the en- 
tire plant from twenty -five to thirty dollars 
per day, the cheapest screenings of coal and 
the sweepings of barns being used for fuel. 
The length of their cars is twenty-one feet 
and their weight about seven hundred 
pounds. 



Mr. Wharton spoke of an experiment 
being made in Philadelphia with a two 
truck eight wheel car with a wheel base of 
only about four and a half feet, and said it 
was very successful. 

The meeting then adjourned to 3 o'clock. 

WEDNESDAY APTEENOON SESSION. 

Mr. Littell moved to appoint a com- 
mittee of seven to recommend officers for 
the ensuing year, and a place for holding 
the annual meeting. The President then 
brought up again for discussion, the sub- 
ject of Cable Roads, but no remarks being 
offered the report of the Committee on 
Ventilation, Lighting and Care of Cars 
was called for and read by Secretary Rich- 
ardson which was as follows: 
ventilation, lighting and caee of cars. 

In all the attempts heretofore made to af- 
ford ventilation for street cars, but half 
the subject has been treated; theaim seems 
to have been only to provide means for the 
escape of inqmre air; while the equally es- 
sential means of supplying fresh air has 
been overlooked. But little air can escape 
from a car, withoutacorrespondingnmount 
being admitted, hence any system of venti- 
lation that provides only for the escape of 
air, is impracticable. 

Under ordinary circumstances, when the 
weather will not permit the doors and win- 
dows to be kept open, the frequent open- 
ing of the door to allow passengers to en- 
ter and leave the car, will admit sufficient 
fresh air to revive that which has become 
heated and foul through repeated breath- 
ing of the passengers and the cool fresh 
air coming in will force the warmer air out 
through the roof ventilators, carrying with 
it the offensive odors and impurities. Thus 
we have a simple and effectual system of 
ventilators for ordinary every day wants. 

Bnt we cannot stop here, the demand of 
the public now is for cars to be heated dur- 
ing the cold weather. Therefore the ques- 
tion of ventilation becomes complicated 
when we introduce heaters into our cars. 
In a heated car, when well rilled with 
passengers, the air soon becomes unpleas- 
ant, and when you enter a car thus heated, 
you at once feel the discomfort of the foul 
air, hence our atten ion should be directed 
to devising a system of ventilation, that is 
practicable for a heated street car. 

In looking the ground over carefully, 
we recognize at once that no fixed system 
will meet the requirements of ventilating a 
heated car; the condition of the atmos- 
phere being variable, so must any system 
of ventilation be variable to meet the arbi- 
trary one. For example, to-day may be 
clear and cold, and if our car be heated to 
a temperature that is comfortable to the 
passengers, and our system of ventilation, 
which we assume to be fixed, so_nicely ad- 
justed as to carry off the surplus heated air 
which is in return replaced by fresh air 
coming in as the door is opened to allow 
passengers egress and ingress, what will 
be the effect on those days when we have a 
cold rain? The passengers will require 
warmth and also a free circulation of air. 
Of course this changed condition can be 



met partially by graduating the heat, and 
opening the ventilators. 

This example is offered as an illustra- 
tion to show that any system of ventila- 
tion, to be effective, must be variable, so as 
to permit a large or^small amount of circula- 
tion, as the condition of the weather and 
temperature of the air in the car may re- 
quire. 

Your committee has given the subject of 
Ventilation for Street Cars considerable 
thought, but we cannot recommend any 
system that has come under our notice, as 
being an improvement upon the old system 
of side and end roof ventilation. 

Passing from the subject of ventilation 
to that of lighting cars, your committee has 
but little to offer. A car provided with two 
end lights, and a center lamp, or two cen- 
ter lamps, without the end lights, as is now 
quite popular with some of our companies, 
seems to meet every demand for a well 
lighted car,;aud, until electricity is made ap- 
plicable to a street car, we believe the pub- 
lic will be contented with either of the 
above systems. 

In taking up the subject of Care of Cars, 
we will confine ourselves strictly to the 
economical side of the question. " A stitch 
in time saves nine" is an old maxim which 
applies particularly to this subject, but is 
as a rule overlooked. One of the requi- 
sites for successful street railway manage- 
ment is the maintenance of its property, 
which embraces cars, horses and tracks. 

The best kept street railways are usually 
the best paying ones, and it is a natural 
consequence that a management neglectful 
of its property will soon become unpopular, 
and gradually but surely lose its patronage, 
and the first evidence of a careless manage- 
ment is in the unclean condition of the 
cars. 

There is no economy in keeping a car con- 
tinually in service. A car should be washed 
outside and inside as often as its condition 
requires. In some cities, the streets being 
well paved and free from dust, it is not 
necessary to wash every day. The car af- 
ter being washed should be carefully in- 
spected to see if any parts are broken, or if 
any nuts have become loosened or lost, and 
those little things, though small at first, lead 
to serious results if not looked after. 

In the care of cars the most prominent n eg- 
lect is in not varnishing them as frequently 
as we should. Every car should go through 
the paint shop once a year, and all parts 
that become broken be repaired, and all 
bare spots touched up with paint, and the 
whole outside receive two coats of varnish, 
one leveling coat to fill up the inequalities 
of the surface, to be well rubbed, when dry 
and hard, and then receive a weariug coat 
of the best finishing varnish. The roof to 
havea coat of pure white lead, and the in- 
side of panels and floor a heavy coat of 
mineral paint. This operation repeated 
yearly will keep your cars in good condi- 
tion and appearence and with necessary 
minor repairs a car will last twenty-five 
years. 

Anew car, after having been in service six 
months, should be put into the paint shop 



10 



THE; STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



NoVEMBEB, 1886. 



aud the surface carefully rubbed down and 
receive a fresh coat of varnish, then each 
year thereafter, if you will shop your cars 
for a week, we will guarantee the x^aint 
will last for ten years. 

There is no ether way in which the ex- 
penditure of so little money will yield a 
larger return to the company than in paint- 
ing, varnishing and renovating their cars 
each year. 

Walter A. Jones, 
Chairman of Committee. 
Upon motion the report was accepted and 
ordered to be placed on the minutes. 

Me. Richards thought the present me- 
thods of ventilation were sufficient and 
satisfactory, if cars were not heated, and it 
seemed to him therefore, that the discus- 
sion hinged upon whether or not it was 
wise to heat cars. He had always been a 
determined opponent to heating cars, 
though he did not wish to be understood as 
opposed to any particular device for heat- 
ing. Said that passengers in street cars 
rarely took off their wraps or coats and that 
the cars were liable to be heated up to 
eighty degrees instead of fifty-five, the 
temperature to which they should be kept 
if heated at all. Said that the car was lia- 
ble to contain passengers from the sick 
room, having been exposed to contagious 
diseases, and that the odor of wet clothes 
and umbrellas, etc., was unpleasant. 

Mr. Woodworth of Rochester, on the 
contrary, took the grounds that heating 
was wise aud profitable and that it was 
only a question of time when the cars in 
Northern cities would be heated. 

Mr. Kilgour thought that street cars 
were not so built as to admit advantageously 
of heating, and that coming out of the cars 
was a prolific cause of pneumonia. 

Mr. Woodworth would not make cars 
hot but ouly heat to such a temperature, 
that with the frequent opening of the doors 
only the chill would be taken off. 

A desirable device seen in Toledo, for 
heating, was spoken of. 

Mr. Bailey concurred with Mr. Kichards 
ou tli e he.itiug question, but said that in 
Toledo they were compelled to heat. 

Mr. Cleminshaw was on general princi- 
ples opposed to heating, but it was neces- 
sary to do so in their city. He wished to 
hear from Mr. Richardson, of Brooklyn. 

Mr. Sage said it was purely a question 
of profit. Said he was formerly of the 
opinion held by Mr. Richards, but that ex- 
perience had proved, that his traffic had in- 
creased twenty-five per cent by the use of 
stoves. Though the fact that tie poorer 
classes were not usually well clad, should 
be taken into consideration in this connec- 
tion. 

Mr. Witt. J. Richardson said that he un- 
derstood the street railway business to be 
a matter not of philanthropy but of 
profit. That they in Brooklyn at least 
were engaged in the business to make 
money. He spoke of a six mile run, over 
bleak, hilly, cold roads on which they had 
first adopted stoves, and here the results 
were favorable to heating. Gave as the 
expense of running stoves, ten cents per 



day. Said that while they depended on a 
regular traffic their profits were made 
from the ladies going shopping, etc., and 
experience had proved that this class of 
traffic was very greatly increased by heat- 
ing cars. They had noticed a falling 
of a hundred dollars a day, on account of a 
rival line putting in stoves, before they did. 
He referred to this as the best of evidence 
that stoves were a necessity in Brooklyn. 
Said they seldom got complaints because 
cars were heated, but they were very 
frequent if stoves were not put in early 
enough or were taken out too early. 

Spoke of a new line, which they had 
leased, which had not stoves, but when they 
were put in the receipts were very percep- 
tibly increased. 

Mr. Strong of Peoria spoke in favor of 
stoves as based upon experience in their 
city. 

Mr. Littell asked what the death rate 
w is in Peoria. 

Mr. Kilgotjr asked whether heating cars 
was regulated by law in any city, to which 
no response was made in the affirmative. 
He thought the question almost wholly a 
local one. 

Mr. Merrill of Boston thought the 
question not only local as to country, but 
also as to each individual city; different 
roads in the same city differing in circum- 
stances and requirements. Thought that 
roads running iuto the couutry could use 
stoves advantageously and some could not 
do otherwise, but that in crowded cities 
heating was impracticable. Said that on 
Mr. Richards' road for instance, where 
every car was crowded at some time during 
each tiip, that heating was impracticable, 
and that it was impossible to accommodate 
the traffic in a city like Boston, without the 
cars at some time in eachtrip were crowded. 

Mr. Richards said he had been inter- 
ested aud instructed and thought the de- 
bate a profitable one. 

Mr. Williamson said the questiou came 
up last winter for legislation in his city. 
He said that ladies objected to heating cars. 

At this point invitations were read for the 
convention to attend such places of resort 
as the "Zoological Garden," "Museum," 
&c, and also one to visit a brewery. 
Thanks of the convention were extended 
for the various invitations. 

The question was then asked as to whe- 
ther there was any special device for taking 
cars over a line of hose in case of fire. Mr. 
Lawless responded that he supposed the 
ordinary bridge was always used for that 
purpose. 

The^ President then announced the 
committee on officers and place of next 
meeting, which was as follows: H. H. Lit- 
tell, C. Cleminshaw, H. M. Watson, J. 
Scullin, C. A. Richards, A. G. Clark aud 
Wm. Wharton, Jr. 

The Convention then discussed for a 
short time the subject of requiring deposits 
from conductors and drivers. 

Mr. Richards, being called upon, said 
that they required deposits of twenty-five 
dollars of each conductor, and though he 
was in doubt as to whether the amount 



could be held legally beyond the exact 
sum shown as shortage or damage caused, 
he thought the moral effect beneficial. 
Their road formerly required a fifty-dollar 
deposit, but he became satisfied that this in 
very many cases worked a hardship on con- 
ductors, that they were obliged to borrow 
the money, and in many cases give large in- 
terest, and in some instances to brokers 
who made it a business to lend to conduc- 
tors, aud in some cases the brokers taking 
the deposits in their own name. This last, 
however, was not allowed. They had found 
the deposit advantageous in a few instances, 
when men left at night, and were not again 
heard from. 

Mr. Holmes of Chicago, spoke in favor 
of deposits. Said that, on their road, they 
required twenty-five dollars of conductors 
and forty dollars of drivers; this, however, 
in form was paid to the company as a bonus 
for becoming its employees, the road, 
therefore, not being compelled to return 
the amount, which of course they always 
did, unless in case of shortage on the part 
of conductors, or damage caused by the 
carelessness of either conductors or drivers. 
Thought that a deposit more important 
from drivers than conductors, and that it 
had a very salutary effect in preventing 
carelessness. 

Mr. Richards queried as to the legality 
of the methods spoken of by Mr. Holmes. 

Mr. Holmes thought there was no diffi- 
culty in that direction. Said that five per 
cent, interest was returned the employees 
with the twenty-five or fifty dollars on his 
leaving the company. He also spoke of re- 
ceiving deposits from employees for safe 
keeping on which interest at four per cent, 
was allowed. 

Mr. Kerper believed in the deposit, and 
in his own experience had made a mistake 
when exceptions had been made to the 
rule. 

Mr. Littell said his company required a 
deposit of twenty-five dollars, but said that 
they could legally hold only such amount 
of shortage or damages as could be shown. 
He also spoke of a system of giviug ten per 
cent, increase to employees on each pre- 
ceding year's earnings. 

Mr. Rugg, of Boston, had had the man- 
agement of men for eighteen years; had 
never required deposit, and had seen no 
necessity for it; hid never lost any receipts 
as shown by conductors' reports. Iu most 
cases where damage occurred through the 
carelessness of conductors or drivers, he 
could arrange with the careless employee to 
defray a portion of the expense iucurred. 
He declared himself agaiust deposits. 

Dr. Everett, of Cleveland, did not be- 
lieve in deposits, but handled his men 
very much as Mr. Rugg spoke of doing. 
At this point an invitation was received 
from the Chamber of Commerce to visit its 
rooms, and for delegates to avail them- 
selves of its privileges. 

The meeting then adjourned to meet at 
ten o'clock Thursday morning. 

THURSDAY MORNING SESSION. 

A letter of regret was read from Mr. T. 
C. Bobbins, of Baltimore, on account of his 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



11 



inability to be present, after which his very 
interesting report of the committee on 
"Progress of Electric Motors" was read. 

Mb. President and Gentlemen: Your 
Committee on tbe Progress of Electricity 
as a Motive Power, respectfully report as 
follows: 

In searching for the first experimenter 
in the field of electric locomotion it>very 
soon becomes apparent that extreme diffi- 
culty will be experienced, due to the great 
number of visionary experimenters which 
seem to be attracted to this branch of 
physics. Though the experiment of Jacobi 
on the Eiver Neva in 1834, certainly dem- 
onstrated the possibility of producing a not 
inconsiderable force by electrical means, a 
casual inquiry as to the cost of the experi- 
ment conclusively proves that very little 
hope remained of its application assuming 
a commercial form so long as chemical de- 
composition was the only recognized means 
of exciting electricity. 

It remained, however, for later scientific 
invesbigators to point out that this was not 
due so much to the inefficiency of the pro- 
ducer as the exceeding crudity of the re- 
ceiving apparatus and the necessary high 
cost of the electric fuel, so to speak, which 
in this case as in many subsequent cases, 
was zinc. In view of the really discour- 
aging character of this experiment regarded 
as even a possible commercial achievement, 
it is surprising that mauy inventors could 
have been found sufficiently bold to make 
any other attempts until radical changes 
had been made in the producing force, but 
history records that a number of other dar- 
ing experimenters attempted to supplant 
the steam locomotive wit i in the next de- 
cade; it is not, however, recorded that a suf- 
ficiently hopeful result was obtained at this 
period to be regarded as anything more 
than an interesting scientific display. 

The intervening experiments being hard- 
ly worthy of record until the year 1860, 
when Prof. Page made the first recorded 
experiment of any note, with batteries hav- 
ing carbon plates in place of the inferior 
copper ones formerly employed. It is re- 
corded that by means of his improved ap- 
p iratus, Prof. Page was enabled to drive a 
car load of passengers through the streets 
of Washington with an electric locomotive, 
traveling at the rate of twenty miles an 
hour. Though it is quite possible the speed 
is here exaggerated and that the car load of 
passengers were propelled only on the level, 
which would not necessarily call for a 
powerful effort, it is still noticeable that 
sueh an achievement was possible sim- 
ply by the use of batteries and the im- 
perfect apparatus of that time, in a manner 
sufficiently satisfactory to have attracted a 
number of business men who for some time 
anticipated great results. It is now evi- 
dent that nothing of a commercial nature 
could possibly have followed with the 
means at command, and though a number 
of more or less successful experiments of a 
similar kind were made, nothing of suffi- 
cient importance to even promise a com- 
mercial result occurred until the year 1879, 
when Messrs. Siemens & Halske of Berlin I 



operated a small electric railroad of about 
one-third of a mile in length at the Berlin 
Exhibition, employing an auxiliary conduc- 
tor between the rails from which the cur- 
rent was taken up by means of a metal 
brush and transferred to the motor in the 
now well known manner. Several more of 
these small locomotives, being rated at one 
or two H. P. , were made during the year of 
1879 and 1880, and it is recorded that with 
this apparatus the current was sufficiently 
powerful to throw horses when accidentally 
placed in contact with the third rail. These 
latter experiments partook of a mucli closer 
approximation to the commercial character 
for the simple reason that during the in- 
terval between Prof. Page's test and that 
of Messrs. Siemens & Halske the -greatest 
advance yet recorded in electric locomo- 
tives had taken place, namely, the in- 
troduction of the mechanical producer 
or dynamo machine, which apart from 
the details involved rendered possible 
the substitution of coal for zinc as a fuel; 
that the energy of the former had now to 
be passed through a steam engine was a 
comparatively important detail considering 
the enormous disproportion between the 
energy produced from coal and zinc, from 
a financial standpoint, and though the in- 
efficiency of the engine as a therrno dy- 
namic motor militated strongly agninst the 
complete triumph of this new order of 
things, the extraordinary efficiency of the 
infant dynamo operated in a great measure 
to place the new power on a commercial 
basis, indeed, so wonderfully efficient were 
even the earlier dynamos manufactured by 
Messrs. Siemens that the first recorded re- 
sults proved indisputably that under such 
favorable conditions as those which Messrs. 
Siemens w*=re able to avail themselves, 
competition with horse flesh seemed possi- 
ble even from the first, though it was a 
daring man who in these lines would even 
hint at competition with steam and other 
well known converters. 

The little machines above noted were so 
satisfactory in their operation that they 
were quickly followed by an electric rail- 
way for actual business traffic which was 
constructed by Messrs. Siemens & Halske 
between Hitcherfelde and Military College, 
Berlin. The elec ric motor or car on this 
road was built so as to closely resemble the 
ordinary Europeau tram-car, and the motor 
was attached under the floor. It is recorded 
that the performance of this car was emi- 
nently satisfactory in dry weather, but con- 
siderable difficulty was experienced in ope- 
rating in wet weather, until several changes 
had been made in the manner of conduct- 
ing the current, it being subsequently 
found necessary to use an overhead con- 
ductor, which is the first recorded example 
of this kind, and a2ipeared to be so success- 
ful that the road has continued running 
without any radical changes up to this time. 
It must, however, be remembered that the 
power required was very small since the 
road is entirely level from end to end, and 
the car was limited in size, being only able 
to carry about twenty-five persons when 
fully loaded. 



Passing over a number of [minor experi- 
ments which followed this achievement of 
Siemens on the other side, the first not- 
able example after that ot Prof. Page's in 
this country appears to lie the electric 
locomotive of Thomas A. Edison in the 
summer of 1882, which is said to have at- 
tained a speed of nearly forty miles per 
hour on a level track, at Meulo Park, New 
Jersey. The experiments were conducted 
for a considerable time but did not appear 
to have been of a character sufficiently en- 
couraging to warrant any attempt in a com- 
mercial way, and no machines of this type 
were ever placed on a commercial road. 
The manner of taking up the current was 
similar to what had before been tested by 
Siemens in Berlin, and afterwards aban- 
doned as not affording sufficient insulation 
in wet weather. 

Later in the year 1882, Leo Daft con- 
structed a number of small electric locomo- 
tives which were tested and run for a con- 
siderable time on a track provided at the 
works of the Pa ft Electric Light Company 
at Greenville, New Jersey, which were the 
first recorded example of a number of lo- 
comotives (there were four employed at 
one time) running on the same track at the 
same time, from the same generating appar- 
atus, and a number of experiments were 
conducted from time to time for the satisfac- 
tion of a large number of visitors, among 
whom were many electrical and engineer- 
ing experts, to prove what was then a mat- 
ter of considerable doubt, that locomotives 
could be run in jjarallel from a producer of 
sufficient capacity. This was so conrplete- 
ly demonstrated at that time that in this 
direction no further doubts existed though 
it seemed to be for a long time the stand- 
ing objection to the progress of this new 
enterprise from those who were less fami- 
liar with the true inwardness of this pro- 
blem. On these occasions the four cars 
were purposely manipulated in the most 
difficult manner, being all started at the 
same time so nearly as possible and all the 
evolutions which a most exacting audience 
demanded without at any time showing the 
least reason to doubt that the system w.is 
c qjable of indefinite extension on the same 
lines. Not the least extraordinary of the 
effects which constant experiments devel- 
oped was the remarkable tractive capacity 
of the motors when operated with insulated 
wheels and using both rails as the conduct- 
ing system. It was clearly shown that a 
small locomotive weighing but 450 lbs. was 
capable of developing the extraordinary 
tractive force of 300 lbs. on a dry rail; this 
was repeatedly demonstrated, and the sub- 
sequent experiments with the same appara- 
tus developed the astonishing fact 
that it was capable of ascending a 
gradient of 2,900 feet per mile 
without any extra tractive appliances what- 
ever, and with a driver weighing upwards 
of 150 lbs. to add on the car; it wdl thus be 
seen that an effect was arrived at contrary 
to anything which inaybe evolved from the 
co-efficients of Molesworth. There have 
been many opinions as to the cause of this, 
but the fact remains that the above achieve- 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886. 



ment was repeated day after day before a 
large number of technical persons, and can 
of course be repeated at any time, though 
it is not possible to reproduce this effect on 
the large scale required by commercial 
practice for reasons which cannot form a 
part of this paper. The increased traction 
under favorable conditions is.^not by any 
means an unimportant feature in consider- 
ing the relative weight and energy of a 
given motor. In the fall of 1882, an ex- 
periment was made at Chicago National 
Exhibition of Railway Appliances with a 
motor consisting of a Weston machine 
placed upon a platform car and driven by 
a second Weston machine, by means of two 
copper conductors placed near the track. 
This car traveled on a circular track under 
cover without any gradients, and as might 
have been expected, created a favorable im- 
pression among the spectators, though it 
would not be classed as commercial per- 
formances, since the energy required was 
comparatively insignificant; it served, how- 
ever, to keep up the public interest in mat- 
ters of that kind and was so far successful. 

In February of the following year, it is 
recorded that a motor weighing 300 lbs. con- 
structed by Chas. J. Van Depoele was put in 
operation at the works of their company, 
and operated a car which is stated to have 
been capable of carrying twenty-rive people, 
and the trials were conducted for several 
days, and are said to have met with perfect 
success. In the following year a number of 
experiments were carried out at the Daft 
Company's factory at Greenville, New Jer- 
sey, with a view to demonstrate the possibi- 
lity of electric locomotion on a much larger 
scale, and in May, 1883, an electric locomo- 
tive, afterward called ''Ampere," was begun 
for an experiment on the Saratoga aud Mt. 
McGregor Railroad, a narrow gauge road 
running from Saratoga about ten miles to 
Mt. McGregor. Sometime was occupied 
in experiment prior to the construction of 
this machine, but in the fall of the same 
year (1883), the locomotive was finally 
finished and forwarded to Saratoga, where 
a number of experiments were 
made on a part of the track, which had 
been furnished with a third rail to the dis- 
tance of about a mile and a quarter from 
the depot, the dynamo machines being sit- 
uated about midway and a few hundred feet 
from the track. In this case a third rail 
was used, supported on blocks of wood, 
saturated with rosin, and experiments re- 
vealed the fact that with the low potential 
employed, the insulation was sufficient for 
a practical experiment, even when a consid- 
erable portion of the tracks were covered 
with snow. The main achievement of this 
was, that it 'owed a car weighing over ten 
tons loaded with sixty-eight passengers, 
over the road, including a gradient of 93 
feet per mile; though several difficulties 
were here experienced, due to the compar- 
ative crudeness and temporary char- 
acter of the local arrangements, suffi- 
cient was accomplished to prove the 
possibility of commercial electric traction, 
and since it was the first example of electric 
locomotion on an ordinary steam railroad, 



it attracted attention, and encouraged 
others to proceed in the same direction. It 
is noticeable that about this time a number 
of experiments were recorded with what are 
now known as accumulators on the other 
side of the water, and a number of more or 
less successful experiments were made 
which only served to develop the fact that 
accumulators were then, as they are pre- 
bably now, susceptible of great improve- 
ment. 

The extraordinary impetus which had 
been given by the introduction of the dyn- 
amo machine was reinforced by the compa- 
rative success of the experiment just noticed, 
so that within the next few months a large 
number of electricians aud others found 
themselves sufficiently encouraged to con- 
struct a great variety of electric apparatus 
for the complete extinction of horses and 
steam. As you are doubtless aware, the 
greater part of these have been entirely un- 
productive, but the most notable cases have 
not only survived, but are now being pro- 
secuted with a vigor and success which nat- 
urally results from their having assumed a 
thoroughly commercial character, and in 
the year 1884, a combination of important 
capitalists was effected under the title of 
the American Electric Railway Co., with a 
view to placing everything of this kind on 
a sufficiently strong commercial basis to in- 
sure its adoption, but as some difficulty was 
experienced in securing concerted action, 
nothing of importance has yet resulted from 
this combination, the inventors, as before, 
pursuing their different ways alone. Here, 
perhaps, it may be as well to state that 
electric locomotion alone had not by any 
means absorbed the attention of inventors, 
the question of transmission of power for 
stationary purposes having appeared to pre- 
sent an even more attractive field. Much 
had been acconrplished in this direction, and 
practical results attained by such distin- 
guished inventors as M. Marcel Deprez, 
Messrs. Siemens & Halske, of Germany, 
and Sir William Siemens, of England, to- 
gether with Messrs. Ayretonand Perry, and 
others of lesser note. Notable among the 
achievements of the French inventor, be- 
ing the transfer of nearly forty horse pow- 
er for a distance of several miles by an ordi- 
nary telegraph wire. 

In this country, though workers in this 
direction have apparently been less numer- 
ous, the results have generally assumed a 
more important character regarded as a 
commercial achievement. The first record- 
ed example of the establishment of a cen- 
tral station exclusively for the distribution 
of power, was that of the Massachusetts 
Electric Power Company, which was placed 
in May, 1881, and has since grown to con- 
siderable proportions. This company uses 
the Daft system. Several others similarly 
equipped have since been put in opera- 
tion with entirely satisfactory results, which 
my paper will not allow me to describe. 
There are, however, a large number of sat- 
isfactory motors in operation in different 
parts of the country, though not, so far as 
I know, worked from stations exclusively 
for power ; among the motors so employed 



may be mentioned the Sprague, Van De- 
poele, Edgerton, Baxter, D'hul and a host 
of others which may fairly be said to be too 
numerous to be mentioned, though with one 
or two exceptions these inventors have de- 
voted themselves to matters of very small 
power especially for use in operating sew- 
ing machines, dental instruments, etc. 

In August, 1885, Messr s Knight and 
Bentley operated a small road in the City of 
Cleveland, O., with subterraneau conduct- 
or, which may be said to be the first serious 
attempt with that form of conduit, yet 
made in this country. The experiment ex- 
tended over a cousiderable period, and is 
described as being quite successful, though 
for some reason of which I am not informed 
the plan was not adopted and the experi- 
ments have been discontinued, though 
these gentlemen are still doing good work 
in Providence, R. I., and are I trust, pre- 
paring themselves for a brilliant future. It 
will be unnecessary for me to remind you 
that a plan of this kind must ultimately be 
adopted in many of our large cities, partic- 
ularly since the beginning of the overhead 
wire crusade. 

In the year 1885, C. J. Van Depoele con- 
structed and operated a locomotive 
which is said to have done excellent .\ ork 
at the Toronto Exhibition, in the fall of last 
year, and this has been followed up from 
time to time by notable work and experi- 
ments in different parts of the country, 
chiefly among which may be mentioned, 
Montgomery, Ala., South Bend, Ind. This 
inventor, after the manner of the early 
German road, has adopted an overhead con- 
ductor which seems specially suited for use 
in cities where the necessary permits can 
be obtained, and appears to have met with 
such success as to promise greater things 
in the future. 

Passing over some minor achievements I 
am led to speak of the installation of the 
Baltimore & Hampden Electric Railroad as 
the one commercial plant which has been 
operated for a sufficient time to allow of a 
proper statistical comparison not only with 
horses, but with other mechanical tractors, 
and in so doing I append figures showing 
results of operating this road for twelve 
months by the Daft system, including a 
winter of extraordinary severity for that re- 
gion, and under such conditions as I am 
sure you will conceive are sufficiently com- 
mercial in their character. A profile of the 
gradients and curves on this road will be a 
sufficient assurance that the experimental 
element has not been allowed to predomi- 
nate in selecting the ground for such pur- 
pose, except in a manner sufficiently pre- 
judicial to afford unusually severe means 
for satisfying ourselves as to its enduring 
character. The statistics here appended 
will afford so clear an insight into the result 
of this experience that I will not further 
dwell upon it except to remark that though 
I must confess myself strongly in favor of so 
convenient and sufficient a substitute for 
horses, or other mechanical tractor so far 
tested, I have not allowed myself to be led 
astray by the scientific allurements of the 
case and feel satisfied that a careful analy- 



NoVEMBEH, 1886. 



L3 



sis of the case will lead others to conclude 
as I do, that electricity employed as the 
means of transferring the energy of mechan- 
ical tractors is not only coming but is here, 
and in all essential particulars has been 
here for sometime past. It is not too much 
to add that the Baltimore & Hampden Road 
stands alone in this particular, that it was 
started on a purely commercial basis as a 
purely commercial transaction, and has con- 
tinued, and is now being extended simply 
because it^has proved its right to stay, by 
the performance, which leaves little to be 
desired in that direction. 

About the time that the Baltimore Road 
was started, the Daft Company were en- 
gaged upon the manufacture of a large elec- 
tric motor "Ben Franklin," intended for 
use for experiment on the Ninth Avenue 
Elevated Railroad, in New York. This was 
subsequently put in operation and experi- 
mentally used for a considerable time on a 
short track at Fourteenth street, and also 
towed four cars over two miles of that road. 
It was ascertained during these experiments 
that a more powerful motor would be re- 
quired to fully meet the requirements of the 
case, and the experiments will shortly be 
resumed on a larger basis. 

Lieut. F. J. Sprague has since built and 
put in operation a motive car on a short 
branch of the Third Avenue Elevated Rail- 
road at Thirty-fourth street. The experi- 
ments with this motor have not yet been con- 
cluded, but I understand that they have 
been quite successful, and will probably re- 
sult in an extended application of this 
motor. 

In concluding this brief review of this 
comprehensive subject, I feel that I should 
not be doing it fall justice if I were not to 
attempt a refutation of many charges which 
have been brought against electricity by 
persons unfamiliar with its peculiarity. 

It is said to be unsafe, and though with 
high potential, this is undoubtedly the case, 
I am prepared to say that with the potential 
now iu use on the Baltimore & Hampden 
Railway, the experience by a year's con- 
stant running eighteen hours per diem 
leads me to state that so far as human life 
is concerned it is absolutely harmless. 

Secondly: It has been said to be uncer- 
tain. Again, quoting the experience of a 
year, I am aide to state that after the little 
difficulties incidental to a primary installa- 
tion had been removed during the first 
month (or two, it is as certain as any other 
form of mechanical tractor in all weather. 
Third: It has beeu stated that specially 
skilled help would be required to operate 
a line so eqtupped. I am again able to say 
that the experience before referred to has 
enabled me to place upon the road men 
who were entirely unfamiliar with electric- 
ity in any of its applications, and that these 
men are now our sole reliance for all the 
operations required, and interruptions are 
as much the exception with us now as with 
any ordinary road. 

For the year ending September 1st, 1885, 
the road carried with three cars with horses, 
227,155 passengers at 5 cents each, making 
$11,357.75. 



For the year ending September let, 1886, 
the road carried with two cars, propelled 
by the Daft Electric Motor, 311,141 passen- 
gers, at 5 cents each, making $15,557.05. 

An increase of 83,986 passengers with 
two propelled by electricity, as against 
three cars propelled by horse power for the 
same corresponding time, and an increase 
of $4,199.30. 

The average number of passengers car- 
ried per car per aonuin propelled by elec- 
tric power was 155,570. 

The average carried per car per annum 
for corresponding time by horse power was 
75,718 passengers, an excess of passengers 
per car per annum in favor of electricpower 
of 79,852. 

The average gross earnings per car per 
annum, with cars propelled by electric 
power, was $7,778.52; the average gross 
earnings per car pel annum by horse power 
was $3,785.91, showing an excess of gross 
earnings per car per annum in favor of elec- 
tric power of $3,892.61. 

The average cost of horse power per car 
per day is estimated at $6.50; the average 
cost of electric power per day on this road, 
is one and a half tons of coal at $3.50, equals 
$5.25. 

Engineer, $2.00; fireman, $1.50; oil and 
waste, ,50; interest on plant and repairs, 
$2.75; making $12.00 per day. The power 
furnished at this cost is ample to run three 
motors and cars on this road, making elec- 
tric power per car per day $4.00. Under 
more favorable conditions, such as cheaper 
fuel or water power to drive the dynamos, 
and more favorable gradients and curves, 
the cost of electric power per car per day 
would be proportionately reduced. 

Respectfully subscribed by 
T. C. Robbins, 
Chairman Committee. 

The report having been accepted and or- 
dered on file, it was announced that Mr. 
Guest, familiar with the Daft Electric Sys- 
tem, was present, and would answer any 
questions about the Baltimore road or the 
Daft system generally. 

Me. Wharton said that he had ridden 
over the Baltimore road, and was very 
agreeably surprised by the successful work 
it was doing. Would like to hear from Mr. 
Guest. 

Mr. Guest modestly declined to make a 
speech in behalf of the Daft system, but 
stated his willingness to answer any ques- 
tions that might be put to him. 

Mr. Moxham thought there must be some 
deep rooted reason why so old a principle 
as electricity had not been more generally 
adopted, and in his judgment thought that 
the difficulty was due to numerous minor 
defects which rendered the system imprac- 
ticable for crowded streets or anything but 
country or suburban use. He spoke of a 
former reference by Mr. Richards to elec- 
tricity as an infant which would eventually 
become a giant, but did not agree with him 
inasmuch as electricity had been in use for 
generations. 

Mr. Wharton thought that great strides 
of progress had been made, was of the 
opinion that all obstacles to success for su- 



burban traffic had been substantially over- 
come, and spoke at length of the Baltimore 
experiment as promising great things iu the 
future; believed electricity would soo i be 
very generally used on street railroads. He 
also spoke of storage batteries to be used on 
each car separately, and thought these 
promised much. Referred to two motors of 
the Julian system just brought from Eng- 
land, the batteries charged there, which 
would soon be tried in New York. Referred 
to this in evidence that loss in storage was 
very slight. 

Mr. Moxham thought that the liability of 
individual motors getting out of order was so 
great that the trouble might assume as large 
proportions as iu the case of cable roa Is. 

Mr. WnARTON, in response to Mr. Mox- 
ham, thought it was absurd to speak of all 
the storage batteries on a road getting out 
of order at the same time. He was not here 
to advocate electricity, much less any par- 
ticular system of electricity, but that he 
regarded the promise of electricity as a mo- 
tor with which to supersede horses as very 
encouraging. He said rails used in Balti- 
more and various other features of the rude 
construction of that road would render it 
impracticable for thickly settled districts, 
but regarded it still more encouraging as an 
experiment on that account. Said that 
there was no danger to human life from 
coming in contact with the third rail. Had 
seen Mr. Robbins grasp both rails at a time, 
forming a circuit, and while he did not feel 
called upon to follow Mr. Robbins' example 
would vouch for the fact that no detrimen- 
tal results followed. He said that the in 
fant "Electric Motor" for steam railways 
was destined to grow to be a Hercules. 

Mr. Richards then spoke eloquently at 
some length about the difficulty of under, 
standing the science of electricity, and 
dwelt upon the profound mystery by which 
it was still surrounded; closing his speech 
with the remark, "All honor to those who 
are giving an hour or a dollar to the deve- 
lopment of the important agent." 

Mr. Holmes of Chicago said he thought 
it was the duty of the convention to extend 
an earnest and cordial greeting to every 
man who is trying to replace bad with good. 
Said that when a man had walked the floor 
all night thinking of the proper course to 
pursue before his board of directors the 
following day, as he had done before re- 
commending an expenditure of from three 
to four million dollars, he would earnestly 
appreciate every particle of help or sym- 
pathy from whatever source it came. That 
he believed that the resources of God were 
not by any means exhausted, and there 
would yet be discovered powers at present 
entirely undreamed of, not only better than 
horses and cables but than any now known. 

One delegate thought that recent steam 
motors were nearly perfection, and that if 
city councils would grant permits to use 
them they would solve the motor question. 

A letter of regret was then read from Mr. 
Edward Lusher of Montreal, after which 
the committee report on Sanitary Condi- 
tion of Street Cars was read. 

After the acceptance of this report re- 



14 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL, 



Novembek, 1886. 



marks were made by Messrs. Moxham arid 
Wharton concerning switch-plates, rail- 
grooves, curves, etc. 

The committee on nominations then re- 
ported the following list of officers for the 
ensuing year: 

President — Thos. W. Ackley, Philadel- 
phia; First Vice President — A. G. Clark, 
Cincinnati; Second Vice President — ffm. 
H. Sinclair Galveston; Third Vice Presi- 
dent — Prentiss W. Cummings, Cambridge. 

Secretary and Treasurer —Wm. J. Rich- 
ardson, Brooklyn. 

Executive Committee — Julius Walsh, St. 
Louis; H. Hurt, Washington; C. Dinsrnore 
Wyman, New York; Dr. A. Everett, Cleve- 
land; S. S. Spaulding, Buffalo. 

Philadelphia was named as the place for 
holding the next convention. 

Ou motion a single ballot was cast for the 
gentlemen named, and they were declared 
unanimously elected, and the committee's 
report adopted as to place of meeting. 

The newly-elected President was then 
escorted to the chair by a committee, and 
introduced by the retiring President, and 
made a few remarks. Votes of thanks were 
then offered to Ex-President Walsh and 
the Secretary and Treasurer. 

Mr. Richards on behalf of the Executive 
Committee spoke somewhat discouragingly 
of the custom of giving banquets at the 
expense of the local roads in the city where 
the convention was held. An invitation 
was received from Mr. Kerper to visit his 
cable railroad, which was accepted, and 
announcement made of a program of enter- 
tainment for the next day, given by the 
roads of Cincinnati, Newport, and Coving- 
ton to their guests. Delegates were re- 
quested to step forward after the meeting 
adjourned and receive their badge of invi- 
tation to the banquet to be given in the 
evening at the Gibson House by the Cin- 
cinnati, Newport, and Covington roads. 
The Banquet. 

On Thursday evening (Oct. 21) the mem- 
bers of the association and their invited 
guests assembled at the Gibson House to 
partake of the annual banquet. At eight 
o'clock the procession, headed by Mr. A. 
G. Clark, and the invited guests, took up 
the liDe of march to the large dining rooms. 
The tables were profusely and artistically 
decorated with flowers and evergreens, 
while back of the presiding officer Currier's 
orchestra was placed, and engaged in the 
rendition of operatic and popular airs dur- 
ing the progress of the feast. 

The menu cards were exceedingly neat 
in execution and design. 

Ou the back was the picture of a street- 
car laden with hilarious mules, and under- 
neath the motto, " Let Us Rest from Our 
Labors and Be Gay." At the top, in color- 
ed letters, was the inscription: "Fifth 
Annual Dinner to the American Street Rail- 
way Association," and beneath, "given at 
theGibsonHouseOct.il, 1886." An in- 
genious arrangement of spikes made out 
the year 1886. Within was a humorous 
cartoon of a street car dashing along at full 
speed, and an old lady wildly waving her 
umbrella. Then followed 



THE MENU. 

Blue points on shell. 

Haut Sauterne. 
Printamere Royale. 
Filet of Sole. 
Sauce Bey rout. 
Celery en Mayonaise 
Supreme ol Chicken. 

Chateau Lafltte. 
French Asparagus, 
g \ Terrapin. 
Southside. 
Champagne Punch au Burgundy. 
Cigarettes. 
Filet of Pheasant. 
Pommery Sec. 
Lettuce. 
Ice Cream on Forne. 
Cake. 

Black Hamburg Grapes. 
Roquefort and Brie Cheese. 
Coffee, Cigars. 
Liqueurs. 

At ten o'clock Mr. Clark announced the 
first of the post-prandial remarks. On be- 
half of the people of Cincinnatihe express- 
ed the hope that their guests had enjoyed 
their visit, and if they went away saying so 
it would be the greatest compliment that 
could be paid to Cincinnati. The first toast 
is, "OurGuests." It is our sincere hope 
that their remembrance of Cincinnati will 
be measured by the same degree of pleas- 
ure which it affords us to greet them. He 
called upon Mr. Moody Merrill of Boston to 
respond. 

Mr. Merrill was warmly greeted, and 
craved for indulgence in his first attempt at 
alter-dinner speaking. In Boston they had 
au org mization called the Presidents' Asso- 
ciation, and one of its principles was that 
the presiding officer (Mr. Richards) should 
do all the talking and the others all the list, 
ening. To the people of Cincinnati he 
would express the visitors' high apprecia- 
tion of the generous hospitality accorded 
them. There was, however, a more serious 
subject to be dwelt upon. It was probably 
the last time he^should address them as an 
important railroad official. He had passed 
through in his career what few had exper- 
ienced. He then detailed his entering into 
the street railroad business in Boston four- 
teen years ago on what was known as the 
Highland loute. After dwelling upou the 
dividends paid by the roads in Boston, the 
inauguration of the system of consolidation 
and the advantages that had accrued, not- 
withstanding that great doubt had at first 
been expressed as to the result. Street 
railroads, he said, were run solely for the 
purpose of making money, and consolida- 
tion had io creased the revenues of the com- 
panies and redounded to the advantage of 
the public. He closed with the heartfelt 
wish that the day would not be long coming 
when the visitors from Boston could return 
the generous hospitality of the good people 
of Cincinnati. 

Mr. Clark then announced the second 
toast — "Our Retiring President— whose 
gentlemanly and intellectual administra- 
tion has increased the respect which we al- 
ready felt for him as a fellow-member." 

Three cheers and a tiger were given for 
Mr. Julius S. Walsh, of St. Louis, who 
referred to the fact that last year he had as- 
sumed the duties of presiding officer with 



trepidation, and expressed the wish that 
the same kindness and consideration ex- 
tended during his incumbency would al- 
ways continue. 

"Our next toast," said Mr. Clark, "is to 
our President. May he bear the cares of 
office lightly, and upon his retirement have 
the satisfaction of knowing the good work 
has gone bravely on." 

Three cheers and a tiger also greeted Mr. 
Thomas W. Ackley, of Philadelphia, as he 
arose to respond to the sentiment. He had 
attended the convention for a double pur- 
pose. 

First, he had come to receive information, 
and then he was delegated to invite the 
next annual convention to meet in Phila- 
delphia. He brought with him the warm 
invitation of every street railroad in Phila- 
delphia, and cordially wished all to join 
them in that city in October, 1887, and he 
would guarantee to each and every one the 
heartiest of welcomes. 

For the next sentiment, said Mr. Clark, 
he had found few anxious to respond, but 
the selection had fallen on Mr. C. B. 
Holmes, Superintendent of the cable roads 
of Chicago. His subject would be "Street 
Railroads and Public Opiuion." Mr. 
Holmes said that in turning the subject 
over he was reminded of the time when the 
ice broke with him, and he found the water 
very cold and very deep. The subject in- 
trusted to him he had found to be fathom- 
less. 

Mr. Calvin A. Richards, of Boston, then 
eloquently and touchingly spoke to the 
sentiment, "Our Home and the Ones We 
Left Behind Us." He urged all to bring 
next time their wives and children. He had 
found here the whitest souls and the finest 
men he had ever seen. 

General M. Ryan, in a characteristic 
speech, spoke to "Our Passengers." ingeni- 
ously taking the vein that Mr. Kerper had 
transformed our woodlands into a great 
city, replaced the cow-bell with the gong of 
the cable car, so that where land formerly 
sold per farm, it was now sold per front 
foot. He neatly coupled Mr. Kilgour's 
name with that of Mr. Kerper. 

For the toast "The Press," Mr. Clark 
presented a gentleman who needs no intro- 
duction, Mr. Halstead. That gentleman 
dwelt in interesting terms on the import- 
ance of the street railroad interest, the 
good it had done for the city, and how, with 
the press, it was engaged in building up 
Cincinnati, and placing it in the rank of 
leading American cities. 

This ended the regular programme, but 
several gentlemen were called upon and 
made happy impromptu remarks. 

Much of the success of the affair is due 
to the Reception Committee, composed of 
James Doherty, General George B. Kerper, 
A. G. Clark and John Kilgour. 



The interest manifested by the conven- 
tion in motive power was very marked and 
the increase over that shown at the '85 con- 
vention was quite noticeable. Of the com- 
mittee reports next year three will be on 
motive power subjects. 



Novembeb, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



At the Cincinnati Convention. 

The following gentlemen not delegates 
■were iu attendance at the Street Railway 
Convention at Cincinnati. 

John Stephenson Co. and Pugh & Rus- 
sell, represented by John S. Pngh, H. W. 
Pugh, James A. Tackabery and H. C. 
Evans. 

A. French Spring Co. G. W. Morris, 
General Manager, and William Lawrence. 

Johnson Steel Street Rail Co. A. J. 
Moxham, President of the company. 

Pullman Car "Works of Chicago. Charles 

E. Pullman. 

J. G. Brill & Co., Philadelphia. John A. 
Brill. 

Railway Register Manufacturing Co., 
Beadle & Courtney, General Agents. Ed- 
ward Beadle, Charles Courtney. 

Eultou Foundry, Cleveland. C. J. Lang- 
don, Secretary, and T. C. White, salesman. 

Hathaway & Robinson. Charles Hath- 
away. 

John A. Roebliug, Sons & Co., of Tren- 
ton. George C. Bailey, Manager of the 
Chicago office. 

Standard Index and Register Co. , New 
York. Charles B. Baldwin. 

Walter A. Crowders. 

Baltimore Car Wheel Co. A. S. Littlefield. 

Richard Vose, New York. J. C. Guibert, 
William P. Williams, William S. Silvers, 
and A. W. Slee. 

Laclede Car Works, St. Louis. William 
Sutton, Superintendent. 

Wales Manufacturing Co., Syracuse. W. 
S. Wales, President. 

John Strong, Peoria. 

Augustus Day, Detroit. 

Hale & Kilburn, Philadelphia. George 

F. Small. 

Bryden Forged Horse Shoe Works, Catas- 
auqua, Pa. J. B. White, Manager Sales 
Department. 

Lewis & Fowler Manufacturing Co. H. 
C. Simpson, Secretary; E. Packer and L. 
E. Robert, salesmen. 

D. B. Andres, Philadelphia. 

Frank H. Andrews, represented by F. T. 
Lerned. 

Brownell & Wight Car Co. , St. Louis, 
represented by Mr. Brownell. 

W. L. Everit, New Haven. 

Cleveland Foundry. N. B. Bowler, Pro- 
prietor. 

Michigan Stove Co. , Detroit. G. H. Bar- 
bour, Secretary, and M. R. Mills, Treas- 
urer. 

Valentine & Co., New York. W. L. En 
Earle. 

H. K. Porter & Co., Pittsburg. T. W. 
Belle. 

J. O. Haddock, Louisville. 

A. Ballenberg, Chicago. 

M. M. Willson, Troy, N. Y. 

Post& Co., Cincinnati. E. V. Cherry, 
Vice President; Isaac Kinsey, Manager; 
and Peter Leidenger, salesman. 

Bemis Car Box Co., Springfield, Mass. 
Charles J. Stearns. 

D. J. Miller, New York. 



Exhibit of Street Railway Appliances 
at the Cincinnati Convention. 

The John Stephenson Co., New York, 
through Pugh & Russell, general represen- 
tatives, made the following exhibit: 

1. Exhibit a handsome section of a Broad- 
way car of New York City, of which they 
are now delivering the second fifty of the 
one hun dred cars of this style built by them 
for the Broadway Road. 

2. This exhibit shows the patent spring 
draw-head and hook with latch, thus pre- 
venting the whiflietrees from becoming de- 
tached by accident, or the horses. 

3. The adjustable windlass handle, allow- 
ing the driver to set his brake according to 
the various conditions of the load. 

i. The telephone signal system by which 
the passenger is enabled to signal the con- 
ductor for stopping the car. 

5. The metal sash style, rubber lined, 
thus cushioning the glass and preventing 
rattling and extending the field of vision. 

6. The high windows permit a passenger 
standing in the aisle to read the store and 
street signs, without having to stoop as for- 
merly, and not in any manner sacrificing 
the strength of the car. 

7. The ventilated ceiling affording pure 
air in the car at all times and conditions, 
also the drop sash at the ends of car and 
in doors, which when opened give a free 
circulation of air. 

8. The patent ventilated lamp-house with 
the signal light having the bull's eye sur- 
rounded by clear glass to light the platform 
aud roadway, and lettered with the desti- 
nation. 

Pugh & Russell, New York and Chicago, 
general agents for A. French Spring Com- 
pany, exhibit graduated keg-shaped steel 
street car springs which are now being 
universally used. 

Pugh & Russell, agents Johnson Steel 
Street Rail Company, exhibit sections of 
the Johnson girder rail of various weights, 
both center and side bearing. 

Pugh & Russell, sole agents, exhibit Nel- 
son car heater, now used extensively 
throughout the country. 

J. G. Brill & Co. , Philadelphia, exhibited 
their 

1. New dnst-and-oil-tight journal box; 
will be illustrated in a future issue. 

2. New reversible sign boards for cars. 
New system to change signal lights. 

3. Bell with movable plunger for strik- 
ing.. 

4. Full line of car trimmings. 

5. New ratchet brake handle. 

6. Patent brake shoe. 

7. Patent sash stop. 

8. New journal box with link motion. 

9. The Brill gear. 

10. New and improved patent reversible 
seat for open cars. 

Beadle & Courtney exhibited a full line 
of registers, manufactured by the Railway 
Register Manufacturing Co. of Buffalo. 

Edward Beadle exhibited the Eureka 
Folding Mat for car floors. 

Hathaway k Robinson, Cleveland, ex- 
[ hibited their new transfer table. 



Hale & Kilburn, Philadelphia, exhibited 
their car seats and springs. 

Bryden Forged Horseshoe Works, Ld., 
Catasauqua, Pa., exhibited a full line of 
their horse and mule shoes. 

Detroit Brush Co. exhibited a sample 
line of their brushes. 

Leib Lubricating Co., Buffalo, exhib- 
ited Dux grease for street railways. 

Lewis & Fowler Manfg. Co. exhibited 
their Patent Alarm Passenger Register; 
their new heater designed expressly for 
one-horse cars; their two-horse heaters, 
fancy stove box for each size; two sections 
of a car, showing the location and arrange- 
ment of the heater, one of which was for a 
one-horse car in front doorway. 

Frank H. Andrews exhibited car wheels, 
White's Patent Automatic Switch, turn 
table, snow sweeper, etc. 

Brownell & Wight Car Co., St. Louis, 
exhibited a complete aDd very elaborately 
fiuished car containing various improved 
devices and features which we hope to de- 
scribe fully in a later issue. 

D. B. Andres, a new grip for cable rail- 
ways; complete working model. 

W. L. Everit, New Haven, improved car 
floor. 

Morgan Envelope Co., sample lot of their 
change envelopes. 

The Standard Index and Register Co., N. 
Y., exhibited their Standard Register, as 
used on the Broadway Road, New York. 

Walter A. Crowders, electric fare box. 

The Street Railway Supply Co., Cleve- 
land, 0.,the Shattuck and Worswick jour- 
nal boxes. 

W. E. Haycox, Cleveland, new patent 
door fastener for street cars. 

Josephine D. Smith exhibited sample of 
very fine end and center lamps for street 
cars. 

J. Wilder & Co., Belle City Feed Cutter. 

The Champion Horse Nail Co. , Appleton, 
Wis. , full line of horse nails, for country 
and city street railway use. 

The Wales Manfg. Co., Syracuse, sam- 
ple of fare box and change gates. 

Tom. L. Johnson and A. A. Anderson, 
Indianapolis, showed specimens of John- 
son's Fare Box, with prices. 

John Strong, Peoria, new patent brake. 

Augustus Day showed a track scraper. 

Cleveland Foundry showed a sample of 
Bowler's Patent Wheel. 

Michigan Stove Co., Detroit, showed two 
street car stoves. 

Barret Manfg. Co., Boston, Barret's new 
Journal Box. 

J. O. Haddick, Louisville, revolving car 
stool for drivers. 

A. Ballenberg, Chicago, new method for 
heating cars. 

E. Hambujer, Detroit, showed a car 
heater. 

M. M. Willson, patent brake shaft. 

Post & Co. , Cincinnati, a variety of street 
railway appliances, notable among them 
their new center lamp, head and monitor 
lamps for cable cars, car brass bearings, 
car trimmings, student and hand lamps for 
office use; all kinds of burners, chimneys, 
wicks, lenses, etc., etc. with a general hue 
of track builders' tools and supplies. Some 
of them are new and will be described in a 
later issue. 

Julius Jaegel, patent pneumatic electric 
subway, complete model. 

L. Jordan & Co., automatic railroad sand 
| distributor. 



16 



THE STBEET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November 1.886. 




Monthly, $1.00 per Year. 
E. P. HARRIS, General Manager. 



American Railway Publishing Co., 



32 Liberty Street, 
New York. 



Lakeside Building, 
Chicago. 



Chicago, Lakeside Building, E. L. Powers, Worth, 
western Manager. 

Boston, Mass., 185 SUMMER STREET, H. M. SWET- 

LAND, Manager. 
Philadelphia, 119 So. FOURTH ST. J. II. McGRAW, 

Manager. 



The Convention. 



To all who attended the convention of the 
Street Railway Association at Cincinnati 
there must be a feeling of pleasure at the 
complete success attending all of the ar- 
rangements and in the carrying out of the 
programme. The interest manifested in 
the work and the thorough way in which 
it was performed, is shown by our report of 
the proceedings. The committees having 
charge of the subjects for report and dis- 
cussion entered into their work with an 
earnest interest that showed itself in the 
extent and thoroughness of the reports. 

Mr. Richards' report on the Cause, Pre- 
vention and Settlement of Accidents, is es- 
pecially interesting as showing the dilemmas 
in which street railway officials are placed, 
and the annoyances to which they are sub- 
jected by the unjust claims for damages 
that are trumped up against them. 

Mr. Richards' suggestions are very sim- 
ilar to those employed by Mr. Thompson 
of the Pennsylvania R. R. a number of 
years ago, and which made him so popular 
and successful in the treatment of such 
cases, that it was declared to be almost a 
positive luxury to be hurt upon that road. 

The subject of mechanical propulsion for 
street cars has received so much attention 
from outsiders and the railroad managers, 
that considerable was naturally expected 
from the committees having the cable and 
electric systems in charge. Nor was there 
any disappointment m this regard. There 
is a strong yet good natured fight waging 
between the advooates of the two systems ; 
aud while the railroad men are ready to 
discard their old love, the horses, as being 
expensive and troublesome, they have dif- 
ficulty in choosing between the other two, 
sighing: "How happy could I be with 
either, were t'other dear charmer away." 

These papers and the discussions 
upon them will therefore be read with con- 
siderable interest. 

Nor must we forget the banquet, where 
the members of the convention meet in the 
goodly presence of well-laden tables, and 
are lighted up with the happy disposition 
to be pleased with everybody and every- 
thing: when the present moment seems the 
happiest of their lives, and strikes and 
unions, break downs, accidents and worries 



are forgotten, and the management of a 
street railroad assumes the features of a 
lotus-eater's paradise. 

But, perhaps, after all, this outside ap- 
pearance of success and smoothness that 
characterized every feature of the conven- 
tion, was due to the fact that the whole 
was under the control of men who have the 
management of the most difficult of indus- 
tries in their hands, and to whom the man- 
agement of a convention, where solid work 
is done, partakes of the freedom of a school 
boy's holiday. 

Rudiments of Driving. 

BY W. E. PARTRIDGE. 

It is a wonder of street railroading that 
no one has attempted to put in available 
shape for use, by drivers of street cars, in- 
structions in regard to the proper manner of 
driving a pair of horses. Even Bergh, the 
great philanthropist of the horse, the ass 
and the mule, has never seen fit to issue di- 
rections for the ordinary driver. On most 
roads where a man can handle a brake, get 
his team from one end of a car to the other, 
or manage a turntable, his education in 
that line is supposed to be complete. So 
little is known by the drivers of the best 
methods of driving a team, that if the 
horses did not know more about driving 
than the men who hold the lines, the busi- 
ness of our large cities would stop. The 
wear and tear in horse flesh, caused by this 
ignorance, is something fearful. Teams 
are worn out yet the work is not done. The 
labor is expended in pulling against the 
brake, in surging against the lines aud in 
other nameless ways which fret aud tire the 
horses without performing work. 

Of all the senses bestowed upon a horse 
the hearing is the most delicate, and the 
one upon which the animal places almost as 
much dependence as upon any other, except 
perhaps that of smell. In spite of this, 
most horses in the city of New York, at 
least, are driven by the whip and lines. 
The voice is not used until the team has 
been jerked up or the whip applied. Even 
gentlemen often drive their horses as if 
they were mere machines. 

The following rules will be found to worl 
well in practice. Their correctness can be 
easily demonstrated by applying them to a 
private team. 

The voice should be used first in every 
case where the horse is required to do any- 
thing, in starting, stopping, turning to the 
right or left, increasing or decreasing the 
speed. To put it more clearly, the driver 
should express every wish in words before 
using lines or whip, or brake if on a car 
The words should be sinrple and for the 
same action should not be varied. In 
some parts of the Eastern States, the fol 
lowing vocabulary covers the usual orders: 
"Whoa," for a stop, given in a sharp tone 
for a sudden stop aud more softly when the 
gait is to be slacked up. It is also used to 
signify that the team has turned far enough, 
etc. " Come here," when the team is to 
turn to the left, and " Get off, "for a turn 
to the right. "Gee up," derived like the 



last two from thelauguage of the ox driver, 
starts the team and is also used to increase 
the speed. Almost any word may be used 
for the latter purpose. 

What the words are, makes very little 
difference if they are used without variation 
and are not so much alike in sound as to be 
misunderstood. Any ordinary team of 
horses will learn the ords as easily and as 
quickly as a child four years old. As a rule, 
a horse will fear the voice more than the 
whip and will respond to it quicker, even 
when tired and overloaded. The time 
needed for this latter lesson is short. Let 
the voice invariably precede the use of the 
whip and let a blow always follow the voice 
if the horse does not quicken his speed in 
proportion to the command or the tone in 
which it is given. Sometimes a horse will, 
in an hour's drive, learn the lesson so as not 
to forget it for days. If the practice be made 
a habit, the horse thus trained will respond 
to the voice when whipping scarcely urges 
him out of a walk. The dread of a punish- 
ment to come appears to be greater than 
that of one which has already fallen. 

The same principle applied to teaching a 
team to make a sudden stop is of the great- 
est use to the driver of a car. The team 
that has been taught to stop at the sound 
of the voice, will slack their traces in case 
of an emergency before the driver could 
gather his lines and thus leave him to apply 
the full power of the brake. The drill for 
this is simple. Say "Whoa!" sharply before 
touching the lines, and then, if the horses 
do not instantly respond, pull them up aud 
make the shortest possible stop. Horses 
can stop themselves quicker at the word 
than the most stalwart driver can stop them 
by aid of the lines. A turnout square across 
the track or the turn of a truck at a corner 
can be taught in a similar manner and has 
the same advantages. Teams driven in this 
manner do not fret themselves, are always 
ready for the driver's voice and seem to en- 
joy obeying orders. As a rule such teams 
do a greater amount of work without falling 
off in condition, than those driven in the 
ordinary manner. 

Whether it is possible to introduce re- 
forms in driving car horses appears ques- 
tionable. If an attempt is made to improve 
the class of men employed, it can be done. 
If the men are to remain but one remove 
from the day laborer, it is useless to think 
of any scheme which calls for any exercise 
of intelligence. 



Subjects for Discussion at the Next Con- 
vention. 

The subjects for consideration at the 
Street Railway Convention of 1887 in Phila- 
delphia, are as follows: "Electric Motive 
Power;" "Cable Motive Power;" "All 
Other Kinds of Motive Power;" "Practical 
Devices Looking Towards Economy in 
Street Railway Practice ;" "Mutual Insur- 
ance for Street Railway Companies," and 
" Track Construction." 



Much valuable matter is crowded out to 
make room for our Convention report. 



November, 1886. 



THE STKEET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



17 



Stephenson's Broadway Car. 

The John Stephenson Co. are building 
some new cars for the Broadway line in New 
York, that embody the latest improvements 
in car construction. They are of the nar- 
row seven foot width pattern in use upon 
that road, and have the same coloring as the 
old cars. One of the most recent improve- 
ments introduced is in the drawbar. It is 
a spring bar, so that the team is not oblig- 
ed to make a dead pull against an unyield- 
ing load when starting the car. It has also 
a clip hook that holds the ring of the whif- 
fletree in place, but may be raised by the 
driver with his foot, when he wishes to de- 
tach the team. Beyond the hook proper 
there is a buffer that serves the double pur- 
pose of protecting the car a gainst other cars 
that are run into it, and of affording a place 
upon which the whiffletree rests, and is held 
from the ground at all times, so that it 
never drags upon the ground and the traces 
are not trailing under the horse's feet. 

Instead of the wooden strip that has 
lately been put upon the dasher to afford a 
comfortable leaning place for standing pas- 
sengers, and which following horses delight 
to gnaw, a strip of brass of the same shape 
is fastened. The brake handle is of the 
kind that allows the brakes to be set with- 
out making a complete revolution, as we 
have already described it in a previous 
number. 

The running gear has super springs and 
the rubber track cleaner, both of which we 
will illustrate in a future issue and there- 
fore refrain from further particulars at 
present. 

In the interior, the decorations are plain 
finished natural woods (mahogany and 
maple.) The windows are large with me- 
tallic frames and the stiles projecting under 
the exterior casing so tha t from the outside 
there is really nothing to be seen but the 
glass. The windows are prevented from 
rattling by a spring attached to the side. 

The end windows are made to drop, and 
that in the door also. The bullseye lights 
are surrounded by a piece of clear glass 
bearing the word " Battery " in black let- 
ters. The car has the Stephenson ventilat- 
ed ceiling and the telephone bell pull, so 
that the passenger can signal the car to 
stop without moving from the seat or wait- 
ing to attract the attention of the con- 
ductor. 

Another feature outside the car proper, 
is the matting. It is made of rubber, and 
laid in squares in such shape that it can be 
readily changed about to bring an even 
wear upon all parts. The squares are per- 
forated in such a way that coins cannot get 
out of reach when dropped upon the floor. 

The cars when we saw them, were ready 
deli very. 

Personal. 

Thos. Lowrey, of Minneapolis, is in 
Europe. 

J. B. Hauna, of Cleveland, is in Colorado. 
Daingerfield Deaderick f of Nashville, is 
in California, 



Convention Briefs. 

WUlson's new brake was pronounced 
practical. 

The new grip shown by W. B. Andresat 
tracted much attention. 

Cable roads were a good deal discussed, 
and the Cincinnati road attracted much at- 
tention. 

A special car was chartered by F. T. 
Lerned and carried a party of Eastern gen- 
tlemen to the convention. 

Thenames.of H. M. Watson and Charles 
Cleminshaw were mentioned for the presi- 
ding office the ensuing year. 

J. G. Brill & Co. exhibited several new 
patents, improved devices.in the street rail- 
way line, descriptions of which will appear 
in a future issue of this paper. 

The Cincinnati, Covington and Newport 
street railway companies entertained 
their guests, the delegates and their friends, 
in a very handsome manner. 

Charles Cleminshaw, of Troy, so well 
known as a street railroad man, is also a 
member of the firm of H. C. Curtis & Co., 
manufacturing the celebrated " C. & C." 
collars and cuffs. 

The increased number of exhibits ap- 
pearing would seem to substantiate the 
prediction made by the Street Railwai 
Journal a year ago that this yearly show 
of improved devices is destined to assume 
large proportions. New ideas expressed in 
models and samples are as valuable to live 
delegates as those expressed in words on 
the floor of the convention. 

New Publications, 

We have received from President H. M. 
Watson a new edition of the official time- 
table of Buffalo Street Railroad and Buf- 
falo East Side Railway. It is a neat little 
book, containing full information about the 
street car routes of the city, also other in- 
formation concerning the railroads, and a 
directory of the streets of the city. 

The Fourth Avenue Line have exper- 
ienced so much competition, on the part 
of the elevated railroad, since the fares have 
been cut down to five cents, that they have 
added 44 more cars to those that run during 
the day. This gives a headway from one 
minute to one minute and a half during the 
whole day. It seems to be the intention 
of the compauy to have so many cars on 
this line, that whenever a person crosses 
the avenue, there will always be a car ap- 
proaching him within a block, so that there 
will be an inducement to take a street line, 
rather than walk to the elevated station. 
The delay iu putting the cars on after men 
had been engaged, and the cars had been 
promised to them, caused some complaint 
iu the morning papers, but the new sched- 
ule was posted on the afternoon of the day 
the complaint appeared, and the employ- 
ees found therefore, that they had really 
nothing to complain of. 

The Chaplin Manufacturing Co. have 
issued a new illustrated catalogue of 
their roller bearings, showing its adap- 
tability to street, steam and hand cars, car- 
riages, traveling cranes, and other places 
where it is desirable to haul heavy load- 
with a light draft. 



Notes and Items. 

Akron, O. 

The Akron St. Ry. & Herdio Co. will 
add two miles of track to their present 
road, next year. 

AHentown, Pa. 

Mr. A. T. Brown has succeeded Edwin 
Yeager as Superintendent of the Alleutown 
Pass. R. R. Co. 

Allegheny City, l*a. 

The Federal Street & Pleasant Val- 
ley Pass. Ry. Co. have added two cars 
and fifteen horses to their equipment. 
No more additions will be made at present. 

Altoona, 1'a. 

The City Pass. Ry. Co. have laid a 45 
lb. rail over some portions of their road, and 
increased the number of horses to forty. 

Albany, N. Y. 

The Watervliet Turnpike & R. R. Co. 
have added six cars and seven horses to their 
equipment since our last report. Mr. C 
Tremper has also succeeded Mr. P. Way as 
Secretarv and Treasurer. 

The Albany Railway report 14 miles of 
track, 54 cars aud 232 horses. The officers 
of last year were re-elected at their recent 
annual meeting. 

Atchison, Kan. 

The Atchison St. Ry. Co. have now nine 
miles of track. Geo. W. Carpenter is Gen. 
Superintendent. 

Augusta, tin. 

Frank E. Pettit has been added to our 
list of officers, as Auditor of Augusta & 
Summerville R. R. Co. 

Baltimore, Md. 

The North Baltimore Pass. Ry. Co. 
have now twenty-one miles of road in op- 
eration. 

Poole & Hunt are furnishing a large 
amount of machinery for four extension 
cable roads. 

The People's Ry. Co. have now 10j miles 
of track, and are using 45 and 47 lb. rail. 
T. Edward Hambleton is now President; 
the other officers remain as heretofore. 

The Central Ry. Co. report the same 
mileage and officers as before, and no im- 
provements in contemplation before next 
spring. 

The Baltimore Union Pass. Ry. Co. are 
extending their track one mile to the City 
Hall. 

The Baltimore City Pass. Ry. Co. are 
now operating 44 miles of track, with 151 
cars and 1,051 horses. J. M. Blandell has 
charge of the car shops and Boyer Parks 
of the roadway. 

Geo. V. Keen is Treasurer of the Citi- 
zens' Ry. Co. 

Beatrice, Neb. 

The Beatrice St. Ry. Co. is running with 
the following equipment and officers. The 
road is four miles long, of 4' 8|" gauge, and 
is laid with 25 lbs. rail. Four cars are used 
aud 20 horses are owned. Mr. J. D. Kil- 
patriek is President and J. C. Smith Su- 
perintendent and Purchasing Agent. 



18 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Novembeb, 1886 



Birmingham, Ala. 

The East Lake Land Co. are building a 
road 7 miles long, to be operated by mot- 
ors. It is expected that it will be opened 
in January. Robert Jennison is President 
and S. M. Hanley is Secretary. 

The personnel of the Highland Ave. E. E. 
jCo. has been somewhat changed since our 
ast report. Mr. W. J. Milner, formerly 
Superintendent, is now Manager, and J. M. 
Lens is Superintendent. H. Schoel is Engi- 
neer and H. M. Caldwell, President. 
Boone, Iowa. 

Twin City & Des Moines Eivee Motor 
St. Ry. Co. have now six miles of track laid 
with 20 lb. rail. They contemplate making 
extensions of from two to five miles in length 
to reach the coal mines; when it is antici- 
pated that it will be the best paying road 
in the State. In time it is the intention of 
the management to reorganize under the 
railroad laws, making the company a rail- 
road company. 

The Boone & Boonesbobo St. Ey. Co. 
remain exactly the same in officers and 
equipment as during last year. 

Boston, Mass. 

The Lynn & Boston E. E. Co. have in- 
creased their mileage to 37 miles, and their 
stock to 748 horses and 175 cars. 

William P. Harvey is now Secretary of 
the Metropolitan Co. in the stead of H. E. 
Harding, heretofore reported. 

The SoMEEviiiLE Horse E. E. Co. and 
the Boston & Chelsea Co. are both operated 
by the Boston Consolidated Street Ey. Co. 
The Boston Consolidated Street Ey. Co. 
will continue to build the expensive and 
elegant cars formerly used on the Highland 
line, maintaining the system of external 
plaiding that was there used. 

Ezra H. Baker has succeeded James C. 
Davis as Vice-President of the South Boston 
Ey. Co. 

The Metbopolitan Steeee Railway Co. 
have the new shop on Bartlett street nearly 
completed. It stands in the rear of their 
present storehouse and stable at that place 
and the main building is 350 by 100 feet, 
three stories, boiler house 38 by 60, foun- 
dry 40 by 80. The first floor of the main 
building will be used for blacksmith shop, 
machine shop, and engine room, the sec- 
ond floor for painting room and construc- 
tion room, and wood-working machinery 
and carpenter work will be done on the 
third floor. 

The engine, boilers and a few large tools 
are uninjured from the fire and will be used 
in the new plant. 

The second floor of the main building 
will be connected by a bridge to the same 
floor of the storehouse, giving an additional 
floor space of 220 by 180 feet. 

The company are laying the Eichards 
girder rail on Harrison avenue, which is now 
being double tracked two miles, making 
about six miles of new track this year, in- 
cluding the new " First Section " in East 
Boston, which is a new line just opened con- 
necting the ferries, Cunard wharf, and Jef- 
freys point. 

Oar building is now conducted in the 



storehouse, where 22 new cars have been 
built since the fire, and besides the usual 
repair work they have a capacity of about 
10 new cars a month; 24 snow plows are to 
be built, and Eandall's patent "Jumbo" 
snow shovel, which was completed last sea- 
son too late to be used, and was burned with 
the shop, will be at once reproduced for 
service this season. 

The Consolidated Eaileoad Co. have 
already had some interviews with the dis- 
satisfied employees-. It seems that the lat- 
ter must have been very harshly treated, 
inasmuch as they were enabled to find 27 
cases of complaint, which were submitted 
to President Powers, in the form of a series 
of resolutions, while the preamble demand- 
ed that tLe company should acquiesce 
in these resolutions within one week. 
President Powers referred the matter to the 
Directors, and the latter promptly returned 
complete power into his hands. The de- 
mands of conductors and drivers were that 
they should receive $2 a day for 10 hours 
work, and that this 10 hours work should 
be done within a limit of 12 consecutive 
hours. Further, that the men going to 
work before 6 o'clock in the morning should 
have at least one hour for breakfast and one 
hour for dinner, and those going to work 
between 6 and 8 o'clock in the morning, 
shall have at least one hour and a half for 
dinner. That all extra work shall be paid 
for at the rate of 25 cents per hour. Then 
there were resolutions regarding the pur- 
chase of uniforms at whatever place the 
employees should see fit, that the officers 
should not keep boarding houses, etc, etc., 
to the end of the twenty-seven resolutions. 
Some of them were of course so absurd that 
they could not be considered, whereas 
where they were just in their demaud, Pre- 
sident Powers has granted them without a 
demur. 

Binghamton, N. V. 

Ira J. Meagley has succeeded G. O. Eoot 
as Secretary of the Washington Street 
& State Asylum E. E. Co. 

Burlington, la. 

The Buelington City E. R. Co. keep four 
cars in constant use, hold five in reserve 
for emergencies. 

Brenliaui, Tex. 

To the list of officers of Brenham Street 
E. E. Co. we add F. Krentzliu as Vice- 
President, and E. B. Eandle as Manager. 
Brockton, Mass. 

C. E. Fillerbrown has succeeded Z. C. 
Keith as Treasurer of the Brockton Street 
Ey. Co. 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

The Chaplin Eolleb Beaeing Co. re- 
port that they have recently shipped orders 
to the City of Buenos Ayres Tramway Co.; 
Central Pass. E. E. Co. of Louisville, Ky. , 
and to J. M. Jones' Sons, West Troy, N. Y. 
This latter firm is building the twenty new 
cars for the Boston Consolidated St. Ey. 
Co., which will be of the elegant pattern 
introduced by the Highland St. Ey. Co. 
previous to the consolidation. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

The following is a list of the officers of 
the Brooklyn City and Newtown E. E. Co. : 



Pres. Col. John N. Partridge; Sec. ad 
Treasurer, Duncan B. Cannon; Supt. John 
L. Heins. The number of horses is now 
400 instead of 410 as heretofore. 

In March last Pres. Richardson of the 
Atlantic Ave. E. E. applied to the Com- 
mon Council for permission to substitute a 
cable for horses on the Park avenue line, 
part of which is already built and the rest 
in the course of construction. 

The aldermen favored cable railways and 
granted the permit at once. The Corpora- 
tion Counsel, however, found that the City 
Fathers had been a little too premature, as 
the law required the change to be advertis- 
ed for fourteen days. Mr. Eichardson, 
fearing that the work on his road might be 
delayed because of the legal point raised, at 
once began to advertise the fact of the pro- 
posed change. Before the expiration of the 
fourteen days, however, the Common Coun- 
cil adjourned for its summer vacation. 

This caused another long delay and over- 
sights and technicalities delayed the final 
approval of the Council far beyond the 
necessary limit of time. The resolutions 
have, however, had their final presentation 
to the board, they have been found to be 
all right and Mayor Whitney has affixed his 
signature to them. 

The right thus extended affects the At- 
lantic Avenue and the Prospect Park and 
Coney Island Eailroad companies. 

To begin with the substitution will be 
made on but a small section and a fair 
chance will be given to see how the system 
works. Should the verdicl be favorable 
it will be extended over the entire route. 
Mr. Eichardson claims that .he Johnson 
girder plan of cable traction, which he pro- 
poses to use, is the best yet tried and that 
it will recommend itself to the public as an 
easy solution of the rapid transit problem. 
The first test is to be made on Park avenue 
from Washington avenue to Broadway. 

The City Works Commissioner, under 
the resolutions, is authorized to issue a per- 
mit to the railroad company to open the 
streets after the company has given a bond 
in the sum of $50,000 "that it will pave and 
keep narmless the city of Brooklyn from 
all damages or injury caused by the 
adaptation or maintenance of the road • 
caused by any interference of said com- 
pany, its lessees, contractors, agents or em- 
ployees with the streets, water pipes or 
sewers." The resolutions were signed in 
I the morning, and in the afternoon Mr. Eich- 
ardson filed with the Corporation Counsel 
an indemnity bond for $50,000 which was 
signed by himself as President and N. N. 
Frost as Treasurer of the Atlantic Avenue 
Eailroad Company. Plans of the works are 
already in the hands of the Chief Engineer 
of the City Works Department and the ap- 
plication for a permit has been made. With- 
in sixty days Mr. Eichardson expects to 
demonstrate to the people of power the 
superiority of cable traction as a means of 
locomotion over all others. 

If this is done Mr. Eichardson's road will 
simply be the first step towards the gener- 
al introduction of the cable system in Brook- 
lyn. The other companies are only waiting 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



19 



to see the result of the scheme. President 
Hazard, of the Brooklyn City Railroad, is 
strongly in favor of the cable system, and 
if the Park avenue venture proves a success 
he will probably follow in Mr. Richardson's 
wake. 

In his argument in favor of the cable 
railway Mr. Richardson presents some in- 
teresting facts. In the first place, he claims 
that the abolishment of horses is a sanitary 
necessity. The Atlantic avenue road uses 
1,361 horses in pulling its cars over the 
route, and he estimates that these horses 
contribute 2,200 tons of filth to the street. 
The Brooklyn City Railroad, with its 3,200 
horses, adds 6,400 more tons to this amount. 
This, of course, is detrimental to the health 
of the city. The introduction of the cable 
system will do away with this. 

Unless something interferes the work on 
the Park avenue road will be continued this 
month. 

After seeing the various systems in oper- 
ation in New York, Chicago, Cleveland and 
other cities, Mr. Richardson decided that 
the Johnson system was the most practic- 
able. Thomas L. Johnson, the inventor, 
is a member of the Street Railway Associa- 
tion and President of the lines in Cleve- 
land, O. , and Indianapolis, Ind. His sys- 
tem differs from those first in use. The 
cars run by two parallel wire ropes, locat- 
ed an inch apart and connected at intervals 
of six inches by drop forged steel links. 
This is carried on rollers in a conduit a few 
inches below the street's surface, running 
the entire length of the line. The chain 
gears with a toothed wheel carried by the 
car which replaces the grip of other sys- 
tems. The wheel is attached below the 
center of the car and revolves on an axis 
that is elevated or depressed by the oper- 
ator of the car, raising the wheel from or 
lowering it into the slot of the conduit. By 
a wheel on the platform the operator is en- 
abled to apply a brake acting on the gear 
wheel, which retards the hitter's action and 
completely stops its rotation when suffi- 
ciently applied. When this is done the 
car moves at the speed of the cable. By 
applying the brake gradually the car can be 
started without the jerking motion. The 
system is a new one and has not been used 
on any other line as yet. A trial line of 
one-tenth of a mile was built in Cleveland, 
O., and it was there that Mr. Richardson, 
in company with Mr. Hazzard, saw it work. 
The test was sufficient to show the practi- 
cal operation of the system. 

The Brooklyn City Railroad has added 
seventy-four cars and 164 horses to their 
equipment since we received their last re- 
port. 

The Brooklyn Crosstown ^Ry. Co. are 
adding new heaters to their cars, of the 
Lewis & Fowler make. 

There has been an indignation meeting 
at Fiatbush, to get something out of the 
Brooklyn, Coney Island, and Fiatbush 
Railroad Co. 's one horse car line between 
Windsor Terrace and Parkville. The claim 
is that the residents between the City line 
and Parkville, are poorly served, they are 



dumped out into the weather, into a disa- 
greeable waiting room, and obliged to wait 
the pleasure of a dispatcher. The case as 
far as we can see, seems to be somewhat ex- 
aggerated, and the railroad company are 
not so altogether negligent as the indig- 
nant parties claim. 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

The Railway Register Manufacturing 
Co., Beadle & Courtney, general agents, 
are tasked to their utmost capacity to fill 
orders for bell launches, which would not 
seem to indicate that the "trip slip'Mevice 
was waning in popularity. 

Cambridge, Mass. 

The consolidation that took effect Octo- 
ber 1, removes the Charles River Street 
Ry. Co. from our list of roads. 

Cedar Unplds, la. 

Secretary N. B. Consigny, of the Cedar 
Rapids & Marion Ry., writes that they 
have recently been extending their city 
lines on Sixteenth street, for about three- 
quarters of a mile. He also announces the 
death of Mr. O. T. Richmond, the Vice 
President of the company. 

Charleston, S. C. 

The Enterprise R. R. Co. have 15 miles 
of track, and are running 25 passenger and 
10 freight cars with 95 horses. 

Chicago, III. 

The Chicago City Ry. Co. are now run- 
ning 90 miles of tracks. They are using 
1,600 horses beside the cable, and run 697 
cars. 

The Union Electric Co. shipped on Oct. 
25 a car load of electrical apparatus to 
Kansas City for the use of the Kansas City 
Street Railroad. The electrician of the 
road, Prof. Henry, expects to have his Fifth 
street line in operation inside of two weeks. 

The Electric Elevated Ry.Co. has been 
licensed in this city, with a capital stock of 
$5,000,000, to construct and operate elec- 
tric railways in Chicago and Cook county, 
corporators, Charles W. Rigdon, Silas S. 
Willard, George P. Everhart. 

Cincinnati, O. 

The Cincinnati St. Ry. Co. report 96 
miles of track laid with 42 and 52 lb. rail, 
250 cars and 2,000 horses. The road is un- 
der the same management as last year. 
They further expect to begin work on the 
construction of two cable roads next 
spring. 
Cleveland, O. 

The Brooklyn St. R. R. Co. have added 
four miles to their roadway, four cars and 
27 horses, since our last report from them^ 

Cortlandt, N. Y. 

B. B. Terry has succeeded S. E. Welch 
as Superintendent of the Cortlandt & Hom- 
er Horse Railroad Co. Mr. Welch retains 
his position as Secretary and Treasurer 
which he formerly held in conjunction with 
that of Superintendent. 

Cleveland, O. 

The East Cleveland Co. have in- 
creased the weight of the rail they are now 
using to 45 lbs., all steel. They have at 
present 570 horses. 



Danville, III. 

The Citizens' St. Ry. Co. are about to 
purchase some new cars to be delivered in 
the spring. They have added one-half mile 
of track since their last report. 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

The present board of officers of Des 
Moines Street R. R. Co., as just handed in, 
is as follows: President, M. McCain; Vice- 
President, C. W. Rogg; Secretary, F. A. 
Sherman; Treasurer, G. B. Hippee. 

Dayton, O. 

The Wayne & Fifth St. R. R. Co. have 
added one new car to their equipment, and 
propose to relay a part of their track with 
new rails. 

Denver, Col. 

The Denver City Ry. Co. have added 
eight miles of track, fourteen cars and 
eighty-two horses to their equipment dur- 
ing the past year. 

Ean Claire, Wis. 

The Eau Claire St. Ry. Co. are now op- 
erating four miles of road, laid with rails 
weighing 27 lbs. to the yard. They have 
sixteen cars and seventy horses. The offi- 
cers are : President, A. G. Bradstreet, New 
York; Secretary and Treasurer, Weston 
Lewis, Gardiner, Me. ; and Vice President, 
George B. Shaw, Eau Claire. 

Fort Smith, Ark. 

The Fort Smith St. Ry. Co. are using 
mules instead of horses as heretofore re- 
ported. 

Haverhill, Mass. 

The Pentucket Street Ry. Co. has gone 
out of existence, or as our correspondent 
puts it, "has all blown over." 

Hutchinson, Kan. 

The Hutchinson St. Ry. Co. report two 
miles of track with four cars and 24 horses. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 

We are informed by Mr. Henry S. Ely, 
Secretary and Manager of the Pine Street 
R. R., that the report that G. A. Buck- 
instea was the owner of the road is erro- 
neous. The gentleman in question never 
owned any of the stock, and his only inter- 
est was that of lessee for two years. The 
officers of the road are as they always have 
been: President, S. B. Hubbard; Vice- 
President, S. M. Schumacher; Treasurer, 
J. C. Greeley; Secretary and Manager, H. 
S. Ely. 

London, Eng. 

The North Metropolitan Tramway Co. 
now runs every Thursday afternoon over 
its line, from Stratford Church to Manor 
Park, an electric locomotive and car; and 
as soon as the necessary legislative powers 
can be obtained, regular trips will be made 
and ^passengers carried. This is the first 
serious attempt that has been made in Lon- 
don to use electricity as a motive power for 
cars or tramways. The company is tho- 
roughly satisfied with its experiments, and 
is proceeding with the manufacture of elec- 
tric locomotives. The speed is about the 
same as that of the ordinary horse-car, and 
the cost of maintenance is about 40 per 
cent, lower than on the present tram-car 
system, the saving effected being estimated 



2G 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886 



at over $250,000 per anuum in the case of a 
single company. 

Lockport, N. Y. 

The iron has arrived from Dansville, Pa., 
for the new street railway. Opposition to 
the scheme is dying out. 

New Brunswick, N. J. 

New Brunswick Street Railway Co. 
opened their roads on Oct. 14th, and cele- 
brated the event by carrying passengers al- 
the afternoon about the city free. 

N ew York. 

The Chambers Street and Grand Street 
Ferry R. R. are preparing to enter their 
new offices at Tenth and Cherry streets. 
At present they are in the building of the 
Broadway and Seventh Avenue R. R. at 
Fiftieth street. 

A hearing has been granted by the Rail- 
road Committee of the Board of Aldermen 
for arguments in favor of the Fultou Street 
cross-town road, but no decision has been 
reached. N. S. Smith and Homer Nelson 
appeared for the road. There was no op- 
position. 

The Railroad Committee of the board 
have reported in favor of granting a fran- 
chise to the Twenty -eighth and Twenty- 
ninth street cross-town line uuder the re- 
striction of the act of 1884 as amended by 
the Cantor act. 

The Proposed Fulton St. Line com- 
prises a plan proposed by the North and 
East River Railroad Co. to connect the 
Fulton, Chambers, and Cortlandt street fer- 
ries. It is proposed to lay a double track 
and permit the Bleecker street line to run 
through Fulton street to Broadway. 

The John Stephenson Co. are building- 
cars for the New Britai i Tramway Co. of 
New Britain, Conn., (he Christopher street 
and Broadway lines iu New York and the 
Waterbury Co. of Waterbury, Conn. 

The Railroad Committee of the Board of 
Aldermen have reported iu favor of the 
cross-town surface road through Twenty- 
eighth and Twenty-ninth streets. Also iu 
favor of the application from the St. Nich- 
olas Avenue Cross-town Railroad Co. for 
permission to lay tracks on One Hundred 
and Sixteenth street and almost every street 
above that to One Huudredaud Thirty-fifth 
street. 

There has been a growl from the resi- 
dents along the Hue of the Ninth Avenue 
surface railway, because no through cars 
are run on the Eighth or Ninth Avenue af- 
ter 11 o'clock in the eveuing. The growler 
claims that even though the company should 
run these cars at a loss, they ought to be 
compelled to do so, on account of the profit 
they make during the day, aud the accom- 
modation which it would be to the few per- 
sons who would care to travel at that late 
hour. 

The Board of Aldermeu have come to the 
conclusion, that the car drivers shall re- 
ceive b.ick the amount paid by them for 
their licenses under the unconstitutional 
ordinance passed by the Aldermen over the 
Mayor's veto. The board recently passed 



a resolution requesting the Board of Esti- 
mate and Apportionment to appropriate a 
sufficient sum to make a repayment. 

A motion which, it is said, has been pend- 
ing since December 1875, for the appoint- 
ment of Commissioners of Appraisal to de- 
termine the amount of compeusation to be 
paid to the city of New York for the right 
to use such of the streets and avenues as 
are proposed to be occupied by the lines of 
the elevated and other railroads projected 
by the Metropolitan Transit Company, 
came before Judge Donohue in Supreme 
Court, Chambers. Many well-known 
lawyers were present, representing the 
city, the elevated railroads, the Broadway 
aud Seventh Avenue Railroad, the New 
York District Railway Company and the 
New York Arcade Railway Company. The 
motion was adjourned to suit the conven- 
e uce of counsel for the petitioner. 

The Metropolitan Transit Company 
claims to be organized under chapter 832 
of the laws of 1872, and chapter 636 of the 
laws of 1881. It proposes to construct and 
operate various lines of railroad, both ele- 
vated, underground or depressed, and sus- 
pended. Exactly what kind of a railroad 
is intended by a "suspended" railroad does 
not distinctly appear from the papers in 
the case. The main line is to run from 
Broadway, oppositeBowling Green, through 
private property to Church street, thence 
through Church to Canal street, thence 
mainly through private property to Seventh 
avenue, near Christopher street, aud thence 
through Seventh avenue, Thirty-seventh 
street, Eighth avenue, Fifty-fifth street, 
Broadway and Sixty-third street, to a point 
about two hundred feet west of Ninth 
avenue, thence parallel with Ninth avenue 
through private property to One Hundred 
and Seventy-filth street, and theuce to the 
Harlem River. This is the main line, and 
iu addition there are several I tranches. One 
'•branch" is to run from the Harlem River 
at Kingsbridge, along the Kingsbridge 
road to the Boulevard, through the Boule- 
vard to Tenth avenue, through Tenth 
avenue to West street and along West to 
Morris street, and thence to Church street 
to connect with the main line there. An- 
other "branch" is to run from the mainline 
at Eighth avenue and Forty-third street, 
through Forty-third street to Eleventh 
avenue and Fifty-ninth street, where it is to 
connect with the tracks of the Hudson 
River Railroad. 

But the line which will probably chiefly 
interest the public is the "branch" which 
is projected to connect with the main line 
at Chambers and Church streets, and wnich 
then is to run through Chambers street to 
Broadway, thence through Broadway to 
Forty- third street, down Forty-third street 
to the Grand Central Depot. The plans for 
this line are for an elevated railroad with a 
double track, one over each Broadway curb- 
stone. 

The Third Avenue Railroad Co. are 
rapidly completing their crosstown line 
through 125th street, to the East river, aud 
the cars will be runuing shortly. The man- 
agers are keeping a sharp look out for a 
suitable and economical method of propul- 
sion, for the street cars to be used on the 
Third Avenue line between the City Hall 
and Harlem. They state that they are con- 
vinced of the economy of motors over 
horses, and are understood to be carefully 
searching for a desirable system. They 
state that they have now received the most 
serious blow that can be dealt them by the 
elevated railroad, as they now know the 



exact extent to which the overhead compe- 
tition will affect their receipts. They dis- 
claim all ideas of reducing their fares to three 
cents, -and maintain that the road can still 
be made to pay, with the same fares that 
the elevated railroad is charging. 

The directors of the Manhattan ' elevated 
railroad having ascertained that five cent 
fares on the Second, Third and Ninth Ave- 
nue lines are such an absolute success, have 
decided to reduce the fares upon the Sixth 
Avenue line to five cents, upon Nov. 1st. 

Superintendent White of the Dry Dock, 
East Broadway, and Battery Railroad Com- 
pany has j ust finished building a horse car 
that will dazzle the residents of the east 
side. The roof is covered with plates of 
fancy decoration in gold and silver panel. 
The passengers may sit and gaze at gor- 
geous poppies.kingfishers with golden wings 
and radiant birds of paradise. Over the 
windows, where the advertisements gener- 
ally are, are plate glass mirrors, and the ven- 
tilating windows are of stained glass. All 
the metal work is nickel plated. The car 
is 135, aud will be put on the Grand street 
line. Mr. White will next try his hand in 
making a car with opera chairs on the sides, 
which w,ll fold up when unoccupied. — Ex. 

The John Stephenson Co. are now de- 
livering the second load of 50 cars to the 
Broadway Railroad, making one hundred 
of the style of which a section was exhibit- 
ed at Cincinnati convention. The foimer 
load of Stephenson's cars have been running 
on the road for a year. 
Ogdentsburc, N. V. 

The officers of the Ogdensburg Street 
Railway Co. are as follows: President, W. 
H. Daniels; Treasurer, W. A. Egert; Sec- 
retary, E. A. Newell. They are operating 
5 miles of rond with 6 cars and 18 horses. 

Paducab, Ky. 

The Park R. R. Co. , reported to exist at 
this place, does not exist. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Messrs. Hale &Kilburn report that they 
have orders from the Chicago West Divis- 
ion Railway Co. and Chicago City Railway 
Co. for seventy-five cars of their spring 
seats; also twenty-five cars of spring seats 
(Broadway pattern) from the Pullman Pal- 
ace Car Co. 

J. G. Brill & Co. have just shipped two 
large orders of cars to South America and 
an order of twelve cars to Costa Rica. To 
one man in South America they have now 
sold 330 cars. 

Scranton, Pa. 

The Scranton Suburban Ry. Co. will 
not be opened before Nov. 15, instead of 
on the 1st, as originally anticipated. 
St. Paul, Minn. 

A. L. Scott, Superintendent of St. Paul 
St. Railway, speaking of lameness in horses, 
says he has used on sixty different animals 
with success Gombault's Caustic Balsam. 
Syracuse. N. Y. 

The officers of the Syracuse and South 
Bay Street Ry. Co. are : President, H. 
McGonegal; Vice-President, W. S. Wales; 
Treasurer, A. E. Mathews; Secretary, 
James C. Rann. The office is in Room C 
of the Wieting Block. 

The Wales Manufacturing Co. have 
just shipped a second lot of fare boxes to 
the new electric road at Appleton, Wis. 
Tney are also supplying the boxes for the 
new electric road at Montgomery, Ala. 
Have new orders from Philadelphia and 
Washington Territory. Report business 
good. 

Wichita, Kan. 

The RrvERSiDE and Suburban Ry. Co. 
has been organized, with J. O. Davidson as 
President and N. G. Lee as Secretary. The 
capital stock is $100,000. Work has been 
commenced upon the roadway, and it is in- 
tended to open in January. 



November, 1886. 



21 



A Stove Box. 

We illustrate one of several styles of stove 
boxes* to protect the woodwork of the car, 
and the passengers, from the direct action 
of the heat and stove, as they are used iu 
heating street railway cars. The design we 
illustrate shows the construction very ac- 
curately; and the simplicity of the device 
will be very apparent to all. It consists of 
a wooden box placed in the center of the 
car, occupying the place of one or more 
seats, according to the size of the heater 
used, and is handsomely polished on the 
outside; it has sheet iron trimmings, which 



sertion. A great many business men as well 
as others do most of their reading on their 
way to and from business, and in almost 
every instance the passenger will read, pro- 
vided lie can see his paper at all, and con- 
sequently a well lighted car is invariably 
well patronized. Eegarding the injury to 
the eyesight from the jolting of the car, 
when the car is poorly lighted, it is to a 
certain extent hurtful. But when a car is 
properly and thoroughly lighted the strain 
on the eye is thereby avoided. Passengers 
of street railway cars of twenty or even 
ten years ago used to be annoyed contin- 
ually by miserably lighted and ventilated 



A Street Car Replacer. 

We illustrate in this connection a very 
simple device* that has been introduced for 
the purpose of replacing street cars that 
have left the track and to derail them 
where it becomes necessary to haul them 
off the track. The mechanism is shown 
in perspective in section and in plan in our 
engraving. It consists of a light cast-iron 
plate, with a frog cast upon it, and may be 
placed so as to catch the flange as it lies 
outside of the rail, lifting it over the same 
into place, or it may be reversed and catch 
it so as to carry it up and out,thus throwing 





STREET CAR REPLACER. 

the car into the street. It weighs about 
twelve pounds, and may be readily carried 
in the car, under the seat or on the plat- 
form, wherever it is convenient for driver 
or conductor. 
*Pugli tt, Russell, Stewart Building, New York. 



LEWIS & FOWLER'S STOVE BOX. 



are ornamented to a greater or less extent, 
according to the expense which is to be 
lavished upon it. It is merely a fire screen 
and its true design is readily seen from the 
engraving. 

'Lewis & Fowler, Mrg. Co., 27 to 35 Walwortli St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Street Car Lighting. 

Editor Street Railway Journal : Your 
article in the October number on Lighting 
is to my mind a decided mistake, as a street 
car of the present day is not by any means 
considered complete unless well lighted 
either by one or two center lamps, and 
many street railroad companies are even 
using three. A brilliantly lighted car is 
not only attractive in appearance, but in- 
variably causes an increased traffic, con- 
siderably more than is sufficient to pay the 
additional expense. The constantly increas- 
ing demand for more light in all classes of 

asaenger cars substantiates the above as- 



cars, the lamp which would dimly flicker at 
one time, and then suddenly yield a length 
of flame that went cavorting through the 
lamp chimney to the roof of the car, caus- 
iug timid passengers to hold their breath, 
jump to their feet or remain in a state of 
constant fear, while requently the odor of 
unconsumed carbon pouring down upon 
the traveler and the odor of the kerosene 
was simply intolerable. 

Enterprising railroad companies have 
now remedied this evil. But those, like the 
old Bourbons, who never learn anything, 
still annoy their patrons with insufficiently 
lighted cars. A revolution has occurred in 
this matter within a few years, however, 
a d the change, I claim, is due entirely to 
the genius and enterprise of the late Wil- 
lard H. Smith, the well known manufactur- 
er of railroad car lamps and reflectors; 
and the street car of to-day is not com- 
plete without the latest and most approved 
lighting. And railway companies find it 
profitable as well. Chas. G. Smith 



Car Licenses in New York City. 

The city sued the Third Avenue Railroad 
Company to recover an annual license fee of 
$20 a car from the company for each and 
every car run during the busiest season of 
the year. Many years ago effort was made 
to compel the rond to pay the license fee of 
$50 a car prescribed by the horse car or- 
dinance. The Court of Appeals, however, 
held that that particular license fee could 
not be recovered from this company, which 
had received its charter before the ordin- 
ance was passed. The city then claimed 
that the road should pay the license fee of 
$20 each for each car, being the amount of 
license fee exacted from stages or omni- 
buses at the time the road was chartered. 
The la ignaueof thegranc provided that the 
Third Avenue road should "pay, from the 
date of opening the railroad, the annua 
license fee, for each car, now allowed by 
law." 

Judge Lawrence has sustained this claim 
after elaborate argument, the c ise being 
tried for the defendants by John E. Parsons, 
James P. Lowery, Charles C. Applegate 
and Edward Lauterbach. and for the city 
by Corporation Counsel Lacombe. 

The amount of judgment to be entered 
under this decision is $49,000. And the de- 
cision controls a further action for $40,000, 
covering the fees down to and including the 
year 1881, and will also, if sustained, carry 
fees iit the rate of $20 a car for all subse- 
quent years. 



22 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



NoVEMBEB, 1886 



STREET RAILWAYS 

IK THE UNITED JJTATES & CANADA. 

Compiled from data furnished the editors of "The 
Street Railway Journal, "by the officers 
of the various roads. 

Abbreviations— m, miles; g, gauge; lbr, pounds 
rail to the yard; c, cars; h, horses; mu, mules. 

Officers' addresses are the same postoffice as the 
company unless otherwise specified. 

AKRON, O.— Akron St. Ry. & nerdic Co. 2% m> 
6c, 31 h. Pres. Ira M. Miller, V. Pres. James Chrlstyi 
Treas. B. I,. Hodge, Sec. F. M. Atterholt, supt. John 
T. Metlln. 

ALBANY, N. Y Watervllet Turnpike & R. R. 

Co. 15 m, 4-8% g, 28-4."> lb. r, 31 c, 150 h. Pres. Chas. 
Newman, V. Pres. C. B. Tlllinghast, Sec. & Treas. 
Cautlne Tremper, Supt. Amos Free. Offices 1165 
Broadway. 

The Albany Ry. 14 m, 4-8 g, 54 c. 232 h. 33-47 lb r. 
Pres., supt. and Treas. John W. McNamara. Sec. 
Jas. H. Manning. Offices 3 & 5 N. Pear: st. 

ALLEUHENY CITY, PA Federal St. & Pleas- 
ant Valley Pass. Ry. 4.8 m, 5-2 g. so lb r, 22 c, 160 h 
and mu. Pres. Wm. McCreery, Sec. R. F. Ramsey, 
Supt. Wm. J. Crozler. Office, 129 Taggart street, 

People's Park Pass. R. R. Co. 4.2 m, 5-2 g, 50 lb r, 
10 c, 70 mu. Pres. Wm. McCreery, Sec. R. F. Ram- 
sey, Supt. Wm. J, Crozler. Office, 129 Taggart st. 

ALLENTOWN, PA.— Allentown Pass. R.R. Co. 
3% m, 4-8% g, 19 lbs. r, 3 coaches, 22 h. Pres. Samuel 
Lewis, Treas. & sec. Joseph E. Balllet. Supt. A. 
T. Brown. Office Hamilton St. Capital, $45,200. 

ALTON, ILL, Alton & Up. Alton Horse Ry. Co. 

ALTOONA, PA. — City Pass. Ry. Co. of Altoona. 
3% m, 5-3 g, 43 & 45 lbs. r, 17 c. 40 h. Pres. John P. 
Levan, Sec. & Treas. L. B. Relfsnelder, Supt. John 
J. Buch. Capital, $08,000. 

AMSTERDAM, N. Y. — Amsterdam st. Ry. Co. 
1 Jim, 4-8 g, 25 lbr, 3 c, 10 h. Pres. Henrv Herrlck, 
Treas. Havld Cady, Sec. M. L. Stover. Leased to 
Jas. R. Snell. 

APPLETON, WIS — Appleton Electric St. Ry. 

ASHTABULA, O — Ashtabula City Ry. Co. 4 m, 

4- 8% g, 40 lb r,9c, 60 h. Owner <jz Prop..) no. N.Stewart. 
ATCHISON, KAN.— Atchison St. Ry. Co. 9 m, 

20 c, 65 h, 4-8 % g, 20-30 ibr. Pres. J. H. Beeson, Treas. 
H. M. Jackson, Sec. J. P. Adams. Gen. Supt. Geo. W. 
Carpenter. 

Gate City S R.R. t.Co. m, 4-8% g, 16 lb r, 7 c, 26 
h. Pres. L. li. Nelson, v. pres. L. ueGlve, Sec. & 
Treas. John Stephens, Solicitor, A. Remharat. 

Metropolitan St. R.R. Co. 

West End & Auantlc R.R. Co.' 2m, 4-8V g, 20 lb r, 
6 c, 34 mu. Pres. J. H.Turner, v. Pres. T. L. Lang- 
ston, sec. & Treas. B. H. Brumitead, Man. & Pur. 
Agt. Jno. S. Brumhead. 

ATLANTA, GA. — Atlanta St. Ry. Co. 13 in, 4-8% 
g, 42 lb O. B. rail, 40 two h cars, 150 horses. North 
Atlanta Line l m. Becatur St. Line 1.50 m. Mari- 
etta St. Line 2.50 m. McDonough st. Line 1.50m. 
Peachtree St. Line 2.50 m. West End Line 2.50 m. 
Whitehall St. Line 1.50 m. Pres. Richard Peters, 
Sec. & Treas. J. W. Culpepper. Supt. & Purch. Agt. 
E. C. Peters. Office, 49 Line st. 

ATLANTIC, N.J — Atlantic City Ry. Co. 

AUBURN, N.Y.— Auburn &owasco Lake R.R. Co 
1H m, 4.-8% g, 28-30 lb r, 4c, 13 h. Pres. U. M Osborne, 
Sec. & Treas. C. B. Rosters, Supt. B. F. Andrews. 

East Genesee & Seward Ave. Ry. Co. 2\ m, 4-8 1 . g 
30 lb r, 6 c, 25 h. Pres. Havld M. Osborne, Sec & 
Treas. C. B. Rosters, supt. B. F. Andrews. 
AUGUSTA, GA.— Augusta & Summervllle R.R. Co. 
6 m, 5 g, 30 lbr, 13 c, 42 li. Pres. Patk Walsh, Supt 
Edw. G. Mosher. Auditor, Frank E. Petit. Office 
513 McKinne St. 

AURORA, ILL.— Aurora City Ry. Co. 5 m, 4-8'-; 
g, 28 lb r, 7 c, i i , 30 mu. Pres. H. H. Evans, V. Pres" 
S. W. Thatcher, sec, A. J. Hopkins, Treas. E. W 
Trask, Supt. I. B. cliattle. 

BABYLON, N. Y — Babylon Horse R.R. Co. 1% 
m, 4-9 g, 00 lb r, 3 c, 3 h. Pres. W. F. Norton, Sec. 
Jos. M. Sammls, Treas. John R. Reid, Supt. Uavid S 
S. Sammls. 

BALTIMORE, MI>.— Baltimore & Powhatan Ry. 
Co. 6 m, 5-4% g, 4 c, 17 h. Pres. & Treas. E. H 
Freeman, Sec. R. B. Clark, Supt. I. M. Ketrlck. 

Baltimore City Pass. Ry. Co. 44 m, 151 c, 1051 h 

5- 4% g, 46 & 47 id r. Pres. & Supt. Oden Bowie, 
Supt. car shops J. M. Blemdell. Supt. trucks, Boyer 
Parks. Treas John Bolgiano, Sec. S. L. Bridge. Office 
cor. Calvert & Baltimore Sts. 

Baltimore Union Pass. Ry. Co. 16 m, 5-4% g, 47 lbs 
r, 61 c, 391 h. Pres. N. Perrin, Gen. Man. T. C. Rob- 
bins, Treas. E. P. B . Cross, See. Leon Fender, Ass't 
to Gen. Man. R. E. Robbins. Office cor. Huntington 
Ave. & Oak St. 

Baltimore & Catonsvllle Ry. Co. m, 5-4% g, 35 lb 
r, 15 c, 51 h. Pres. J. C. Robbins, Supt. & Pur. Agt 
G. W. Appleby. Office Pratt St. & Frederick av. 

Baltimore & Pimlico & ITkesville R.R. Co. 

Central Ry. Co. 11% m, 2 sweepers 182 h, 5-4X- g, 
401b r, 22c. Pres. Peter Thompson, sec. & Treas 
Walter Blakistone. Office cor Preston st and Green- 
mount ave. 

Citizen's Ry. Co. 20 m, 5-4% g, 34 lb?, r, 42 e, 380 h. 
Pres. Jos. S. Hagarty, Sec. Wm. Hammersley, Supt 
C. C. Speed, Treas. S. V. Keen. 

Highlandtown & Point Breeze Ry. Co. City Div 
6 m, 5-8 g, — lb r, 15 c, 9j h. Pt. Breeze Hiv. 3 m, 1 
loco, 4 c. Pres. Howard Munnikhuysen, Treas. 
Robt. B Morrison, Gen. Man. M. A. McCormick. 

North Baltimore Passenger Ry. Co. 21 m, 5-4v; g, 
45 lb. r, 72 c, 400 h. Pres. Jas. L. McLane, Treas. 
Han'lJ. Foley, Sec. Thos. J. Wilson. 

People's Ry. Co. 10% m, 5-4% g, 47-45 lb r, 30 c, 
200 h. Pres. T Edw. Hambleton, Treas. Gustavus 
Ober, Sec, Supt. & Pur. Agt. Wm. A. House, jr. Office 
Hruld Hill ave. 

York Road R.R. Co. 

BATTLE CREEK, MICH. — Battle Creek Ry. Co. 



5 m, 3-6 g, 28 lb r, 8 c, 18 h, 3 mu. Pres. Geo. Bet- 
J. White, V. Pres. H. H. B rown, Sec. Chas. Thomas, 
Supt. John A. White, Gen. Man. J. W. Hahn. 

BAY CITY, MICH.— Bay City St. Ry. Co. 7% 

m, 4-8% g, 18 lb r, 13 c, 35 h. Pres. James Clements, 
Traas. Wm. Clements, Sec. Edgar A.Cooley. 

BEATRICE, NEB Beatrice St. Ry. Co. i. m, 

4-8% g, 25 lb. r, 4 c, 20 h. Pres. J. B. Kilpatrick, Supt. 

6 Purchasing Agt. J. E. Smith. 

BEAVER FALLS, PA.— Beaver VaUey St. Ry. Co. 
3% m, 5-2% g, 38 lb r, 8 c, 34 h. Pres. M. L. Knight, 
V. Pres. Col. J. Weyand, Sec. & Treas. J. F. Merrl- 
man, Supt. L. Richardson. 

BELLAIRE, O.— Bellalre St. R.R. Co. 

BELLEVILLE, ONT., CAN. — Belleville St. Ry. 
Co. 1% m, 3-6 g, 281b. r. 5 c, 13 h Pres. B. Lockwood, 
Sec, Treas. & Man. S. Lockwood. 

BELLVILLE, ILL. — Citizen's St. Ry. Co. 1% in, 

5 c. Pres. H. P. Alexander, Man. & Treas. H. A Alex- 
ander, Sec J. E. Thomas. 

BEREA, O.— Berea St. Ry. Co. in m, 3-6 g, 28 lbr, 
2 c, 2 h. Pres. C. W. B. Miller, v. Pres, T. Chinchward 
Sec. & Treas. A. H. Pomeroy, Supt. A. W. Bishop. 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y.— Washington Street & 
State Asylum R.R. Co. 4% m. 4 g, 16-35 lb r, 13 c, 23 
h. Pres. R. H. Meagley, V."Pres. Geo. Whitney, Sec. 
Ira J. Magley, Treas. F. E. Ross, Supt. Wm. Whitney 

Blnghamton Central R.R. Co. 3K m (2% laid,)3' 
g, 28 lb r, 6 c. Pres. Geo. L. Crandall, supt. Nelson 
Stow, Sec. Chas. O. Root, Treas. H. J. Kneeland. 
Offices 65 Court St. 

Blnghamton & Port Bickinson R.R. Co. 5 m, 4-8% 
g, 20-30 lb r, 10 c, 23 h. Pres. Harvey westcott, Sec. & 
Treas. G. M. Harris, Supt. N. L. Osborn. (Leased to 
Mr. Osborn). offices 112 State st. 

City Ry. Co. 1 m, 4 g, 25 lb r, 2 c, 5 h. Pres. & 
Man. R. H. Meagley, supt. Wm. Whitney. Office, 
216 Fort st. 

Main, Court & Chenango St. R.R. 5 m, 4-8 g, 40 lb r, 
10 c, 25 h. supt. & Lessee, N. L. Osborn. Offices 83 
Washington st. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA Birmingham St. Ry. Co. 

5% m, 4-8 g, 16 lb r, 13 c, 40 m. Pres. Geo. L. Morris, 
Supt., Sec. & Treas. W. H. Morris. 

East Lake Land Co. (see New Roads.). 

Highland Avenue R. R. 6% m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 5 c, 
28 h. Pres. H. M. Caldwell, Man. W .1. Milner, Supt. 
J. M. Lens, Eng. H, Schoel. Owners, The Elyton 
Land Co. 

Birmingham & Pratt Mines St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 4-8% 
g, 10 lb r, 6 c, 30 h. Pres. and Gen. Man. J. A. Van 
Hoose, Sec. & Treas. Wm. Berney. 

BLOOMFIELD, N. J.— Newark & Bloomfield R. 
R. (See Newark, N. J.) 

BLOOMirsGTON, ILL.— Bloomlngton & Normal 
Horse Ry. Co. 5% m, *-s% g, 30 lb r, 10 c, 00 b. Pres. 

6 Proprietor A. H. Moore, Sec. Edw. Sharp. 
BOONE, IA Boone & Boonsboro St. Ry. Co 

l?i m, 3g, 20 lbr, 3 c, 10 h. pres. L. W Reynolds 
Treas. Ira B. Hodges, Sec. and supt. A. B. Hodges. 

Twin City & Hes Moines River Motor St. Ry. Co. 
6 m, 20 lbs. r, 3-6 g, 3 motors, 3 c President & 
Supt. J. B. Hodges, Treas. A. B. llodges, Sec. 
S. K. Huntsinger. 

BOSTON, MASS.— Boston Consolidated St. Ry. 
Co. 51% m, 4-8% g, 48-50 lb r, 359 c, 1720 h. Pres. 
Chas. E. Powers", Treas. sam'l Little, Ass. Treas. 
John H. studlev, Jr., Gen. Supt. Julius E. Rugg. 
Capital, $1,700,000. Office, Tremont row, cor. pem- 
berton sq. 

Boston & Chelsea R. R. Co., Pres. W. W. Wheildon; 
Treas. and Clerk, John H. Studley; (Operated by the 
Boston Consolidated St. Ry. Co.) 

Albany St. Freight Ry. Co. .93 m, 4-S% g, on ID r 
no c, no h. Pres. Chas. L. Pierson, Treas. Geo. w 
Child. Office. 439 Albany st. 

Lynn & Boston. 37 m, 4-8% g. 25-48 lb r, 175 c 
748 h. Pres. Amos F. Breed, Treas. & Sec. E. Francis 
Oliver, Supt. Edwin C. Foster, office, 214 Broadway 
Chelsea, Mass., & 13 Tremont row. 

Metropolitan R. R. Co. 83 m, 48 to 54 lb r, 687 c 
3543 h. pres. C. A. Richards, Sec. Wm. P. iiarvey 
Treas. Chas. Boardman. Office, 16 Kilby st. 

So. Boston Ry. Co. 16 m. 4-8% g, 5o lb r, 199 c, 970 h' 
Pres. Chas. H.Hersey, v. t'res. k/th 11. Baker; Sec. & 
Treas. Wm. Reed, Supt. Baniel C'oolidge. Office, 715 
Broadway, So. Boston. 

Somervllle Horse R. R. Co. (Operated by the Bos- 
ton Consolidated Street Ry. Co.) Pres. Sam'l E. 
Sewail, Treas. & Clerk, J. H. Studley, Jr. Office, 27 
Tremont row. 

Winnlsimmet R. R. Co. 1.95 m, 4-8)^ g, 48 lb r, no 
c. no h. Pres. Wm. R. Pearrnain, Chelsea, Mass. 
Treas. & Clerk, E. Francis Oliver. Office, 13 Tre- 
mont row. 

BRAOFOUD, PA.— Bradford & Kendall R.R. Co 
1% m, 4-8% g, 38 lb r, 3 c, 4 h. Pres. James Brodey, 
!>ec. Geo. H. \loon, Gen. Man. & Supt. Enos Parsons. 
Capital. $12,01 0. 

BRENHAM, TEX. — Brenliam St. R.R Co. 2 m, 
4g. 20 lb r, 3 c, 18 mu Pres. T. J. Pampell, V-Pres. F. 
Krentzlin, Sec. John A. Randle, Treas. B. C. Glddin"'s 
Man. E. B. Randle. Office, ,Gruber Bldg., North st. 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN.— The lirldgeport Horse 
R.R. Co. 6 m, 4-8% g, 42 lb r, 16 c, 80 h. Pres. Albert 
Earner, Sec. & Treas. F. Hurd, Supt. B. F. Lashar. 

Bridgeport & W. Stratford Horse R. R. Co. 3% m, 
4-8% g, 45 lb r. 10 c, 40 h. Pres. Bavid F. Hullister, 
Sec & Treas. Henry H. Brew, Man. Henry N. 
Beardsley. 

BROCKTON, MASS Brockton St. Ry. Co. 11% 

m, 4-S% g, 35 lb. r, .32 c, 140 h. Pres. W. W. cross, 
Treas. C. R. Fillerbrown; Supt. H.B. Rogers, jOffice, 
Main St. : 

BROOKLYN, N. Y.-The Atlantic Avenue R.k. 
Co. of Brooklyn. 32 y m, (leased and owned). 4-8% 
g, 50-60 lb r, 228 c, 955 h. Pres. William Richardson, 
Sec. W. J. Richardson, Treas. Newbery H. Frost. 
Office cor. Atlantic & Third Aves. 

Broadway R.R. Co. 12 m, 4-8% g, 45-50-60 lb r, 
166 c, 657 h. Pres. Edwin Beers, Sec & Treas. Robert 
Sealey, Supt. Joshua Crandall. Office 21 Broadway, 
E. B. 

Brooklyn Cross Town R.R. Co. 16 m, 4-8% g, 40-60 lb 
r, 72 c, 400 h. Pres. Henry w. Slocum, V.'Pres. Ezra 
B. Tuttle, Sec & Treas. John R. Connor, Supt. B. W. 
Sullivan. Offices 585 Manhattan Ave. 



BushWlCk R.R. Co. 28 m, 4-8% g, 45-50-60 lb r, 172 c, 
600 h. Pres. Frank Cromwell, V. Pres. Wm. H. Hus- 
ted, Treas. & Sec. S. B. Hallowell, Supt. Wm. M Mor- 
rison. Office 22 Broadway, N. Y. 

The Brooklyn. Bushwick & Queens County l .R. 
11 m, 4-8% g, 42-47 lb r, 41 c, 117 h. Pres. Richard H. 
Green, V. Pres. James W. Elwell, 59 south st. N. Y. 
Sec. John B. Elwell, Treas. Wm. W. Greene. 

Brooklyn City R.R. Co. 87 m, 4-8% .g, 45-60-64 lb r, 
835 c, 18 dummies, 3,209 h Pres. William H. Hazzard, 
v. Pres. Wm. M. Thomas, Sec & Treas. Baniel F. 
Lewis, Asst. Sec. Francis E. Wrigley. Offices 8 & 10 
Fulton st. 

Brooklyn City & Newtown R.R. Co. 13% m, 4-8%?! 
43-00 lb r, 128 c, 400 h. Pres. Col. John N. Partridge; 
sec. & Treas. Buncan B. Cannon; Supt. John L. 
Heius. Office cor. DeKalb & Central Aves. 

Calvary Cemetery, Greenpolnt & Brooklyn Ry. Co. 

Coney Island and Brooklyn R.R. Co. 18 3-5 m, 45 
lb r, 4-8% g, 103 c, 344 h. Pres. James Jourdan, Sec. 
Ed. F. Brayton, Treas. John Williams, Supt. Wil- 
liam FarreU. Office cor. Smith & Huntington sts. 

Coney Island, sheepshead Bay & Ocean Avenue 
R. K. Co. 2% m, 4-8% g, 4 c. Pres. A. A. McCiemue 
. Pres. DanielMone, Sec. John McMaiion. Sheepser, 
head Bay, Treas. Horace valkulyh. office 16 Red 
Hook Lane. 

Crosstown Line, Hamilton Ferry to Bridge. 

Grand St. & Newtown R.R. Co. 13 m, 4-8% g, 50- 
60 lb r, 72 c, 250 h. Pres. Martin Joost, Sec. & Treas. 
Wm. E. Horwill, Supt. Walter G. Howey. office 374 
K6nt .A.V6 

Grand Street, Prospect Park & Flatbush R.R. Co. 
11% m, 4-8% g, 50 lb r, 75 c, 244 h. Pres. Louis Fitz- 
gerald, 120 Broadway, N. Y., Sec. & Treas. Duncan B. 
Cannon, Supt. Jno. L. Helns. Offices Franklin Ave. 
and Prospect Place. 

Greenpolnt & Lorlmer St. R. R. Co. 5% m, 4-8% g, 
50 lbr, 36 c, 198 h. Pres. Geo. W. Van Allen, sec. 
Wm. B. Wait, Treas. C. B. Cottrell, Supt. Chas. E. 
Harris. Office, cor. Nostrand and Park aves. 

Prospect Park & Coney island R. R. Co. 25 m, 
45-50 lb r, 4-8% g, 69 c, 214 h. Pres. A. R. Culver 
Treas. A. C. Washington, Sec. George H. smith, Eng. 
Supt. R. Schermerhorn, tsupt. Robert Attlesey. 
Offices 16 Court st. (Leased to Atlantic Ave. R. R. 
Co). 

Prospect Park & Flatbush R.R. 3 m, 4-8% g, 34 
lb r. 70 c, 300 h. Pres. Loftls Wood, Sec & Treas. 
Sam'l Parkhril, Supt. Loftls Wood. Offices 45 Broad- 
way. 

South Brooklyn Central R.R. Co. 8%' m, 4 8% g, 60 
lb r, 42 c, 192 h. Pres.Wm. Richardson, sec. Wm. J. 
Richardson, Treas. N, H. Frost, supt. James Rud- 
dy, offices, Atlantic & 3d aves. 

The New Wllliamsburgh & Flatbush R. R. Co. 17% 
m, 4-s% g, 47-50 lb r, 74 c, 255 h. Pres. Geo. W. Van 
Alien, 54 Ann St., New York, Sec. W. B. Waitt, 34th 
St. & 6th Ave., New York, Treas. C. B. Cottrell, 8 
Spruce St., N. Y. City, supt. Chas. E. Harris, Nost- 
rand Ave. OarroU st., Brooklyn. 

Van Brunt St. & Erie Basin R.R. Co. 3 m, 4-8% 

g, 45 lb r, 7 c, 24 h. Pres. John Cunningham, Sec. & 
Treas. Edmund Terry. Offices, 264 Van Brunt st. 

BRUNSWICK, GA.— Brunswick St. R.R. Co. 

BUFFALO, ILL.— See Mechanicsburg, 111. 

BUFFALO, N. Y. — Buffalo St. R.R. Co. 17% m, 
4-8%g, 50 lb r, 96 c, 510 h. pres. Henry M. Watson, 
V. Pres. P. P. Pratt, Sec. S. S. Spauldtng, Treas. W. 
H. Watson, Supt. Edward Edwards. 

Buffalo East Side St. R.R. Co. 28 7-8 m, 4-8% g, 42 
lb r, 47 c, 218 h. Pres. S. S. Spauldlng, v. Pres. Joseph 
Churchyard, Sec. II. M. Watson, Treas. W. II. Wat- 
son, supt. Edward Edwards, office 346 Main st. 

BURLINGTON, I A.— Burlington City R.R. Co. 
2 1 , in, 4-8% g, 15-20 lb r, 9 c, 22 h. Pres. John Patter- 
son, sec. & Man. C. T. Patterson, office 1401 sum- 
mer st. 

Union St. Ry. Co. 8% m, 4-8% g, various r, 19 c, 85 

h. Pres. Geo. E. Rust, Sec. & Supt. F. G. Jones. 
BURLINGTON, VT Winooskl & Burlington 

Hoi se Ry. Co. 3% m. 4-8 g, 25 lb r, 7 c, 24 h. Pres. 
W. A. Woodbury, V. Pres., F. C. Kennedy, Supt, K. 
B. Walker, Treas. L. E. Woodhouse, Clerk, G. W. 
Walls. Office, Winooski ave. 

CAIRO, ILL.— Cairo St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 3-6 g, 25 lb 
r, 3 c, 9 h. Pres. J. A. Goldstine, V-Pres. H. Bloms, 
Supt. is. Treas. Thos. Lewis, Sec. H. Schulze. 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. — Cambridge R. R. Co.51-59 
m, 4-8ii g, 50 lb r, 235 c, 1,428 h. Pres. Prentiss Cum- 
rnings, Treas. & Clerk Fra nklin Perrin, Exec. Com. I. 
M. Spelman, P. Cummlngs, O. S. Brown, Clerk of Bi- 
rectors, O. s. Brown, Supt. Wm. A. Bancroft. 

CAMOEN, N. J.— Camden & Atlantic St. Ry. 

Camden Horse R.R. Co. 9 m, 5-1 g, 35-52 lb r, 26 c, 
85 h. Pres. Thos. A.Wilson, Sec. Wilbur F. Rose, 
Treas. & Supt. John Hood. Office 1125 Newton Ave. 

CANTON, O.— Canton St. Ry. Co. 4% m, 4 g, 28 
lb r, 11 c, 58 h. Pres. & Treas. G. E. Cook, sec John 
F. Clark, Supt. O. S. Stanton. Office, 4 E. 7th st. 

CAPE MAY, N. J.— Cape May & Schellenger 
Landing Horse R. R. 

CARTHAGE, MO.— 

CEDAR RAPIDS, IA.— Cedar Rapids & Marlon 
Ry., I3i4 m, 4-8% g. 22-28-35 lb r, 11 c, 40 h. Pres. W. 
Greene, Sec. N. B. Consigny, Treas. G. Greene, Supt. 
Wm. Elson. Office 11 N. Second st. 

CHAMPAIGN, ILL.— Champaign R.R. Co. 

Urbana & Champaign St. R.R. Co. (See Urbana.) 

CHARLESTON, S. C— Charleston City Ry. 
Co. 8 %m, 4-8% g, 38-40 lb r, 32 c, 1 15 h. 1 mu. Pres. 
Jno. S. Rlggs, Treas. Evan Edwards, Sec' and Asst. 
Treas. Frank Whilden, Foreman Jno. Mohlenhoff. 
Office 2 Broad st. 

Enterprise R.R. Co. 15 in, 5 g, 42 lb r, 29 pass, c, 
10 freight c, 95 h. Pres. A. F. Ravenel, Sec & Treas. 
U. E. Hayne, Supt. T. W. Passailaigue. 

Middle Street Sullivan Island Ry. Co. 2!f m, 5-8% 
g, 20 lb T r, 7 c, 4 mu. Pres. B. Callaghan, Sec. & 
Treas. Frank F. Whilden, Supt. B. Buckley. Office 2 
Broad st. 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN.— Chattanooga St. R. 
R. Co. 5% m, 4-8% g, 25-45 lb r, 12 c, 54 h. Pres. and 
Treas. J. H. Warner, Sec. C. R. Gaskill. 

CHESTER, PA.— Chester St. Ry. Co. 5% m, 5-2% 
g, 47 lb r, 14 c, 66 h. Pres. Richard Peters, Jr., Treas. * 
Sam'l H. Seeds, Sec. & Manager E. M. Cornell. 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



23 



CHICAGO, ECX.— Chicago City Ry. CO. 90 m, 4- 

8)4 g, 45-63 lb r, 697 o, l,6uo h, cable doing work of 2,500 
h. I'res. C. B. Holmes, Sec. II. II. Windsor, Treas. 
T. C Pennington, Supt. C. B. Holmes, office 2,020 
State st. 

Chicago West Division Ry. Co. 45'., m, 4-8)4 g, 40 
r, 6ss c, 3,s25 h. Pres. J. K. Jones, sec. George 1.. 
Webb, Supt. He Witt C. Cregler. Office, 59 State St. 

Chicago & Hyde Parle St. — m, — g, — lb r, — c, 
— h. Pres. Douglas s. Clarke. 

Crosstown Pass. Ry. Co. (See New Roads.) 

North Chicago City R.R. Co. 45 m, 4-8)4 g, 45 lb r, 
375 c, 1,800 h. 

Pres. Chas. T. Yerkes, Sec. & Treas. Hiram Crawtord 
Asst. Supt. Fred L. Threedy, Supt. Horse Dept. 
Robt. Atkins, Purch. Agt. John w. Roach, Master 
Mechanic J. Miller. 

CHILLICOTHE, O Chllllcothe St. R.R. Co. 

l%m, 3g, I6 1br, 7 c, 10 h. Pres. E. P. Safford, 
i-ec. a. E. Wenls, Treas. William Polanel, Supt. Ewel 
McMartln. 

CINCINNATI, O — Cincinnati Inclined Plane Ry. 
Co. tiy m, 5-2)4 g, 43 lb r, 25 c, 140 h. Pres. Geo. a 
Smith. Sec. & supt. James M. Doherty, Tr. J. s. Hill' 

Cincinnati St. Ry. Co. 96m, 5-2 g,42-52 lb r,25(ic, 2,000 
h. Pres. Jno. Kllgour. V. Pres. Albert G. Clark 
Treas. R. A. Dunlap, Sec. & Auditor, Jas. A. Collins' 
Supt. Jno. Harris, Pur. Agt. B F. Haughton. office 
second lloor of Apollo Building. 

Columbia & Cincinnati St. R.R. Co. 3K m, 3 g 40 
lb r, 3 c, 6 dummy n. Pres. & Auditor C. U. Kllo-o'ur 
V. Pres. John Kllgour, Treas. & Sec. A. H. Meier' 
Mt. Lookout, o. supt. J. J. Henderson, Mt Look- 
out, O. Office Station C. 

Mt. Adams & Eden Park Inclined R.R. Co. 3v m 
5-2>4 S, 42 lb r, 40 o,3 20 h. Pres. & Treas J. p Kee- 
per, Sec. J. R. Murdock, Supt. Chas. Whltten. 

So. Covington & Cincinnati. (See Covington, Ky.) 

CLARKSVILLE, TENN — Clarksvllle St. Ry 
Co. 2 m, 4-8)4' g, 16 lb T-r, 4 c, 16 mu. Pres. John 1' 
Shelton, Sec. & Treas. John W. Faxon. Capital 
$6,250. Office, Farmers' & Merchants' Nat. Bank ' 

CLEVELAND, O.— The Brooklyn St. R.R Co 18« 
m, 4-8)4 S, 52 lb r, 70 c, 402 h. Pres. Tom. L. Johnson 
V. Pres. A. J. Moxham, Sec. J. B. lioefgen, Treas' 
John McConnell, Supt. A. L. Johnson. Office 1 301 
Pearl st. 

Broadway & Newburg St. R.R. Co. 6 m, 4-8v g 10 
c, 160 h. Pres. & Supt, Joseph Stanley, v' Pres 
Sam'l Andrews, Sec. & Treas. E. Fowler. 

Superior St. R.R. Co. 15 m, 4-8)4 g, 45 lb r 46 c 
225 h. Pres. Frank De II. Roblson, V. Pres' John 
Koch, Sec, Treas. & Supt. M. S. Roblson, Jr. 

The East Cleveland R.R. Co. 20)4 m, 4-8)4 g 45 lb 
steel r, 110 c, 570 h. Pres. A.Everett, v-Pres & 
M. C. B. Chas. Wason, Sec. & Treas. H. A. Everett 
Supt. E. Duty. Offices, 1154 Euclid Ave. 

Woodland Avenue & West Side St. R.R Co 40 m 
4-8)4 g, 43-45 lb r, 128 c, 6u5 h. Pres. M. A. Hanna, v'. 
Pres. C. F. Emery, sec. & Pur. Agt. J. B. Hanna, 
Gen. Supt. George G. Mulhern. office, cor. Pearl 
and Detroit sts. 

South Side St. R. R. Co. 3)4 m, 3g. 40 lb r, 8 c, 60 
h. Pres. Tom L. Johnson, Supt. A. L. Johnson, Sec. 
& Treas. J. B. Hoefgen. office 1301 Peal st. 

St. Clair Street Ry. Co.— m— g,— ibr— c,— Pres. Chas 
Hathaway. 

CLIFTON, CAN.-Nlagara Falls, Wesly Park 
and Clifton Tramway Co. 314 m, 4-8)4 g, 30 lb r, 8 c, 
40 h. Pres. J. H. Mooney, 280 B'way, N. Y Treas 
John N. Ilayward, 52 B'way, N.Y. Sec. John H. 
Ba.che, Niagara Falls, Ont. 

CLINTON, IA — Lyons & Clinton norse R.R. Co. 
(See Lyons.) 

COLUMBIA, S. C— Columbia St. Ry. iY, m 
4-8)4 g, 30 lbr, 6 c, 18 h. Pres. J. S. Plerson, New 
York, V. Pres. II. nr. Plerson, New York, Treas. W. 
K. Lawton, New York, Sec. E. M. Cole, 32 Liberty st. 
New York. Capital $50,000. 

COLUMBUS, GA.— Columbus St. R.R. Co. 3 m, 
4-8)4 g. 16 lb r, 6 c, 25 h. pres. Cliff B. Grimes, Sec. 
L. o. schnessler, Treas. N. N. Curtis, Supt. J. A. Ga- 
bourgh. 

COLUMBUS, O.-Columbus Consolidated St. R.R. 
Co. 19 m, 5-2 g, 30-52 lb r, 92 c, 350 h. Pres. A. Rodg- 
ers, V. Pres. II. T. Chittenden, Sec. & Treas. E. K. 
Stewart, Supt. J. H. Atcherson. 

Glenwood & Greenlawn St. R.R. Co. 4)4 m, 3-6 g, 
24 lb r, 9 c, 25 c. Pres. A. D. Rodgers, V. Pres. B. S. 
Brown, Sec. R. R. Ri kly, Treas. S. S. Rlckly, Supt. 
JonasWlllcox. 

CONCORD, N. H. — Concord Horse R.R. Co. 7)4 
m, .3 g,:it lb r, 9 c, 15 h, 2 steam motors. Pres. & Supt. 
Moses Humphrey, Treas. II. J. Crlppln, Clerk E. C. 
Hoag. 

CORTLAND, N. Y — Cortland & Homer Horse Ry. 
Co. 4 m, 4-8)4 g, 25-30 lb r. 5 c, 15 h, Pres. Chas. II. Gar- 
rison, Troy, N. Y. V. Pres. E. Mudge, Sec. & Treas. 
G. K weloh, supt. B.B. Terry. Office25N. Main st, 

COUNCIL BLUFFS, IA. — Council Bluffs St. R.R. 

COVINGTON, KY — So. Covington & Cincinnat 
St. Ky. co. 17% m, 5-2)4 g. 43 lb r, 46 c, 296 h. Pres. 
E. P. Abbott. Sec. J. C. Benton, Treas. G. M. Abbott. 

COVINGTON, GA.— W. C. Clark & Co. (see new 
roads ) 

DALLAS, TEX — Dallas St. Ry. Co. 4v m, 4-8M 
g, 20-38 lb r, 12 c, 4 h, 72 mu. Pres. Wm. J. Keller, Sec. 
Hairy Keller, Supt. C. E. Keller. 
Commerce & Ervay St. R.R. ly m, 4-Sy g, 20 lb r, 
<• 2 mu. Pres. A. C. Ardrey, Sec., Trea. & Man. II. 
A 1 filer. 

DANVILLE, ILL.-Cltizens' St. Ry. Co. 4)4 m, 4 

g, 20 lb r, 8 c, 41 m. Pres. Wm. P. Cannon, v. Pres. 
& Gen. Man. Wm. Stewart, Sec. & Treas. Adam R. 
Samuel. 

DAVENPORT, IA. —Davenport Central St. Ry. 
Co. 3 m, 4-8J4 g, 201b r, 14 c, 21 h,15mu. Pres. Whit. 
M. Grant, V. Pres. W. L. Allen, Treas. J. B. Fidlcr, 
Su pt. J. W. Howard, Sec. O. S. McNeil. 

Davenport City Ry. Co. 3% m, 4-Sy g, — lb r, 14 
c. 46 h. Pres. C. S. Watklns, Sec. and Treas. S. D. 
Bawden. 

DAYTON, KY — Newport & Dayton St. Ry. Co. 
2 m, 5-2)4 g, 44 lb r, 9 c, 36 h Pres. & Supt. W. W. 
Bean. 

DAYTON, O.-Dayton St. R.R. Co. 7X m, 4-8)4 g, 
44 lb r, 24 c, SO h and mu Pres. J. W. Stoddard, V- 



Pres. II. S. Williams, Sec. C. A. Craighead, supt. A. 
W. Anderson. 

Fifth St. R. R. Co. 7 m, 4-8)4 g, 45 lb r, 18 c, 58 h. 
Pros. A. A. Thomas, Sec. D. B. Corwln, Treas. R. I. 
Cummin, Supt. J. M, B. Lewis. Office, 7 E. 3d st. 

Oakwood St. Ry. Co. 6 m, 4-8)4 g, 38 lb r, 14 c, 
56 h. Pres. Charles B. CTegg, Sec. H. V. Perrlne. 

The Wayne & Firth St. R.R. Co. %ym,4-v,yg, 
38 lb r, 6 c, 30 h. Pres. Geo. M. Shaw, Sec. & Treas. 
Eugene Wlnchet, Supt. N. Routzahn. Office 29, 
Wayne st. 

DECATUR, ILL Decatur Horse Ry. Co. 

Citizens' street R.R. Co. 2 m, 4-8)4 g, 20 lb T r, 7 c, 
47 h & mu. Pres. D. S. Shellabarger, Sec, Treas. & 
Supt. A. E. Kinney. 

DENISON, TEX.— Denlson St. Ry. Co. 3 m, 

3- 6 g, 16 lb r, 5 c, 22 mu. Pres. C. A. Walterhouse 
supt. S. A. Robinson. 

DENVER., COL Denver City Ry. Co. 24m, 3-6 

g, 16 lb r, «4 c, 332 h. Pies. Geo. II. Holt, 10 Wall st. 
New York City, Sec. G. D.L'huiller, 10 Wall St., New 
York City, Treas. & Man. G. E. Randolph. 

Denver Tramway Co. 4 m,3-6 g, 16-18 lb r, 8c. Run 
by electricity. Pres. Rodney Curtis, V. Pres. John 
J. Riechman, Sec. Wm. G. Evans. 

DES MOINES, IA.— Des Moines St. R. R. Co. 
14 m, 3 g, 39-52 lb r, 28 c, 120 h. Pres. W. McCain, 
V.-prest. C. W. Rogg, Sec. F. A. Sherman, Treas. G. 

B. Hippee. 

Des Moines & Sevastopol St. Ry. Co (See Sevasto- 
pol, la). 

DETROIT, MICH.— Fort Wayne & Elmwood Ry. 
Co. 6 m, 4-8)4 g, 45 lb r, 30 c, I811 h. Pres. H. B. 
Brown, v. Pres. Edward Kanter, Treas. George B. 
Pease, Sec. N. W. Goodwin, Supt. Geo. S. Hazard. 

Detroit City Ry. 30 m, 4-8)3 8, 40-4314 lb r, 130 c, 
700 h. Includes Jefferson Ave. line, Woodward Ave. 
line, Michigan Ave. line, Gratiot Ave. line, Brush St. 
line, Cass Ave. line, Congress & Baker line. Pres. 
Sidney D. Miller, Treas. George Hendrle, sec. James 
lleugh, Gen. Supt. Robert Bell, M. M. John Willis. 

Grand River St. Ry. Co. 2% m, 4-8)4 g, 43 lb r, 13 c, 
110 h. Pres. & Treas. Jos. Dalley, Sec. J. W. Dailey, 
Supt. C. M. Dailey. 

Highland Park Ry. Co. 3 m, 4-8)4 g, 42 lb r for )4 
m in cltv limits, outside 35 lb T r, 2 c, electric motors. 
Pres. and Treas. Frank E. Snow, Sec F. Woodruff. 
Capital, $50,000. Office, 92 Grlswold st. 

DOVER, N. H.— Dover Horse R.R. Co. 5 m, 3 g, 
30 lb r, 4 c, 14 h. Directors, Z. S. Wallingfor, Chas. 
H. Sawyer, Jas. E. Lothrop, C. W. Wlggin, Harrison 
Haley, Frank Williams, Cyrus Littlefleld, Treas. 
Harrison Haley. 

DUBU»fUE, IA. — Dubuque St. R.R. 5 m, 4-8)4 g, 
21 c, 45 h. Pres. J. A. Rhonberg, sec. & Treas. B. E. 
Llnehan, Supt. J. J. Linehan. 

DULUTH, MINN.— Duluth St. Ry. Co. 5)4 m, 3-6 
g, 32-45 lb r, 18 c, 92 mu. Pres. Sam'l Hill, V. Pres. 
T. P. Wilson, Sec. & Treas. A. S. Chase, Supt. T. W- 
Hoopes. 

EAST OAKLAND, CAL — Oakland, Brooklyn & 
Frultvale R.R. Co. 

EAST SAGINAW, MICH East Saginaw St. 

Ry. Co. — m, 4-8)4 g, 30 and 43 lb r, 23 c, 70 h. Pres. 
Walter A. Jones, Sec. and Treas. Chas. F. Shaw, 
Supt. A. Bartlett. 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL.— East St. Louis St. R.R. 
Co. 

EASTON, PA The Easton & So. Easton Passen- 
ger Ry. Co. Us m, 5-2)4 g, 45 lb r, 4 c, 20 h. Pres. H. 
A. Sage, Sec. & Treas. H. W. Cooley, Supt. Elisha 
Burwell, So. Easton. Capital, $29,562. Office, 348 
Northampton st. 

The West End Passenger Ry. Co. ly m, 5-2)4 g, 45 
lb r, 6 c, 20 h. Pres. H. A. Sage, Sec. & Treas. H. W. 
Cooley, Supt. Samuel Berry. 

EAU CLAIR, WIS.— Eau Clair St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 

4- 8)4- g, 27 lb r, 16 c, 70 h. Pres. A. G. Bradstreet, 
New York, V.-Pres. Geo. B. Shaw, Eau Clair, Sec. & 
Treas. Weston Lewis, Gardiner, Me. 

ELGIN, ILL.— Elgin City Ry. Co. 2 c. Pres. Sec. 
Treas. Supt. & Owner, B. C. Payne. 

ELIZABETH, N. J.— Elizabeth & Newark Horse 
R.R. Co. 14 m, 5-2%, 4-10)4 g, 30 lb r, 24 c, 74 h. Pres. 
& Treas. Jacob Davis, Sec. & Supt. .John F. Pritchard. 

ELKHART, IND Citizens' Ry. Co. 3)4 m, 4-8)4 

g, 30 lb r, 6 c, 30 h. Pres. F. W. Miller, V. Pres. G. 

C. Johnson, Sec. E. C. Bickel, Treas. A. R. Burns. 
ELM1RA, N. Y The Elmira & Horseheads Ry. 

Co. 10 m, 4-8)4 g> 25-30-40 lb r, 18 c, 34 h. Pres. & 
Treas. George M. Diven, V. Pres. Geo. W. Hoffman, 
Sec. Wm. S. Kershner, Supt. Henry C. Silsbee. Offi- 
cers, 212 E. Water st. 

EL PASO, TEX.-E1 Paso St. Ry. Co. 2y m, 4-Ss; 
g, 20 lbr, 8 c 25 h. Pres. B. II. Davis, Vice Pres. 
J. F. Crosby, Treas. C. R. Morehead, Sec. & Supt. 
H. W. Marks. 

EMPOKIA, KAN. -Emporia City Ry. Co. 3J4 m, 
5 g, 20 lb r, 6 c, 23 m. Pres. Van R. Holmes, Treas. 
A. F Crowe, Sec. & Man. J. D. Holden. 

E "TERPRISE, MISS.— Enterprise St. Ry. Co. 
IX m, 3-6 g, 24 lb r, 2 c, 6 h. Pres. John Kampe, V. 
Pres. E. B. Gaston, Sec. & Treas. J. W. Gaston. 

ERIE, PA.— Erie City Passenger Ry. Co. 5? 4 'm, 
4-8)4 g, 30-40 45 lb r, 20 c, 85 h. Pres. Wm. W. Reed, 
Treas. Wm. Spencer, Sec. W. A. Demorest, Supt. 
Jacob Berst. 

EUREKA SPRINGS, ARK.— Eureka Springs 
City Ry. Co. 

EVAN S VILLE, IND. — Evansville St. Ry. Co. 12 
m, 4-8 g, 28 lb r, 31 c, 190 mu. Pres. John Gilbert, Sec. 
P. W Raleigh, Treas. John Gilbert, Supt. W. Bahr. 

FALL RIVER, MASS. — Globe St. Ry. Co. 12 m, 
4-8 y, g, 40-46-47 lb r, 40 c, 160 h. Pres. Frank S. Stev- 
ens," Treas. F. W. Brightman, Sec M. G. B. Swift, 
Supt. John n. Bowker, jr. 

FAR ROCK AWAY, N. Y . — Village Ry. Co. 1 m, 
4-8)4 g, 47 lb r, 5 c, 10 h. Pres. C. A. Cheever, Treas. 

D. L. Halght, Sec. J. S. Armbach, Supt. Rufus Mar- 
tin. 

FITCIIBURG, MASS. — Fitchburg St. Ry. Co. 
3V m, 4-s)rf g, « c, 31 h. Pres. II. A. Willis, V. Pres. H. 
J. Wallace, Treas. B. F. Wallls, Sec H. C. Hartwell, 
■Supt. Wesley w. Sargent. 

FORT SCOTT, KAN.— Bourbon County St. Ry. 
Co. 1 m, 4 g, 22 lb r, 2 c, 4 m. Pres. Isaac Madden, 
V. Pres. Benj. Files, Sec. Wm. Perry, Treas. J. H. 
Randolph. 



FORT SMITH, ARK Fort Smith St. Ry. Co. 

2 m, 3-6 g, 28 lb r, 5 c, 16 mu. Pres. Sam'l M. Loud, 
Sec. & Treas. Geo. T. Sparks. 

FORT WAYNE, IND Citizens' St. R.R. Co. 

FORT WORTH, TEX.— Fort Worth St. Ry. Co. 
7)4 m, 4 g, 25-38 lb i', 16 c, 73 m. Pres. K. M. Van- 
zandt, Treas. W. A. Huffman, Acting Sec & Gen. 
Man. S. Minis, Supt. J. T. Payne. 

FRANKFORT, N. Y.— Frankfort & Illon Street 
Ry. Co. 2)4 m, 6 g, 4 c. Pres. A. C. McGowan, Frank- 
fort, Sec. D. Lewis, Illon, Treas. P. Remington, Illon, 
Supt. Fredk. Gates, Frankfort. 

FREDONI A, N. Y. — Dunkirk & Fredonla R.R.Co. 
3)4 m, 4-10 g, 25 lb r, 5 c, 8 h. Pres. Wm. M. McClns- 
try, Sec. & Treas. M. N. Fenner, Supt. Z. Elmer, 
Wheelock. 

FULTON, N. Y. -Pulton & Oswego Falls St, Ry 
Co. 6,000 tt, 4 8)4 g, Gibbon's metallic stringer and 
r, 4 c, 12 h. Pres. Joseph Walker, Jr., V. Pres. N. N. 
Stranahan, Sec, and Treas. Chas. Lyman. Capital 
$15,000. Office, 15 Broad st,, New York. 

GAINSV1LLE, FLA. — Gains vllle St. Ry. 

GAINSVILLE, TEX.— Gainsvllle St. Ry. Co. 2y 
m, 3-6 g, 17 lb r, 4 c, 12 h. Pres. N. Stevens, V. 
Pres. J. T. Harris, Sec & Treas. F. R. Sherwood. 

GALESBURG, ILL.— College City St. Ry. Co. 3 
m, 4-)4 g, 18-20-48 lb r, 4 c, 16 h. Supt. Geo. S. Clayton. 

GALVESTON, TEX.— Galveston City R.R. Co. 
18 m, 4-8)4 g, 30 lb r, 08 c, 169 mu. Pres. Wm. H. Sin- 
clair, Sec. & Treas. F. D. Merrit, Supt. M. J. Keenan. 

Gulf City St. Ry. & Real Estate Co. 15 m, 4 g, 20-30 
lb i', 30 c, 90 mu. Pres. J. H. Burnett, Sec. in Treas. 

F. D. Allen. 

GLOUCESTER, MASS.— Gloucester City R.R. 

Gloucester St. Ry. Co. Pres. & Supt. Morris C. 
Fitch, V. Pres. Walter A Jones, 'Treas. Francis W. 
Homans, Sec. David S. Presson. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.-Street Ry. Co. of 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 14% m, 4-8)4 g, 25-40 lb r, 29 c, 
190 h. Pres. C. A. Otis, Cleveland, O., V. Pres. L. H. 
Wlthey, Grand Rapids, Treas. C. G. Swensberg, 
Grand Rapids, Sec I. M. Weston, Grand Rapids, Supt. 
A. Bevler, Grand Rapids. 

GREE CASTLE, I D Green Castle City St. 

Ry. Co. 2 m, 4-8)4 g, 23 lb r, 3 c, 12 h. I'res. & supt. 
D. Rogers, Sec. James S. Nutt, Treas. Rudolph 
Rogers. 

GREE VILLE, S.C.— Greenville City Ry. C0.1 m 
5g. — lbr, 5 c, 20 h. Proprietors, Gilreath & Harris. 

HALIFAX, N.S.— Halifax St Ry. Co. (Llm.)7m, 
4-8)4 g, 45-60 lbs. r, 15 c, 65 h, Pres. John Bothwell, 
Sec. & Treas. H. K. Adams, Supt. John C. Conlan. 
Offices, Room 39, Drexel Building, New York, and 
Halifax, N. S. 

HAMILTON, O.— The Hamilton St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 

3 g, 28 lb r, 11 c, 12 h. Pres. James F. Griffin, Sec. O. 
V. Parrlsh, Treas. H. L. Morey, Supt. J. C. Bigelow. 

HANNIF VL, MO.— Hannibal St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 
4-8)4 g. 36 lb r, 6 c, 22 h. Pres. & Supt. M. Doyle, 
Sec. & Treas. James O'Hern. 

HARRISBURG, PA.— Harrlsburg City Pas- 
senger Ry. Co. 5 m, 5-2)4 g. 42-47 lb r, 26 C, 65 h, 
Pres. H. A.Kelker, V. Pres. Daniel Epply, Sec. John 
T. Ensminger, Treas. R. F. Kelker, Supt. S. B. Reed. 
Capital, $62,500. office, 27 South 2d st. 

HARTFORD, CONN Hartford & Wethersfield 

Horse R.R. Co. 12 m, 4-8)4 g, 45 lb r, 49 c, 250 h. Pres. 
& Treas. E. S. Goodrich, sec. Geo. Sexton. 

HAVERHILL, MASS.— Haverhill & Groveland 
St. Ry. Co. m m, 4-4)4 g, 30 lbr, 12 c. 30 h. Pres. 
& Gen. Man. Jas. D. White, Treas. John A. Colby. 

HELENA, ARK.— Helena St. Ky. Co. 

HERKLMER, N. Y. — Herkimer & Mohawk St. 
Ry. Co. \y m, 4-8)4 g> 25 lb r, 3 c. Pres. J. M. Ans- 
men, Sec Joab Small, Treas. H. D. Alexander. 

HOBOKEN, N. .1.— North Hudson County Ry. 
Co. 16)4 m, 4-7 g, 50-60 lb r, 116 c, 630 h Pres. John 
H. Bonn, sec. F. J. Mallory, Treas. Fredk. Mlckel, 
Union, Supt. Nicholas Goetz, Union. 

HOLYOKJE, MASS.-Holyoke St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 
4-8)4 S, 35 lb r, 8 c, 26 h. Pres. Wm. A. Chase, Treas. 
C. Fayette Smith, Supt. H. M. Smith. 

HOT SPRINGS, ARK.— Hot Springs R.R. Co. 
3 m, 4 g, 25 lb r, 11 c, 30 h. Pres. S. W. Fordyce, Sec 
C. E. Maurice, Supt. J. L. Butterfield. 

HOUSTON, TEX.— Houston City St. Ry. Co. 14 
m, 4-8)4 g, 20-30-40 lb r, 40 c, 118 m. Pres. Wm. H. 
Sinclair, Galveston, V. Pres. & Gen. Man. H. F. 
MacGregor, Houston, Supt. Henry Freund, Houston, 
Sec. & Treas. E. H. Bailey. 

HUTCHINSON, KAN.— Hutchinson St. Ry. Co. 
2 m, 3-6 g, 35 lbr, 4 c, 24 h. Pres. A. L. Foisha, V. 
Pres. John Severance, Treas. S. W. Campbell, sec. 
Frederick A. Forsha. Office, 5 North Main st. 

ILION, N. Y.— Frankfort & Ilion Ry. Co. 2)4 m, 5 
g, 25 lb r, 4 c, 6 h. Pres. A. C. McGowan, Sec. D. Lewis, 
Treas. F. Remington, Supt. Frederick Gates. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND.— Citizens' St. Ry. Co. 
35 m, 4-8)4 g, 20-33-38-40-52 lb r, 70 c, 535 h. Pres. A. W. 
Johnson. Indianapolis, Treas. Tom L. Johnson, 
Cleveland, O. Sec. a. A. Anderson, Indianapolis, 
Man. W. T. Steele, Indianapolis, Auditor P. wool- 
aridge, Louisville, Ky. 

JACKSON, MICH.— Jackson City Ry. Co. — m, 
— g, — lb r, 11 c, 40 h. Pres. Hiram H. Smith, Treas. 
Samuel Hopewell, Gen. Supt. Henry H. Smith. 

JACKSON, MISS.— Jackson City R. R. l v, m, 5g 
3c, 9mu. Pres, P.W.Peoples, Sec. & Tr. J.B.Bnidford, 

JACKSON, TENN Jackson Street Ry. Co. 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA Pine St. R.R. Co. 2} 8 ' 

m, 5 g, 25 lb r, 4 c, 18 m. Pres. S. B. Hubbard; V. 
Pres. J. M. Schumacher; Treas. J. C. Greeley; sec. 
& Man. H. S. Ely. 

Jacksonville St. Ry. Co. 2% m, 5 g, 25 lb r, 10 c, 36 
m. Pres. H. S. Haines, Savannah, Ga., V. Pres. & 
Sec. Geo. R. Foster, Treas. W. P. Hardee, Savannah, 
Ga., Supt. G. W. Haines. 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL Jacksonville Ry. Co. 

Supt. B. F. Slbert. 

JAMAICA, N. Y.— Jamaica & Brooklyn R.R.Co. 
10 m, 4-8)4 g, 56-60 lb r, 29 c, 56 h. Pres. Aaron A. De- 
grauw, Sec. Martin J. Durea, Treas. Morris Fos- 
dick, supt. Wm. M. Scott. 

JAMESTOWN. N. Z.— Jamestown St. Ry. Co. 
3.67m 4-8)4 g, 30-42 lb r, 13 c, 15 h. Pres. R. N. Marvin, 
V. Pres. F. E. Glfford, Treas. A. N. Broadhead. Supt. 

G. E. Mattby, Sec. & Atty. C. R. Lockwood. 



24 



THE STEEET RAILWAY JOURNAL, 



November, 1886. 



JERSEY CITY, N. J.-Jersey & Bergen R. R. 
Co. 21 m, 4-10 g, 60 lb r, 73 c, 494 h. Pres. Chas. B. 
Thurston, V. Pres. wm. Keeney, Treas. C. B. Place, 
Sec. Warren E. Dennis, Newark, Supt. ihos. M. 

S YoHNSTOWN N. Y. — The Johnstown, Glovers- 
vllle & Klngsboro Horse R.R. Co. 5% m, 4-8% g, 26 lb 
r 6 c 16 h. Pres. James Younglove, V. Pres. R. l<an- 
cher,' Sec. & Treas., J. McLaren. 

JOHNSTOWN, PA.-Jnhnstown Pass. R.R. Co. 
7x m 5-3 s, 41-43 lb r,i3 c, 73 h. Pres. James Mc.Mil- 
len. Sec. B. L. Yeagley, Treas. W. H. Rosensleet, Jr., 
Supt. D. J. Duncan. Capital. $100,000. 

JOLIET, ILL.-Jollet City Ry. Co. m, 
g, 30 lb Johnson T r, 16 c, 30 h. & mu. l J rop. J. A. 
Henry, Supt. A. Blschman, Treas. J. Hulslzer. 

KALAMAZOO, MICII.-Kalainazoo St. Ry. Co. 
10 m 4-8 g, 35 lb r, 28 c, 80 h. Pres. Fred Bush, t-.ec. 
J. W. Bo'ynton, Treas. P. H. Brown. 

KANSAS CITY, MO.— Kansas City Cable Rj. 
Co 2}/m, 4-8k, g. 45 1br, 10 pass, cars, 10 dummy 
cars Pres. Wm. J. Smith, Sec. W. H. Lucas, Eng. 
Robert Gillham. Supt. Edward J. Lawless. 

corrlgan Consolidated St. Ry. Co. ;.'0 m, 4-1 g, 3C 
lb r 80 c, 350 h. Pres. Bernard Corrlgan, Gen. Man. 
Thos. Corrlgan, Sec. Jas. T. Kelley. 

Grand Avene Ry. Co. 6 m, 4-8,', g, 40 It) r, 3o C, 145 
h Pres. C. F. Morse, V. Pres. and Gen. Man. W. 11. 
Holmes, Engineers, Knight & Bontlcon, Auditor, T. 
J. Fry, Supt. C. F. Holmes. 

Jackson County Horse R. R. Co. 

Kansas City Electric Ry. Co. 1 m, 4 8% g, heavy 
girder r, 8 c, 4 electric motors ( Henry system). Pres. 
W W. Kendall, V. ires. Hugh L. McBlroy, Sec. & 
Treas. Warren Watson. Office, 1139 E. 5th St. 
Capital. $lo,000. 

Kansas City & Rosedale St. Ry. Co. 

KEOKUK, IA.— Keokuk St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 4-8% g, 
27 lb steel r, 12 c, 40h. Pres. Jas. H. Anderson, ec. 
Wm. E. Anderson. 

KINGSTON, ONT.) CAN.— Kingston St. R.R. 
Co M m, 3-6 g, 9 lb r, 10 c, 36 h. Pres. Kobert car- 
son, Sec. k Treas. P. Sargent, Man. William Wilson. 

KNUXV LEE, TENN.— Knoxville St. R.R. Co. 2 
m 4-8% S, 22 lb r, 5 c, 2 hacks, 30 h. Pres. W. P. 
Chamberlain, sec, Treas. & Supt. T. L. earn an. 

Mabry Bell Ave. & Hardee St. Ky. Co. Pres. K. N. 
Hood, sec. B. L. Smith. 

Market Sq. & Asylum t. Ry. C o. Pres. Peter Kern, 
Sec. W. H. Slmmonds. 

LACONIA, N. H.-Laconla & Lake Village Horse 
R K 2v m, 3 g, 34 lb r, 5 c, 17 h. Pres. A. G. Folsom, 
Treas. Edmund Little, Man. ela S. Keuniston. 

EA CROSSE, Wis. — La Crosse City Ky. co. 5 m. 
g 45 1br, 15 c, 65 h. Pres. B. K. Edwards, V. 
Pres Ceo. F. Gund, Treas. Fred Tillman, Sec. Jas. 
T Daggart, Supt. (North Division), Peter Valler 
Sunt. (South Division), Geo. F. Smith. 

LAFAYETTE, IND.-LaFayette St. Ky. 2%: m, 
4-8 vg 35 lb r, 6 c, 38 h. Pres J. B. Caldwell, LaFay- 
ette, sec. & Treas. E. G. Jones, Decatur, 111., supt. F. 
ureer, La Fayette. 

LAKE CITY, FLA.— Lake City St. Ky. Co. 

LAMPASAS SPRINGS, TEX.-Lampasas City 
Ky. ( 'o. 3v m, 4-8% g, 22 lb r, 6 c, 15 h. Receiver, — 
Maddox. 

LANCASTER. PA. — Lancaster & Mlllersviile St. 
\l Y (jo — m, 4 8% g, 3d lb r, 4c, 14 h. Pres. J C. 1 lager. 
V Pres H. S shirk, Sec. & Treas. Chas. Dennes 

Lancaster City St. Ky. Co. 1.1 m, 5-2 g. 38 lb r, 6c, 

4 b Pres W. D. sprecuer, Treas. J. 11. Banmgard- 
uer. Sec. Thos. B. Cochrane, Man. J. B. Lang. Gen. 
Ol'fLe. 120 North Queen st. 

LARCHHONT, N. Y. — Larehmont Manor Co. 1 
in 4-8 g, 25 lb r, 2 c, 8 h. Pres. C. 11. Murray, Treas. 

5 'h French, 38 East Fourteenth st , N. Y. City. 
LAWRENCE, KAN. -Lawrence Transportation 

Co. 5 m, 4-1 g, 38 lb r, 7 c, 34 h. Pres. H. Tisdale, 
Sec W H Bangs 

LAWRENCE, MAS!-..— Merrimack Valley Horse 
R K Co 5 4-5 in, 4-8J,, g, jy lb r, 20 c,70 h. Pres. w m. A 
Russell V. I'res. .las' Walton, Methuen, clerk & Treas 
James II. Eaton, Supt. A. N. Kimball. Lawrence. 

LEWISTON, ME.-LewlStOI) & Auburn Horse 
R R Co 1% m, 4-8i,, g) 32 lb r, 16 c,451l. Pres. Frank W 
nana Lewlston, Clerk, II. C. Little, Lewlst on, Treas. 
H C Packard, Auburn, Supt. E. P.Stluclifiekl, Auburn 

LEXINGTON, KY.— Lexington city Ky. Co. 5 
m 4-10 g, DO lbr, 20 c, 85 h. Pres. John Cross, V. 
Pres. C R Diver, Sec. & Supt. Bert, cross. 

LEXINGTON, MO . — Lexington St. Ky. co. 

LIMA, O.— Lima St. Ry. Co. 

LINCOLN. NEB Capital City Ky.Co. 4m, 4 8 1-2 

g 25 lb r, 8 c, 61 h. Pres. & Treas. E. B. Durfee, See. 

6 Supt H. B. Durfeee. 

Lincoln St: Ry. Co. 6y m, 10 c, 60 h. Pres Frank 
L- Sheldon, Supt L. P. Young. 

LITTLE ROCK, ARK. — Little Rock st.Ry. Co. 
iy, m 5-10 g, 36 lb r, 9c,S0 mu: Pies. T.J.Darragh.Sec 
A J Thompson, Tres. C F.Penzel, Sup.J.A.Garrett: 

Citizens' St. Ky. Co. 4% m, 4-io g, -_<0 lb r, 22 c, 80 h. 
Owned and operated by Little Rock Street Railw ay 
Co. Same offices. ^ t 

LOCK PORT, N. Y. (See New Roads.) 

LOGANSPORT, INI>.— Logansport Ky. Co. 2 m, 
40- 28 lb r, 6 c, 29 mu. Pres. Frank. G. Jaques, Sec. 
M.' Jaques, Supt. wm. P. Jaques. office, Urbana. 111. 

LONDON, CAN. -London St. R.R. Co. 3 m, i-Sy, 
g 30 lb r, 12 c, 30 h. Pres. V. Cronga, Sec. Jas. R. 
Flock, Supt. Henry Thos. Smith. 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. - Steinway & 
Hunter's Point R.R. Co. 30% m, 4-8* g, 47 lb r, 65 c, 
154 h Pres. Wm. Steinway, steinway Hall, N. Y . 
Citv ' V. Pres. Henry A. Cassebeer, Jr.., Steinway 
p o' Long Island CP y, N. Y. Sec. & Treas. Chas. F. 
Tretnar, Steinway Hall, N. Y. City. Supt. Chas. J. 
Campbell. Offices Steinway Hall, N. \. 

Dutch Kills & Hunter s Point R.R. — m, — g, — lb 
r — c, — h Pres, R. J. Gleason. 

' Long Island City & Newtown Ry. Co. 4% m, 4-8% g, 
45-55 lti r, 25 c, 60 h. Pres. Isaac Buchannan, N. Y. 
City Sec Geo. S. Crawford, Brooklyn. N. Y., Treas. 
Patrick J. Gleason, Supt. Michael Conway. Offices 
112 Front st. 

LONGVIEW, TEX. — Longvlew & Junction St 
Ry 3-6 g, 2 c, 4 h. Pres. F. T. Rembert, Sec 



R. B. Levy, Treas. F. L. Whaley, Supt. C. W. Booth 

LOS ANGELES, CAL.— Boyle Heights R.R. Co. 

Central R.R. Co. and the Sixth & San Fernando St, 
R.R. Co. 7 m, 3-6 g, 16 1br, 13 c, — h. Pres. E. T. 
Spencer, Sec. F. X. Palmer, supt. J. A. Falrchild. 

City & Central St. Ky. Co. iy m, 3-6 & 4-8 g, — lb 
r, 2g cars, 167 h. Pres. I. W. Hellman, Sec. Fred 
Harkness, Supt. Wm. Hawks. 

Los Angeles & Ahso Ave. St. R.R. Co. 

Main St. & Agricultural Park Ry. Co. Pres. W. J. 
Broderick, sec. col. John Wheeler, Supt. Wm Hawks. 

Second St. Cable Ry. Co. 6 c and 6 grip c. Pres. 
Jesse Garnell, sec. & Man. Edw. A. Hall, Eng. and 
Supt. Kibble. 

Temple. St. cable Ry. Co. 8 c. andsgilp c. Pres. 
Walter S. Maxwell, Supt. and Man. col. A. H. 
Wands 

LOUISVILLE, K Y.— Kentucky St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 

5-2 g, — lb r, 22c— h. Pres. T. J. Minary, Sec. & 
Treas. Thos. Donlgan. 

Central Pass. R.R. Co. — m, — g, —lb r, — c, — h, 
Pres. , V. I'res. Thos. J. Mmery. 

crescent Hill Ry. Co. 

Louisville city Ky. Co. 63 m, 5 g, 58 lb r, 214 c, — 
mu. Pres. Maj. Alexander Henry Davis, Syracuse, n 
Y., V. Pres. St. John Boyle, Sec. & Treas. R. A. Watts, 
Supt. II. II. Littell. 

LOWELL, MASS.— Lowell H orse R.R. Co. 6 m. 
814 g, 28-47 lb r, 28 c, 100 li. Pres. Wm. E. Living- 
ston, Gen. Man. J. A. Chase. 

Lowell & Dracut St. Ry. Co. 

LYNCHBURG, VA. — Lynchburg St. R.R. Co. 
^m. 5 1 g, 26 lb r, 6 c, 31 h. Pres. Stephen Adams, 
Treas. John L Adams, Supt. William M. Payne. 

LYONS, IA. — Clinton & Lyons Horse Ry. co. iy 
m, 3-8 g, 19-30 lb r, 15 c, 40 h. Pres. D. Joyce, V. 
Pres. & Man. R. N. Rand. 

MACON, GA.— Macon & Suburban St. R.R.Co. 6% 
m, i-Sy to, 20 lb T r, 20 c, loo mu. Pres. John S. 
Branstord, Nashvl le, Tenn., Sec. and Supt. Jno. T. 
voss. office. Elm st. 

Madison, ind.— Madison St.Ry. 0. £% m, 4 
g, 15 lb r, 7 c, 8 h, 10 mu. Pres. Jacob Wendle, V.Pres. 
Peter F. Robenllus, Supt. & Treas. Chas. F. Tuttle. 

MADISON, WIS.— Madison St. Ry. Co. 2y m, 3 
g, 23 lb r, 8 c, 7 h, 24 mu. Pres., D. K. Tenney, Sec. 
and Treas. B W Jones, Supt. A. R. Kentzler 

MANCHESTER, N. H. — Manchester Horse R.R. 
5%m, 3-% g, 27-34 lb r, 14 c, 55 h. Pres. S. N. Bell, 
I reas. F Smyth, Clerk J.A.Weston, Supt. A. Q.Gage. 

MAN KATO, MINN. — Mankato St. Ky.Co. 2m, 3-0g, 
27 lb steel r, 3 c, 10 h, Pres. and Man. W. M. Farr, 
sec. and Treas. John C. Noe, Capital, $50,000; office, 
So Front street. 

MAltSHALLTOWN, IA 3 m, 4 g, 25 lb r, 7 C, 

20 h. Pres. B. T. Frederick, Treas. T. E. Foley, sec. 
C. C. GUlman, Supt. A. E. Shorthill. 

MARYSVILLE, CAL.— City Pass. R.R. Co. 

MAYSV1LLE, K.- Maysville St. Ry. & T. Co. 
3 m, 20 lb r, 4-8% g, tic, 32 mu. Pres. L. W. Robertson, 
sec. & Treas. W. S. Frank. 

MECHANICSBURG, ILL. — Mechanlcsbui'g & 
Buffalo Ry. Co. 3% m, 3-10 g, 16 lb r, 3 c, 4 mu. I'res. 
J. N. Fullenwelder, Treas. A. T. Thompson, Sec. 11. 
Thompson. 

MEMP»ii*». I'K* . ■ mphls City R.R.Co. 16m, 
5 g, 38-40 lb r, 66 c, 320 h. Pres. R. Dudley Frayser, 
V. Pres. Thos. Barrett, Supt. W. F. Shlppey. 

MERIDIAN, MISS.— Meridian St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 
4-8 g, lBlbTr, 5 c. 11 mu. Pres.ceo S.conant, v. Pres 
and Sup. J. L. Handley, Treas. J. A. Kelly, Sec. R. M. 
Houston. 

MICHIGAN CITV, MICH.— MiChCily St.Ry Co. 

MLDDLETOWN, CONN. — Mlddletown Horse 
Ry. co 2 m, 6 c, 31 h. Pres. John M. Danlord, sec. 
and Treas. J. K. Guy, sup;;. Joseph Lane. 

MIDDLETOWN, O.— Mlddletown Horse R.R.Co. 
Pies John ML Douglas, Sec. & Treas, Jas. K. Guy. 

Mlddleton & Madison St. R.R. co. 2 m,5 9 g, — r, 4 
c, 8 h, Pres. F. Gunchel, Sec. and Treas. E. W. Gun- 
chel . 

All LLEES VILLE, PA — Lancaster & Mlllersviile 
sr. R.R.Co. (See Lancaster, Pa.) 

MILWAUKEE, WIS.— Cream City R.R. Co. 81-6 
in, 4-8>., g, 27-38 lb r, 74 c, 307 m, 2 h. Pres. Wlnfield 
MUith, V. Pies, clulstlan Preusser, Treas. Ferdinand 
Knehn, Sec. V in. Damkoehler, Gen. Man. D. At wood, 
Supi . 11. J. C. Berg. 

Milwaukee city Ry. Co. 30 m, 4-8% g, 27 lb iron & 
48 lb steel r, 80 c, 45a h. Pres. Peter M'ci.eoch, Sec. & 
Treas. Geo. O. Wheateroft. 

West Side St. Ky. CO. Owner & Manager, Wash- 
ington Becker, Sunt. McNaughton. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. — Minneapolis St. Ry. Co. 
62 m, 3-6 g. 27-35-45 lb r, 186 c, 1050 h and mu. Pres. 
Thos. Lowry, v. Pres. C. Morrison, Treas. W. W. 
Uernck. Sec. C. G. Goodrich, Supt. D. W. Sharp. 

AIOBILE, ALA.— City R.R. Co. 17% m, 5-2 g, 35 
lb T-r, 68 c, 240 h. Pres. Jno. Maguire, Sec. I. 
strausse, Treas. Myer I. Goldsmith, Supt. A. Moog. 

Dauphin & Lafayette Ry. Co. 2 m, 5-2% g, 40 lb 
r, 9 c, 10 h, 12 m. Pres. D.P. Bestor, V. Pres. <sz Sec.G. 
Y. overall. Treas. & Acting sec. Jas. W. Gray, Pur. 
Agt. & Man. J. B Robertson. 

Mobile & Spring Hill R.R. Co. 8 m, 5-2;,. g, 35 lb r, 
15 c, 35 h, 1 dummy. Pres. Daniel McNeill, Sec. & 
Treas. c. F. Sheldon, Man. F. Ingate. 

MOHAWK, N. Y. -Mohawk & Illon R.R. Co. 
\% m, 4-Sj,, s;, 30 lb r, 4 c (contract for motive power). 
Pres. o.W. Bronson, V.Pres. J. Brown,Sec.H. D.Alex- 
ander, Treas. R. M. Devendorff, Supt. O. W. Bronson. 

MO LINE, ILL.— MoUne Central St. Ry. CO. \y 
m, g, 3d lb r, 3 c, 10 h. Pres. S. H. Velle, v". 
Pres. P. H. Wessel, Sec. W. R. Moore, Treas. C. F. 
Hemenway. 

MoUne & Rock Island St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 4-8 v, g. 20 lb 
r, 13 c, 41 h. Pres. J. Huntoon, Sec. I. M. Butord, 
Treas. C. Lyons, Supt. Wm. Gamble. 

MONTGOMERY, ALA Capital City Electric 

St. Ry. Co. Electric motoiv. Pres. E. B. Joseph, 
Gen. Man. J. A. uaboury, Treas. Thos. E. Hannon, 
sec. Taylor Kobert. 

MONTREAL, CAN.— Montreal City Pass. Co. 21 
m, 4-8,1-0' g, — lb r, 76 c, 465 h. Pres. Jesse Joseph, V. 
Pres. Alex. Murray Sec. & Man. Ed. Lusher, Supt. T. 
II. Roblllard. 

MOULTRIE VILLE, S. C- Middle St. & Sulli- 



van's Landing Ry. 2% m, 4-8% g, 20 lb r, 7c 4 h. 
Pres. B. Callahan, Treas. B. Buckley. 

MT. VERM>N. N. Y.— Mt. Vernon St. Ry. Co. 

Mount Vernon&East Chester R.R. Co. Sy m, — g, 
— r, 7 c, 30 h. Pies. Wm. A. Butler, V Pres. Thos. 
Nlehols, Sec. Jas. T. Byrne, Treas. Ben]. L. Welt- 
heimer; office, 261 Broadway, N.Y. 

MUSCATINE, IA Muscatine CR7 Ry. Co. %y 

a, 3-6 g, 211b r, 7 c, 19 h. Pres. Peter Musser, V. 
Pres. D. C. Klchman, Sec. T. R.. Fitzgerald, Treas. 
S. M. Hughes, Supt. O. J. Chapman. 

MUSKEGON, MICH.— Muskegon Ry. Co. iJi m 
1-6 g, 20 lb r, 8 c, 26 h, 8 mu. Pres. F. A. Nlms, V. 
u res. chas. Merriam, Boston, Mass., Sec. Thomas 
Munroe, Treas. G. R. Sherman, Supt. C. H. Newell. 

NASHUA, N. II Nashua St. Ry. co. 2 m, 3 g, 35 

lbr, 5c,22 h. Pres, John A. Spalding, Clerk, R. D. 
Barnes, supt. Q. A. Woodward. Office, Kinsley St. 

NASHVILLE, TENN Nashville & Edgefield 

R.K. Co. F'atherland Street Railway Co. North Edge- 
field and Nashville St. R.R. Co., one management. 

5 m, 5 g, 16-20-32 lb r, 21 c, 100 mu. Pres. Jno. P. White, 
Sec. & Treas. H. B. stuublefield, Supt. D.Deaderick. 

McGavock & Mt. Vernon Horse R.R. Co. 7}< m, b g, 
16-20-28-32 lb r, 25 c, 140 h & mu. Pres. John P White, 
V. Pres. B. F. Wilson, Sec. & Treas. H. B. Stubble- 
field, Supt. Dalngerfield Deaderlck. 

south Nashville St. R.R. Co. iy m, 5 g, 16-20 lb r, 
10 c, 68 h. Pres. W. M. Duncan, Sec, Treas. & Supt. 
C. L. Fuller. 

NATICK, MASS.— Natlck & Cochltuate St. Ry. 
3 m, 4 8's g, 35 lb r, 6 c, 17 h. Supt. Geo. F. Keep. 
NEW ALBANY, IND New Albany St. Ry. Co 

6 m, 4-111- g, 25 lb r, 15 c, 55 h. & mu. Pres. Geo. T. 
Vance, Treas. Letltla v. Vredenburgh, Supt. & Pur. 
Agt. Wm. L. Tlmberlake. 

NEWARK, N. J.— Newark & Bloomfleld St. 
R.R. Co. 7 m, 5-2)4 g, -47 lb r, 22 c, 140 h. Pres. S. S. 
Battln, Sec. W. L. Mulford, Supt, H. F.Totten. Con- 
solidated with Essex Pass. Ry. Co. 

Essex Pass. R.K. 31 m, h-iy g, 471b r, 107 c, 702 h. 
Pres, S. s. Battin, Sec. F. F. Klrke, Supt. H. F. 
Totten. Paymaster, W. L. Mulford. office, 786 
Broad st. 

Newark & Irvington St. Ry. Co., 7 m, 5-2y g, 47 lb r, 
28 c, 130 h, Pres. S. S. Battin, Sec. W. L. Mulford, 
Supt. H. F. Totten. 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS.— New Bedford & Fair- 
haven St. Ky. CO. iy m, i-Hy g, 35-45-50 lb r,428 C, 140 

Pres. Warren Ladd, Treas. & Clerk, A. G. Pierce. 

Acushnet St. R.R. Co., 6 m, 4-8>rf g, 3S lb r, 29 c, 103 
h. Pres. Chas. E. Cook, Sec. & Treas. A. P. Smith. 

NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J.— New Brunswick 
Horse R.K. 4 m, 4-8 % g, 40 lb r, 5 c, 20 h. Pres. F. 
M. Delano, Treas. Carroll Sprigg. 

NEWBURGH, N. Y. — Newburgh St. R. R. Co. 
Pres. D. S. Haines, Sandy Hill. 

NEWBURYPORT, MASS.-Newburyport & 
Amesbury Horse R.R. Co. 6 1-3 m, 12 c, 54 h. Pres. 
W. A. Johnson, Treas. N. H. Shepard, Sec. Geo. H. 
Stevens. Lessee. E. P. Shaw. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN.— Fair Haven & Westvllle 
R.K. co. 7 m, iy g, 42 ib r, 23 c, 150 h. Pres. H. B. 
Ives, sec. & Tr. L. Candee, Supt. Walter A.Graham. 

New Haven & Centreviile Horse R.R. Co. 2y m, 
i-8y g, 42 lb r, 4 c, 30 h. Trustee Cornelius Plerponu 

New Haven & West Haven R.R. Co. (See West 
Haven). 

State Street Horse R.R. Co. 2y m, 4-8 g, 43,1b r, 4 c, 
40 h. Pres. C. A. Warren, Sec. & Treas. C. C. Blatchen. 

The Whitney Ave. Horse Ry. 2H m, i-8y g, 25 lb r, 
3 c, 25 h. Pres. Geo. H. Watrous, Sec. George D. 
Watrous, Treas. Ell Whitney, jr. 

NEW MARLBORO, O.— Kankapot R.R. Co. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA.— Canal & Claiborne St. 
R. H. Co. 13 m, 5-2y g, 37 lb r, 40 c, 200 h. Pres. E. J. 
Hart, Sec. & Supt. Jos H. DeGrange. 

Crescent City R.R. co. 26 m, 5-2^ g, 35-45 lb r, 30 c, 
4(10 h. Pres. Frank Roder, Sec. & Treas. Jno. J. Ju- 
den. Supt. A. V. Smith. 

New Orleans St. R.R. Co. 

Orleans R.R. Co. — m, — g, —lbr, 32 c, J40 h. 
&mu. Pres. & Supt. H. Larqule, Sec. u Treas. P. 
Cou^ot. Office, cor. White * Laharpe sts. 

st Charles St. R.R. Co. 15 m, 5-2;^ g, 35 lb r, 60 c, 
366m. Pres. & Supt. Alden McLellan, Sec. V. Kivlere. 

New Orleans & Carrollton R.R. Co. 8 m, i-8y g, 30- 
45 lb r, 65 c, 200 h, 19 engines. Pres. Wm. Behthuy- 
sen, Sec. Walter F. Crouch, Supt, C. V. Haile. 

New Orleans City & Lake R.K. Co. 64 m, 5-2% g, 

46- 40 lb r, 180 c, 39 coaches, dummy engines, 1050 mu. 
Pres. J. A. Walker.Sec.W.E. Leverich, Supt. F. Wlntz. 

NEWPORT. KY.— Newport St. R.R. Co. 

NEWTON, MASS.— Newton St. Ry. Co. (See 
New Roads.) 

NEW YORK, N.Y.— Ninth Ave. R.R. Co. 10 m, 
i-8y g, 60 lb r, 52 c, 530 h. Pres. W. H. Hays, Sec. & 
Treas. James Affleck, Supt, lleman B. Wilson. Offi- 
ces, Ninth Ave., cor. 54th st. 

Broadway & Seventh Ave. R.R. Co. 16 m, i-8y g, 

47- 60 lb r, 150 c, 1,350 h. Pres. Henry Thompson, Sec. 
& Treas. Thos. B. Kerr, Supt. Henry A. Newell. 
Office 761, seventh Ave. 

Central Crosstown R.R. Co. r,-22 m, 4-8% g, 52 lb r, 
45 c, 241 h. Pres. Geo. S. Hart, V. Pre=. A. Cammack, 
Sec. & Treas. Milton I Masson, Office 365 Ave. A. 

Central Park, North & East River R.R. Co. 19 m, 
i-by g, 60 lb r, 162 c, 1,225 h. Pres. J. H. Scrblner, 
v. Pres. C. D. Wyman, Sec. H. Scrlbner, Treas. J. L. 
Valentine, Supt. M. W. A. Harris. Office, Tenth 
Ave.. 53d. & 54th. st. 

Chambers St. & Grand St. Ferry R. R. Pres. II. 
Thompson. 

Christopher & Tenth St. R.R. Co. 5 m, 4-8 g. 45 lb 
r, 47 c, 290 h. Pres. Jacob Sharp, Treas. W. T. Hatch, 
Sec. & Supt. G. W. Lynch. Office, 168 Christopher st. 

Dry Dock, East Broadway & Battery R.R. Co. ltS% 
m, 4-8% g, 60 lb r, 187 c, 1,132 h. Pres. William White, 
Auditor E. T. Landon, Sec. & Treas. Richard Kelly, 
Sunt. Fred F. White. Offices, 605 Grand st. 

Eighth Ave. R. R. Co. 20 m, i-8y g, 60 lb r, 112 c, 
1155 h. Pres. W. H. Havs, Sec. & Treas. James Affleck, 
Supt. H. B. Wilson. Office, Eighth Ave. & soth st. 

Forty-second Street & Grand Street Ferry R.R. Co. 
10% m, 8-4 g, 64 lb r, 50 c, 500 h. Pres. Chas. Curtis, 
Sec. & Treas. E. S. Allen, Supt. John M. Calhoun. 

Office, 653 W. 42d St. 
Forty-second St., Manhattanville and St. Nicholas 



November, 1886. 



25 



Avenue Ry. Co. 18% in. Pres. Dan'l D. Conover, 
Sec. and Treas, John P, Roberts, Supt, Abram L. 
Smltn. Offices 42d street ana 7th aves. 
Harlem Bridge, Morrisanla & Forciham Ky. 16.37 in, 

4- 8% g, 45-60 ib r, 85 c,318h. Pres. and supt, H. Sprat- 
ley, V. Pres. Richard M. Hoe, Sec. & Treas. wm. 
Caudwell. Office, North. Third Ave, near 170 st. 

Houston, West Street & Pavonla Ferry R.R. Co. 
112-3 m, 4-8% g, 60 lb r, 50 c, 450 h. Pres. Rich, Kelly, 
Sec. & Treas. Daniel B. Hasbrouck. Office,415 E.10 St. 

Jerome Park R.R. 1 2-3 m, i-8% g, 50-56 lb r. Pres. 
Leonard M. Jerome, Sec. Fred A. Lovecraft, Treas. 
Theodore Moss. Office, cor. 5th. Ave. & 22d st. 

New York City St. Ry. Co. 10 m, [not In operation]. 
Pres. Loomls L. White, Sec. W. L. McCorkle, Treas. 
Wm. L. Skldmore. 

New York & Harlem R.R. Co. 17% m, 4-8% g, 60-75 lb 

r, 161 c, 1,560 h. Pres. V. Pres. & 

Sec. Cornelius Vanderbllt, Treas. Ed. V. W. Rossl- 
ter, Supt. Alfred Skltt, Pur. Agt. P. S. Semis. 

Sixth Ave. R.R. Co. 9% m, 4-8% g, 60 lb r, 127 c, 
1296 h. Pres. Frank Curtlss, Sec. and Treas, Henry 
S . Moore, Supt, Edw E. Moore. Office, 75S 6th Ave. 

South Ferry Ry. Co. 1% m, 4 8% g, 60 lb r, 13 c, 
41 h. Pres. Hen ry Hart, Sec. Wm. N. Cohen, Treas. 
Albert J. Ellas, Supt. Chas H. Meeks. Office 20 
Whitehall st. 

St. Nicholas & Crosstown R, R. Co. (See New 
Roads.) 

The second Ave. R.R. Co. 28 m, 4 8% g, 60 lb r, 316 
9cars, 1750 h. Pres. W. Thorn, V Pres. J. Wadsworth, 
Sec. & Treas. J. B. Underbill. Office Second Ave. cor. 
96th st. 

The Third Ave. R. R. Co. 16 m main line, 6% m 
10th Ave. cable line, 4 m 125th street cable line, 4-8% 

g, 60 & 74 lb r, 318 c, 2150 h. Pres. Lewis Lyon, 739 
Madison ave., V. Pres. Henry Hart, 110 Tribune 
Building, Sec. Alfred Lazarus, 436 W. 61st St., Treas, 
John Beaver, 211 13. 112th St., Supt. John H. Robeit- 
son, 307 E. 65lh st. 

Twenty -third St. R.R. Co.14 m, 4 S% g, 54 lb r, 102 c, 
692 h. Pres. Jacob Sharp, Sec. Thos. H. McLean, 
Treas. Lewis May, Act-Supt. George Ferry. Office 
621 West 23d st. 

NIAGARA FALLS, N. Y — Niagara Falls & Sus- 
pension Bridge Ry. Co. 3% m, 4-8% g-, 38-42 lb r, 8 
c, 36 h. Pres. Benj. Flagler, sec. W. J. Mackay, Treas. 
A. Schoellkopf. 

NORFOLK, VA.— Norfolk & City R.R. Co. 3%m, 

5- 2 g, 44 lb r, 18 c, 65 h. Pres. John B, Whitehead, 
Treas. H. C. Whitehead, Supt. E. W. Savage. 

NORTH ADAMS, MASS.— North Adams Horse 
Ry. Co. 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. — Northampton St. 
Ry. Co. 3% m, 4-8% g, 32 lb r, 7 c, 26 h. Pres. Oscar 
Edwards, sec. M. H. Spaulding, Treas. & Sup. E. C. 
Clark 

NORWALK, CONN.— NorwalK Horse R.R. Co. 

2 m, 4-10 g, — lb r, 7 c, 20 h. Pres. James W. Hyatt, 
V. Pres. & Sec. Edwin G. Hoyt, Sup. James W. Hyatt. 

NORWICH. CONN Norwich Horse R.R. Co. 

OAKLAND, CAL.— Alameda, Oakland & Pied- 
mont R.R. 
Berkley Villa R.R. 
Broadway & Piedmont St. R.R. Co. 
Fourteenth St. R.R. Co. 6 m. 5 g, 20-30 lb r, 6 c, — 

h. Pres. & Supt. Walter Blair, Sec. P. J. Van Loben. 
Oakland R.R. Co. 

Oakland, Brooklyn & FruitvaleR. R. Co. (See East 
Oakland.) 

OGDE v CITY, UTAH Ogden City Ry. Co, 

3 m, 4-8% g, 20 1br, 4 c, 21 h. Pres. L. W. Shurtle, 
Ogden City, V. P. & Supt. O. P. Arnold, Salt Lake 
City, Sec. & Treas. H. S. Young, Ogden City. 

OGDENSBURG,N. Y.— Ogdensburg St Ry.Co.5m. 
4-s% g, 2> lb. r, 6c, 18 h. Pres. W. H . Daniels, Treas. 
W. A. Egert, sec. W. H. Daniels. 

OLEAN, N.Y Olean St. Ry. Co. 1% m, 3-6 g, 

25 lb r, 3 c, 8 h. Pres. M. B. Fobes, Sec. & Treas. M. W. 
Barse. 

OMAHA, NEB.— Omaha Horse Ry. Co. 15 m, 
4-8^ g, 35 lb r, 40 c, 300 h. Pres. Frank Murphy, V. 
Pres. ouy C. Barton, Treas. W. W. Marsh, Supt. W. 
A. Smith, cable (see new roads.) 

Omaha Tramway Co. 

ONEIDA VILLAGE, N. Y Oneida Ry. Co. 2 

m, i-8y, g, 47 lb r, 3 c, 6 h. Pres. Jerome Ulckox, 
Sec. & Treas. W. E. Northrup, Supt. Chas. Bonta. 

OSHKOSH, WIS Oshkosh St. R R. Co. 3% m, 

4-8% g, 27 lb r, 9 c, 24 h. Pres. Leander Choate, V. 
Pres. F. Zentner, Sec. & Treas J. Y. Hull, Sup. F. L. 
Thompson. 

OSWEGO, N.Y.— oswego St. Ry. Co. 2% m, 4-8% 
g, 45 lb r, 3 c, 23 h. Pres. Jas. F. Johnson, v. Pres. 
R. J. Oliphant, Sec. Haynes L. Hart, Treas. Robt. G. 
Post, Gen. Man. James O'Connor. 

OTTAWA, ONT — Ottawa City Passenger Ry.Co. 
3 m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 9 c, 40 h. Pres. Thomas C. Reef- 
er, V. Pres. R. Blackburn, Sec. James D. Fraser. 

Ottawa St. Ry. Co. 

OTTUMWA, IA Ottumwa St. R.R. Co. 2 m, 3-6 

g, 27 lb r, 4 c, 2 h, 14 mu. Pres. J. M. Hedrlck, Sec. & 
Treas. H. L. Hedrick, Supt. C. M. Hedrick. 

Mineral Springs St. Ry. 1 m, 3% g, 16 lb T r, 1 c 4 h. 
Owner, L. E. Gray. 

PALATKA, FLA Palatka St. Ry. Co. 

PARIS. TEX Paris Ry. Co. 1% m, 4-8% g, 22 lb 

r, 2 pass. 4 ft c, 16 mu. Pres. L M. Daniel, Sec. Geo. M. 
Daniel, Treas. D. J. Latimer, Supt. C. G. Caviness. 

PATERSON, N. J Paterson &z Passaic R.R. Co. 

7 m, 4-10 g, 33 lb r, 16 c, 24 h. Pres. John N. Ter- 
hune, Treas. John I. Brown, Sec. K. S. Brown, Man. 
iJ Pur. Agt. Ambrose T. King, Supt. M. O. Rourke. 

Paterson City R.R. Co. 6y m, 4-8% g, 35 lb r, 12 c, 
31 h. Pres. Garrett Planten, Treas. Helmas Romaine, 
Sec. Albert A. Wilcox. 

PAWTUCKET, R. I.— Pawtucket St Ry. Co. 8 
m 54 lb r. 

PENSACOLA, FLA.— Pensacola St. Ry. Co. 

PEORIA, ILL.— Central City Horse Ry. Co. 4% 
m, 4-8% g, 40 lb r, 60 c, 1 35 h. Pres. H. R. Woodward, 
ilea M. Pneffer, Treas. Elliot Callender, Supt. John 
strong. 

Fort Clark Horse Ry. Co.— m,— g,— lb r,— c,— h.— 
Pres. J. H. Hall. 

Peoria Horse Ry. Co. 7% m, 4-8% g, 40 lb r, 63 c, 
140 h. Pres. H. woodward, Sec. M. Pfelffer, Treas. 
H. N. Wheeler, Supt. John Strong. 



PETERSBURG H, VA.-J'etersburgh St. Ry. Co. 
3% m, 4-8% g, 42 )b r, 9 c, 44 h. George Beadle, Pro. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. -Citizens Pass. Ry. Co. 
10^ m, 5-2 g, 45 47 lb r, 92 c, 420 h. Pres. John Mc- 
Carthy, Sec. & Treas. J. J. Adams, Sup. Sam'l Cllne. 
Office, n w cor. 12th and Susquehanna ave. Capital, 
$192,500. 

Empire Pass. Ry. Co. 8% m, 5-2 g, 45 lb r, 32 c, 250 
h, Pres. James McManes, Sec. and Treas. John I. 
Adams. Office, n w cor. 12ih st. and Susquehanna av. 

Frankford & Southwark Phlla. City Pass. R.R. Co. 
18 m, 5-2 g, 47 lb r, 102 c, 8 dummy c, 618 h. Pres. 
Henry Getger, Sec. & Treas. Geo. S. Gandy, Supt. W. 
H. Janney. Capital, $750,000. 
.German town l'ass. Ry. Co. 29% m, 5-2% g, 47 lb r, 
Cars and horses, leased. Pres. Craig D. Ritchie, 
Treas. Lewis S. Renshaw, Sec. R. H, Parks. Office, 
n w cor. 10th and Chestnut sts. 

Hestonvllle, Mantua & Falrmount Pass. R.R. Co. 20 
m, 5-2 g, 43 lb r, 50 c, 480 h. Pres. Charles F. Laffer- 
ty, Sec. & Treas. W. C. Foster. Office, 4,300 Lancas- 
ter ave. 

Lehigh Ave. Pass. Ry. Co. Pres. John Lamon, Sec. 
Chas. A. Porter, Treas. John L. Hill. [Track not laid.] 

Lombard <s South Sts. Pass. Ry. Co. — m, 5-2 g, 43 
lb. r, 51 c, 278 h. Pres. John B. Parsons, Sec. & Treas. 
Francis Hazelhurst Supt. Jno. M. Gaughen. Office, 
2,509 South st. 

People's Pass. Ry. Co. 44 m,5-2g, 47 lb r, 125 c, 1,080 
h. Pres. John B Parsons, sec. & Treas. Jno. C. Des- 
salet, Supt. Wm. Uagenswller. 

Philadelphia City Pass. Ky. Co. 7 m, 5-2% g, 47 lb 
r, — c, — h. Pres. Wm. W. colket, Sec. & Treas. T. 
W. Pennypacker. (Leased to Phlla. Traction Co.) 

Philadelphia Traction Co. 109 m, 5-2 !<> g, 45-78 lb r, 
594 c 2,942 h. Pres. W. H. Kemble, V. Pres. P. A. B. 
Wldener & W. L. Elklns. Treas. D. W. Dickson Of- 
fice, n w cor. 4lst and Haverford sts. 

Philadelphia & Darby Ry. Co. 6% m, 5-2% g, 42 
lb r, road leased. Pres. C. L. Borle, Sec. and Treas. 
Wm. W. Colket. Office, 202 Walnut pi. Leased to 
Phlla. City Puss. Ry. Co. 

Philadelphia & Gray's Ferry Pass. R.R. Co. 10 1-3 
m, 40 c, 200 h. Pres. Matthew Brooks, Treas. J. C. 
Dawes.Sec.J.Crawford Dawes. Supt. Patrick Lovett. 
Office, 36th st. and Gray's Ferry Rd. 

Ridge Avenue Pass. Ry. Co. 14 m, 5-2 g, 47 lb r, 55 
c, 352 h. Pres. E. B. Edwards, V. Pres. John Lam- 
bert, Sec. & Treas. Wm. S. Blight, Supt. Wm. lnges. 

Second & Third Sts. Pass. Ry. Co. 37 m, 116 c, 669b. 
Pres. Alexander M. Fox, Treas. William f. Miller, 
Sec. Charles D. Matlack, Supt. David W. Stevens. 

Seventeenth & Nineteenth sts. Pass, Ry. Co. 7% m. 
Pres. Matthew S. Quay, Sec. & Treas. John B. Ped- 
dle. [Leased to Philad'a. Traction Co.] 

Thirteenth & Fifteenth Sts. Pass. Ry. Co. 14 m, 5-2 

g, 43 lb r, 73 c, 452 h. Pres. Thos. W. Ackley, Sec. & 
Treas. Thos. S. Harris, Supt. Wm. B. Cooper. 

Union Pass. Ry. Co. 70 m, 348 c, 1,724 h. Pres. 
Wm. H. Kemble, Sec. & Treas. John B. Peddle, Supt. 
Jacob C. Petty. (Leased to Phlla. Traction Co.) 

West Philadelphia Pass. Ry. Co. 18% m, 122 c, 646 

h. Pres. Peter A. B. Wldener, Sec. & Treas. D. W. 
Dickson. (Leased by the Phlla. Traction Co.) 

PHILLIPSBURGH, N. J. — Phlllipsburgh Horse 
Car Ry.Co. 2% m, 4-8 g, 351b r, 4 c, 13 h. Pres. 
Daniel Runkle, Sec. & Treas. James W. Long. 

PITTSBURGH, PA Central Pass R.R. Co. 3m, 

16 c, 95 h. Pres. J F. Cluley, Sec. F. L. Stephenson, 
Treas. E. R. Jones, Supt. R. G. Heiron. 

Citizens' Pass. Ry. Co. 16% m, 5-2% g, 47 lb r, 40 c, 
337 h. Pres. Jno. G. Holmes, Sec. C. M Gormly, 
Supt. Murry Verner. Treas. Jas. J. Donnell, Capital, 
$200,000. 

Federal St. & Pleasant Valley Pass. Ry. Co. 26 m, 
5-2% g, 46-50 lb r, 20 c, 154 h. Pres. Wm. H. Creery, 
Sec. R. F. Ramsey, Treas. James Boyle, Supt. Wm. J. 
Crozler, Allegheny City. 

People's Park Pass. Ry. Co. 2 m, 5-2% g, 45 lb r, 

10 c, 75 h. Pres. Wm. McCreery, Sec. R. F. Ramsey, 
Treas. James Boyle, Supt. Wm. J. Crozler, Allegheny 
City. 

Pittsburgh, Allegheny & Manchester Pass Ry. Co. 

5 m. 5-2% g, 46 lb r, 40 c, 275 h. Pres. Chas. Atwell, 
Sec. & Treas. Chas. Seibert, Supt. James C. Cotton.' 
M anager J. P. speer. 

Pittsburgh, Oakland & East Liberty Pass. Ry. Co. 

11 m, 5-4=4 g, 47 lb r, 32 c, 110 h, 61 mu. Pres. J. T. 
Gordon, Sec. John G. Traggardh, Treas. A. W. 
Mellon, Supt. H. M. Cherry. 

Pittsburgh Union Pass. R.R. Co. 5 m, 5-2^ g. 45 It 
r, 29 c. 170 h. Pres. Chas. Atwell, Supt. James C. 
Cotton, Sec. & Treas. Chas. Seibert, Cash. Saml. C. 
Hunter. 

Pittsburgh & Birmingham Pass. R.R. Co. 3% m, 5- 
2% g, 48 lb r, 20 c, 170 h. Pres. W. W. Patrick, Sec 
D. F. Agnew, Treas. John G. Holmes. 

Pittsburgh & West End Pass. Ry. Co. 3y m, 5-2 g, 
35 lb r, 13 c, 75 h. Pres. John C. Reilly, Sec. & 'I reas. 
Thomas S. Bigelow, Supt. William .1. Burns. 

Pittsburgh & Wilkinsburg St. Ry. Co. 

Second Avenue Pass. Ry. Co. 3% m, 5-2% g, 47 lb r, 
8c, 60 h. Pres Geo. Fawcett, Sec. Jas. F. Fawcett, 
Treas W. J. Fawcett. 

South Side Pass. R.R. Co. 2% m, 5-2% g, 45 lb r, 12 
c, 80 h. Pres. D. Z. Brickell, Sec. & Treas. W. T. Wal- 
lace, Supt. W. M. Rosborough. 

Transverse Pass. Ry. Co. 6% m, 5-2 g, 52 lb r, 39 c, 
243 h. Pres. C. L. Magee, V. Pres. C. F. Klopfer,Sec. 

6 Treas. Vv'ra. R. Ford, Supt. Miller Elliot. 
Wilkinsburg & East Liberty Ry. Co. (See new 

roads.) 

P1TTSTON, PA. — Plttston St. R.R. Co. 1% m, 
3c, 5 h. Pres. Thomas Griffith, Treas. M. W. Morris, 
Sec. William Allen. 

PLYMOUTH, MASS Plymouth & Kingston St. 

R. tt. Co (See new roads.) 

PORT HURON, MICH.— Port Huron St. Ry. Co. 
6% m, 4-8% g, 7 c, 22 h. Pres. Jno. P. Sanborn, V.Pres. 
Frank A. Beard, Sec. Treas. & Man. J. R. Wastell. 

PORTLAND, ME.-Ocean St. R.R. Co. 

Portland R.R. Co. 7% m, i-8% g, 30-33-45 lb r, 34 c, 
154 h. Pres. H. J. Llbby, Treas. & Gen. Man. E. A. 
Newman, Supt. Geo. W. Soule. 

PORTLAN D, ORE.— Portland St. Ry. Co. 2m, 
3-6 g,25-42lb r,li c,40 h. Pres.D. P. Thompson, Sec & 
Supt, C. K. Harbaugh. 



Multnomah St. Ry. Co. 2% m, 3-6 g, 30 lb r, 19 c, 65 
h. Pres. A. N. King, Sec. E. A. King. 

Transcontinental St. Ry. Co. 7 m. 3-6 g, 381br, 15 
c, 65 h. Prest. Walter V. Burrell, D. W. Wakefield, 
Sec, Tyler Woodward, Supt. 

PORTSMOUTH, o.— Portsmouth St. R. R. Co. 
2 m, 3-6 g, 18 lb r, 4 c, 10 h. Pres. James Skelton, 
Treas., Sec. & Supt. Enas Reed. 

POTTSVILLE. PA.— People's Ry.Co.9:<;ni,i6c,56h. 

POUGHKEEFSIE, N. Y City R.R. Of Pough- 

keepsie. 4 m, i-8% g, 35-42 lb r, 11 c, 38 h. Pres. Geo. B, 
Adrlance V. Pres. & Treas. Hudson Taylot sec. A. 

B. Smith, Supt. C. M. Davis, office 491 Main St. 
PROVIDENCE, It. I.— Union R.R. Co. 53 m, 4- 

8% g, 47-54 lb r, 230 c, 1,300 h. Pres. Jesse Metcair, 
V. Pres. & Gen. Man. D. P. Longstreet, Sec. and 
Treas. C. A. Babcock. 

QUEBEC, CAN.— Quebec St. Ry. Co. 3 m, 4-8S 
g, 45 lb r, 9 c, 46 h. Pres. Chas. St. Michel, Quebec, 
V. Pres. G. R. Renfrew, Quebec, Sec, Treas. & Supt. 
Samuel Moore. 

St. John St. Ry. Co. Llm. 1!5 m, 4-8% g, 35 lb r, 4 c, 
23 h. Runs 4 'buses out 4 m. from city limits. 
Pres. Jos. W. Heury, V. Pres. A. Robertson, Sec. & 
Man. W. W. Martin. 

OUINCY, ILL.— Quincy Horse Ry. & Carrying 
Co. 6 m, 5 g, 71 lb r, 21 c, 118 mu. Pres. Lorenzo Bull, 
Sec. C. H. Bull, Supt. E. K. Stone. 

RACINE, WIS.— Belle City St. Ry. Co. 1 m 4g3u 
lb r, 9 c— 40 h. Pres. John T. Fish, Sec & Treas. E. S. 
Dodge, Gen. Man. Geo. B. Hathaway. 

RAPID CITY. DAK Rapid City St. Ry. Co, 

Pres . Fred. T. Evans. 

READING, PA — Reading City Pass. Ry. Co. 
2 1-5 m, 5-2% g, 45 lb r, 19 c, 44 h. Pres. B. F. Owen, 
V. Pres. Jas. L. Douglass, Sec. & Treas. H. A. Muhlen- 
berg, Supt. J. A. Rlggs. 

Perkiomen Ave. Pass. Co. 2 1-5 m, 5-2% g, 46 lb r, 
13 c, 41 h. Pres. Chas. Breneiser, Sec & Treas. Isaac 
lllester, Supt. John B. Houp. 

RED OAK, IA. — Red Oak St. R.R. Co. l^m,4-2% 
g. flat r, 2c, 2h, 2 mu. Pres. J. W. Judkln3, V.Pres.G. 
West, Sec. F. M.Byriket, Treas. & Supt. F.O. Judklns. 

RICHMOND, IND.— Richmond City Ry. Co. 3 m, 
8 g, 9 lb r, lo c, 30 h. Pres. J. Y. Miller, V. Pres. Jos. 
Rulllff, Treas. H. 1. Miller, Supt. F. M. Francisco. 

RICHMOND, ILL.— Richmond St. R.R. Co. 

RICHMOND, VA — Richmond CltyRy. Co. 7% m, 
4 8% g, 30-45 lb r, 40 c, 180 h. Pres. J. L. Schoolcraft, 
sec. & Treas. Walter Kidd, Man. C. M. Bolton, Supt. 
Charles Selden. 

Richmond & Manchester Ry . & Imp. Co., 2%m, 26 h, 
4 c. Supt. B. R. Selden. 

ROCHESTER, N.Y Rochester City & Brighton 

R.R. CO. 37 m, 4-8% g, 25-30-45 lb r, 142 c, 696 h, 
Pres. Patrick Barry, Sec. C. C. Woodworth, Treas. 

C. B. Woodworth, Supt. Thomas J. Brower. 
Citizens' St. Ry. Co. Pres. Wm. H. Jones, Sec & 

Treas. J. E. Pierpont, supt. S. A. Green. 

ROCKFORD, ILL Rockford St. Ry. Co. 6 2-5 

m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 13 c, 52 h. 16 m. Pres. Anthony 
Haines, V. Pres. L. Rhodes, Sec Miss A. C. Arnold, 
Treas. N. E. Lyman, Supt. Fred. Haines. 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL.— Rock Island & Milan St. 
Ry. Co. 7 m, 4-8% g, 20-30-42 lb r, 10 c, 7 h. Pres. & 
Supt. Bally Davenport, Sec. E. H. Hunt, Treas. J. F. 
Robinson, 2 m, with horses, 5 m, with motor. 

RONDOUT. N. Y Kingston City R. R. Co. 3 

m, 4-8% g, 40 lb r, 10 c, 40 h. Pres. James G. Llnds- 
ley, V. Pres. S. D. Coykendoll, Sec. & Treas. John C. 
Romeyee, Supt. Wm. H. DeGarmo. 

RUTLAND, VT. -Rutland St. Ry. Co. 8 m, 4-8% 
g, 2u lb r, 8 c, 3u h. Pres. M. Quin, Sec. John N. 
Woodfln, Treas, A. H. Tuttle, Supt. M.McKeough. 

SACRAMENTO, CAL.— Sacramento CltyRy, Co. 
121-horse and 10 2-aorse c Prop. R. S. Carey, Supt. 
Geo. W. Carey. 

SAGINAW, MICH — City ot Saginaw St. R. R. 
Co. 2% m, 4-8% g, 42 lb r, 10 c, 50 h. Pres. David H. 
Jerome, V. Pres. Geo. F. Williams, sec. &Treas. Geo. 
L. Burrows, Supt. Fred G. Benjamin. 

SALEM, MASS.— Salem & Danvers St. Ry. Co. 
6 m, 4-8% g, 35-47 lb r, 15 c, 45 h. Pres. Ben]. W. Rus- 
sell, Sec. G. A. Vickery, Treas. Geo. W. Williams, 
Supt. W. B. Furgurson, Asst. Supt. David N. Cook. 

Naumkeag St. Ry. Co. — m, 4-8% g, 30-35-45 lb r, 50 
c, 140 h. Pres. Chas. odell, Clerk Joseph F. Hickey, 
Treas. Henry Wheatland, Supt.Willard B. Ferguson. 

SAL1NA. N. Y. — Woodlawn and Butternut St 
Ry. Co. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.— Salt Lake City 
R.R Co. 13 m, 4-8% g, 20 lb r, 20 c, lis mu. Pres. lohn 
Taylor, Sec. David McKenzle, Treas. James Jack, 
Supt. Orson P. Arnold. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEX San Antonio St. Ry. Co. 

15 m, 4 g, 30 lb r, 38 c, 125 mu. Pres. A. Belknap, San 
Antonio, V. Pres. F. W. Pickard, N. Y. City, Treas. 
I. Withers, San Antonio, Sec. E. R. Norton, Supt 
John Robb. 

Prospect Hill St. Ry. Co. 

SANDUSKY, O.— Sandusky St. Ry. Co. 2 m,- 

g, — lb r, — c, — h. Pres. Chas. B. Ods, Sec. & Treas. 
A. C. Morse, Supt. Clark Rude. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL California St. R.R. Co. 

Central R. R. Co. 12 m, 5 g, 45 lb r, 31 c, 290 h, 
Pres. Chas. Main, V. Pres. S. C. Bigelow, Treas. A. 
J. Gunnison, Sec. C. V. LeBreton Supt J. F. Clark 

Clay St. Hill R. R. Co. 1 m. 3-6 g, 30 lb r, 11 c, 12 
dummy cars. Pres. Joseph Britton, V. Pres. James 
Moffit, Treas. Henry L. Davis, Sec. Chas. P. Camp- 
bell, Supt. Joseph Britton. 

Geary St. Park & Ocean R.R. Co. 9% m, (5% m 
cable, 4% m steam) 5 g, 45 lb r, 39 c. Pres. Daniel 
Meyer, V Pres. R. F. Morrow, Treas. S. C. Bigelow, 
Supt. Johnson Reynolds, Sec. John N. Syrne. 

Market St. Cable Ry. Co. 12% m, 4-8% g, 37-38 lb r. 
1S2 c, 2 motors, 82 h. Pres. Leland Stanford, V. Pres, 
Chas. P. Crocker, Treas. N. T. Smith, Sec. J. L. Wll- 
lcutt, Supt. H. D. Morton. Office, Fourth and 
Townsend streets. 

North Reach & Mission R.R. Co. 8 m, 5 g, 46 c, 400 

h. Pres. Carl Ahpel, Sec. II. w. Hathorne, Treas. 
Wm, Alvord, Supt. M. Skelly. 

Ocean Beach Ry Co. (operated by Market St. 
''able Ry Co.) 2 m. Pres. Leland Stanford, V. 
Pres. Chas. F. Crocker, Treas. N. T. Smith, Sec. J. 
L. Willcutt, Supt. H. D. Morton. 

Omnibus R.R. & Cable Co. 8% m, 5 g, 35-45 lb r, 50 



26 



November, 1886 



c, 364 h. Pres. Gustav Sutro, V. Pres. D. Callaghan, 
Sec. G. Ruegg, Supt. M. M. Martin. 

Park & Ocean K.K. Co. 4.62m, 35 and 401b r, 4-8% 
g, 7 dummy engines, 16 pass, c, 6 flat and section t. 
Pres. Clias. F. Crocker, V. Pres. Timothy Hopkins, 
Treas. N. T. Smith, Sec. J. L. Willcutt, Supt. H. 
D. Morton. 

Potrero & Bay View R.R. Co. 1% m, 5 g, 35 lb r, 
10 c, 43 h. Pres. Leland Stanford, V. Pres. Chas. 
Crocker, Treas. N. T. Smith, Sec. i. L. Willcutt, Supt. 
H. O. Rogers. 

Powell & Jackson St. R. K. Co. (see new roads.) 

Sutter St. R.R. Co. 5% m, 4-11 g, 35-45 lb r, 40 c, 
180 h. Pres. R. F. Morrow, Sec. A. K. Stevens, Treas. 
M. Schmltt, Supt. James McCord. 

Telegraph Hill R.R. Co. 1,500 ft, 4-8% g, 45 lb r, 
a c, — h. Pres. Gustavo Sutro, V. Pres. C. Kohler. 
Sec. & Supt. Chas. J. Werner. 

The City R.R. Co. 11 m, 5 g, 45 lb r, 72 c, 280 h. 
Pres. R. B. Woodward, V. Pres. Geo. E. Raum, Sec. 
M. E. Willis, Treas. Jas. II. Goodman, Supt. William 
Woodward, Master Car Builder, Frank O. Landgram. 

SAN JOSE,CAL.— San Jose & Santa Clara R. It. Co. 
8% m, 4-8 and 3 g wide g, 4i> lb r, narrow g 20 lb r, 25 
c, 75 h. Pres. S. A. Bishop, V. Pres. W. S. Mc- 
Murtry, Treas. Jacob Rich, Sec. E. M. Rosenthal, 
Man. Win. Fitts. office, 20 W. Santa Clara St. 

First St. R. R. & Willow Glen R. R. 7% m, 3 g, 20 
lbs. r, 8 c. 10 h, Jacob Rich, Sole owner, Sec. E. M. 
Rosenthal. Office, 20 Santa Clara St. 

First St. & San Pedro St. Depot R.R. Co. 

North side Horse R.R. Co. 2% m, 3 g, 10 lb r, 3 c, 
10 h. Pres. & Man, Jacob Rich, sec. E M. Rosenthal, 
Treas. S. A. Bishop. 

Willow Glen R.R. 7H m, 3 g, 2ii lb r, fic, 30 h. Sole 
owner Jacob Rich, Sec. E. M. Rosenthal, office 20 
W. Santa Clara st. 

SANTA BARBARA, CAL Santa Barbara St. 

R.R. Co. l m, 3-0 g, 3 c, 8 mu. Pres. A. w. McPhalL 

SARNIA, CAN.— Surnla St. Ry. Co. 2%m, 4-8 g, 
.32 lb r, 2 c, 9 h. Pres. J. F. Lister, Sec. & Treas. Thos. 
Symington, Supt. Henry W. Mills. 

SAUGATUCK, CONN. — Westport & Saugatuck 
Horse R.R. Co. (See Westport, conn.) 

SAVANNAH, G A.— City & Suburban Ry. Co. 18% 
m, 5 g, 10-30 lb r, 49 c, 110 h, 3 engines. Pres. J. H. 
Johnson, Asst. J. W. Alley. Treas. E. Schmidt. 

Coast Line R.R. Co. 7 m, 5g, 30 lb r, 17 c, 37 h 
Pres. Geo. Parsons, .\ew York, Sec, Treas. & Gen. 
Man. R. E. Cobb, Savannah. 

SAYKE, PA Sayre St. Ry. Co. Pres. Howard 

Elmer. 1 See new roads.) 

SCRANTON, PA People's St. Ry. Co. 934 m, 

4-8% g, 25-52 lb r, 19 c, 70 h. Pres. Win. Matthews, 
Sec. & Treas. J. C. Piatt. 

Scranton Suburban Ry. Co. (see new roads.) 

SEARCY, ARK.— Searcy & west Point R.R. Co, 
8 m, 4-8% g, 20 lb r, 7 c, 6 mu. Pres. A. W. Yarnell 
Sec. W. H. Llghtle, Treas. Jasper Hicks. 

SEATTLE, \V. T. — Seattle St. Ry. Co. 3% m 
4-8% S, 35 lb r, 5 c, 20 h. Pres. P. II. osgoua, Sec. 
Geo. Klnnear. 

SEDALIA, MO.— Sedaila St. Ry. Co. 2^ m, 4-10 
r, 22 lb r 6c 25 h. Pres. Joseph L>. Slcher, V. Pres. 
Louis Deutsch, Treas. F. H. uuentlier, Sec. Chas. 
S. Conrad. 

SELMA, ALA.— Selma St. R.R. 2% m, 18 lb r, 5 
c, 8h. Pres. E. Oilman, Sec. & Treas. J. H. Ilollls, 
Supt. W. liohlia. 

SENECA FALLS, N.Y.— Seneca Falls & Waterloo 
R.R. Co. 7 m, 4-8% g, 4u lb r, 4 c, dummies. 

SEVASTOPOL, IA.— Des Moines & Sevastopol 
St. R.R. Co. \% m, 4g, 36 Ibr, 2 c, 12h. Pres. G. 
Van Glnkel, Sec. G. O. Van Ginkel, Treas John 
Weber. Offic •, Main st. 

SHERMAN, TEX. — Sherman City R.R. Co. 3^m 
6 g, 211 lb r, 7 e, 32 mu. Pres. C. W. Hat sell, Treas. 
J. M. Batsell. sec. C. W. Batsell, Jr. 

SHREVEPORT, LA — Shreveport City R.R. Co. 
1% m, 4-4 g, ifi lb r, 6 c. 14 h. Pres. Peter Youree. 

SILVER CLIFF, COL.-Silver Cliff St. R.R. CO. 

SIOUX CITY, IA — Sioux City St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 
4 g, — r, 8 c, 52 mu. Pre . Fred. T. Evans, V. Pres. 
D. A. M agee. Sec. & Treas I'red Evans, Jr. 
• SOUTH BE^D, INI).— South Bend Railway Co 
6 m. 4-s% g, 30 lb r, 17 c, 49 h. Pres Jacob Woolver- 
ton. Treas Lucius 1 lark, Sec W G George. Office, 
212 W Market st, Utlca, N Y. 

South Bend and Mishawauka St. Ry. Co. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL Chicago Horse & 

Dummy R.R. 5 m, 4-8^, —lbr, — c, — h. Pres. 

D. L. Huff, Treas. A. C. Calkins, See. E. R. Bliss. 
[Not in operation.] 

South Chicago City Ry. Co, 4 c, 8 U.. Pres. An- 
drew Rehm. Sec. & Supt. A. KrlmWtl, Treas H. 
Shearrer. 

SOUTH PUEBLO, COL Pueblo St. R.R. Co. 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL Citizens' St. R. R. Co. 

9% m, 3 6 g, 20-36 lb r, 29 c, 100 h. Pres. J. II. Schriek, 
Treas. Frank Relsch, sec. Chas. F. Harman. 

Springfield City Ry. Co. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS Springfield St. Rv. Co. 

4-8% g, 33-40 lb r, 30 e, 120 h. Pres. John Olmstead, 
Auditor L. E. Ladd, Clerk Gideon Wells, Treas. A. 

E. Smith, Supt. F. E. King. 
SPRINGFIELD, MO. — Citizens" Ry Co. of Spring- 
field and No Springfield, 5% m, 5-Si, and 4.10 g, 30, 
33 and 40 lb r, 16 c, 70 h & mu. Pres" R C Kerens, V 
Pres B F Hobart, Sec and Treas A M Long-well, 
Supt F B Smith, Ex-Com L II Murray, H F Den- 
ton, C B McAfee. 

SPRINGFIELD, O. — Citizens' St. R.R. Co. 10m, 
4g, 29 c. 135 h. Pres. D. W. Stroud, v. Pres. A. S. 
Bushnell, Treas. Rose Mitchell, Sec. F. S. Penfield, 
Supt. W. H. Hanford. 

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Staten Island Shore Ry. 

ST. CATHARINE'S, ONT St. Catharine's, Mer- 

rllton & Thorold St. Ry. Co. 5% m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, S 
c, 32 h. Pres. E. A. Smyth, Sec. S. R. Smyth, Supt. 
E. A. Smyth. 

ST. JOHN. N. B.— St. John St. Rf. Co. 7 m, 
4-8% g, 45-C0 lb r, 15 c, 65 h. Pres. John R. Both well. 
Sec. & Treas. John J. Pyle. Office Room 39 Drexel 
Building, New York, and St. John, N. B. 

ST. JOSEPH, MO Citizens' St. R.R. Co. 3 m, 

4-8% g, 28 lb r 14 c, 52 mu. Pres. Richard E. Turner, 
Sec. & Treas.' Arthur Kirkpatrick, supt. John F. 
Merrlam. 



Frederick Ave. Ry. Co. 1% m, 3 g, 16 lb r, 6 c, 16 h. 
Pres. Thos E. Tootle, V. Pres. Winslow Judson, Sec. 
W.D.B. Motter, Treas. Thos W. Evins, Sup. S. Rowen. 

St. Joseph & Lake St. R. R. Co. 

Union Ry. Co. — in, — g, 20, 30 and 52 lb r, 27 c, 110 
h. Pres Seymour Jenkins, Sec & Treas S Stein- 
acker, Supt Harvey E Lewis. Office, cor Highland 
and St. Joseph Avenues. 

ST. LOUIS, MO Baden & si. Louis R.R. Co. 

3% m, 4-10 g, — lb r, 7 c, 21 h. Pres. George S. Case, 
V. Pres. William Z. Coleman, Supt. J. H. Archer. 

Bent on & Belief ontaine Ry. Co. 7% m, 4-10 g, 45 lb r, 
29 c, 200 h. Pres. J. G. Chapman, V. Pres. Chas. 
Parsons, Sec. & Treas. Robert McCulloch. 

Cass Avenue & Fair Grounds Ry. Co. 8% m, 4-10 g, 
38 lb r, 39 c, 285h. Pres. W. R. Allen, V. Pres. Geo. W. 
Allen, Sec.&Treas. J. W. Wallace, Supt. G. G. Gibson, 
Cashier O. H. Williams. 

Citizen's Ry. Co. — m, — g, —lb r, — c, — h. Pres. 
Julius S. Walsh. V. Pres. J. P. Helfenstine. 

Forest Park, Laclede & Fourth St. Ry. Co. Pres. 
Chas. H. Turner, Sec II. B. Davis. 

Jefferson Ave. Ry. Co. Pres. John M. Gelkeson, 
Gen. Alan. John Scullin, Sec. C. K. Dickson. 

Llndell Ry. Co. 13% m, — g, — r, 65 c, 475 h. Pres 
John II. Maquon, V. Pres. John II. Lightner, Sec. & 
Treas. ceo. W. Baumhoff, Supt. Jos. C. Llewellyn. 

Northern Central. 

Missouri lt.R. Co. — m, — g, — lb r, — c, — h. Pres. 
P. c. Maffit, Sec. W. D. Henry. 

Mound City R.R. Co. Pres. John. Scullin, Sec. & 
Treas. C. M. Seaman. Supt, Jas. Sullivan. 
."^People's line. Pres. Chas. Green, Sec. John Ma- 
nouey. supt Patrick Shea. 

Southern Ry. Co. 7 4-5 m, 4-10 g, 35-52 lb r, 49 c, 250 
V. Pres. E' R. Coleman, Sec. J. S. Minary, Man. W. 
L. Johnson. 

St. Louis R. R. Co. 11 m, 4-10 g, 38-44 lb r, 58 c, 375 h. 
Pres. c. Peper, sec. & Treas. R. B. Jennings, supt. 
Chas. 1 scher. 

St. Louis cable & Western Ry. Co. Pres. M. A. 
Downing, V. Pres. F. M. Colburn, Sec. & Treas. E. F 
Claypool, Man. Geo. F. Branham. 

Tower Grove « Lafayette Ry. Pres. Chas. Green, 
Sec. John Mahoney, Supt. Patrick Shea. 

Union Depot R.R. Co. — m, — g, — lb r, — c, — h. 
Pres. John scullin, v. Pres. & Treas. C. M. Seaman, 
supt. Jas. H. Roach. 

Union Ry., Co. Pres. Julius S. Walsh. V. Pres. J. P. 
Helfenstine, sec. & Treas. M. J. Moran, supt. Michael 
Moran. 

ST. PAUL, MINN.— St. Paul City Ry. Co. 37 m, 
4-8% g, 45-52 lb r, 82c, 600 h. & mu. Pres. Thos. Lowry 
V. Pres. C. (i. Goodrich, Sec. A. Z. Levering, Treas. 
Clinton Morrison, Supt. A. L. Scott. 

STO EHAM, MASS Stonebaili f-t. R. R. CO 

•Z% m, 4-8% g, 33 lb r, 10 c, 2b h. Pres A V Lynde, Mel, 
rose, Treas. & Clerk Lyman Dyke, Supt. John 1 1 i 11- 

STILLWATER, MINN Stillwater St. Ry. Co. 

STILLWATER, N. Y Stillwater & Mechanlcs- 

vllle St. Ry. Co. 4% m, 4-8% g, 25-30 lb r, 3 c, 6 h- 
Pres. S. Rowley, V. Pres.. W. L. Denison, Gen. Supt. 
Peter Van Yeghten, Sec. & Treas. lidw. I. Wood. 

STKOUDSBURGH, PA.— Stroudsburgh Passen- 
ger R. R. Co. 1 4-5 m, 4 -8% g, 28-30 lb r, 3 c, 9 h. Pres. 
« Treas. J. Lantz, Sec. Jacob Houser. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y — Syracuse & unondaga R.R. 
Co. 2 3-5 in, 4-8 g, 28-47 lbr, 9 c, 18 h. Pres. Peter 
Burns, V. Pres. Chas. P. Clark, Sec. & Treas. Lyman 
C. smith, Supt. W. B. Thompson. 

Central City Ry. Co. 2% m, i-Sy, g, 40 lb r, 12 c, 37 
h. Pres. Daniel Pratt, V. Pres. Jonathan C. Chase, 
Sec. & Treas. James Barnes, Supt. oeorge Crampton. 
4 Syracuse Savings Bank Building. 

Fifth Ward R.R. Co. 2% m, 4-8% g, 35-56 lb r, 8 c, 
30 h. Pres. P. B. Brayton, V. Pres. John D. Grey, 
Sec. & Treas. O. C. Potter, supt. Hugh Purnell. Office 
W. Washington st. 

Genesee & Water St. R.R. Co. and Fourth Ward 
R.R. Co. 4 m, 4-8% g, 18-30 lbr, 10 c, 35 h. Pies. 
Robt. G. Wynkoop, V. Pres. Wm. II. H. Smith, Sec. 
& Treas. Geo. J. Gardiner, Supt. W. J. Hart. Onon- 
daga Savings Bank Building. 

New Brighton & Onondaga Valley R.R. Co. 1% m, 
4-8 g, 16-35 lb r, 2 c, 6 h, 1 dummy. Pres. Matthias 
Britton, Sec. T. W. Meacham, Treas. J. u. Anderson. 
Supt. J. H. Anderson. 

seventh Ward Ry. Co. 

Syracuse & Geddes Ry. Co. 2% m, 4 g, 30-45 lb r, 7 c, 
33 h. Pres. R. Nelson Gere, V. Pres. Chas. C. Hubbell, 
Sec. & Treas. Rasselas A. Bonta, Supt. Wm. J. Har t. 
Gen offices, 1 Onondaga Co. Bank Building. 

Syracuse « South Bay St. Ry. Pres. H. McGone- 
gal, V. Pres. W. S. Wales, Treas. A. E. Matthews, 
Sec. James C. Rami. Office Room c, VMeting Block 

Third Ward Ry. Co. Pres. W. B.Cogswell, Sec 
& Treas. W. S. Wales. 

TAMPA, FLA. — Tampa St. Ry. Co. Sec. Geo. 
T. Chamberlain. 

TAUNTON, MASS.— Taunton St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 
4-8% g, 14c, 45 h. Pres. Wm. C. Lovering, Treas. 
Henry M. Lovering, Clerk, orville A. Barker. Supt. 
Geo. C. Morse. 

TERRE HAUTE, IND Terre Haute St. Ry. Co. 

m m, 4-8% g, 28 lb r, 16 c, 48 n. Pres. T. C. Buntln, 
v.Pres. Josephus Collett, sec. John R. Hagen, Supt. 
John T. Shriver. 

TEXARKANA, ARK Texarkana St. Ry. Co. 

TOLEDO, OHIO — Toledo Consolidated St. Ry. 
Co. 17% m, 4-8g,42' 2 lb r, 41c, 200 h. Pres. J. E. 
Bailey, Sec. A. E. Lang. 

Adams Street Ry. Co. 

Metropolitan St. Ry. Co. 10 m, 3 g, 28-35 lb r, 31 c, 
101 h. Pres. & Sec. Jno. J. Shipherd of Cleveland, 
Treas. H. E. Wells of Cleveland, Gen. Man..T. F. 
Shipherd, Supt. Jno. A. Watson. 

Monroe Street R.R. 

The Central Passenger R.R. Co. of Toledo, O. 8 m, 
3 k, 27 lb r, 17 c, 70 h. Pres. F. E. Seagrave, Treas. & 
Man. A. R. Seagrave, Supt. Joseph Murphy. 

TOPEKA, KAN — Topeka City Rv.Co. 9 m, 4 g,25- 
48 lb r, 25 c, 90 h. Pres. Joab Mulvarie, V. Pres. D. W. 
Stormont. Sec. & Treas. E. Wildes, Supt. Jesse Shaw. 

TORONTO, CAN — Toronto St. Ry. Co. 60 m. 
4-loy g, 301b r, 160 c, 750 h. Pres. Frank Smith, Sec 
James Gunn, Supt. John J. Franklin. 

TRENTON, N. J.— Trenton Horse R. R. Co. 3 
m,5-2 g, 43-48 lb r, 10 c, 33 h. Pres. Gen. Lewis Perrlne, 



Sec. & Treas. Lewis Perrlne, Jr., Supt.ThomasS Morris. 

City Ry. Co. 7 m, 5-2% g,35 lb r, 19 c, 110 h&m.Pres. 
Adam Exton, V. Pres. W. H. Sklrm, Sec.H. B. Howell, 
Treas. & Mang. Director Chas. Y. Bamlord. 

TRINIDAD, COL.— Trinidad St. R.R. Co. 1% m, 
3-2 g, 14 lb r, 2 c, 8 mu. Pres. S. H. Jaffa, Treas. F. 
B. collier, Sec. R, L. Wootten, Supt. H. E. Pearson. 

TROY, N.Y.— Cortland & Homer Horse R R. Co., 
4 m, 4-8% g, 25-30 lb r, 2 c, h. Pres. C. H. Garri- 
son, Troy, V. Pres. E. A. Fish, Cortland, N.Y., Treas. 
Jas. M. Milen, Cortland, Sec. s. E: Welch, Cortland. 

Troy & Albia Street Ry. Co.- 3% m, 4 g, 35-45 lb r, 
9 c, 41 h. Pres. Thos. A. Knickerbocker, Sec. & Treas. 
Theo. E. Ilaslehurst, Supt. W. R. Bean. 

Troy & Lansingburgh R.R. Co. 21% m, 4-8% g, 47 lb 
r, 91 c, 466 h. Pres. William Kemp, V. Pres. Charles 
Cleminshaw, Sec. & Treas. Joseph J. Hagen, supt. 
L. C. Brown, Asst. Supt. C. H. Smith. 295 River st. 

URBAiSIA, ILL.— Urbana 8, Champaign St. Ry. 
Co. 2 m, 4-8% g, 33 lbr, 4 c, 20 h. Pres.Wm. Park, 
Sec. & Treas. Frank G. Jaques, Supt. W. Park. 

UTICA, N.Y.— Utica, Clinton & Binghamton St. 
R.R. 10 1-3 m, 4-8% g, 43-56 lb r, 17 c, 82 h. Pres. 
Isaac Maynard, See. & Treas. Robt. S. Williams, Supt. 
Roger Rock. 

The Utica & Mohawk R.R. Co. 3% m, 4-8% g, 25-04 
lbr, 9 c, 5 h. Pres. Jas. F. Mann, Sec. Wm. E. 
Lewis, Treas. J. H, sheehan. 

Utica Belt St. Ry. Co. (See new roads.) 

VAILSBURGH, N. J.— Newark, so. Orange 
Ferry St. & Hamburg Place R.R. Co. 

VALE.IO, CAL Valejo St. Ry. Co. 

VICKSBURG, MISS Vicksburg St. Ry. Co. 

Hill City R.R. CO. 

VINCENNES, IND Vlncennes St. Ry. Co. 

WACO, TEX.— Waco St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 4-8 g, 

14-18 lb r, 9 c, 44 h. Pres. E. Rotan, Sec. & Treas. W. 
R. Kellum, Supt. J. W. sedbury. 

WALTHAM, MASS Waltham & Newton St. 

Ry. Co. 3 s m, 3-8 % g, 30 lb r, 7 c, 18 h. Pres. R. E. 
Robblns, sec. & Treas. Henry Bond. 

WASHINGTON, D.C.— Capital, No O St. & SO. 
Washington R.R. 13% m, 4 8 g, 35 lbr, 45 c, 176 h. 
Pres. C. White, Sec. & 'i reas. W. E. Boughton, Supt. 
Andrew Glass. 

Anacost la & Potomac River Ry. Co. 3 m, 4-8 g, 37 
lb r, 9 c, 24 h. Pres. II. A. Griswold, Sec. Edward 
1'emple, Treas. T. E. Smlthson. 

Columbia R.R. co. of the District of Columbia. 2% 

ji. g, lbr, 19 c, 56 h. Pres. H. A. Wlllard, Sec. 

& Treas. Wm. H Clayette, Supt Thos. E. Benson. 

Metropolitan R.R. Co 21% m, 4 8 g, 38 lb r, 90 c, 400 
h. Pres. George W. Pearson, V. Pres. A. A. Wilson, 
Sec. & Treas. William W. Moore, Supt. L. W. Emmart 

Washington & Georgetown R.R. Co. 20 m, 4-8% g, 
42 lb r, 173 c, 850 h. Pres. H. Hurt, Sec. & Treas. C. M. 
Koones, Gen. supt. C. C. Sailer. 

WATERFORD, N. Y.— Waterford & CohoesR.R. 
Co. 2 m, 4-8% g, 45 lb r. Pres. Thos. Breslin, Sec. 
& Treas. C C. ormsby. (Leased by the Troy & Lan- 
singburgh R.R. CO.) 

WATERLOO, IA.— Waterloo St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 3 
g, 211 lb r, 2 c, 1 baggage wagon, 9 h. Pres. Loran W. 
Reynolds, Sec. and Treas. J. II. Kuhn, Man. M. K. 
Kent. 

WEST HAVEN, CONN New Haven & West 

Haven R.R. Co. 6 m, 4-8% g, 54 lb r, 24 c, 115 h. Pres. 
Geo. R. Kelsey, Supt. W . W. Ward, Treas. D. 'irow 
bridge, sec. Sam'l L. Smith. 

WESTPORT, CONN Westport & Saugatuck 

Horse R. R. Co . 1% m, 4-8% g, 40 lb r. 3 c, 5 h. Pres. 

A. S. flurlbutt, Sec and Treas B L Woodwerih, 
Supt E S Downe 

WHEELING, W. VA Citizens Ry. Co. 10 m, 

5-2 y, g, 45 lb r, 211 c, 55 h. Pres. Dr. C. A. Wlngelter. 
Sec. Van B. Hail, Supt. Michael I o.tus. 

Wheeling & Elm Grove R.R. 7 in, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 12 
c, 4 Baldwin Motors. Pres. J. D. DuBois, Sec. E. J. 
Rutter, Supt. E. Hlrsch. 

WICHITA, KAN.— Wichita City Ry. Co. 7%m, 
lie, 60 mu, 4 h. Pres. B. H. Campbell, V.Pres., 
Treas. & Gen. Man. E.R.Powell, sec. G. W. Lara- 
nier, Atty. E. C. Ruggles. 

WILKESBARRE, PA. — Wilkesbarre& Kingston 
Pass. R.R. 

Coalville Passenger R.R. 2^m, 4-8% g, 20-34 lbr, 
3 c. 10 h. Pres. Geo. W. Klikendall, supt. A. S. Orr, 
Sec and Tre'ts Geo Loveland. Capital, S62.675 

WILLIAMSPORT, PA.- Willlamspoi t St. R.R. 
CO. 

WILMINGTON, DEL.— Front & Union St. Pass- 
enger Ry. Co. 1 \i m, 5-2 g, — lb r, 7 c, 20 h. Pres. 
Geo. W. Bush, Supt. Sam'l A Price, Treas. E. T. 
Taylor. 

Wilmington City Ry. Co. 6 m, 5-2% g, 45 lbr, 19 
c, 80 h. Pres. W. canby, Sec. & Treas. John F. Miller, 
supt. Win. H. Burnett. 

WINDSOR, CAN.— Sandwich & Windsor Passen- 
ger R.R. CO. 

Windsor & Walkervllle Electric Ry. Co. 

W1NFIELD, KAN Union St Ry Co 2%m 4 

g, 28 lb r, 2 c, 8 mu Pres ■ Shuler, V Pres H E 

SUliman, Treas John D Pryor, Sec John A Eaton 
Capital, $25,000 

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, CAN.— The Winni- 
peg St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 4 8% g, 35 lb r, 13 c, 75 h. Pres. 
Duncan MacArthur, Sec. & Mangr. Albert W. Austin, 
Supt. Geo. A. Young. 

WINONA, MINN.— Winona City Ry. Co. 4 m, 3-6 
g, 27 lb r, 10 c, 39 h. Pres. John A. Mathews, V. Pres. 

B. H. Langley, Sec. & Treas. C. H. Porter. 
WOBURN, MASS No. Woburn St. Ry. Co. 

•1 % m, 4 8 %g, 40 lb. r. 5 c, 4 h. Pres. & Treas. J. R. Car- 
ter. Supt. Dexter Carter. 

WORCESTER, MASS.— Worcester St. Ry. Co. 
6% m, 4-8% g, 43-45 lb r, 28 c, 151 h. Pres. Geo. H. 
Seeley, Supt and Treas Henrys Searls 

Citizens' St. Ry. Co. Pres. Chas. B. Pratt, Sec. & 
Treas. F. W. Brigham. 

WYMORE, NEB Wymoreand Blue Springs Ry 

Co. 2% m, 3-6 g, 3 c, 8 h. Pres. E.P. Reynolds, Rock 
Island, 111., V. Pres. I. H. Reynolds, Gen. Man. Ben- 
Reynolds, sec. Treas. and Acting Supt. E. P. Rey. 
nolds, Jr. 

YOUNGSTOWN, O.— Youngstown St. R.R. Co. 

ZANESVILLE, O.— Zanesvllle & Mclntire St. Ry. 
Co. 3 m, 3-6 g, 38 lb r, 12 c, 54 m. Pres. J. Bergen, 
Sec. W. C. Townsend, Treas. T. B. Townsend. 



27 



NEW JROADS. 

BIRMINGHAM, Ai-A East Lake Land Co. 

7 m. i-H)4 g, 45 lb r, 4-8 c, motor power. Pres. Kobt. 
Jennlsou, v.-Pres. a. A. Clisby, Treas. T. B. Lyons, 
Sec. S. M. Hauby. Capital $200,000. Work In pro- 
gress, to be completed In January, 18S7. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y Union Ky. Co. of the City 

of Brooklyn. 

OOVlN«TON, GA.-W. C. Clark & Co. incorpor- 
ators and owners. 1 m, 20 or 3o lb r, 2 pass, c, 2 flat 
c, pass, cars tor 1 h, 6 to 8 mu. or h. work will be 
commenced by Nov. 1 or delayed until spring. 

CHICAGO, II.,!,.— The Crosstown Pass. Ky. Co. 
of Chicago, 30 m, 4-8 1-2 g, 45 lb r, 75 c, 500 to 800 h. 
Pres. John J. Currar, Treas. Geo. P. Bunker, Sec. 
James A. Taylor. Capital stock, $1,000,000. cen. of- 
fice, room 18, No. 104 Washington st. Time of com- 
mencement of work undecided. 

DANBUUY, CONN Danbury St. Ry. Co. 4m, 

between Danbury and Bethlehem. Work In pro- 
gress. 

KANSAS CITY, MO Grand Avenue Ity. Co. 

(For officers see Directory). Now constructing: 8 
in, double track cable road. 

LOCKPORT, N. Y.— Lockport, St. Ky. Co- 
(Work In progress.) 

MEK1WEN, CONN.-Merlden St. R. it, i% m, 
4-8% g, 35 lb r, 12 c, 56 h. John L. BUlard, Man. 
Work under contract. 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN.— New Britain Tramway 
Co., chartered by C. S. Lander. 3J<?m, capital $25, 000. 

NEW LONDON, CONN New London Horse Ky. 

Co. John Tebbetts, Incoporator. 

NEWTON, MASS.— Newton St. Ky. Co. 5 m, 
4 8% g, 5C. 5 electric motors, 35 lb r. Pres. Horace 
B. Parker, V. Pres. LnciusG. Pratt, Treas. Herbert 
G. Pratt. Capital stock, $60,000. Present office, 87 
Milk st. Boston, Mass. Work will be commenced and 
the road opened in the spring of 1887. 

NEW YORK, N.Y.— St. Nicholas and Crosstown 
R. R. C o. (Incorporated and franchises partly 
granted.) 

OMAHA, NEB.— Cable Tramway Co. of Omaha, 

4 m, 4-8 1-2 g, 58 lb r, K) c, each with grip; operated 
by cable. Pres. S R. Johnson, V. Pres. L. B. Wil- 
liams, Sec. and Treas. C. E. Yost, Chief Engineer 
Robert Glllham. Capital stock, $300,000. General of- 
fice, 215 South 13th st. 

PLYMOUTH, MASS.— Plymouth & Kingston St. 
R.R. Co. 2% m, 4 8X g. rundecldeo, 6 to 10 c, 10 
to 12 h. Capital stock, $25,000. Joseph D. Thurber 
and others Incorporators. Work to be begun in 
spring of 1887. 

PITTSBURG, PA.— Wilklnsburg and East Lib- 
erty Ry. Co. 3 m, 4-81-2 g, Johnson Trails, Pres. Ed. 
Jay Allen, Sec. and Treas. W. H, Allen. To use about 

5 c and 20 h. Not decided when road will be open- 
ed. Capitalstock, $15,000. Present office, si7 Woodst. 

SCRANTON, PA.— scranton Suburban Ry. Co. 
In process of construction, will use electric motor 
on Van Depoele system. To be In operation about 
Nov. 15, 1886. 2 1-8 m, 4-8 1-2 g, 52 and 40 lb r, number 
of c>>rs undecided. Pres. Edward B. St urges, Treas. 
T. F. Torrey. Sec. Geo. Sanderson. 

SAN FliANCISCO, CAE The Powell & Jack- 
son Sc. R.R Co. 11 m, 3-6 g. Pres. W. J. Adams, V. 
Pres. H. H. Lynch, Treas. W. H. Martin, sec, G. H. 
Waggoner. Capital stock, $2,000,000. Work in pro- 
gress. Cable traction. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. — Butternut St. Ry. Co. 2m. 
To be built in the spring of 1887. 

SAYRE, pa.— Sayre St. Ry. Co. Pres. Howard 
Elmer. No work done. 

STAMFORD, CONN.— J. B. Curtis and W. W 
Jillisbee, Incorporators. 

UTICA, N. Y Utica Belt Line St. Ry. Co. 8 m, 

15 c. Pres. Dr. C Tefft, V. Pres. W. A.Jones, Sec. 
and Gen. Man. Isaac J. Griffith, Treas. Chas. w. 
Mather. To be opened about Dec. l. Work now in 
progress. 

WATERBURY, CONN Waterbury St. R. R. 

5% m, 4-8)4 g, 40 lb r, 13 c, 60 h. Pres. D. S. Plume, 
Treas. E. F. Turner, Sec— Baldwin. Work in pro- 
gress. 

WINSTED, CONN.— Geo. S. Rowe, Incorporator 
WICHITA, KAN.— Riverside and Suburban Ry. 
Co. Pres. J. O. Davidson, Sec. N. G. Lee. Capital 
stock $100,000. Work now In progress, road to be 
opened about January, 18S7. 



Horse-Cars in New York and Brooklyn. 

In the matter of neatness, cleanliness and 
an attractive exterior, the car equipment 
of the horse railroads in the cities of New 
York and Brooklyn is not creditable to the 
companies operating the lines, nor to a 
great metropolitan community which prides 
itself on the extent of its local facilities 
for passenger transportation. It is true, 
that upon some of the lines the cars are 
kept in a passably decent condition, but 
upon others there is a uniform shabbiuess 
in their appearance which calls for a more 
frequent use of the scrubbing broom and 
paint brush. The cars of the New York 
Third Avenue line have long been an eye- 
sore on account of their soiled and unsavory 
appearance, and yet they are only a little 
worse iu this respect than those of some 
other lines that might be named that have 
been less seriously crippled by strikes and 
boycotts. Even in the ' Oity of Churches,' 
where cleanliness and godliness ought to 
go hand in hand, the seedy looking cars 



that are run on some of the lines would 
present a sorry contrast if they were rang- 
ed alongside of those on the street lines of 
some other cities — those of Boston, for 
example. This neglect, which is fast be- 
coming chronic, cannot be justified on the 
plea of low fares or light traffic. The fares 
with scarcely an exception are as high as 
they are elsewhere, the traffic is heavy and 
rapidly increasing, and regular ten per 
cent, dividends are the rule. Why, then, 
should not tne cars be kept furbished up 
so as to be as good as the best? The an- 
swer is easy. The patronage is a continu- 
ous, dead sure thing, and why should divi- 
dends and surplus balances be whittled 
down the tithe of a hair, even, for such 
luxurious trifles as sweet smelling cars and 
bright and showy coats of paint? 

It may also be suggested whether the 
horse-car management in these populous 
cities could not be improved by the adop- 
tion of a ticket system that would facilitate 
the collection of fares to the extent that 
passengers might buy tickets. Even if no 
discount were allowed, the time saved in 
handing a ticket to the overworked and 
over-spotted conductor, instead of waiting 
for him to make change for a dime or a dol- 
lar, would be an inducement to buy tickets. 
Such a system is certainly practicable, and 
if put in operation great numbers of those 
who ride regularly every day on particular 
lines would avail themselves of it as a mat- 
ter of convenience; and where the fares are 



uniform and the traffic heavy, as they are in 
New York and Brooklyn, the tickets might 
be exchangeable between tlie several lines 
and balances be settled at a clearing office. 

Another source of discomfort in our street- 
cars — the open or summer cars more par- 
ticularly which are run almost exclusively 
on the principal Brooklyn lii es duiii g the 
warm season — is the incommodious seating 
arra ngement. Each car has ten cross seats 
made of the hardest kind of hardwo d. Eive 
persons of average size can be crowded in- 
to each seat, where they sit back to back 
with those in the next seat, and knee to knee 
with those facing them in front. The seats 
are narrow from back to edge, and slightly 
concave to proven t slipping off. One seat- 
back answers for each pair of seats, and this 
back, in order to economize spacelongitud- 
inally, is of necessity straight up and down. 
When the car is full, each occupant is in a 
sort of pillory and half of them must, of 
course, ride backward. Would it be too 
much of on inroad on the revenues of the 
prosperous companies if this semi-barbnr- 
ous way of carrying people were modified 
a little by making the seats reversible or 
by turning the car round at the end of each 
trip, so everybody could ride facing for- 
ward instead of staring at one another at 
such a disagreeably short range while in 
transit? The introduction, also, of a little 
rattan into the seats to soften their adaman- 
tine rigidity would be very much appreci- 
ated. — National Car Builder. 



STREET RAILWAY STOCK QUOTATIONS. 



Corrected by H. L. GRANT, 145 Broadway, N. Y. City. 



New York Stocks. 



Bleecker St. & Fulton Ferry 

1st mort 

Broadway & Seventh avenue 

1st mort 

2d mort 

Broadway Surface Guaranteed 

Additional 

Brooklyn City — Stock 

1st mort 

Brooklyn Crosstown 

1st mort bonds 

Central Park North and East river 

Con. mort. bonds 

Christopher & Tenth 

Bonds 

Central Crosstown 

1st mort 

Dry Dock, East 'way & attery.. . 

1st mort consol 

Scrip 

42d & Grand St. Ferry 

1st mort 

42d St., Manhattan & St. Nlcli. av. 

1st mort 

2d mort. In. bonds 

Eighth Avenue -stock 

Scrip 

Houston, West St. & Pavonia Ferry 

1st more 

Second Avenue— stock 

1st mort 

Consol 

Sixth Avenue 

1st mort 

Third Avenue— Stock 

1st mort 

23d St.— Stock 

1st mort 

Ninth Avenue 

Chicago St. Hallway 



Par. 


Amount. 


Period. 


1 Rate. 


Date. 


Bid. 


Asked. 


100 


$900,000 


J. & J. 


% 


January, 


188C 


28 


30 


1,000 


700,00 


J. & J. 


7 


July, 


1900 


116 


125 


100 


2,100,000 


Q—J. 


2 


January, 


1886 


210 


225 


1,000 


1,500,000 


.1. & D 




•Hi ne, 


1904 


104 


107 


1,1100 


500,000 
1,500.000 


J. & J. 


5 


July, 


1914 


103 


106 


1,000 


J. & J. 


5 


■July, 


1924 




100 


1,000 


1,000,000 


J. & J. 


5 


July, 


1905 




100 


10 


2,000,000 


Q.— P. 


2 


August, 


1880 


190 


195 


1,000 


800,000 


J. & J. 




January, 


1886 


100 


110 


1U0 


200,000 


A. & O. 


4 


April, 


1886 


165 


175 


1,000 


400,000 


J. & J. 


7 


January, 


1888 


105 


109 


100 


1,800,000 


Q.— J. 


2 


January, 


1886 115 


118 


1,000 


1,200,000 


J. & D. 


1 


December, 
February, 


1902 


120 


123 


1C0 


630,000 


F. & A. 


pi 


1886 


132 


135 


1,000 


250,000 


A. & o. 


October, 


1898 


110 


116 


103 


000,000 


Q.-F. 


IX 


January, 


1886 


160 


165 


1,(00 


250,000 


M. & N. 


6 


November, 


1922 


114 


115 


:oo 


1,200,000 


Q.-F. 


o 


February, 


1886 


160 


160 


500 


1,900,000 


J. & D. 




June, 


1893 


114 


1163* 


100 


1,200,000 


F. & A. 


6 


August, 


1914 


105 


107 


100 


748,000 


Q.-F. 


3 


August, 


1886 


225 


235 


1,000 


230,000 


A. & O. 


7 


April, 


1893 


111 


115 


100 


2,500,000 








35 


37 


1,000 


1,200,000 


M &S. 


5 




1910 


109 


110 


1,000 


1,200,000 


J. & J. 


6 




1915 


58 


60 


100 


1,600,000 


Q.-J. 


2 


October, 


18S6 


205 


210 


100 


1,000,000 


F. & A. 


6 


August, 


1914 


105 


110 


100 


1,000,000 


Q -F. 


2 


August, 


1885 


120 


130 


son 


25", 000 


J. & J. 


7 


July, 


1894 


112 


113 


100 


500,000 


J. & J. 


5 


July, 


1880 


185 


190 




1,862,000 


M. & N. 


5 


November, 


1909 


106 


107 


i,666 


550,000 


M. &N. 


7 


May, 


1888 


103 




100 


1,050,000 


M. & 8 




August, 


1885 


200 


210 


1,000 


500,000 


J. & J. 


7 


July, 


1890 


112 


116 


100 


2,000,000 


Q.-F. 


3 


February, 


1886 


260 


270 


1,000 


2,000,000 


J. & J. ! 


7 


lanuary, 


1890 


110 


112 


100 


600,000 


M. & N. 


5 


Way, 


1885 


265 


275 


1,000 


250,000 


M. & N. 


7 


May, 


1893 


110 


113 


100 


800,000 




3 


September, 


1885 


110 


120 


100 












299 


325 



ZEPIb-ila,. Street ^aol-w^37- Stocks. 

Corrected by Robert Glendinning & Co., 303 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Citizens 

Continental 

Frankford £ Southwark 

Germantown 

Green & Coates 

Hestonville 

Lombard & South 

People's 

Philadelphia City 

Philadelphia & Gray's Ferry 

Philadelphia Traction 

Ridge Avenue 

Second & Third 

Seventeenth & Nineteenth.. , 

Thirteenth & Fifteenth 

Union 

West Philadelphia , 



Par. 



50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



Period. 



Q.-J. 
J. & J. 
Q.-J- 

Q.-J. 

Q.-J. 



J. & J. 
J. & J. 



J. & Q. 
Q. -J- 
J. & J. 
J. & J. 
J. & J. 
J. & J. 



Amount. Rate. 



$500,000 
1,000,000 
750,000 
1,500,000 

500,000 
2,050,000 

500,000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 

617,500 
5,000,000 

750,000 
1,060,200 

500,000 
1,000,000 
1,250,000 

750,000 



Date. 



Bid. 



Asked. 





130 




320 


97 


99 




122 




34 


83K 




40% 


lljrf 


140 




83 J* 


85 


8« 


87% 


225 




205 


150 


152 


ISO 






200 



28 



THE* STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Novkmbbk, 1886. 



Directory of Manufacturers and Dealers in Street Railway 
Appliances, and Index to Advertisers. 



AUTOMATIC SWITCHES. 

M. M. Willie & CO., o31 W. 23d St. N . Y . . . 
Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 23d St. N. Y . 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila. 
Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St. N. Y 

A F. W.'j'esup & Co., 67 Liberty St., N. Y . . 
Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn, N. Y 
A. Whitney & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. ... 
Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., II. Y . 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Pnila 



, Pa 



Pa... 



'age. 
. . 35 
60-01 

. 4y 

.. 33 

...34 
58-59 
...35 
60-01 
49 



BEARINGS. „ _ 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W 33d St., N. Y fcO-bl 

Pu>rli& Russell Stewart Building, New York 37 
Edward c. White, 531 W. 33d. Street, New York. 36 

Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn,N.Y 58-59 

Chaplin M'f'g. CO., Bridgeport «j 

Bemis Car Box co., Springfield, Mass..... ±4 

Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co. Limited, Phila, Pa 49 

The Street Railway Supply Co., Cleveland, o. . . 48 

BOXES, JOURNAL,. 

a. Whitney & sons, Philadelphia, Pa ■ • 3o 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N.Y »o-o9 

Frank 11. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 60-61 

Chaplin M'f'g Co., Bridgeport 32 

Bemls Car Box co., Springfield, Mass...... 4* 

Wm Wharton Jr., & Co., Limited, Bulla. Pa. ... 49 
The street Hallway Supply Co., Cleveland, O.. . 48 

BRAKE ROBS. , „ _ „ _„ 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N Y 5b-5b 

Wm Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa... 49 
Malliuckrodt St. Car Brake Co., St. Louis,Mo... 39 
Mordecal M Wilson, Agent, Troy, N.Y 31 

B Frauk E lL Andrews. 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 60-61 

Wm Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa. . . 49 
Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 58-59 



BRAKE CHAINS. 

covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N. Y 39 

C .L^l' Gould, 9th and Market sts., Phila., Pa. . .. 46 

CARS, NEW 

John Stephenson Co., New York 64 

J. G. Brill & Co., Phila., Pa «2-63 

The Feigel Car Co., 108 Wall St., N.Y 33 

Browned & Wight car Co., St. Louis, Mo 38 

J. M. Jones' Sons, West Troy, N. Y 38 

The Laclede car Co., St. Louis, Mo 47 

CARS, SECONB HANI). 

Humphreys & Sayee, l Broadway, N. Y 30 

Brooklyn Railway Supply Co., 37 Walworth St., 
Brooklyn 5 ' 

CAR HEATERS. 

The National stove Co., 243 Water St., N. Y — 31 

The Michigan stove Co., Detroit, Mich 39 

CAR STARTERS. 
C. B. Broadwell, 169 Laurel St., New Orleans, La. 35 

CAR LAMPS. 

Geo. M. Clute, W. Troy, N. Y 39 

Josephine D. smith, 35U & 352 Pearl st.,N. Y 53 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York... 37 
Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 58-59 

CAR WHEELS. 

A. Whitney & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa 35 

Lewis* Fowler, Brooklyn.N. V 58-59 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N.Y 6n-6i 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York... 37 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa... 49 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phila., Pa. ..42 

CAR WHEEL PRESSES. 
Watson & Stlllman,204 21 E. 43d St., N.Y., .... 39 

CAR SPRINGS. 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 58-59 

Frank II- Andrews 545 W. 33d St., N.Y 6u-6l 

Richard Vose, 13 Barclay St., .>f.Y 56 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York... 37 

CAR SEATS. 
Bale & Kilburn Mfg. Co., 4S & 50 N. 6th Str., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 37 

Gardner & Co., 643 to 657 W. 4Sth St., N.Y 40 

CAR SASH. 

Ayers Patent Sash Holder Co., Stewart Build- 
ing, New York City 34 

W. L. Everit, New Haven, Ct 31 

CAR CEILINGS. 

Gardner & Co., 643 to 657 W. 43th st., N.Y 40 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, Y. Y 58-59 

CASTINGS. 

Bowler & Co., Cleveland, O 33 

F. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty St., N. Y 34 

A. Whitney & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa 35 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N.Y' 33 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 58-59 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N.Y 60-61 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa . . 49 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood Sts., Phila., Pa.. 42 
The Street Railway Supply Co., Cleveland, O. . . 48 

CURVE B RAILS. 

Frank H . Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 60-61 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New \ ork. . 37 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 33 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa 58 

Wm. Wharton Jr.. & Co., Limited, Phila. Pa.-. . . 49 
Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 58-59 



CURVEB RAILS — Pat. Steel Grooves. Page. 
Wm. Wharton Jr. & Co. Limned, Phila, Pa 4o 

CROSSINGS. 

Frank II. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 60-61 

Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 35 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co. Limited, Phila. Pa... 49 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 58-59 

Bowler & Co., 10 to 24 Winter St., Cleveland, O. 35 

CHANNEL PLATES. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 60-61 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 33 

Wm. Wharton Jr. & Co. Limited, Phila, Pa 49 

CABLE KOAUS. 

D. J. Miller, 234 Broadway, N. Y 34 

Frank 11. Andrews, 5i5 W. 33d St., N. Y 60-61 

Poole & Hunt, Baltimore 44 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa... 49 
.ohnston Frog and Switch Co., 3o7 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 37 

Neltel & uothout, 41 Liberty St. N.Y. City.... 36 
J. H. Gould, 9th and Market sts., Phila., Pa... 46 
John A. Koebling's sons Co., 117 & 119 Liberty 

St., N. T 31 

BOOK STOPS. 
Uayeox Door Fastener Co., 1158 Euclid ave., 

Cleveland, O 36 

ECTR1C RAILWAYS, 
v n Depoele Electric Manufg. Co 50 

EEEB CUTTERS. 

Nordyke 6l Marmon Co., Indianapolis, Ind. .. . 33 

E. W. Ross & Co., springneld, 40 

FEED MILLS. 

Edward P. AUls & Co., Milwaukee, Wis 30 

Nordyke & Marmon Co., Indianapolis, Ind — 39 
. OGS. 

mphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N.Y 30 

_ nk H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. i 60-61 

, i_h & Russell, Stewart Building, New York.. 37 
w . Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa... 49 
Way Foundry Co., u3d & Wood Sts., Phila., Pa. 42 
Johnston Frog and switch Co., 3u7 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 37 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 58-50 

Bowler & Co., 10 to 24 Winter St., Cleveland, O. 35 



FARE BOXE*. 

Wales Manuf . Co., 76 and 7S East Water St., 

Syracuse, N. Y 32 53 

Tom L. Johnson, Indianapolis, Ind 42 

Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn, N.Y 58-59 

J. B. Slawson, 16 W. 46th Street, New York 43 

John Stephenson Co., New York ... 64 

FARE REGISTERS, STATIONARY. 

Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn.N.Y' 58-59 

Standard Index and Register Co, 138 Fulton St. 

New Y'ork 55 

Railway Register Mfg. Co., 1193 Bdy., N. Y.. 51 

FARE COLLECTORS. 
Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn,N. Y 58-59 

GUTTERS. 

Bowler & Co., Cleveland, O 35 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa.. . 49 

GROOVEB CURVES. 

Humphreys & sayce, 1 Broadway, N.Y 3« 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 60-61 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York... 37 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty st., N . Y 33 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa 53 

Wm. Wharton Jr. & Co. Limited, Phila, Pa " 

HARNESS. 

U. S. Harness Co., Chicago, 111 34 

Charles E. Berry, Cambridge, Mass 32 

Rutus Martin & Co., 13 & 15 Park row, N. Y. ... 33 

HYDRAULIC JACKS. 
Watson & Stlllman, 204, 210 E. 43d. St, N. Y. . . . 39 

HORSE SHOES. 
P. F. Burke, 860 Dorchester Ave., SouthBoston 34 

F. P. Roberge, 1741 Broadway, N. Y' 49 

Bryden Forged Horseshoe Co., Catasauqua, Pa. 45 

KNEES. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33d st., N. Y ..60-61 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty Street, New York 33 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New Y'ork. . . 37 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa... 49 
Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia. Pa 37 

Lewis & Fowlor, Brooklyn, N. Y 53-59 

LUBRICANTS. 

The Leib Lubricating Co. , 196 Chicago Street, 

Baffalo 34 

Rufus Martin & Co., 13 & 15 Park row, N. Y. . . . 33 

METALLIC RAILWAY. 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co. (limited) Phila., Pa.. . . 49 
Metallic Street Railway Supply Co., Albany N.Y' 34 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 30 

D. F.Longstreet, Providence, R. 1 35 

MATTING. 

Warneck & Tomer, 211 E. 22d St., N. Y 33 

Lynn & Pettlt, 7u7 Market Street, Phila 34 

Edward Beadle, 1193 Broadway, N. Y 

MOTORS— Electric. 
Van Depoele Electric Manufg.Co.,203 Van Buren 
St., Chicago, 111 50 



PEBESTALS. Page. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33d St., N. Y. . . .60-61 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila. Pa... 49 

PANELS Page 

Gardner & Co., 183 Canal St., N. Y 40 

RAILS. 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N.Y 30 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, N. Y 37 

F. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty St., N. Y 34 

Pennsylvania Steel Co., l«o Broadway, N. Y — 38 

Carnegie, Phipps & co 39 

Frank II. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y.... 60-61 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 33 

Johnson steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa 52 

Wm. Wharton Jr. & Co. Limited. Phila, Pa 49 

STEEL RAILS. 

Carnegie, Phipps & Co 39 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N.Y 30 

P. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty St., N 34 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co,, Limited, Phila., Pa ... 49 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa 52 

Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 37 

SEATS tfc SEAT SPRINGS. 

Hale & Kilburn Manufg Co 36 

SWITCHES. 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., 25th St. & Wash- 
ington Ave., Philadelphia, Pa 49 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 30 

M. M. White & CO., 531 West 33rd st, N. Y 35 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West(33rd St., N. Y. 60-61 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 58-59 

Johnson Steel Rail Co.. Johnstown, Pa 52 

Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 37 

Bowler & Co., 10 to 24 Winter St., Cleveland, O. 35 
STREET RAILWAY BUILBERS. 
Metallic St. Railway Supply Co., Albany, N. Y. 35 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Phila., Pa 49 

Delano & Richardson, 47 Broadway, N. Y 39 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 33 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. Y 60-61 

A. J. Hutchinson, 95 Liberty St., N.Y 34 

Neftel & oothout, 41 Liberty st. N. Y. City 36 

M. W. Conway, 487 Monroe st. Brooklyn, N.Y. . 36 
STREET RAILWAY SUPPLIES. 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 30 

Metallic St. Railway Supply Co., Albany, N. Y 34 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Bldg., N. Y 37 

F. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty St., N. Y 34 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 33 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 58-59 

Delano & Richardson, 47 Broadway, N. Y 39 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd st., N. Y 60-61 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa... 49 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood Sts., Phila., Pa. 42 
Brooklyn Railway Supply Co., 37 Walworth St., 

Brooklyn 57 

FultonFoundry Co., 202 Merwin st. Cleveland.O. 49 
M. W. Conway, 487 Monroe st. Brooklyn, N.Y... 36 

Edward Beadle, 1193 B'dway N. Y. City 33 

Rufus Martin & Co., 13 & 15 Park row, N. Y 33 

The Street Railway Supply Co., Cleveland, O. . . 48 
STREET RAILWAY TOOLS. 
Wm. Wharton Jr. & Co. Limited, Phila, Pa 49 

SNOW PLOWS. 

Frank H. Andrews, 543 West 33rd St., N. Y . .60-61 

Augustus Day, Detroit 

Brooklyn Railway Supply Co., 37 Walworth St., 43 

Brooklyn 57 

Fulton Foundry Co., 202 Merwin st. Cleveland.. 49 

TURNOUTS. 
Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co., 25th St. & Washing- 
ton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa 49 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. Y. . .60-61 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood Sts., Phila. , Pa. 42 
Bowler & Co., 14 Winterst., Cleveland, 35 

TURN TABLES. 

W. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 33 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 west 33rd sr., N. Y . . . 60-61 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood Sts., Phila., Pa. 42 
Bowler & Co., 14 Winter St., Cleveland. 35 

TRACK CASTINGS. 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 30 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd st. , N. Y . . . 60-61 
Wm Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa... 49 

Augustus Day, Detroit 43 

Way Foundry Co.. 23d & Wood Sts., Phila., Pa. 42 
Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 37 

Bowler & Co., 14 Winter st., Cleveland, O 35 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y ^58-59 

TRACK SCRAPERS. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N.Y 60-61 

Brooklyn Railway Supply Co.. 37 Walworth St., 
Brooklyn 57 

VARNISHES. 
John Babcock & Co., 2 Liberty sq., Boston Mass. 36 
Parrott Varnish Co., Bridgeport, conn 30 

WHEEL PRESSES. 

Watson & Stlllman, 204, 210 E. 4d3 St., N.Y 39 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa.. 49 
WHEELS. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. Y . . 60-61 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N.Y 58-59 

A. Whitney & Sons. Philadelphia Pa, 35 

Bowler & Co. 14 Winter st., Cleveland, 35 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



29 



PERSONAL DIRECTORY OF STREET RAILWAY 

SUPPLY MEN. 



Page. 

Allis, Edw. P. and Co. Milwaukee, Wis. Edw. P. 

Allls, Prop.; Edw. Reynolds, Supt 30 

Allyn, Chas. B., Pres. Brooklyn Kallway Supply 

Co 57 

Allyn, Jno., Sec. and Treas. Brooklyn Kallway 

Supply Co 57 

Anderson, A. A., Tom. L. Jolmson, Indianapolis, 

Ind 42 

Andrews, Frank H., P. T. Lerned, General Agent, 

545 West 33d St., N. Y 60,61 

Ayers Pat. Sash Holder Co. Stewart Bldg. New 

York 34 

Baldwin, A. L., sec. and Treas. Standard Index 

and Register Co 55 

Baldwin, Ell, Pres. Standard index & lfeglsterCo 55 

Barbour, Geo. H., Sec. Mich. Stove Co 3a 

Beadle and Courtney, Edw. Beadle, Chas. Court- 
ney, 1193 Broadway, N. Y 61 

Beadle, Edw., Beadle and Courtney 51 

Beck with, Sheldon, Pres. St. Ry. Supply Co 48 

Bemls, S. A., Pres. The Bemls Car Box Co 44 

Bemls Car Box Co, The. S. A. Bemls Pres.; Geo. 
B. Hewlett, Sec. and Treas.; Geo. M. Hoadley, 
Supt.; Chas. T. Stearns, Agent.i 20 Piatt St., 

New York,) Springfield, Mass 44 

Berry, Chas. E., Cambridge, Mass 32 

Blnns, D. W., V.-Pres. Brooklyn Ry. Supply Co. 57 

Bowler and Co 35 

Braden, Oliver. 119 So. 4th st. Philadelphia, Pa. 35 

Brady, P., Mang. U. S. Harness Co.. 34 

Brill, G. M., J. a. Brill and Co 62,63 

Brill, J. G. and Co. J. G. Brill, G. M. Brill, Jas. 

Rawle, Philadelphia, Pa 02,63 

Brill, J. G., J. G. Brill and Co 62^63 

Broadwell, C. B., New Orleans, La 35 

Brooklyn Railway Supply Co. Chas. B. Allyn, 
Pres.; D. W. Blnns, V.-Pres.; Jno. Allyn, 

Sec. and Treas 57 

Brownell and Wight Car Co. B. F. Brownell, 
Pres.; A. S. Partridge, Sec. and Treas. St. 

Louis, Mo 3s 

Brownell, B. F. Pres. Brownell and Wight Car Co. 38 
Bryden Forged Horse Shoe Works, Ld. Oliver 
Williams, Treas.; T. F. Frederick, Supt.; 
J. B. White, General Sales Mang. (288 Green- 
wich st. New York) Catasauqua, Pa 45 

Burke, P. F. 360 Dorchester ave. So. Boston, Mass. 34 
Carleton, Wm. F. Mangr. U. S. Steam & St. Ky. 

Adv. Co 54 

Carnegie, Phipps and Co., Pittsburgh, Pa 39 

Carpenter, S. M. Prop. Fulton Foundry, Cleve- 
land, 49 

Ch.ipllnMfg. Co. The, Bridgeport, Conn. D. C. 
Knowlton, Pres. Boston, Mass., W. c. Mead, 

Sec. and Treas., H. McKenzie Supt 32 

clute, Geo. M. west Troy, N. Y 39 

Conway, M. W. 487 Monroe St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 36 

Courtney, Chas., Beadle and Courtney 51 

Covert, Jas. C, Covert Mtg. Co 39 

Covert, Madison, Covert MIg. Co 39 

Covert Mfg. Co., James O. Covert, Madison 

Covert, West Troy, N. Y 39 

Craig, Wm. P. 95 Liberty st. N. Y 33 

Day, Augustus, Detroit, Mich 34 

DeLamater, L. M. Sec. John Stephenson Co. Llm. 64 

Delano, F. M. 47 Broadway, N Y 39 

Egerton, Alfred, Metallic St. Ry. Supply Co 34 

Emerick, John A. Pres Johnston Railroad Frog 

and Switch Co 37 

Everit, W. L. New Haven, Conn 31 

Felgel Car Co., — Fetgel, — Rogers, New Ut- 
recht, N. Y., and 108 Wall St., N. Y 33 

Foote, O. A. Sec. St. Ry. Supply Co 48 

Fowler, Geo. L. Editor Sr. Ry. Journal 16 

Fowler, J. W. Pres. Lewis and Fowler Mtg. Co..5?,59 
Frederick, T. F. Supt. Bryden Forged Horse 

Shoe Works 45 

Fulton Foundry, S. M. Carpenter, Prop. C. J. 

Langdon, Sec, Cleveland, 49 

Gardner and Co. Wm. Gardner, John M. Gardi- 
ner, Samuel H. Gardner, 643, 637 W. 48th st. 40 
Gardner, Fred. W. Western Manager Michigan 

Stove Co., Chicago, 111 39 

Gardner, John M. Gardner and Co 40 

Gardner, Samuel H. Gardner and Co 40 



Page. 

Gardner, Wm. Gardner and Co 40 

Gibbon, T. II. Metallic St. Ry. Supply Co 34 

Glazier, H. A. Jarvls Engineering Co 39 

Gould Cable System, J. H. Gould, 9ih and Market 

sts., Philadelphia, Pa 46 

Grant, J. A. Sec. Jarvls Engineering Co 38 

Gould, J. II. Gould cable, system , 40 

Gulbert, J. S. Richard Vose 56 

Hale and KUburn Mfg. Co., Cheney Kilburn, 
Pres., II. S. Hale, Treas., J. Warren Hale, 
Sec, 48 and 50 N. Sixthst. Philadelphia Pa. . 3 
Hale, H. S. Treas. Hale and Kilburn Mfg. Co.... 37 
Hale, J. Warren, Sec. Hale and Kilburn Aifg. Co. . 37 

Harris, E. P. Gen. Man. St. Ry. Jouknai 11; 

Haycox Pat. Door Fastener Co, W. E. Haycox 

Manager, Cleveland, 36 

Haycox, W. E., Man. Haycox Pat. Door Fastener 

Co., Cleveland, O 36 

Ilewlett.Geo. B. Sec. and Treas. Bemls Car Box Co 44 
Hoadley, Geo. M. Supt. The Bemls Car Box Co.. 44 
Holwell, A. K. Treas. Nordyke and Marmon Co. . . 33 

Humphreys and Sayce. 1 Broadway, N. Y 30 

Hutchinson, A. J. 95 Liberty st. N. Y 34 

Jarvls Engineering Co. K. M. Jarvis Pres., A. F 
Upton, Treas. andG. Man., J. A. Grant, Sec, 
H. A. Glasler, (Chicago) Western Manager ... 38 

Jarvis, K. M. Pres. Jarvls Engineering Co 38 

■lesup, F. W. and Co., 65 Liberty St., N.Y 34 

Jillard, Edw. E. 1,645 N. Ninth St., Philadelphia 33 
Johnston, Edw. H. Man. Johnston Railroad Frog 

and Switch Co 37 

Johnson Steel St. Rail Co., Wm. Wharton, Jr., 
and Co., Ld., Pugh and Russell Agents, A. J. 

Moxham, Pres., Johnstown, Pa 52 

Johnson, Tom. L 42 

Johnston Railroad Frog and Switch Co., Jno. 
A. Emerick, Pres. Edw. II. Johnston, Man., 

Samuel Lees, Treas. Chester, Pa 37 

Jones' Sons, J. M . Walter A. Jones, Jones 38 

Jones, Walter A. J. M. Jones' sons 3S 

Kilburn, Cheney, Pres. Hale and Kilburn Mfff.Co 37 
Knowlton, D. C, Boston, Mass., Pres. Chaplin 

Mfg. CO 32 

Langdon, C. J. Sec. Fulton Foundry 49 

Lees, Samuel, Treas. Johnston Railroad Frog and 

Switch Co., Chester, Pa 37 

Leib Lubricating Co., Buffalo, N. Y 34 

Lerned, F. T. Gen. Agt. Frank H. Andrews60-61 
Lewis Danl. F. Treas. Lewis and Fowler Mfg. co58,59 
Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Co., J. W. Fowler, Pres., 
Dan'l F. Lewis, Treas., H. C. Simpson, sec, 

E. Packer, L. E. Robert 58,59 

McGraw, J. H., Sec. St. Ry. Journal 16 

McKenzie, H. Supt. Chaplin Mfg. Co 32 

MallinckrodtNtreet Car Brake Co., St. Louis, Mo. 36 

Martin, Rufus and Co., 15 Park Row, N. Y 33 

Marmon, D. W. Sec. Nordyke and Marmon Co 33 

Mead, W. C. Sec. and Treas. Chaplin Mfg. Co. . . . 32 
Metallic St. Ry. supply Co., Alfred Egerton, T. 

H. Gibbon, Albany, N. Y 34 

Masson, Milton I., Estate of J. B. Siawson 43 

Michigan Stove Co., Francis Palms, Pres., Geo. 
H. Barbour, Sec, M. B. Mills, Treas., Fred 
W. Gardner, Western Man., (Chicago), De- 
troit, Mich 39 

Miller, D. J., 234 Broadway, N. Y 34 

Mills, M. B., Treas. Mich. Stove Co 3« 

Moxham, A. J., Pres. Johnson Steel St. Rail Co. . 52 
National Stove Co., J. R.Thomas, Treas., 243 

Water st., N. Y 31 

Neftel and Oothout. 41 Liberty st., N. Y 36 

Nordyke, A. H., Pres. Nordyke & Marmon Co. 33 
Nordyke and Marmon Co, Indianapolis, Ind., 
A. H. Nordyke, Pres.; D. W. Marmon, Sec; A. 

K. Hollowell, Treas 33 

Packer, E., Lewlsand Fowler MfgiCo 58-59 

Palms Francis, Pres. Mich. Stove Co 39 

Parrott Varnish Co., Bridgeport, Conn 30 

Partridge, A. S., Sec. and Treas. Brownell and 

Wight Car Co 38 

Pennington, Ellrs, 204 Walnut Place, Phil 32 

Pennsylvania Steel Co., 160 Broadway, N. Y., and 

208 So. 4th St., Philadelphia 33 

Poole and Hunt, Baltimore, Md 44 

Post and Co., Cincinnati, 41 



Page. 

Powers, E. L., N. W. Mgr. St. Ry. Journal 16 

Pugh and Russell, D. W. Pugh, J. S. Fugh, F. D. 
Russell, Stewart Building, N. Y., Adams Ex- 
press Building, Chicago 37 

I'ugli, D . W., Pugh and Russell 37 

Pugh, J. S., Pugh and Russell 37 

Railway Register Manufacturing Co., James 
McCredie, Pres., Beadle and Courtney, 1193 
Broadway, New York), General Agents; Buf- 
falo, U. Y 51 

Rawle, James, J. G. Brill and Co 62,63 

Reynolds, Edward, Supt. E. P. Allis and Co 30 

Richardson, Philip, 47 Broadway, N. Y 39 

Koebllng's, .sons, John A. Trenton, N. J., HT-119 

Liberty st., N. Y 31 

Roberge, F. P. ,1,741 Broadway, N . Y 39 

Robert, L. E., Lewlsand Fowler Mfg. Co 58,59 

Ross, Edward and Co., E. W. Ross, Pres.; N. 
Fitch, Treas.; c. L. Wheaton, sec, Spring- 
Held, 40 

Russell, F. D., Pugh and Russell 37, 

Simpson, H. C, Sec. Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Co.58,59 

Sliver, John S. Richard Vose 50 

Silver, Wm. S. Richard Vose 56 

Siawson, J. B,, Estate, Milton I. Masson,Agent, 
John Stephenson Co., Llm.,Agents,365 Avenue 

A, New York 43 

Sleeper, Joseph A., Pres. Van Depoele Electric 

Manufacturing Co 50 

Smith, Charles G., Josephine D. Smith 53 

Smith, Josephine D. Josephine D. Smith, Chas. 

G. Smith 53 

Somerville, Wm., and Sons, Buffalo, N. Y 36 

Standard Index and Register Co., Eli Baldwin, 
Pres.; W. S. Baldwin, Sec. and Treas.; A. L. 
Baldwin, C. B. Baldwin, representatives, 138 

Fulton St., N.Y 55 

Stearns, Chas. G., 20 Piatt st. N.Y.Agents, Bemis 

Car Box co 44 

Stephenson, John, Pres. John Stephenson Co. Llm. 64 
Stephenson, John, Co., Lim., (Pugh and Rus- 
sell General Representatives, which see.) John 
Stephenson, Pres., L. M. De Lamater, Sec, 
Hem y C. Valentine.Treas., 47 E. 27th St., N. Y 36 
Stiles, A. K., Manager Van Depoele Electric Man- 
ufacturing Co 5(J 

Street Kailway Journal, E. P. Harris, General 
Manager; George L. Fowler, Editor; J. H. 
McGraw, Sec; H. M. Swetland, Treas.; E. L. 

Powers, N. W. Manager 16 

Street Kailway Supply Co., Sheldon Beckwith 

Pres.; O. A. Foote, Sec 48 

Swetland, H. M., Treas. Street Ry. Journal l« 

Thomas, J. R., National Stove Co 31 

United States Steam and Street Railway Adver- 
tising Co., Wm. F. Carleton, Manager, 239 

Broadway, N. Y., 54 

Upton, A F., Treas. and General Manager, Jarvls 

Engineering Co 38 

U. S. Harness Co., P. Brady, Mang., Chicago, 111. 54 
Valentine, Henry C, Treas. Jno. Stephenson 

CO. Ld 64 

Van Depoele, Chas. J., Electrician, Van Depoele 

Electric Mfg. Co 50 

Van Depoele Electric Mfg. Co., Jos. A. Sleeper, 
Pres.; a. K. Stiles, Mang.; W. A. Stiles, Treas. 
C. J. Van Depoele, Electrician, Chicago, 111.. 50 
Vose, Richard, J. S. Gulbert, Jno S. Silver, Wm. 

S. Silver. 13 Barclay st. New York 56 

Wales Mfg. Co., W. S. Wales, Treas., Syracuse, 

N. Y 32-53 

Wales, W. S., Treas. Wales Mfg. Co 32-53 

Warneck and Toffler, ill East 22d st. New \ ork. . 33 
Watson and stillman, 204-210 East 43d st. N. Y. . 39 
Way Foundry Co., Way, Rhodes and Blankley, 

23d and Wood sts. Philadelphia, Pa 42 

Wharton, Wm., Jr. and Co. Ld 49 

White, E. C, 531 West 33d st, New Y'ork 36 

White, J. B., 288 Greenwich St., General Sales- 
man. Bryden Forged Horse Shoe Works, Ld.. 45 

White, M. M. and Co. 531 West 33d st 35 

Whitney, A. and Sons, Philadelphia, Pa 35 

Williams, Lawrence, and Co., Cleveland, 41 

Williams, Oliver, Treas. Bryden Forged Horse 
Shoe Works 45 



30 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



NOVEMBEH, 1886. 



SPECIAL NOTICES. 
Rates for Special Notices. 

Advertlsemei'ts of Street Railway Property 
"Wanted nr "For Sale," " Positions Wanted " or 
" Men Wanted," or similar matter inserted under 
his heading at 10 c. per line, eight words to a line. 



WANTED— A party with $50,000 to $75,000 to 
form a company for con-olidating several 
Street Car lines In a large and srrowlnsr city. A good 
opportunity. A valuable franchise. Address, 
"CONSOLIDATION," Street Railway Journal, 3a 
Liberty street, New York, 

WANTED— A thoroughly reliable man exper- 
ienced In Street Railway practice, to organ- 
ize and manage a company, for the Introduction of a 
new system of propulsion. Patentee will turnlsh 
capital. An exceptional opportunity for a man of 
large street railway acquaintance and with the en- 
ei and judgment requisite to success. Address, 
IXION, Street Railway Journal Office, 32 Liberty 
Street, New York City. 

WANTED— A party with Capital to take one- 
half interest in horse and cattle grooming 
machine, now ready for operation, fully covered by 
patents. Will sell whole or one-half Interest. Full 
control given in either case. Patentee has other 
business. Cannot give It his attention. Address, 
SAFETY, care Street Railway Journal, 119 South 
4th St., Phila., Pa. 

SUPERINTENDENT.— Advertiser of ability and 
good managing capacity desires an engagement 
as superintendent ot surface railroad; experienced 
in European and New York systems; would take full 
charge, Including stables and treatment, of sick 
horses it desirable; first-class references. Address 
MANAGER, care Street Railway Journai., 32 Lib- 
erty stieet, New York. 

FOR SALE. — By Concord Horse Railroad, Con- 
cord, N. H., one horse railroad Passenger Sleigh, 
built expressly for the road by Abbott Downing & 
Co., In their best style. It Is built car style with 
side windows; well ventilated ; splendidly finished; 
upholstered with best of goods; seats eighteen pas- 
sengers Inside and three outside with driver: we 
have carried thirty passengers; runs very easy with 
a pair of horses; it has run only three weeks; good 
as new ; the reason why we sell is we have put on 
steam motors on that part of the line; have no use 
forit. M. Humphrey, President. 



WANTED— small size of T rail either steel or 
iron, 12 lb. to 20 lb. weight, new or second 
hand if In good condition for relaying. Adress L. 
this Office, stating quantity, price and where seen. 

WANTED— Position as Superintendent or Fore- 
man with some good street railroad, by a 
thoroughly practical and experienced street railroad 
man who has had 15 years' experience In the busi- 
nf ss; can refer to some of the most prominent street 
railroad men of the country. Address R. P. A., care 
street Ry. Journal. 32 Liberty St., New York. 

WANTED -A reliable man as stable and track 
foreman who has had some experience in the 
street railway business. Address Erie City Pass. Ry. 
Co., care of Jacob Berst. supt.. Erie. I' i 

FOR SALE— Three second-hand Turntables 7ft. 
6in. in diameter, with KUide plates all complete ; 
suitable for narrow-gauge ronds of the Fulton 
Foundry, Cleveland, Ohio, pattern. Address Frank 
II. Andrews, 545 West 33d St., New York City. 



WANTED— Position as Superintendent on a 
street railroad by an experienced man. N. 
Y. City references. Willing to go South or West. 
Parties wishing a good, steady man, and one able 
and willing to look sharp after all the minute details 
of a road will please address superintendent, care 
Street Railway Journal, 32 Liberty St., New York. 



Second Hand One-Horse Street Cars 
in good condition, 

HUMPHREYS & SAYCE, 

1 Broadway, New York, 



Steel Rails, T and Street Patterns, all 
weights ; Spikes, Fishplates, Bolts, 
Wrought Iron Knees, Etc. 
Light Steel T Rails always on hand, 
Old Rails taken in trade, or purchased 
for remanufacture, 

HUMPHREYS & SAYCE, 

No. I Broadway. New York. 



Clark'sTramways 



Tramways Their Construction and Work- 
ing. Embracing a Comprehensive His- 
tory of the System; with, mi exhaustive 
Analysis of the various Modes of Trac- 
tion, including Horse-Power, Steam, 
Heated Water and Compressed Air; a 
Description of the Varieties of Rolling 
Stock; and ample Dettils of Cost 
and Working Expenses: the Progress re- 
cently made in Tramway Construction, 
&c, &c. By D. Kinnear Clark, M. Inst., 
C. E. With over 200 Wood Engravings, 
and 13 Foldiug Plates. Two Vols. , large 
crown 8vo, 30s. cloth. Price $12. 



" All Interested in tramways must refer to it, 
as all railway engineers have turned to the au- 
thor's work ' Railway Machinery.' "—Engineer. 



" An exhaustive and practical work on tramways, 
in which the history or this kind of locomotion, and 
a description and cost of the various modes of laying 
tramways, are to be found."— Building News. 



" Ti.e best form of rails, the best mode of construc- 
tion, and the best mechanical appliances are so fair- 
ly Indicated in the work under review, that any 
engineer about to construct a tramway will be ena- 
bled at once to obtain the practical Information 
which will be of most service to him "— Athenasum. 



mer.Rail 




32 LIBERTY STREET, 
NEW YORK. 



The Best Roller Feed Mill 



ON THE MARKET. 




Either Geared or Belt Drive. 



The Milwaukee Granulator.'' 

Simple, 

Durable, 

Cheap. 

Just Hie tiling for .Street Railway 
Stables. 

Write for Descriptive Circular, Prices, etc. 

Fdw. P. Allis & Co., 

Reliance Works Milwaukee, Wis. 



Parroit Varnish Co., 

"mm VARNISHES, 

"\ Bridgeport, Conn., U.S.A. 

USE PARROTT or; > 





American Railway Pub. Co. 

Lakeside Building, CHICAGO. 32 Liberty St. , NEW YORK 



MORGAN ENVELOPE QO. . 




Springfield, Mass 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



31 



THE NATIONAL CAR 




HEATER. 

IMPROVED. 

For Wakmino Horse 
OR.Stbbet Rail- 
road Cars. 

It isbriek lined, lws 
rotating and dump- 
ing grate, and safety 
door catch. 

These car heaters 
are in successiul op- 
eration on all of the 
street railway lines 
in the city of Brook- 
lyn, New York, and 
on railroad lines In 
the United States and 
Canadas, and give 
entire satisfaction. 

It is neat in ap- 
pearance, occupies 
but little space, is an 
ornament to a oar, 
is not costly in price, 
nor expensive in its 
operation. 

Sole Manufacturers, 

NATIONAL 

Stove Co., 

243 Water St., 

New York City. 



EVERIT'S CAR FLOOR. 



Wilson Rrake Shaft. 

ENTIRELY NEW & NOVEL IN CONSTRUCTION. 
POSITIVE AND .SURE IN ACTION. 

BRAKES SET WITHOUT COMPLETELY TURN- 
ING THE HANDLE. 

MADE ON THE PRINCIPLE OF A FRICTION 
CLUTCH. 
SIMPLE IN DESIGN 

Saves Room, Adds to Available ;Braking Power, 
and Gives the Driver the Best Possible 
Control over the Car. 

Mordecai H. Wilson, Agent. 

TROY, N. Y. 



i i! 



i 1. 1 
ill 



Dispenses with Mats of 
all kinds. 

Easily Repaired. 

Nothing to break or be 
stolen. 

Most easily cleaned of 
any floor in use. 

Can be swept orwashed. 
Does not hold the dirt, 

Low in First Cost 
and High in 
Durability. 



W. L. EVERIT, 

New Haven, Conn. 

JohnA.Roebling'sSonsCo 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Iron and Steel 




FOK 



Street CABLE Railways. 

SWITCH ROPES. PLOW ROPES. 

TELEGRAPH WIRE. 

JOHN A. ROEBLING'S SONS CO., 

H. L. SHIPPY, Manager, 

117 and 119 Liberty Street, New York. 



32 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



Novembeb, 1886. 



"PAY HERE." 

Fare Boxes and Change Receptacles for Street Gars. 

OUR NEW FAKE BOX NO. 3. 

The following are some points of superiority in this box over others: 

Simplicity of Construction, Quickness and Convenience of Cleaning, Securi- 
ty of Money Drawer, Beauty of Finish, and Much Cheaper in Price. 



We have just added to this box a very valuable improvement, viz., a small 
mirror placed back of first slide or rest, which presents to driver's view the back 
side of fare as well as front, when resting on first rest. He can by this quickly 
detect any ^puriousor mutilated coin or ticket that may be split and put in box. 

It often happens in all Fare Boxes, to the annoyance of driver and passenger, 
when several fares are resting on first slide, one or more coins are liable to be 
behind a ticket, ana the driver 
cannot see them, and quite 
often a passenger is "rung 
up," when his fare is concealed 
behind the ticket, from the 
driver. This arrangement 
gives driver view of both sides 
of fnre. 





Box No. 3. 

Front or Passengers' 
View. 



The only satisfactory ar- 
rangement in use for making 
change with the driver. 

Descriptive and illustrated 
circular on application. 
Get our prices before buying. 




PENNINGTON'S 

GROOMING MACHINE. 



Box No. 3, 
Back or Driver's 
View. 



WALES MFG.CO-,76 & 78 E. Water St., ISyracuse, IU. 




The brush {isjcaused to revolve by gear wheels actuated by a flexible shaft, 
Both hands free to handle brush. Swings and turns in any direction. Direc- 
tion of motion quickly changed. The cheapest and best Grooming Machine yet 
Invented. Motion supplied by hand, steam or animal power. Bights to use or 
manufacture. For full particulars am rates apply to 

ELLIS PENNINGTON, 

204 Walnut Place, Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Chaplin Roller Bearing Iramwav- 




CAR BOX AND GEAR. 

LIGHT DRAFT EASY RIDING DURABLE 
POSITIVELY DUST PROOF AND OIL TIGHT 

"Boxes Hold Sufficient Oil for One Year No Waste Used 
for Packing nor Babbitting for Boxes 
Overcomes Friction in Taking a Curve 



SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, HIGHLAND STREET RAILWAY, 

No. 827 Shawmut Ave., Boston, August 19, 18S6. 
Chaplin M'f'g. Co., Messrs:— In reply to your note 1 will say we have had a set of your 
Gear under car, " Gov. Rice." for the past four years and it has proved very acceptable, so 
muchso that we have decided to put on 50 sets of your Improved pattern. The wear on the 
journal is imperceptible, and It is beyond question the easiest running gear in the market. 

Respectfully, J. E. Rtjgg, Sup't 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



THE CHAPLIN MANF. CO.. Bridgeport, Conn . 

Berry's Patent Hames and Regan Snao. 




They have the advantage of easy adjustment. No buckles o- straps are used. They can be applied In an instant, being fastened to the collar. The colla ris 
vlded and there is no strain upon the collar or the eyes of the liorses. 

In case of accident the whole harness can be removed at once. They are adapted to the use of Fire Departments, Horse Railroads, Express WagODS, Teams and 
ght Carriages, and are in use in over oae Hundred cities and towns in the United States and Canada. 



IK 



a- ^ nsr 



They are made of the best gun metal and malleable iron, with a brass spring which Is Inclosed in a water-tight socket and made rust and dust proof. It isan 
mpossiblllty for it to become detached. Write for illustrated catalogue and prices. CHARLES E. BERRY, Cambrfdge, Mass. 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



33 



Portable Grinding Mill Manufactory. 



ZEstaTblisIfcLed. 1S51. 




Mills expressly adapted for use in 

STREET CAR STABLES. 

4-1 different sizes and styles. 

Feed Cutters, 
Corn and Cob Crushers, 
Corn Shelters, 

Roller Mills. 



Portable Engines 

AND BOILER, 

TREAD AND 
SWEEP HORSE POWERS 




Complete Outfits a Specialty. 

Describe Wants and send for Illustrated 



Price List and Circulars. ^ 




IMordyke $c Marmon Co., indianapolis, ind. 



RUFUS MARTIN & CO., 

13 & 15:PAKK ROW, N. Y. 

Street Railway Construction, Equipment and Supplies, 

MARTIN'S IMPROVED CHANGE BELT. 



P. C 



MARTIN'S STANDARD 



TP 



AXLE OIL 



Also Harness, Bells, Wood and Cocoa Mats, Change 
En velopes & Ry. Stationery. Correspondence solicited. 

WARNECK & TOFFLER, 

211 East 22d St., New York, 

Sole Manufacturers and Patentees 
of the only 

"ROLLING WOOD MAT" 

In the market. This matting, either 
In round, square or flat slats, is the 
most convenient one for horse cars, as 
it is a self cleaner and can easily te 
repaired. 

Price, a running foot, 3 feet wide, 
only 70c. Orders respect fully solicited. 

EDWARD BEADLE ~ 

Sole Manufacturer of the 




Street Railway Builder, 

and Dealer in Supplies. 
Office 95 Liberty St., N. Y. 



GROOVE RAIL FOR CURVE 



constantly on hand. Straight or Curved to 
any radius or length, at short notice. 

CURVING MACHINES of Best Style and Make. 

OnPPIliT BRTEQ given on AUTOMATIC SWITCHES, TUKNTABLES, 
OrEiWrlL KrVlDO TRACK CASTINGS, KNEES, JOINT PLATES, 
spikes and all other material for Railway Construction. 

Having had over25 years' practical experience in Street Railway Construction 
feel confident In saying to parties who contemplate building will find it t their 
interest to correspond with me before making contracts or ordering material. 




Established 1856. 



Incorporated 188J5. 



The most durable, easiest, cleaned and 
repaired wood mat ever m ide. We would 
respectfully call the attention of Managers 
of street Railways to our latest improved 
leversible Folding j\l at, made to lit any size 
;jr. Sample order solicited. 

1193 Broadway, New York. 
Factory, Crantord, N. J. 



The Feigel Car Co., 



BUILDERS OF 



EUREKA COLOR WORKS. 

Established for the Manufacture of Pare Colors. 

EDVV. E. J1LLARD, 

PAINTERS' MATERIAL, GLUE, ETC 



Cars for Street Railw 



1645 NORTH TENTH STREET, 



Philadelphia. 



Specialty In Strictly Pure Tinting Colors for Car, Carriage, Ship and House 
Painters' use. 



FACTORY 

New Utrecht, N.Y. 



OFFICE 



3No. 108 Wall Street, N.Y 



34 



THE STEEET KAIL WAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886. 





Lubricant 




Trade Mark Pat. Mar. 13, 1883. Trade Mark Pat. Mar. 13, 1683. 

Tlie Leading New Grease for Street Railways. 

The best Lubricant tor street Railways known . vv ill run for one year on one 
packing. Cars will run easier packed with Dux, than with oil and waste. Why? 
Because we give you a better Lubricant. No drip from car boxes when packed 
with Dux, and therefore, keeps the car boxes and trucks clean. 

Try It, and You Will Use No Other Lubricant. 
Pittsbukgh, Allegheny & Manchester Pafsengeh Railway Co..) 
Leib Lubricating Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., August 13, 1885. j 

Gen-i lemen — We have used Dux Lubricant for the past nine months. 
It has given entire satisfaction. In fact It is the best I have ever used. Think 
it fully as good as represented. Please ship us one (1) bbl. and oblige. 

Yours truly, J. C. COTTON, Supt. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The Leib Lubricating Co, 

196 & 19 8 CHICAGO STREET, - - buFFALO, N.Y 

Ayers' Anti Rattler, 

FOR RAILROAD CAR WINDOWS. 



The Best and Cheapest 



ANTI- RATTLER IN THE 
MARKET. ALSO, 



Ayers' Pat. Sash Holder, 

FOR HOLDING CAR WINDOWS AT ANY 
HEIGHT. 
Manufactured by the 

AYERS' PAT. SASH HOLDER GO. 

Room 242, Broadway & Chambers St. 
stewart BUILDING, NEW YORK. Send for Circulars. 






P. F. Burke, 



C.F.Dewick&Go. M u 



nutact- 
urer of 



Patent Steel Toe-Calks. 

Cold Iron Punching;, Chain Links, 



Washers, etc. 



360 DORCHESTER AVENUE, 

SO. BOSTON, MASS. 

Send for Circulars. 



UNITED STATES HARNESS CO., 



CHICAGO, ILL.. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



Brady's Patent Coupling 
and Iron Hame. 

Most convenient and economical devices known for street railway harness. 
It will be sent subject to inspection before paying for them, on application to 

I). S. HARNESS CO., P. BRADY, MANAGER, 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



F. W. JESUP & COMPY., 

67 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, 

Street Railway Supplies, 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Steel Rails, all patterns; Cars; Automatic Switches; Turntables; Curved 
Rails; Channel Plates; Frogs; Crossings and other Track Castings, Knees, &c. 
Countersunk Spikes, specially adapted for Center-bearing Ralls. 

A. J. HUTCHINSON, 

CONTRACTOR 

And PRACTICAL BUILDER of STREET RAILWAYS. 

Roads Kelaid, Switches, Turnouts, "Warehouse Tracks. Materials Furnished. 



ROOM 11, 



95 LIBERTY STREET, N. Y. 



LYNN * PETTIT, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Machine Braided Cocoa Car Mats. 

707 Market Street, Philadelphia. 



A Sample 

Order 

Solicited. 




Prest. & Treas., Hon. 
A. Blbbker Banks. 
Sec, A. Egerton. 
Engr. & Supt , O. II. 
Gibbon. 



The Metallic Street Railway Supply Co. 

GIBBON'S PATENT. 

ALBANY, NEW YORK. 

Cheapest, quickest laid and most durable track known. Dispenses with nil 
timbers, butts, S'likes, knees, £c. Estimates tor building and relaying street rail- 
way tracks and full particulars sent on application. 

N.Y. Office, 1 Broadway, Hump h reys & Sayce, Contracting Agents. 

Cable Roads. 

AMERICAN SYSTEM TRACTION ROPE RAILWAY, 

OPERATED BY INDEPENDENT DUPLICATE CABLES. 

FULLY PROTECTED BY PATENTS IN THE FOLLOWING 
COUNTRIES. 

FRANCE, 



UNITED STATES, 
ENGLAND, 
GERMANY, 
AUSTRIA, ' 
SPAIN, 

ITALY, ! 

D. J. MILLER, ENGINEER, 

234 BKOADWAY, NEW YORK. 



BELGIUM, 

DENMARK, 

VICTORIA, Australia, 

NEW SOUTH WALES, Australia. 



N VF.MBEH, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



35 



Cleveland 
Foundry. 



Manufacturers ot 



Car and Locomotive Wheels either Chilled or 
Steel Tired ; with or without axles- Street 
Railway Wheels; Turnouts and Turntahles 
Patent Chilled Face RR- Frogs En- 
gine & Heavy Castings a Specialty. 





Graded Stable Cutter with Straight or Curved Cover 

Descent ^ inch per foot. Pieces 5 feet lengths; short pieces furnished to suit 
any length. Spouts to connect with sewer. 

8^* They control and make N. P. Bowler's Patent Street Rail- 
road Wheel. The fire of this wheel is cast separately from the 
hub and spokes ; the latter is made of soft strong iron, and is 
perfectly free from strain — therefore cnn be made much lighter 
and more durable. The tires and the spokes or center of the 
wheel are made perfectly interchangeable so that when the tire or 
rim is worn out another can be put in its place by any employee 
with n6 other tool than a common wrench. 

Bowler&Co/wint°er$t. Cleveland, 0. 

M. M. White & Co., 

531 WEST 33d STREET, 



NEW YORK. 




OWNEES AND BUILDERS OF 

H. DOUGLASS' 

Patent Automatic Switch 

FOR STREET RAILROADS. 

FRANK H. ANDREWS, Sole Agent, 545 West 33d St, N. Y, 




ALL IRON AND STEEL." 

The most permanent and very best form 
of railroad construction for public streets. 
Fully endorsed by city and town authori- 
ties. Send for circular. 

Prices furnished on application to 

Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co., Lim., Phila., Pa., General Agents. 
Or D. F. Longstreet, Providence, R. I. 




OLIVER BRADEN, 

STEAM POWER 

Book and Job Printer, Lithographer and Engraver. 

P. S. Estimates furnished for all kinds of Wood Engraving and Electrotype 
Printing of Descriptive Circulars or catalogues in the very best style. 

Having had twenty years experience in the business I feel corape ent to attend 
to your wants. Address, 

OLIVER BRADEN, 119 So. Fourth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

The "BROAD WELL CAR STARTER," 
having been subjected to practical tests, is now 
placed on the market at a very low price. 

C. B. BROAD WELL, 
169 Laurel Street, - New Orleans, La. 

ESTABLISHED 1847. 

A. WHITNEY & SONS, 

CAR WHEEL WORKS, 

PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

CAST CHILLED WHEELS, 

AXLES AND BOXES 

FOR EVERY KIND OF SERVICE. 

Street Railway Wheels of all Sizes, 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886. 



NEFTELfcOOTHOUT, 

ENGINEERS & CONTRACTORS, 



41 Liberty Street, 



New York- 



We make a specialty ol street railway work, acting as engineers, or will 
contract for the construction of new lines. Repairs promptly executed on 
out of town work. Estimates for warehouse tramways promptly furnished. 



. W. CONWAY, 

STEAM & STREET RAILWAY CONTRACTOR, 

AND DEALER IN 

3E3aalxosicL ^v£sutexisuls. 

Estimates given. Curves and Switches laid at short notice. Office and Res- 
idence 

487 Monroe Street, Brooklyn, N- Y. 



JOHN BABCOCK C9 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



RAILWAY CAR VARNISHES 



WM. SOMERVILLE * SONS, 

CELEBRATED 

ANTI-FEVER MEDICINE. 

The Anti-Fever Medicine has now been in use tor over 30 years as a specific in all Diseases of an Inflammatory Character In Horses and Cattle. Anti- 
Fever Medicine is a Certain Cure for Chills and Fever, Sore Throat, Inflammation of Lungs, Coughs, Staggers, Inflammation of the Bowels, Spasmodic Colic, and 
Pleuro-Pneumonia in Cattle. This valuable Medicine is now used by the Principal Stables in the Country, by the U. S. and American Express Companies, and m any 
of the Street Car Companies. Try one bottle and you will be convinced of its value in your stable. Sold by all Druggists. PRICE $1 per bottle. Discount to 

Mention this paper. Wm. Somerville &, Sons, Buffalo Horse Infirmary, 127 Erie st- Buffalo, N-Y- 




The Mailinckrodt Street Gar Brake Go. 

404 Market Street— Room 206, 
ST. LOUIS, MO 

Manufacturers of the 

MALLINCKRODT 
STREET CAR ? 
BRAKE. 



johnF. Malunckrodt Pres 
Wm. Hoffmann Treas. 
EmilBbeunbkt Sec. 
Ed. L. Gottschalk As. Sec 



See description on 
pages 428 and 429 of 
tins paper. 





THE HAYCOX 

PATENT DOOR FASTENER. 

ADOPTED BY 

All Cleveland Railway Companies. 

Patented May 5, 1885. 

Fastener detached, made of malleable iron, 

weight about five pounds. 
Especially adapted for Elevator Doors. 
For further particulars, prices, circulars, 

etc., address 

Haycox Door Fastener Company, 

W. E. HAYCOX, Manager. 

1158 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, 0. 




THE DAVIS METAL 



forCAR JOURNAL BEARINGS 

EDWARD C. WHITE, SOLE MANUFACTURER 

531 WEST 33D STREET, NEW YORK. 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



30 



D. W. Pugh, J. S. Pugh, 



F. D. Russell. 



PUGH& RUSSELL, 

STREET CARS, RAILS, 

AND EVERY DESCRIPTION OF 

STREET RAILWAY SUPPLIES. 



General Representatives of 

THE JOHN STEPHENSON COMPANY, Limited, 

NEW YORK. 
STREET CARS. 

General Agents of 

THE A. FRENCH SPRING: COMPANY, Limited, 

PITTSBURG, PA. 
STREET CAR SPRINGS. 

Agents for New York District, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio of 

THE JOHNSON STEEL STREET RAIL COMPANY, 

JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO, 

STEWART BUILDING, ADAMS EXPRESS BUILDING, 

Broadway, Reade and Chambers Sts. No. 185 Dearborn Street, 

P. O. Box 3524. Rooms 13 and 14 



THE HALE & KILBDRN MANFG. CO, 



Extensive makers of Patented 

StreetCar Seats 

of every description. 
Our Patent Spring Scats covered with 
llattaii or Carpet are fast being adopt- 
ed by the best railroads In the country. 

Seats for Steam Cars a Specialty. 

Owners and makers of all theCobb patents 





^1 

S~ ST Cut shmiinq car with rattan seat and 

back witttuut springs. 
£S~ REFERENCES: 
« Broadway line (Pullman cars) NewYork 
~ 8,2 Grand St. line, 3d and ithave lines, NY 
C~ 3 Chicago City RR. Chicago W. Dlv. line, 
2 £ and New Adams street line, Chicago; 

East Cleveland K. K. Co. 
and Woodland Ave. and 
West Side R. R. Co. 
Cleveland: Union Line, 
,,. St. Louis; 2d& 3d St. R. 
H H. Co., Frank ford and 
Soinhwark R. R. Co., 
jg Union Line, Chestnut & 
V Walnut R. R., Ridge Ave 
R. R., or any other road 
In Plilla.; and luu others 
elsewhere. 



Many R. R. Co's use our Rattan Pat. 
Canvas Lined Seats for Summer and cov- 
er the same with carpet for Winter. This 
method of seating we recommend as 
durable and economical, for the reason 
both a Summer and Winter seat Is ob- 
tained In one. 

Estimates ifc Particulars cheerfully 
given (mention tills paper), satisfac- 
tion guaranteed. 

A TRIAL SOLICITED. 

OFFICES : 48 & 50 NO. SIXTH ST., 

FACTORIES: (515 to G2I Filbert St., 




PHILADELPHIA, PA Cut of section of cross for summer car. 



JOHN A. EMERICK, President, EDWARD H. JOHNSTON, General Manager, SAMUEL I.EES, Treasurer. 

Johnston Railroad Frog & Switch Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Railway Switches, Stands, Frogs and Crossings. 

ALL SUPPLIES FURNISHED APPERTAINING TO 

Steam & Street Railways. 

Civil & Mechanical Engineers, Machinists & Contractors. 

Blue Prints and Bills Furnished on Application. Correspondence Somcited. 

Works, Chester, Pa. Office, 307 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 



38 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



N TEMBEE 1886. 



(SSTABLISHED 1857. 



INCORPOR \TED 1875 



OAR COMPANY, 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 



BU1LDEH.S OF 



Street Oars 

OF EVERY STYLE AND SIZE, 

For Horse, Cable or Older Motive Power. 



EXCLOS1VE MANUFACTURERS OF 



BROWNELL'S PATENT 

COMBINATON CARS 

FOR SUMMER AND WINTER SERVICE. 



JARVIS ENGINEERING CO., 

Engineers & Contractors 




FOR ERECTING STATIONS 

FOR 

ELECTRIC POWER AND CABLE RAILWAYS, 

USING 

Jarvis Patent Furnace 

For Setting Steam Boilers to Burn Cheap Fuel, such as Wet Saw- 
Dust, Coal Screenings or Slack Coal. 

ALSO 

ARMINGTON AND SIMS ENGINES, 

Belting direct to Power Dynamos without using' Shafting'. 

NO. 61 OLIVER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

SEND FOR CIRCULAR. 



J. M. JONES' SONS, 



AGENTS, 



Street Railway Car Builders 



WEST TROY, 



NEW YORK. 



PENNSYLVANIA 

STEEL COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Steel Rails 



Of T patterns, weighing from 16 to 76 lbs. per yard. 
CENTRE BEARING Street Patterns, 42 to 60 lbs. per 
yard, TRAM Street Patterns 45 to 47 lbs. per yard, 
and Street Patterns for STEAM ROADS. 



WORKS AT 

STEELT ON, DAUPHIN CO., PENN. 



NEW YORK OFFICE. - 160 Broadway. 
Philadelphia Office 208 South Fourth St. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



30 



USE PROF. ROBERGE'S PATENT HOOF EXPANDER, 

Which Cures Corns, Contrac- 
tion, Quarter-Crrcks, &c. 



It Is the best invention for expanding a con- 
tracted toot, or keeping a sound foot In Its 
natural shape. 

It is used and approved by the leading 
horse owners of the New York Driving Park, 
such as 

Robert Bonner, Frank Work, 

and hundreds of other gentlemen of repute. 

In ordering, send diagram of foot with 
price. Same will be forwarded free by mall. 

ONE PAIR $2; TWO PAIRS, $3; FOUR PAIRS, $5. 

F.P.Roberge,Veterinary Surgeon, 

1,741 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 

&~ Lloeral discount to the trade. They are kept by all nrst-class Horseshoers, 
Saddle and Hardware men. 

HAND POWER, LEVER AND HYDRAULIC PRESSES 





See page 197, July, 1886. 



Scr w and Hydraulic Jacks. 

"Vv" ait son. <2z Stillmsun.. 
204 to 210 East 43d Street. N. Y. 




(This Trade Mark on all Genuine Covert Goods.) 

We call particular attention of all horse railroad companies to our celebrated 

Covert Bristle Card. 



The Most Ser- 
viceable and 
Best Quality 
Brush ever 
Made for All 
Purposes of 
the H o r s"e 's 
Toilet. 

Being Drawn 
Penetrating it 

Works Right 
Down to the 

Hide. 




EVERY BRUSH 

GUARANTEED 
BEST RUSSIA 

LEATHER 

CHEAPEST 
BRUSH 

EVER 

OFFERED 

THE TRADE. 



The Best Mane or Tail Brush 
Manufactured. 

ALSO, HARNESS SNAPS, SWIVEL SNAPS, OPEN EYE 
BIT SNAPS, CHAIN AND TRACE SNAPS, ROPE AND WEB 
HALTERS, HALTER LEADS, BREAST CHAINS, HALTER 
CHAINS, REIN CHAINS, BREAK CHAINS, AND A SPECIAL 
GRADE OF TRACE CHAINS, AND HEEL CHAINS. 

Send for illustrated catalogue and price list. 

GOVERT MANUFG. CO., 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS, 

WEST TROY, N. Y. 



F. M. DELANO. PHILIP RICHARDSON. 

47 Broadway, New York. 

Organizers Promoters & Builders 

STREET RAILROADS. 

Dealers in Street Bailrond Securities. Correspondence invited. 

STEEL STREET RAILS. 

CARNEGIE, PHIPPS & CO., LIMITED 

48 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA. 



Section No. 17 
40 lbs. per Yard 



Clute's Patent Double 

Bottomed 

Street Car 

LAMP, 

Ts one that assures safety, 
durability, and is perfect 
in regard to leakage. 

GEORGE M. CLUTE, Sole Manufacturer; 

Also Dealer in Car Reflectors, Chimneys, Burners, Etc. 
WEST TROY, N. Y- 

arland Car Heater 




I H3 



a «g 



£3 f 
02 O 



a* 

CD c3 

GO xj 




B 
o 



% S 
2 4 

B ~ 



o 

p 

W 

p 



The Michigan Stove Company, 

SOLE MAKERS. 

Detroit, Mich. Chicago, 111. Buffalo, N. Y. 



40 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886. 



STREET CAR SEATS & BACKS. 




MAIN PANEL. 
3-'„ in. W.W. 



F00T PANEL. 
3-> u ln. W.W.jj 



THREE-PLY CAR SIDES. 

Having given our three ply white wood car sides a thorouph trial ror a 
number of years In our city street and railway lines, which test has left them as 
firm and good as the day they were put in, we unhesitatingly place these sides 
in the market as a superior article. They are composed of three white wood (or 
poplar) veneers, each % inch thick, the grain of the center layer running at right 
angles with the two outside layers. Hence they derive all the special and well- 
known advantages of glued up wood over single ply, namely: 

1st. They are fully 75 per cent stronger, for they brace and stiffen the 

car. 

2nd. They are lighter, being only 3-8 inch thick, and so do >ot add so 

much dead weight to the car. 
3rd. They will not check or split by change of atmosphere. 
4th. They will not split or crack when nailing into place, even though 

the nail be placed near the edge 
5th. Being laid over a form to suit the shape of the car frame or post 

they cannot buckle or twist, a feature which also adds strength to the 

car. 

For repairing cars these sides have no equal. 

Our Three Ply Car Seats and Backs, so well known all over the world- 
are now the most popular seat and hack In the market, and recommend them 
selves especially for their mildness, Cleanliness, Hcalthfidnessand Beauty, as 
also their Cheapness and Durability. For they are indestructible by moths (the 
great enemy of upholstering), and will not harbor vermin or insects, or carry or 
communicate contagion or disease. Our trade In this line has grown in thirteen 
years to vast proportions, which in itself is a sufficient guarantee of their merits. 
They are made either perforated or plain to suit customer. Birch is the wood 
most generally used. Today fully one-half the railroads in the country are using 
these seats and backs. We would also call attention to our Veneer Ceiling for 
cars. They are made either plain, perforated or decorated, and greatly add to 
the beauty of the car. For repairing cars they have no equal; for they are placed 
over the carlines and cover all the old paint and wood work. The woods general- 
ly used are Birch, Birdscye Maple, Oak and Maliogany. 



GABDITEK Sz CO., 

Manufacturers of Car Seats and Ceilings and Depot Seating, 

OFFICE AND FACTORY : 643, 645, 647, 649, 651, 653, 655 and 657 West 48th St., New York. 
Sample and Salesroom : 206 Canal St., cor. Mulberry. 



Send for Catalogue. 



Address all Communications to Office. 



T HE ROSS HAY CUTTERS. 




A FULL LINE OF CUT- 
TERS BUILT EXPRESSLY 
FOR STREET RAILWAY 
BARNS. 

THEY HAVE COM- 
BINED STRENGTH, DURA- 
BILITY AND GREAT CA- 
PACITY. 

ARE EASILY OPERAT- 
ED AND CAN BE RUN TO 
FULL CAPACITY BY 
SMALL GAS ENGINE. 

MACHINES SENT TO 
ANY PART OF THE U. S. 
ON APPROVAL IF DE- 
SIRED. 

GUARANTEED TO BE 
THE BEST. 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE AND 
FULL PARTICULARS FURNISHED WHEN 
REQUESTED. 



E. W. ROSS & CO., SPRINGFIELD, OHIO. 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



41 



JOS. KINSEY, Prest. 



E. V. CHERRY, Vice-Prest. 



OLIVER KINSEY, Secy. 



POST & CO., Cincinnati, O., U.S.A. 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Street Railway Supplies and Equipment. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Center Lamps, all sizes. 

Globe Brass End Lamps, 
Tin Box Lamps, 

Cable Car Head Lamps 
Office Lamps, 

CAR TRIMMINGS, 

ALL STALES. 

Street Car Gongs, 

Journal Bearings, 

Deck Lights. No . i Monitor Head Lamp, 16 inch Reflectc 




DEALERS IN 



Burners, Chimneys, 
Wicks, Lenses, 

Globes, Etc. 

TRACK MATERIALS. 

Spikes, Bolts, 

Rails, Shovels, 
Picks, etc., etc. 



SPECIAL TRIMMING " MADE TO ANY ORDER TO ANY DESIGN. ESTIMATES FURNISHED. 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 

For Lame and Strained Horses, 



USE 



GOMBAULT'S CAUSTIC BALSAM. 



THE GREAT FRENCH VETERINARY REMEDY. 



STREET CAR BARN SUPERINTENDENTS will And this to be a sate, i reduced with sweet or raw linseed oil, and used as a most valuable liniment for 



speedy and reliable remedy for Curb, Splint, Sweeney, Poll Evil, Grease Heel, 
capped Hock, Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, Mange, Skin Diseases, 
Old Sores, Dropsical Affections, Inflammations, Throat Difficulties, Swellings or 
Ulcerations, Lameness from Spavin, Ringbone and other bony tumors, and many 
other diseases or ailments of horses or mules. Will quickly remove all bunches 
or blemishes, without leaving any scar or other injurious effects. It can also be 



all kinds of simple lameness, strains, etc. 

It surpasses all Liniments, Blistering or Firing, never leaves any 
scar or blemish, very rapid in its action, giving Immediate beneficial results, 
and is as convenient to use as a liniment. 

Price $1.50 per bottle, sent by express, charges paid. Special prices for 
orders of half dozen or over. TRY IT. 



Lawrence, Williams & Co, 

Sole Importers, CLEVELAND, OHIO, U. S. A. 



42 



THE STKEET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Novbmbeb, 1886. 



THE W AY FOUNDRY COM PANY. 

WAY, RHODES BLANKLEY, 



STREET RAILWAY SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY." 





Contractors for Construction of 

3^Ca-n.uLfa,ct"CLxers of" 
Curves, Frogs, Turnouts, All sizes of 

Crossings, Switches, Joint Plates, Knees. 

Steel grooved and Tram Rails at special rates. 
Pedestals & Boxes, All kinds of Brake Shoes. Turntables, 

AND ALL MATERIALS USED IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF STREET RAILWAYS. 



Twentv-third &, Wood Sts., 



Philadelphia, Pa 



TOM. L. JOHNSON'S 

IMPROVED FARE BOX. 

NOW IN GENERAL USE IN CITIES THROUGHOUT THE U. S. 





Ornamental to any Car. 



REDUCTION IN PRICE WHERE TWO 
BOXES ARE PLACED IN ONE CAR. 



Roads Equipped with. Buxes on Trial, find if notSatis- 
1 factory, Returned Without Any Expense to the Com- 
pany trying them. 



Patented Oct- 14, 1873. 



BOX NO. 



CHAKIOT PAITERN. 

One of the principal merits of these Fare Boxes overall others, consists m the fact that the fares are not turned out of sight at once by the drivers, leaving 
nothing but the bare word and memory of the parties as evidence of the payment, thereby making it easy for deception to be practised, even though an officer is on 
the car, and is endeavoring to see that the driver is faithfully performing his duties. They are so constructed that the fares are i.ept in sight from one end ot the 
road to the other, and at any point on the line an officer of the company, or Indeed any other person, can tally passengers with the fares. The drops can easily 
carry from 75 to 80 fares, and can be counteu without mistake, and counterfeit money can be easily detected. These boxes are very simple In construction, being 
cleared, when required, in rive minutes, whereas anv other box takes a much longer time. '1 he glass fronts and drops render i hem so transparent that a per- 
son sitting in the further end of car can readily count the fares and make the tally, without making himself conspicuous in the matter, If desirable. They are 
lighted from an outside lantern, (which is only on the carat night, and should be taken off during the day,) giving an excellent light, for the fares can be seen al- 
most as plain as by day. When the box is put in a car it can not be taken out or tampered with, unless the keys are obtained from the office, and can not be 
robbed without violence, special attention given to correspondence on the subject of street railway construction, equipment and operation. Address all cor- 
respondence to 

A. A. ANDERSON, with TOM. L. JOHNSON, Indianapolis, Ind. 



November, 1886 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



43 



DAY'S IMPROVED STREET RAILWAY TRACK CLEANERS. 



The cut represents a part of one end of the frame 
work of a 10-foot car with cleaners attached. 




These Track Cleaners need no extended statement of their great superiority 
over all others Invented. The fact of over three thousand pairs being now In use Is 
sufficient evidence of their necessity and utility. Are adaptable to all Kinds of 
rails and styles of cars. Clean Snow, ice. Mud and Stones from the rail. The 
driver can raise or lower them instantly with one hand. To secure the largest 
benefit they should be attached to every car. 

No estimate can be made of their advantage in saving of horseflesh hand labor, 
salt, and the makingot time in stormy weather. Since their Introduction new 
and valuable Improvements have been made In their construction, mode of at- 
tachment, and convenience of handling. They are finished In a thorough, work- 
manlike manner of the be-t material obtainable, the design being to manufac- 
ture the most efficient article in preference to other considerations. Price in- 
cludes right of use and is less than heretofore. 

Reference is made to a few of the roads using these Cleaners. 

Detroit city Ry., Detroit, Mich 154 Pair 

Chicago City Uy , Chicago, 111 400 " 

Rochester Citv & Brighton E. R. Rochester, N. Y 100 " 

Albany Ry., Albany, N. Y 75 '• 

Lvnn& Boston R. R., Boston, Mass 68 •' 

Boston Highland Ry., Boston, Mass 46 " 

Grand Rapids Street Ry 48 " 

NTaumkelg Street, Ry., Salem, Mass 69 " 

Bridgeport Horse Ry., Bridgeport, Conn 40 " 

cream City Ry., Milwaukee, Wis 40 " 

Milwaukee City Ry., Milwaukee, Wis 50 " 

Buffalo Street Ry., Buffalo, N. Y 32 " 

AUGUSTUS UAY, 76 State Street, cor. Park Place, 



This cut represents my Snow Plow, 23 of 
which are now In use. With four horses 
and two men they have handled two feet 
of snow, distributing it nine feet from the 
outside rail. 




It is adapted to single or double track road«, adjustable where necessary; built 
In the most thorough and substantial man tier of the best materelal. The Plow 
is not intended to supply the place of the small Track Cleanrs, but be auxiliary 
to them. For execution in deep snow, ease, and convenience lnhandllng, It sur- 
passes all others In use. orders should be given three month in advance. 

Reference is made to the following roads that use them:— Detroit city Ry.. De- 
troit, Mich. (Two plows ) Rochester Cii y & Brighton R.R , Rochester, N. Y. 
(Two plows.) cream City Rv., Milwaukee. W is. West Side Street Ry , Mil- 
waukee, Wis. Chicago City Ry., Chicago, 111. (Three plows.) Grand Rapids 
Street Ry.. Grand Rapids, Mich. Highland St. Ry., Boston, Mass. Buffalo St.. 
Ry., Buffalo, N. Y. (Two plows.) Johnstown Pass. Ry., Johnstown, Pa. Min- 
neapolis St. Ry., Minneapolis, Minn. (Two plows.) St. Paul St. Ry., St. Paul, 
Minn. (Two plows.) Kalamazo oSt. Ry,, Kalamazoo, Mich. Worcester St. Ry., 
Worcester, Mass. south Bend Ry., South Bend, Ind. Milwaukee City Ry., 
Milwaukee, Wis, 

For Further Information and Price, Addresat 



Detroit, Michigan, U. S. A. 



SLAWSON'S PATENT FARE BOXES 



These Boxes are of the latest and most approved 
pattern, and contain a front door, by opening which all 
of the glass inside can be conveniently cleaned. This Is 
a late patent, and is a very valuable improvement over 
the old method of taking the boxes apart for that pur- 
pose. They are well made and not liable to get out of 
order, cannot possibly be picked, and even if all the glass 
Is broken no fare can be extracted from the drawer. 

The late J. B. Slawson originated the "Fare Box Sys- 




tem," and all of his Boxes, Change Gates and Drivers' 
Change Box are protected by several patents, and par- 
ties using them are not liable to claims for inlringe- 
ments, as may be the case with some boxes which are 
now being offered for sale. 

These Boxes, etc., are now In use not only in the 
United States and Canada, but in Mexico, South Ameri- 
ca, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia— In fact, nearly 
all places where street cars are used. 



Change Slide. Outside 
View. 




C. Front View. 



Change Gate. Outside 
View. 

The prices have been great- 
ly reduced, and are made to 
fit the times. Orders will be 




D Front View 



C. Bnck View. f ' promptly filled by addressing, 

MILTON L MASSON, Agent, 365 AVENUE A, NEW YORK. 

or the JOHN STEPHENSON COMPANY, Limited, 47 EAST TWENTY-EYENTH STREET, New York. 



44 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



NoTEMBEBj 1886. 



THE BEMIS CAR BOX COMPANY, 




Manufactukers of 



The Bemis Patent 



Journal Box. 



Light Draft, Easy Eiding, Durable, Economi- 
cal. Brasses are warranted for 10 years, and 
Journal for 20 years. Eequires oiling or in- 
specting but once in 12 months. Boxes are 
positively dust proof. 



30 



Taylor st., Springfield, Mass. 



OOLE astb H UUT 



altirciore, 2x/£cL. 




Manufacturers of Cable Railway Plant. 

Machine Moulded Gearing lor Mills and Factories. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



45 



THE BRYDEN FORGED HORSESHOE WORKS, Limited 

CATASAUQUA, PENN. 




MANUFACTURERS OF 



THE 

BRYDEN 

Forged Solid Calk 




These shoes are forged into shape under heavy drop hammers, greatly condensing the iron and adding very much to wearing qual- 
ities, making it nearly equal to steel in durability. 
The distinctive feature of our system of 
manufacture is, that it produces a finished 
shoe, calked, or plain, ready for attaching 
to the hoof. 



The crease is made low and the nail 
holes are punched well in and beveled to 
permit the nailhead to be well driven in, 
reducing the strain on the nails and insur- 
ing a firmly fastened shoe. 

The foot bearing of the shoe is level, thus 
materially aiding in the preservation of the 
hoof. 

It is not ne essaiy to heat the shoe in 
order to fit it. 

There are no welds in the shoe to break, 
the calks being solid fo r ged up from tbe 
web. 

Our Calked Shoe. A good, strong, reliable shoe 
A handy shoe for the Winter, easily sharpened, and, as 
No. 1 to No. 6. Front and hind of steel or iron. 




The shoes have a good substantial clip 
drawn up from metal driven outside the 
regular outlines of the shoe for that pur- 
pose. The outer edge of the clip, when 
drawn up, coinciding with the outlines of 
the shoe, requires no robbing of the hoof 
wall to let in the clip. 

Among the street railways using our 
shoes are, the Third Avenue R. R. Co., 
Eighth Avenue R. R. Co., Broadway & 
Seventh Avenue R. R. Co. of New York 
city; Bushwick R. R. Co., Brooklyn City 
and Newtown R. R. Co. of Brooklyn; Phila- 
delphia Traction Co., Citizen's Passenger 
R. R. Co., Second & Third Street R. R. 
Co. of Philadelphia; Metropolitan R. R. Co. 
of Washington, D. C. ; North Chicago R. 
R. Co, Chicago City R. R. Co., West 
Division R. R. Co. of Chicago, Bl. ; New 
Orleans City & Lake R. R. Co. of New Or- 
leans, La. 

We present illustrations of some of the 
many designs of shoes manufactured by us. 

to have on hand. The calks will not come off. Always ready to nail on. 
the calks will not break, will give as much service as steel. Made in sizes 




Our Frog Pressure Shoe. The advocates of 
the frog pressure system of horseshoeing have 
in this shoe the very thing they want. The best 
shoe made for curing corns or contracted feet. 
Made in sizes No. 1 to No. 6. Front and hind, 
iron, or steel. 

Our Plain Shoe. " The best railroad shoe 
made," so says one of the largest consumers of 

orseshoes in New York city. This shoe is used 
by the largest street railroads in New York city 
and Philadelphia. Made in sizes No. 1 to 6. 
Front and hind. 

Our Chicago Special. Designed to meet the 
wants of many of our western customers. Exten- 
sively used in Chicago, on the principal railroads 
and for custom work. A light calked ahoe for 
shoeing trotting and driving horses. Made in 
sizes No. 1 to No 4 of iron or steel. 




Our Calked Mule Shoe. Just the thing for street railway and coal mining work; solid calks. Made in sizes No. 1 to No. 5in iron or steel. 

J. B. WHITE, Manager Sales Department. 



46 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886. 



The Gould Cable System 



O F 



STREET RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION. 

Fully covered by patents in the United States and England. Patents applied for In other European countries. 

n ffi fi 



CONSTANT TEARING UP 
OF THE STREETS 
AVOIDED. 



2J x 3 ^7 lbs. 




SECTION THROUGH A B. 1 



Slxfflat 3.13 11,8. _,_ 



PLAN 



-£ 





</ 03 L — Vjf 1 




The conduit Is placed at the side, doing away with the central conduit entirely. A conduit Is supplied for natural gas, steam, electric and telephone 
wires, etc. 

THE RAILS ARE TIED TOGETHER AT THE SURFACE. 



The construction of the grip is the simplest known. 

The slot which admits the grip is placed outside the rails. 

The inventor will make favorable terms with parties desiring to put this system 
into operation. 

A capital chance for the right man to organize a company. 




N. B.— Parties Infringing on this Grip will be Prosecuted to the full Extent of the Law. 



Address all communications to 



J. H. GOULD, Ninth ana Market Streets, Philadelphia, Pa, 



November, 1886 THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 47 



TH E LACLEDE CAR CO. 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 




RAI L WAY 



CARS, 



Of the Latest Improved Patterns, 



ALL PARTS BEING INTERCHANGEABLE AND EASILY DUPLICATED. 

ORDERS QUICKLY AND CAREFULLY FILLED, 



48 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886. 



STREET RAILWAY SUPPLY COMPANY, 



SUCCESSORS TO 



The Higley Car Journal Co., Cleveland, 0., 



MANUFACTURERS OF THE 





WORSWICK, 



HIGLEY 




And SHATTUCK 



MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 



Street Railway Supplies Generally. 

Wheels, Axles, Springs, Rails, Track Sapplies. 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



49 



S. M. CARPENTER, Prop. C. J. LANGLON, Sec'y. 

FULTON FOUNDRY, 

MANUFACTUEEKS OP 

STREET RAILWAY SUPPLIES, 

Carpenter's Patent Turn-tables and Transfer-tables, 

Open Wheels of all sizes and weights. Wheels and Axles of all 

sizes fitted on short notice. 

Chilled curve rail, Turnouts, Switches, etc., etc. Blue prints and Bills Furnished on Application. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. Address, 

FULTON FOUNDRY, 

202 MERWIN ST. CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

WM. WHARTON Jr. & CO. Limited, 

Engineers, Manufacturers & Contractors, 

Twenty-Fifth Street and Washington Avenue, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Cable Railways, Grips, 

And All Appurtenances. 



The Oldest and Largest Manufacturers of Street Railway Track Appliances in the World, Responsible parties con- 
temr'atine Building Renewals or Extensions will find it to their interest to correspond with us. 



50 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886. 




if LECTRI 



Y 



The Van Depoele Electric Manufacturing Company 

21 NORTH CLINTON STREET, CHICAGO, ILL,, 

Owning the Van Depoele Patents for Electric Railways and 
for Van Depoele Motors, are prepared to equip railways with 
their Electric System. 

We claim to have the best and most economical Electric 
Motor in the World. 



We are not Selling Stock, but Doing Business. 

Would be pleased to lurnlsli estimates to new companies or those desiring' to extend lines 01 wanting more rapid transit. 



Van 



ectric Manufg. Co. 



Bl 



MANUFACTURING 

MANUFACTURERS AND OWNERS OP THE 

Latest Designs, Improvements and Inven 
tions in Registers, Indicators, Classi- 
fiers and Punches, for the Record- 
ing of Fares Collected on 
Street and Steam Railroads. 




COMPANY. 



JAMES McCREDIE, Pres., Buffalo, N. T. 



The Alarm Registering; Punch. 

This Register, which is so generally used 
throughout the United States and Europe, 
we claim to be the most perfect check 
that has ever been placed before 
the public for the Collection 
and Registiation of Fares 
on Street Railroads, 
especially where 
different rates 



This company owns over 100 Patents em- 
bracing all the Valuable Features of Fare 
Registers, Indicators, etc., and was 
awarded three Medals at the 
Chicago Exposition of Rail- 
way Appliances. 

Benton Register. 




of Cash fare and tickets 
are to be collected. 



The Monitor Register. 




Railway com- 
panies desir- 
ing to use a 
Stationary 
Register will 
consult their 
own interest 
by examining 
this Register 
before adopt- 
ing any of the 
cheap devices 
now offered as 
it is the most 
Reliable Reg- 
ister of its 
kind. For fur- 
ther particu- 
lars address 




BEADLE & COURTNEY, Gen'l Agents^^fo^Ya ^25*. 



52 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886. 



THE GIRDER SYSTEM OUR SPECIALTY. 

THE 




m\ Street 




JOHNSTOWN, PA. 



Section C. 88, No. 111. 



Section D.45,No.ll. 




SIDE BEARING GIRDER RAILS 



Patented February 20, 1883. 
Section E. 76, No. 117. 



OR 





Patented November XI, 1883. 



Section G. 58, No. 120. 



CENTER BEARING GIRDER RAILS. 





r— ' 

1 — m — 











L.arge Assortment of different Weights 
and Sections. 



Patented January 29, 1884. 



Patented January 29, 1884. 



oiled Steel Switches, Frogs, Curve Crosses, Etc, 

We Furnish Every Detail Wanted in Track Work. 



Our customers are guaranteed against all suits for infringements on goods purchased from us and we further undertake to defend 
I he patents covering the details of cur Girder System. 

To those contemplating the use of tLe Girder System, we offer, FREE OF COST, to survey their routes, and after consultation as 
'o the hest and most economical construction, to furnish lull and complete estimates of cost of the completed work. Send for Illus- 
trated Catalogues. 



November, 1886 THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 53 



JOSEPHINE 0. SMITH, Successor to the late WILLARD H. SMITH, 




MANUFACTURER OF W. H. SMITH'S PATENT RAILROAD CENTER LAMPS AND REFLECTORS. 



FARE BOXES FOR STREET CARS 

UNTIL YOU 

Investigate the Merits of the 

WALES Bll 

WALES MANUFACTURING CO., 

SYRACUSE, N.Y. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



November, 1886. 



The United States Steam and Street Railway 

Advertising Company, Limited. 




Contractors for Advertising Space in Street Railway Cars. 



WM. F. CARLETON, Manager, 239 Broadway, N. Y 

P. O. BOX 2366. 



NovEMBEE, 1886. 



55 



THE STANDARD INDEX * REGISTER CO., 

NEW YORK, 

SOLE LICENSEES AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

THE STANDARD INDEX AND REGISTER, 

ADOPTED BY THE LEADING RAILROADS IN THE UNITED STATES, 

For Indelibly Recording upon paper the number of trips made, and passengers carried for each trip as well as for any number 
of trips for aiif period of time, and sounding an alarm simultaneously with each registration made. 




' E The recent decision of the U. S. Circuit Court in our favor after three years 

of litigation in which the Standard was involved, justifies us in accepting orders 
■ from railway compauies generally for our Registers, which are celebrated for sim- 

plicity efficiency aud infallibility as an indicating and i ecording register. 
It will appear obvious upon inspection that the Standard Register is the only device that should be adopted by railway com- 
panies anxious to secure a correct report and record of trips made and fares collected, for the reason that, in addition to the visual 
dial and indicator, a permanent registration of each trip made, and the exact number of fares collected or passengers carried, is auto- 
matically made by mechanical means upon paper, by which the latter is punctured in a manner that prevents obliteration, and can be 
preserved in the office of the company for reference and comparison with fares turned in by the conductor, and for filing for future 
purposes. 



T US S T I HVE O KT I A L S. 



METROPOLITAN RAILROAD COMPANY. 
President's Office. C. A. Richards. 16 Kilby Street, 

Boston, March 9, 1883. 
Eli Baldwin, Esq., Prest. Standard Index & Register Co., 

New York, N. Y., 

Dear Sir,— In answer to your Inquiry of March 8 1 would most respectfully 
state, that after a trial of some months of the two hundred odd registers that you 
have placed in our cars, I feel that I do no more than exact Justice to your com- 
pany in giving' you In the strongest and most unqualified manner my entire ap- 
proval of them. They are In every way all that you claimed, and all that you 
promised me they would prove to be. In short, I like them. They answer my 
purpose completely, and I would not exchange or part with them for any other 
device of the kind I have yet seen. 

Very respectfully yours, &c, C. A. Richards, 

President Metropolitan Railroad Co. 



C. A. Richards, President. Chas. Boardman, Treas. W. P. Harvey, Secy. 

OFFICE OF 

THE METROPOLITAN RAILROAD COMPANY, 
No. 16 Kilby Street, 

Boston, March 23, 18S6. 
E. Baldwin, Esq., Prest. Standard Index and Register Co.: 

Dear Sir,— We have now Ip dally use four hundred and twenty-five of your 
registers. They have by repeated purchases come to this number. We like the 
registers very much, and have no fault to find with them. With an experience 
of four years we feel that we are Justified in recommending them. 

Very respectfully yours, &c, C. A. Ricuards, President. 

CENTRAL PARK, NORTH & EAST RIVER RAILROAD COMPANY. 
G. Hilton Scribner, Prest. C. Densmore Wyman, Vice Prest. J. L. Valentine, 
Secy, and Treas. W. N. A. Harris, Supt. 
Office, 10th Avknde, 53d and 54th Streets, 

New York, August 31, 1882. 
The Standard Index Register instruments purchased from you about a 
year and a half ago have since that time been in constant use upon the cars ot 
this line, and I am very free to acknowledge their superiority over any device 
hitherto tried by us. We believe from our experience that In their construction 



and result they attain the object sought with accuracy and at the same 
time with a minimum liability to external tampering or dishonest manipulation. 
Very respectfully, C. Densmore wyman, vice President. 



CENTRAL PARK, NORTH & EAST RIVER RAILROAD COMPANY 
Q. Hilton Scribner, Prest. C. Densmore Wyman, Vice Prest. J. L. Valentine, 
Treas. Howard Scribner, secy. W. N. A. Harris, Supt. 
Tenth Avenoe, 53d and 54th Street, 

New York, March 24, 1S8G. 
Eli Baldwin, Esq., Prest. Standard Index & Register Co., 

138 Puli on Street, New York : 
My Dear Sir,— We have used about 150 of your " Standard Index Registers " 
for the past Ave years and such use has demonstrated their entire utility and 
adaptation for the purposes Intended In their construction. We are more than 
satisfied with them, finding that by reason of the simplicity of their construction 
they require hardly any repairs, while they are accurate and reliable and at the 
same time by virtue of the inside paper dial are free from the danger of being 
tampered with. In a word we are thoroughly satisfied with the Standard and it 
Is but just to you that I should express this opinion to you. 

Very sincerely yours, C. Densmore Wyman, Vice President. 



office of 

THE BROADWAY AND SEVENTH AVENUE RAILROAD COMPANY, 
COR. 7TH AVE. AND 50TH STREET, 

New York, March 25, 1886. 
Eli Baldwin, Esq., Prest. Standard Index & Register Co.: 

Dear Sir,— Concerning your Inquiry as to the result of our experience in the 
use of the Standard Register furnished by your company ano the satisfaction 
given I will state that after tive years' test during which they have been in use 
on the cars of our roads, we have found them the embodiment of all that you 
have claimed, and I cheerfully endorse them as the l»est registers that we have 
ever seen, and have found them reliable and not easily put out of order. In sliort 
we would not be without them. The paper register or tablet upon which regis- 
trations are recorded of the number of passengers carried and trips made is an 
Invaluable feature, producing as it does an infallible and indelible record of fares 
collected, serving as a check where a division of trust is questioned. We have 
upwards of two hundred of your Registers on the cars of our roads at the present 
time. Very Truly Yours, 

J. W- Foshay, President. 



STANDARD INDEX & REGISTER COMPANY, 138 Fulton St., N. Y 



56 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Novembeb, 1886. 





13 ZBa,rclsL3r Street, - 3^Te^x7" "2"orDs, 

PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER OF 

Graduated Street Car Springs 



Patented, April 15th, 1879. 



ADAPTED TO THE 

STEPHENSON, 
BEMIS, 
RANDALL, 
HIGLEY, 
BRILL, 
JONES, 
BALTIMORE, 
VOLK, 
CHAPLIN 
And all other Boxes. 






TSftN*" 




No. 0, for 10-ft. Light Oars. 
No. 1, for 10-ft. Cars. 
No. 2, for 12-ft. Cars. 
No. 3, for 14-ft. Cars, 
i No. 4, for 16-ft, Cars. 
No. 5, for 16-ft. Cars. 

(Single Pedestal.) 

No. 1, Cushion, for 16-ft. 
Cars, 

No. 2, Cushion, for 12 and 
14-ft. Oars. 



TESTIMONIAL. 



MIDDLESEX RAILROAD CO., Boston, Mass. 

Richard Vose. Dear Sir,— We have had In constant 
use upon this road for several years the "Vose Grad- 
uated Spring," and they have given very general 
satistactlon. So much so that we shall continue to 
order them. Very truly, 

Chas. E. Powers, Prest. 



NO. CHICAGO CITY RY. CO., Chicago, III. 

Richard Vose, Esq. Dear Sir,— This company has 
had in use tor the past seven or eight years your 
Patent Graduated Car Spring, and our experience 
leads us to the conclusion that they are all in every 
respect which you represent them to be. And cer- 
tainly all that we desire. Yours Respectfully, 

V. c. Tokner, Prest. 

B'DWAY & 7TH AVE. R.R. CO., New York City- 
Mr. Richard Vose. Dear Sir,— We have 125 cars 
equipped with your Graduated Springs. They have 
given entire satisfaction. They are undoubtedly the 
best In the market. Very Respfly, 

J. W. Foshay, Prest. 



BROOKLYN CITY R.R. Co.. Brooklyn N. Y. 

Richard vose, Esq. Dear Sir,— Y'ours of May 27 
to Mr. Hazzard, Prest., has been referred to me for 
reply. And would say that we have now In use 
about 600 sets or your Patent Graduated Car Springs. 
And up to date have given perfect satisfaction. 
Yours truly, A. N. Dickie, Supt. 

CHICAGO CITY RY. CO., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Richard Vose, Esq. Dear Sir,— Replying to your 
**.vor of a recent date I beg to say that we have been 



using your Graduated Car Springs since 1881 aDd 
have increased the number, until at the present time 
we are using 369 sets, and the same have invariably 
proved satisfactory. Yours truly, 

C. B. Holmes, Supt 



CAMBRIDGE R.R. CO., Cambridge, Mass. 

Col. Richard Vose. Dear Sir, — We have used 
your Graduated Street Car Springs for several years 
and I need only say with such success that we con- 
tinue to use them. Very Respty, 

W. A. Bancroft, Supt. 



CINCINNATI I. P. R.R. CO., CINCINNATI, O. 

Richard Vose. Dear Sir,— Send us 6 more sets of 
your new pattern Car Spring, same as the lot we 
ordered of you last Sept. in every way. This is the 
best answer we can make to your question of "How 
we like them." Y'ours truly, J. M. Doherty, Supt. 



LYNN & BOSTON R.R. CO., Chelsea, Mass. 

Richard Vose, Esq. Dear Sir,— All I can say in 
favor of the Vose Spring Is that we continue to apply 
them to most of our new cars. Have about 60 cars 
equipped and think very well of them. If they could 
be produced for less money should think better of 
them. Very Respectfully Yours, E. C. Foster, Supt. 



CREAM CITY' R.R. CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Gentlemen,— Y"ours of May 28 at hand, with re- 
gard to your Car Springs. We And they are the best 
in use. They come a little higher than the Barrel 
Spring, but they are much the better springs. 
Yours truly, H. J. C. Berg, Supt. 



LOWELL HORSE R.R. CO., Lowell, Mass. 

To whom it may concern : We have used the Rich 
ard Vose Graduated Car Springs for several years, 
and are well pleased with them. Should be unwil- 
ling to change them for any other. All of our cars 
use these springs. Yours Respectfully, 

J. A. Chase, Treas. 



DAYTON STREET R.R., Dayton, O. 

Mr. Richard Vose. Sir,— We have eighteen cars 
equipped with your Patent Graduated Spring, and 
will use your springs to replace all other kinds as 
fast as repairs are needed. Your springs give the 
best satisfaction to our company and patrons of any 
that we have ever tried. 

Yours Respectfully, A. W. Anderson, Supt. 



FT. WAYNE & ELMWOOD RY. CO., DETROIT, MICH. 

Richard Vose, Esq. Dear Sir,— For the past four 
years we have b^en using your Graduated Springs on 
all of our cars (30). Our Superintendent says that 
none of them have ever had to be repaired and that 
they are the best springs we ever used. 

Yours truly, N. W. Goodwin, Secy. 



DETROIT CITY RY., Detroit, Mich. 

Richard Vose, Esq. Dear Sir,— I have your favor 
of the 20th ultimo. We have about 70 cars equipped 
with your springs. Our experience is that they wear 
well and give general satisfaction. 

Yours truly, Geo. Hendrie, Treas. 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAIL WAT JOURNAL. 



57 



THE BROOKLYN RAILWAY SOPPLY GOMPANY. 



37 WALWORTH ST., BROOKLYN, N. Y 



*5 



U. S. A. 



RAILWAY SUPPLIES. 



Yellow Pine Timber for Track Construction of Best Quality. Knee Spikes and Joint Plates. 
Eail Spikes at Lowest Manufacturer's Prices, Made to Order, to Fit any Bail. 

Any Kind of Materials Promptly Furnished Besponsible Parties and Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

Second-hand Cars Selected by Experts for Parties at a Distance on Small Commission. 




SPECIALTIES. 



Latest Improved Snow Sweepers of OUR OWN MANUFACTURE. Now used in nearly all the principal 
Northern cities. Rattan for refilling Brooms. Snow Plows. Sand Cars. 

Track Tools of all kinds : Picks, Shovels, Rammers, Bars, Mauls, Tongs, 

Bending Machines, Etc. 

AGENTS FOR 

Carpenter's Patent Turn ■ Tables. 

ONE NOW ON EXHIBITION AT OUR SHOPS. 



{@°We have several Sweepers of other makers, taken in exchange, which will be sold, thoroughly refitted, very lew on early 
orders. Battan lower than ever before; write for prices. 

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



58 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886. 



THE LEWIS AND 

27 to 35 Walworth Street, and 31 to 37, and 



PATEITTEES 6z MAITUFACTUEEES OP 

THE 



IMPROVED 



Used ry Railway Companies in alii 
Pakts of the CoUNTBy. 



"ALARM" 



Kept in Repair One Year 
Free of Charge. 



PASSENGER 



Guaranteed the Most Complete 
Machine in the U. S. for 
the Purpose. 



REGISTER 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 

MANAGERS OF STREET RAILWAYS WHEN VISITING THE EAST SHOULD SEE THE 
LARGE OPEN CARS ON THE PAVONIA HORSE RAILROAD, JERSEY CITY, WHICH ARE 
RUN BY THE DRIVER AND "SMALL'S AUTOMATIC FARE COLLECTOR." THEY ARE 
TWENTY-TWO FEET LONG, SEAT THIRTY-FOUR PASSENGERS, AND FREQUENTLY 
CARRY SEVENTY AT A LOAD. 

The Lewis & Fowler Manufacturing Company, Sole Agents. 



November, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



50 



FOWLER MF'G Co. 

32 to 40 Sandford Street BROOKLYN, H. Y. 

Materials Furnished for 

Street and Cable Railway Construction 



Knees 
Spikes 

Channel Plates 

Frogs 

Points 

Tongue Switches 

Grooved Rails for 
Curves 

Bent any desired radius. 




RAILROAD CASTINGS 

Of every description and most approved patterns. 



FOWLER'S IMPROVED 

RANDALL BOX & RUNNING GEAR. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. J^mb^V*^ 



THELEWIS AND 

27 to 35 Walworth Street, and 31 to 37, and 



PATENTEES cSc ^^nSTTTF-A-CX-CriBieiEBS 



IMPROVED 



Used by Railway Companies in all 
Paiits of the Country. 



§ "A I AO Ail" § 



O 



Kept in Repair One Tear 
Free of Charge. 



ALARM 

PASSENGER 



o 



Guaranteed the Mubt Complete 
Machisi: in the U. S. por 
the Purpose. 



REGISTER 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

MANAGERS OP STREET RAILWAYS WHEN VISITING THE EAST SHOULD SEE THE 
LARGE OPEN CARS ON THE PAVONIA HORSE RAILROAD, JERSEY CITY, WHICH ARE 
RUN BY THE DRIVER AND "SMALL'S AUTOMATIC PARE COLLECTOR » THEY ARE 
TWENTY-TWO PEET LONG, SEAT THIRTY-POUR PASSENGERS, AND FREQUENTLY 
CARRY SEVENTY AT A LOAD. ^HUJiJNiLX 

The Lewis & Fow.er Manufacturing Company, So.e A^nts. 



FOWLER MFG Co. 

32 to 40 Sandford Street BROOKLYN, N. Y, 



Materials Furnished for 

Street and Cable Railway Construction 

Knees 
Spikes 

Channel Plates 
Frogs 
Points 

Tongue Switches 

Grooved Rails for 
Curves 

Bent any desired radius. 



RAILROAD CASTINGS 

Of every description aud moat approved patterns. 



FOWLER'S IMPROVED 

RANDALL BOX & RUNNING GEAR. 




60 THE STEEET RAILWAY JOURNAL. Novmibek, 1886. 



FRANK H. ANDREWS, 



SUCCESSOR TO 



ANDREWS & CLOONEY, 

F. T. LERNED, Gen'l Agent. 

Manufacturers and Contractors for Constructing Street Railways. 

THE BUILDING OF 



CABLE ROADS, 



AND FURNISHING MATERIALS FOR SAME, A SPECIALTY. 

All Kinds of Steel and Steel Grooved Rails, 

Straight or Bent to any Radius. 

Knees, Fishplates, Spikes, Bolts, Etc., Etc. 

MACHINERY: 

Wheel Presses, Wheel Borers, Axle Lathes, Drills, Sc., 

EITHER FOR STEAM OR HAND POWER. 

Promptness and Reasonable Prices, 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 

Biancb. Offices: 

BOSTON, ST. LOUIS. CHICAGO, 

37 Central Street. Southern Hotel. Lakeside Building. 

Represented in California by WM. B. ISAACS, 258 Market St, San Francisco. 



61 



FRANK H. ANDREWS, 

F. T. LERNED, Gen'l Agen. 



OFFICE : 



545 



■ i 



new m, 





STREET CAR WHEELS 

OP EVERY DESCRIPTION, 

On Axles. 



Manufacturers of 

Elliptic, Spiral, 
Volute, Car and 
Engine 

SPRINGS 

Of Every Description, 



■ 




Street Railway Turn-table. 



ALSO 



Sweepers, Snow Plows, 
Turn-Tables, 

Track Work, Automatic 
Switches, Etc. 

REPRESENTED IN CALIFORNIA BY 



WORKS: 

535 to 551 

West 33d St., 

AND 

538 to 552 

West 34th St., 
NEW TBI, 




Car Wheels, 

Axles, 
Brake Shoes, 
Pedestals, 

Boxes, 
Brass Bearings 

Castings 

of all Descriptions where great 
Strength is Required. 




Improved Springs. 



Street Railway Crossings. 



WM. B. ISAACS. 258 Market St. San Francisco. 



62 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



November, 1886. 



J. G. BRILL & CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



BUILDERS OF 



Railway& Tramway Cars 




Passenger Cars of all kinds, 




Light Cars for 
Suburban Roads, 



Construction Cars, Power Hand 
Cars, Small Merchandise 
Cars, Cane Cars. 




Nov EM bkk,1886. THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



63 



j. G. BRILL & CO., 



PHILADELPHIA, 

BUILDERS OF 



Railway ^Tramway Cars 



64 



November, 1886. 



JOHN STEPHENSON COMPANY 



(LIMITED), 



TRAMWAY CARS 

MEDAL OF FIRST CLASS, WORLD'S INDUSTRIAL COTTON EXPOSITION, NEW ORLEANS, 1885. 



LIGHT ELEGANT, DURABLE. 

Every Description. 

Best Materials. 

Minimum Prices. 

■ 

ORDERS QUICKLY FILLED. CAREFUL ATTENTION TO SHIPMENTS. 
All Climates Suited. 





vol. ni. \ t 



NEW VOKK: I 
13 Liberty Street./ 



DECEMBER, 1 886. 



( CHICAGO: ) NI 
(Lakeside Building. f IW. 



The Appleton Electric Railway. 

The two views (hat we present in this 
connection are taken from photographs of 
two sections of the electric railway that is 
now in operation at Aj^pleton, Wis., on the 
Van Depoele system. 

In connection with this road there are 
a few features that will not be found upon 
all roads of this kiud. The power for gen- 
erating the electricity is obtained from two 



it is possible for a traveling contact to pass 
over the wires uninterruptedly from end to 
end of track. This traveler, runniEg upou 
the overhead conductors, brings the cur- 
rent to the motors in the cars by means of 
a double flexible cable, the latter being so 
arranged that it can readily be transferred 
from one car to auother. In order to effect 
this, the cables hanging from the travelers 
on the overhead wire are fastened with 
their lower terminals to a cross bar made 



ent case the motors are |- laced on the front 
platform of the car, so that the driver can 
sit near the motor and have at once full 
view of the road upon which he is running. 
As the motor is placed upon t ie front plat- 
form of the car, it is at all times under the 
eyes of the driver. This enables him to 
take good care of the machine and 
to see that all working parts are in good 
order and kept clean. From this point he 
can also attend to oiling of the shafts, etc , 




turbines coupled together, and which are 
capable of developing 100 horse power. 
They are used to run a 60 horse-power 
dynamo. 

The electric current so generated is con- 
veyed by means of two heavy copper wires 
xip to the overhead wires for a distance of 
about one m'le. Here the feeders are elec- 
trically connected to the double overhead 
wires, these being placed over the center 
of the track, about eighteen or twenty feet 
from the ground, and forming an exact 
counterpart of the track below. These 
overhead conductors are so susjiended that 



THE APPLETON ELECTRIC RAILWAY. FIG. 1. 

of some good insulating substance. To 
the center of the crossbar is attached 
a handle, and if the handle be grasped 
the terminals of the cables can be 
hooked into two corresponding sockets, fas- 
tened to the under side of the roof on the 
front end of the car. From these sockets 
the current is led by means of insulated 
copper conductors to the motor and to a 
switch, and, in the usual way, by turning 
thehandle either to the right or to the left, 
more or less current cau be sent through 
the motor, or be altogether shut off 
when the car is to be stopped. In the pres- 



so that there is no reason to neglect any 
important work. 

The motor is illustrated in Fig. 3, and is 
a very substantial machine although the 
design is very plain. The commutator 
brush holder is provided with two pair of 
brushes, and is so arranged that by turning 
the haudle either to the right or to the left 
the motor can be run back or forward. On 
starting a car the driver turns on the cur- 
rent gradually until the maximum speed of 
the car is obtained, a speed which, for 
street cars, is ordinarily from six to eight 
miles per hour. 



66 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December, 1886. 



In the present plant five motors, one of 
12 horse-power and four of ten horse-power, 
are connected as follows: From the ar- 
mature shaft of the motor a phosphor 
bronze pinion meshes perfectly in a large 
gear wheel carried underneath the motor 
by a solid steel countershaft. Mounted 
upon the latter are two sprocket wheels, 
corresponding to two other sprocket wheels 



ually succeeded, six years later, in working 
trains between Washington and Bladens- 
burg, over a line of five miles in length. 
The speed was only 19 miles an hour, and 
the undertaking was commercially a fail- 
ure, owing to the great cost of producing 
the electric current which worked the 
motor. 

For the time being the subject dropped 




FIG. 2. 



fixed solidly to the forward axle of the car; 
upon these sprocket wheels runs a specially 
made steel belt, so that on starting the mo- 
tor the armature shaft revolves its pinion 
upon the large gear placed upon the couu- 
ter shaft, aud the latter communicates mo- 
tion to the axles of the car by means of the 
intervening sprocket wheels and steel belts. 
The grade varies from six to nine per cent 
and in one place a sixty-foot curve occurs 
on au eight per cent grade; there are num- 
erous curves forty to fifty feet radius. The 
views are taken from photographs. 

The officers of the road are: President, J. 
E. Harriman ; Vice President, N. B. Clark; 
Secretary, T. W. Orbison; Treasurer, Jos. 
Koffend. 



out of sight, aud has only been revived dur- 
ing the last few years. This revival is in a 
great measure due to M. Fontaine's discov- 
ery — made at the International Exhibition 
in Vienna, in 1873 — that, by the aid of two 
dynamo machines and connecting cables, 



practical effect was that henceforth the 
transmission of power, not only between 
two fixed dynamo machines, but also be- 
tween a fixed dynamo machine aud a train 
in motion, has become possible. The act- 
ual development of electric railways has, 
however, only taken place within the last 
five or six years, and now there are both in 
Europe and in America many lines worked 
by electricity. 

There are two ways in which an electric 
railway can be worked. We may either 
utilize the ordinary rolling stock, and re- 
place the steam locomotive by an electric 
locomotive, or we may provide each pas- 
senger coach aud each goods wagon with its 
own small electromotor, so that each vehi- 
cle becomes its own locomotive. In the 
latter case, the power is applied to each 
axle in the train, and the whole of its 
weight is utilized in producing adhesion. 
Of the difficulties connected with the con- 
veyance of current to the train, aud of those 
which at present stand in the way of an 
economical and certain method of regulat- 
ing the speed, we shall speak presently. 
But, supposing that these difficulties can be 
overcome, it will be admitted that electric 
traction, especially when carried out on the 
latter plan, has many advantages over steam 
traction. 

By making every wheel in the train a 
driver, the acceleration at which the train 
can start is greatly increased. There would 
be no difficulty in obtaining a speed of 30 
miles an hour within 10 seconds from the 
moment of starting, and the strain due to 
inertia would not be greater, nor the sen- 
sation to passengers more disagreeable, 
than is the case now, when trains are stop- 
ped quickly by the application of powerful 
continuous brakes. In all probability strain 



Electric Railways, 



The proposal to use electricity as a source 
of energy for working railways is very old. 
With whom it first originated will perhaps 
never be known, but is is probable that 
Professor Henry's " electric engine," which 
was invented in 1833, and especially Jaco- 
bi's famous experiment in 1839, which 
showed to the world that electricity could 
be used to propel a boat, directed public at- 
tention for the first time to the question of 
electric locomotion. This seems the more 
likely, as the first patent for an " electric 
railway " dates from 1810, and was granted 
by the United States Government to Henry 
Pinkus, who seems, however, not to have 
developed his invention. We hear nothing 
more about electric railways until the year 
1845, when Professor Page invented a new 
electromotor, by the aid of which he act- 




motive power could be transmitted over a 
considerable distance. Whether this dis- 
covery was purely accidental, or whether it 
was the legitimate and logical result of sci- 
entific investigation, is to this day a moot 
point; but whatever be its history, the 



aud sensation would be less, because no 
jarring, as with a brake, would take place. 
This is a point of great importance for met- 
ropolitan railways, where trains succeed 
each other every few minutes, and where 
the time wasted to get up speed at every 



I 



December, 1886 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



67 



start is a considerable item in the total time 
required for the journey. On underground 
lines, the absence of smoke would also be 
an enormous advantage, resulting in a large 
increase of passenger traffic. "We may here 
at once remark that the difficulties connect- 
ed with the conveyauce of electricity to the 
trains are the greater, the longer the line 
and the fewer the trains which run over it 
per day. On a short circular line like the 
Metropolitan Bailway, the amount of traffic 
is so great, that it would pay to place the 
engine and dynamo almost at every station, 
and thus reduce the distance through which 
the current has to travel before it reaches 
the train, to a few hundred yards. By pro- 
viding each coach with power, traius can be 
made up of as small a number of coaches 
as convenient, and thus a frequent service 



trie railways intended for passenger traffic, 
and, if added to the ordinary block sys- 
tem, would render collisions almost impos- 
sible. Since electromotors contain no parts 
having a reciprocating motion, such as the 
piston and connecting-rod of a steam en- 
gine, they can run at any speed without os- 
cillation. 

There is, consequently, nothing to limit 
the speed of an electrically-propelled 
car but tbe tensile strength of the wheel 
tire, which, under the action of centrifugal 
force, might burst if its circumferential 
speed exceed a certain limit. We may men- 
tion here, in parenthesis, what is doubt- 
less known to our engineering readers, 
viz., that this limiting speed does in noway 
depend on the diameter of the wheel, tut 
simply on the tensile strength and specific 



a 40 ton engine pounding along. Now, it 
might be asked — How is it that, with all 
these advantages in favor of electric trac- 
tion, our railways, and, indeed, those of 
the whole world, are still worked on the 
train system by steam locomotives? 

The answer to this question is, that up to 
the present no satisfactory solution has been 
found for the three great difficulties which 
stand in the way of applying electricity to 
railway purposes. 

These are, first, the difficulty of convey- 
ing the electric energy to the train; sec- 
ondly, the weight and high speed of elec- 
tromotors as at present constructed: and, 
thirdly, the want of some contrivance by 
which the speed and power of electromo- 
tors could be varied in a simple and eco- 
nomical way. — " Industries." 



Fig.3 

4, 






Fig.4 




of short trains can be substituted for the 
present service of heavy trains at longer in- 
tervals — a decided advantage from the pas- 
senger's point of view. Another very im- 
portant advantage is that of almost perfect 
safety. The late Prof essor Fleeming Jen- 
kin, when working out the details of his 
Telpher Line, devised, with the assistance 
of Professors Ayrtoh and Perry, an auto- 
matic electrical block system, which is in- 
tended to prevent one train Irom overtak- 
ing another. As soon as a train enters on 
a section which has not yet been cleared 
by the preceding train, the current is auto- 
matically withdrawn from the electromotor 
of the second train, and thus the latter 
stops for want of propelling power. The 
first train, in clearing the section, restores 
the current to the second train, and thus 
allows it to proceed. Some such arrange- 
ment could, no doubt, be adopted on elec- 



METHOD OF MAKING A CABLE SPLICE 

I gravity of the metal. For good steel, the 
safe limiting speed is considerably over 100 
miles an hour, and it is therefore by no 
means impossible that about double the 
present speed of traveling might be obtain- 
ed in future on electric railways. Speaking 
on this point at the Society of Arts in 1883, 
Professor Forbes said that he hoped to live 
to see the day when he could travel from 
London to Edinburg in three and a half 
hours. 

With these remarks we have not yet ex- 
hausted the list of advantages possessed by 
electrically- propelled coaches over the 
usual system of trains drawn by steam lo- 
comotives. The permanent way, bridges, 
and viaducts may be built altogether light- 
er, steeper gradients and sharper curves 
may be used, and the wear and tear of the 
road must necessarily be less with light, 
smooth running electromotors, tnan with 



Wire Rope Splice. 

In view of the discussion which has been 
running in the last few numbers of the 
Street Batlway Journal regarding the 
method of splicing cable such as are used 
for car traction, it will be interesting to 
note the construction and method used by 
Messrs. John A. Boebling & Sons in their 
own practice, and to whom we are indebted 
for the engraving usad in this connection. 
The splice is, in reality, nothing more than 
what is called the long splice with manilla 
rope. 

That is, the cable is unrolled back for 
some distance on both ends, and one strand 
laid back still further, into which the cor- 
responding section from the opposite end is 
laid. The tools required are merely one 
pair of nippers which are used in cutting 
off the end of the strand; a pair of pliers 



68 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



IDeoembeb, 188ft. 



o pull the ends of the strands down and 
raighten them, a stick to open them, and 
a knife for cutting the core. In the rope 
nippers are sticks to twist the rope, and a 
wooden mallet for driving the strand home 
to placo. 

The first step to be taken is to haul the 
two ends taut with a block and pulley until 
they overlap each other about twenty feet. 

Next, the strands on both ends of the 
rope are opeued for the distance of teu feet 
each, cutting off both hemp cores as closely 
as possible, as shown iu Figure 1. The open 
bunches of strands are then brought laceto 



groove of strand a. The same course is 
pursued with two other strands, and one 
from each end, except that the stopping 
point is made four feet from the end of the 
firnt set, at d the third set stopping four 
feet from the second set. The strands are 
now laid into each other's places, with the 
exception of the ends fastening to each 
other at le ist four feet apart, as shown iu 
Figure 4. These ends must now be secured 
and disposed of in such a way that the di- 
ameter of the rope may not be increased, 
its strength remain u.iimp tired, and so 
that the e >ds will not be lifted up or mi- 




Fig. 4. 




ATLAS BRONZE BEARING. 



face so that the opposite ones interlock reg- 
ularly with each other. 

The strand marked a is then unwound, 
followed up with the strand 6 of the op- 
posite end, laying it tightly into the open 
groove left by the unwinding of a and mak- 
ing the twist of the strand agree exactly with 
that of the open groove, until all of b is laid 
in and a has become twenty feet long. Then 
cut off a within six inches of the rope, as 
shown in Figure 2, leaving two short ends 
which must be tied temporarily. The next 
step is to unwind a strand from the opposite 
cable, as No. 4, and this must be followed 
up with the corresponding end, which in 
the case in point would be strand/, which 
is laid iuto the open groove in the same way 
iu which strand b was laid into the open 



raveled by any action or grip, or other ap- 
pliance which may be brought in contact 
with the cable. Two nippers are then 
brought round the wire rope about six 
inches on each side of the crossing point of 
two strands, the stick is inserted through 
the loop, and they are then twisted in op- 
posite directions, thus laying open the rope, 
as shown in Figure 5. The core is now cut 
six inches from the left, and the end of b 
' stuck under a in the place occupied by the 
core. The core is then cut in the same way 
on the right, and a is stuck into the corein 
this way iu that position, care being taken 
that the ends of the straudsare straightened 
out before they are stuck iu. The rope 
nipper is then loosened and the wire rope 
allowed to close. Any slight inequality that 



may occur may be taken out by beating the 
rope with the wooden mallet. The rope 
nippers are then shifted to each of the other 
live places in succession, and after the rope 
has run for a day it will be impossible to 
detect the locality of the splice, as there are 
no eijds turned under to stick out and the 
rope is not increased in size, and it is never 
appreciably weakened in strength. Of 
course these mles can be applied only to 
those ropes which have a hemp core, but as 
this method of manufacture is almost uni- 
versal with wire ropes, and is quite so with 
those of the larger size, the method is thor- 
oughly applicable in any case that can arise. 
The ropes, however, which do have wire 
centers may be spliced in the same manner 
as hemp rope by putting in long splice, 
although, of course, the appearance is not 
so neat as that of the splice we have just 
described, and can be more easily detected. 
The usual method of indicating this splice 
is to paint it white, or some color, so that 
the eye can readily catch the place; then, 
of course, an examination will show where 
the rope ends are tucked under. 



Atlas Bronze Bearing. 

It is a well-known source of trouble that 
car-bearings when new seldom conform to 
the axle, causing much frictional heat and 
causing great delay. The want of proper 
tit gives the journal au irregular bearing 
which speedily destroys both. The object 
of this invention — an anti-friction, self-fit- 
ting journal bearing,* — is to provide a bear- 
ing that will in a very short time fit itself to 
a journal iu use and come to the exact de- 
gree of closeness that will enable the axle to 
move without undue friction. It is claimed 
that this bearing will readily adapt itself to 
a journal of different radius, or worn orun- 
ev n surface, and afford means for proper 
lubrication. 

Figure 1 represents a bearing comprising 
the improvement. Figure 2 is a journal 
having a gi eater radius than the bearing, 
showing the advantage of the bearing. 
Figure 3 is a journal with less radius, show- 
ing the manner in which it wears the bear- 
ing. Figure 4 shows a journal presenting 
au uneven surface to the bearing and the 
manner in which it conforms itself and 
forms reservoirs along the same for lubri- 
cating fluid. The grooves wearing rap- 
idly away allows the journal to find a true 
bearing in a very short time, the interven- 
ing grooves being such as to prevent heat- 
ing by allowing a pat sage way for the oil 
until it gets down to its true bearing. The 
manufacturers fully guarantee them not 
to heat or cut, and to wear longer than any 
other bearings, and to give better results 
and satisfaction. It has been fully and 
thoroughly tested. 

*Atlas Bronze and Tuyere Co. Ltd., Pittsburg, Pa. 



It has been decided that the Broadway 
Surface E. B. Co. has no existence and 
cannot be taxed; that its personal property 
is in the hands of Beceiver O'Brien, and 
must be taxed in Dutchess County, where 
he resides. 



Deoemueb, 18^6 



Post's Center Lamp. 

The new feature in the lamp* illustrated 
iu this connection consists in the ring 
that is placed at the bottom to hold the 
oilpot. Besides this, the lamp has the usual 
reflector at the top and this may, of course, 
be made in any style that may suit the 
road for -which it is intended; though it is 
represented in this case as the corrugated 



lar in the inside, and the other nippers 'will 
bear evident tokens of increased wear. The 
tushes are nearly grown, the sixth molar is 
up and the third molar is wanting. This last 
circumstance will prevent the deception of 
attempting to pass a Lite four-years-old as 
a five-yoars-old. At six the mark on the 
central nippers is worn out. At seven years 
the mark is worn out in the four central 
nippers and fast wearing away in the cor- 




POST & CO.'S CENTER CAR LAMP. 



rejector. Ventilation is secured at the top 
through the roof; and the odpot and at- 
tachments are secured to the roof by ordi- 
nary brackets. 

•Post & Co., Cincinnati, o. 

How to Tell a Horse's Age by the Teeth. 

At three years old the horse should have 
the central permanent nippers growing, 
the other two pairs wasting, six grinders 
in each jaw, above and below, the first and 
fifth level, the others and the sixth protrud- 
ing. The sharp edges of the new incisors 
will be very evident, compared with the old 
teeth. As the permanent nippers wear and 
continue to grow a narrow portion of the 
cone-shaped tooth is exposed by the at- 
trition of the teeth on each other. The 
mark will be wearing out; the crowns of 
the teeth will be sensibly smaller than at 
twoyeirs. Between three and a half and 
four years the next pair of nippers will 
be chunged, the ceutral nippers will have 
nearly attained their full growth, a vacuity 
will be left where the second stood, and the 
corner teeth will be diminished in breadth, 
worn down, and the mark in the center of 
the tooth will become faint. The second 
pair of grinders will be shed. At four years 
the central nippers will be fully developed, 
the sharp edge somewhat worn off, and the 
mark somewhat wider and fainter. The next 
pair will be up, but they will be small, with 
a mark deep and extending quite across 
them. The corner nippers will be larger 
than the inside ones, but smaller than be- 
fore and flat, and the mark nearly effaced. 
The sixth grinder will have risen to a level 
with the others, and the tushes will begin 
to appear. At Ave years the horse's mouth 
is almost perfect. The corner nippers are 
uite up, the long, deep mark irregu- 



ner teeth.' The tushes are rounded at the 
points and edges and beginning to getrouud 
inside. At eight years old the tushes are 
rounded in every way ; the mark is gone 
from the bottom nippers. There is nothing 
remaining in them that can afterward clear- 
ly show the age of a horse. After this the 
only guides are nippers in the upper jaw. 
At nine years the mark will be worn from 
the middle nippers, from the next pair at 
ten, and from all the upper nippers at elev- 
en years. At nine years the center nippers 
are round, instead of oval. At ten years the 
others begin to become rounded; at eleven 
years the second pair are much rounded; 
at thirteen the corner ones have the same 
appearance; at fourteen the face of the ceu- 
ter nippers become somewhat triangular; 
at seventeen they are all so. — Harness. 



Many of these same readers would now 
be equally charmed and astonished should 
they visit the extensive works of the Put- 
nam Nail Company at Neponset, Mass., 
and see a large room full of wonderful ma- 
chines, each performing automatically the 
same work done by the blacksmith, but 
with far greater precision and a hundred 
times greater rapidity. The nail rods are 
coiled upon reels, from which they are fed 
into the machines automatically, passing 
through jets of burning gas, which heats 
the iron uniformly to a welding heat, in 
which condition the hammers take it and 
forge it into the required shape and cut it 
off. Each machine turns out about sixty 
nails per minute. These nails are then 
thrown into a bath of cold water, no acids 
being used, to remove the scale, and from 
this into a tumbler or revolving cylinder 
that wears them smooth. They are then 
passed through another machine that 
strikes the blacksmith's last blow, and gives 
to the points a bevel to turn them outward 
when driven into the horse's hoof. This in- 
genious machinery, the patents on which 
are controlled by this company, gives them 
an immense ^advantage over all competitors 
by enabling them to produce, at low cost, 
a hot-forged and hammer- pointed nail equal 
in every particular, aud superior in some 
respects, to the best hand-made nail a 
olajksmith can produce. This company has 
already attained a world wide reputation, 
and their nails are used and recommended 
by the most noted farriers in foreign lauds j 
as shown by numerous testimonials. 

While good nails may be made by other 
machines and different processes, there is al- 
ways a liability, which no owner of a val- 
uable horse would willingly take if he knew 
the danger, of iron becoming laminated, 
cracked or splintered by rolling and punch- 
ing or shearing, so that when a nail is driven 
into the hard and horny substance of a 
horse's hoof it will split, and a sliver may 
penetrate to the quick, causing serious 
damage, as shown by the following cuts 
representing nails said to have been taken 




The Manufacture of Horse Nails. 

Undoubtedly many of our readers can re- 
call the times in their boyhood days when 
they have stood around the village black- 
smith's anvil and watched with wondering 
gaze the operation of drawingtoa point aud 
the shaping by skillful blows the blazing 
nail rod, and dodged the sparks that flew 
from beneath the hammer — especially if 
they happened to have been barefooted ur- 
chins. 



from the hoofs of horses in different parts 
of the country. 

Out of the six tons a day produced by the 
machines and over three hundred opera- 
tives of the Putnam Nail Company, prob- 
ably not one nail will ever be found to split 
or crack in driving, as there never has been 
since the organization of the company iu 
1859. Persons interested in the care and 
protection of horses' feet will do well to call 
on Mr. Whitmarsh, the genial manager at 
the works, who will take pleasure in show- 
ing them through the factory and explain- 
ing the process of manufacture. 



70 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Djecimbki', 1886 



Horse Shoeing'. 

Editor Street Railway Journal: — 

One of the most important things in the 
management of horse railroads and one 
that should receive the most careful atten- 
tion from superintendents and proprietors, 
is the shoeing of their horses, for the least 
soreness or tenderness of a foot prevents a 
horse from exerting his full strength and 
applying his full power to his 
work. This being a recognized fact it is 
plain that any defect in the form or ma- 
terial of which the shoe is made or in the 
nails used, or want of skill or knowledge on 
the part of the shoer, must be a fruitful 
source of loss in the operating of a horse 
railroad and sufficient to justify the mana- 
gers in employing the most reliable work- 
men and procuring for them the most ap- 
proved materials regardless of any slight 
difference in the cost. The shoe best 
adapted to horse railroad purposes in paved 
streets is a heavy plain shoe without calks 
and having the nail holes punched deep and 
beveled 1o permit the nail to be driven 
well in, insuring a firm fastening and reduc- 
ing the strain on the nails. The shoe should 
always be fitted to the foot and not the 
foot to the shoe as is too often practiced. 

The bearing should come around the out- 
side of the foot for about half an inch and 
in order to prevent the concussion which 
would otherwise take place the frog should 
never be cut away but allowed to come to 
the ground. The misfit of a shoe or an im- 
perfection in or careless driving of a 
nail often causes a lameness which although 
it may be very slight will necessitate the 
withdrawal of the horse from oue or more 
trips, thereby causing a loss that might have 
been prevented by proper care and skill 
but cannot always be remedied by re-set- 
ting the shoe, especially if the lameness is 
caused, as it sometimes is, by the splinter- 
ing of a nail of cheap quality of iron and 
improper manufactuie, end a sliver pen- 
etrating to the quick. The numerous well 
authenticated cases of valuable horses hav- 
ing been ruined by the use of cold rolled 
cut nails should be enough to deter every 
horse owner from allowing the use of any 
but hot forged nails made from the very 
best Swedes iron. 

A pernicious custom has been adopted by 
some horse railroad managers in this coun- 
try of having their shoeing done by 
contract, believing that by so doing they 
are enabled to save money and increase 
their dividends. But do they ? And if so 
why not carry the system still farther and 
contract for the feeding of their horses '? 
By this they could certainly make a greater 
saving and with less danger of permanent 
injury to their auimals. The horse that 
suffers from inadequate or improper feed- 
ing will show it in an unmistakable man- 
ner and the remedy is very simple, but the 
horse whose foot is injured by a sliver of a 
nail may not show lameness for some time 
afterwards and when it does show it the 
lameness is often attributed to some other 
cause. 

Therefore if shoeing is to be done by con- 



tract it should be specified that only hot 
forged hammer pointed nails of the best 
quality should be used. 

Another important advantage possessed, 
by forged nails is their superior strength or 
toughness allowing the use of smaller sizes, 
causing less displacement of the fibers of 
the hoof, and still another advantage of 
great importance to horse railroad men 
whose horses travel on pavements, is their 
superior elasticity. 

A horse's foot is not very heavy but it 
strikes a powerful blow upon the pavement, 
which is unyielding, and consequently the 
hoof yields a trifle, and if the nails are stiff 
and unyielding as cut nails are they sooner 
work loose. 

Tubal Cain. 



The Nash Splice. 

Editor Street Railway Journal:— 

In'answer to B.of San Francisco of S.ept. 
24th, 1886, in an article headed "The Cable 
Splice," published in your last itsue, 1 do 
not wish to enter into any newspaper con- 
troversy regarding the merits of the Nash 
splice. 

It is speaking volumes for itself in Chica- 
go, where the cable roads are doing thebir- 
gest business of any cable roads in the coun- 
try if not iu the world. It is meeting with 
equal success in Kansas City, St. Louis, 
Philadelphia, Cincinuati, New York and 
other cities where it has been adopted. 

The Chicago City Railway Co. operate 
20j miles of cable roads. The speed of the 
cables is 9+ and 11 miles per hour There 
are three and very often four cars to each 
train. Each car weighs about four tons 
and will accommodate 100 passengers. 
There are sixty trains on State street and 
about the same number on Cottage Grove 
avenue. This gives the reader an idea of 
what labor the cables are performing in 
Chicago. 

Prior to the introduction of the 
Nash splice, all of the splices 
known to the trade were used in the 
Chicago system and proved failures. But 
since the Nash splice was introduced there 
has been no trouble whatever from the 
splice. 

The amount of cable required to make a 
splice is thirty -four feet all told. 

When the California splice was used in 
our ropes, 75 to 100 feet was used up iu 
making a splice. 

I never had oue of the California splices 
to draw or the ends to pull out of the heart. 
But where the meeting ends of the strands 
are tucked into the heart of the cable, the 
cable is enlarged at such points, and from 
this cause the California splice is very ob- 
jectionable; and where cables are laboring 
so heavy as in Chicago it is impractica- 
ble. 

Any practical cable man will see in an in- 
stant what the result must be where the 
cable is enlarged at the points of splicing. 
For instance, the grip is moving at a less 
momentum than the cable, which fact oc- 
curs with every train in Chicago on account 
of the heavy street traffic, etc.; the jaws of 



the grip are then set as &die, and the result 
is if chere is any enlargement at the points 
of splicing it is crushed or cut away very 
rapidly. In the Nash system on the other 
hand, the same strength is maintained in 
the splice as any other portion of the cable, 
and the uniformity of the diameter of the 
cable is preserved. 

When properly put in it will do better 
service than any other splice known to the 
trade, under favorable circumstances. 

Mr. Hovey, who was experienced in 
cable roads in San Francisco for years, and 
now of Chicago, says the Nash splice is su- 
perior to anything of its kind. Mr. E. J. 
Lawless, Superintendent of the Kansas 
City line, latterly of San Francisco, says, 
"Your splice has many advantages over 
the California system. First it requires 
less cable, is made quicker, does better woik 
and I would recommend all cable roads to 
use it." Mr. Holmes says he tried all man- 
ner of splices, which proved to be failures, 
and that the Nash splice is a success. 

Thos. C. Nash. 



Devices for the Prevention of Accidents. 

Editor Street Railway Journal : — 

In consideration of the matter of devising 
methods for preventing passengers from 
entering and leaving the forward platform 
of street cars, I would respectfully submit 
to your consideration the following sugges- 
tions: 

The liability of accidents by persons 
standing and riding on platforms and leap- 
ing off the same before the cars are stopped 
being especially dangerous, railroad men 
are looking for some means to prevent this 
liability. I would suggest that they have 
fitted to both platforms of the cars, that are 
running either end forward, folding gates 
that may be closed on the platforms which 
are on the front end of the car and folded 
back out of sight upon the rear of the plat- 
form, giving free access to and from the 
car, leaving the front clear and allowing the 
driver to have full control of his horses 
without being obliged to answer questions 
on the different topics which come so fre- 
quently from passengers standing upon the 
front platform. 

The doors leading from the inside to the 
platform of the cars could also be provided 
with latches, at a very slight expense, 
which would thus prevent passengers leav- 
ing the cars to go upon the platform. These 
latches should have a handle on the outside 
only, thus allowing the con luctoror driver 
to use them, but preventing thepassengers 
from doing the same. Further if cars had 
a telephone bell such as is manufactured 
by John Stephenson, so that the passengers 
could use it freely without endeavoring to 
attract the notice of the conductor, they 
might also be prevented from leavicg until 
the car has been brought to a full stop. 

S. T. B. 

Electric Railways seem to be attract- 
ing considerable attention just at present, 
and many managers are looking into the 
merits of the various systems that are of- 
fered with a view to adoption. 



Deoemuer, 1880. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



71 



London R aihvay System. II. 

THE GEEAT EASTEIiN. 

As for the oast part of London, which re- 
presents the most populous and commer- 
cial quarters, the docks, the warehouses 
and the ship yards which extend along the 
banks of the Thames on Tower street, it is 
served by the line from Fenchurch to 
BlackwalJ, upon which trains are run every 
quarter of an hour. 

The line from Blackwall to Stepney 
Limehouse anfl Poplar, by way of the 
branch from Stepney to Bow, connects with 
that from Bow to Tilbury, whose stations, 
Bromley, Plaistow and Barking, [have an im- 
portant position in the transportation of 
passengers. From Bow there is also a con- 
nection with Noi+h Woolwich, whichis the 
only road to Victoria Docks. This line 
from Tilbury connects with Gravesend, like 
that from North Woolwich to Woolwich, 
by steam ferrii's which cross the river on 
arrival of the train. Thus the inhabitants 
of the east end of London can go to these 
different points without making use of the 
roads along the river bank. 

Gravesend is well known from its com- 
mercial importance as the point where all 
vessels which ascend or descend the Thames 
stop. Blackwall is a stopping point for all 
passenger steainers]which serve the mouth 
of the river, and many persons come here 
to embark in order, in this way, to avoid 
the sinuosities of the Thames, which they 
would be obliged to traverse in starting 
from the London Bridge. The outskirts of 
the North E istern line which converge at 
Stratford Junction, have their points of de- 
parture at Bishop's Gate, so that travelers 
are enabled to reach London or depart 
therefrom from the Fenchureh Street Sta- 
tion, which is far more central than theone 
which has been mentioned. A service of 
thirty-five trains a day each way, connects 
this last station with that of Stratford Junc- 
tion. 

The old station which was originally at 
Bishop's Gate has been removed into Broad 
street. In spite of the 224 trains which 
daily traverse the line from Blackwall and 
Bow, and in spite of the frequent passages 
from Bishop's Gate, Mile End and Strat- 
ford, the movement is such upon the main 
Eastern line that omnibus lines running 
every five minutes besides the street rail- 
way Hues do a good business. Wherever 
the population is so dense and is obliged 
to be kept in continual motion, good means 
of transportation, whatever maybe their 
nature, always do a good business and only 
serve to increase the circulation by the fa- 
cilities they offer. 

We will return to the facts upon this 
question in the South of London, where 
the railways, tramways, and omnibuses 
hardly serve to answer the wants of the 
population. One of the most striking ex- 
amples of this insatiable necessity of trans- 
portation and good service is found in the 
success with which the Metropolitan Bail- 
way is attended while at the same time it is 
very far from injuring the omnibus lines 
which circulate about it in all directions. 



METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 

The Metropolitan Syslem comprises a 
a subterranean line somewhat over ten mile 8 
in length, and which is connected with an- 
other line, also subterranean, and of about 
the same length, crlled the District Railway. 
As far as the public is concerned they form 
practically one and the same line, which is 
described under the general name of Me- 
tropolitan Bailway. The total length of 
the main line embracing the branch from 
Brompton to West Brompton, is about 
14 miles; the branch from St. John's 
Wood, which is a mile and three-quarters ) 
and the line from Edgware Road, all known 
under the name of Hammersmith and 
City Junction Railway, are not comprised 
in these figures. 

Its construction was undertaken by the 
Great Western Railway. The Metropolitan 
actually begins at Moorgate street, near 
Finsbury square, a short distauce from 
the Bank and the Exchange. Thence it 
turns westerly towards Aldersgate, which 
it crosses and where it has a station. From 
Aldersgate a branch runs from Chatham 
which redescends towards the freight de- 
pots of the Great Western at West street, 
where it rejoins the line from LudgateHill 
to Farringdou street. The Metropolitan 
runs under Smith-field, and, turning to the 
north, runs to Farringdon street. From 
Moorgate to Farringdon street the road is 
for the most part open. From Farringdon 
street the road runs for the most part 
through cuttings to King's Cross, one of the 
most important stations of the line. Thence 
branches start out, which allow the trains of 
the Great Northern and Midland to use the 
rails of the Metropolitan. Between King's 
Cross and Moorgate street the road has 
four tracks. From King's Cross to Edg- 
ware road the line runs underground along 
the Euston road and Marylebone road. 
Stations are placed at the junction of 
Gower street, of Portland, and of Baker 
streets. The first serves the Euston square 
station, but has no communication with it. 
The second is a few steps from Portland 
place and Regent's park, and is connected 
with the central bureau of the Metropol- 
itan at Regent Circus by an omnibus line. 
Finally, the third is at the head of the 
branch line from St. John's Wood, which 
runs to Swiss Cottage. 

A short distauce from the Edgware road 
station a branch starts out which runs to 
Bishop's road at the northeast of Padding- 
ton station, where it connects with the line 
of the Great Western. From King's Cross 
to Edgware road and Bishop's road the Me- 
tropolitan runs under ground, excepting at 
the stations of King's Cross, Edgware road 
and Bishop's road, where it is open. The 
next station south of Paddington on the 
Metropolitan is Praed street. Starting 
from this point the Metropolitan bends 
slightly towards the south, passing under 
Queen's road, where the Bayswater station 
js located; and under High street (Notting 
Hill) where Notting Hill station is located. 
From Notting Hill the line turns again 
towards the south, skirts the Kensington 
gardens, reaches High street, where 



Kensington station is located. About 
1,300 feet from High street a branch starts 
out which connects with the West London 
line by way of Earl's Court, in the direc- 
tion of Kensington (A. R.) 

The Metropolitan ends and the District 
commences at the next station on the Glou- 
cester road, which is more often called by 
the name Brompton. From Brompton a 
new branch starts out which connects 
with that from High street at the limits of 
West London, where it leaves it to run to 
West Brompton. 

The connection of the Metropolitan, Dis- 
trict and West London road is a very cu- 
rious piece of work. 

It was necessary to buy up the property 
for a short distance back and to make up 
the difference in grades between them in 
cuttings. 

From Brompton the District runs under 
South Kensington, Sloan's square, where 
there are stations at the corner of Victoria 
street opposite Victoria Station. From 
this point the line turns in the direction of 
Westminster Abbey, rjasses along St. James 
park, Westminster Abbey and the Parlia- 
ment House, and finally runs beside the 
Thames at the head of Westminster 
Bridge. 

From Westminster to Black Friars 
Bridge the District follows the course of 
the river. It passes under the Charing 
Cross road at Cannon street, and serves the 
Temple and Black Friars Bridge by the 
Charing Cross and Southeastern stations, 
whence it runs under the Chatham line. 

Starting from Black Friars Bridge the 
District runs back from the Thames, cut 
under Upper Thames street, runs iv 
Queen street and stops at Mansion Ho . 
street, where it originally ended. The Ivle- 
tropolitan has been prolonged along Moor- 
gate street to Tower street and reconnects 
with the District. The company had once 
asked Parliament to be freed from the ob- 
ligation of passing beyond Broad street. 

The greatest distance upon the Metropol- 
itan and District between two consecutive 
stations is about a mile from Farringdon 
street to King's Cross, and the shortest 
about 1800 feet from Portland road to 
Gower street. A cross section of that part 
of the road running under ground is in the 
shape of an arch with three centers, with 
feet resting on the arcs of a circle; the 
vault is formed of 6 layers of brick 2" thick. 
In some places they were obliged to start 
an inverted arch, which is generally ar- 
ranged so that in the arc of the circle 
bricks of about l£" thickness are 
used. Every 50' they have placed 
niches into which the employees can step 
in order to allow the trains to pass. 

The cuttings are held up by revetement 
walls built of brick formed by vertical 
arches, bound together by lateral bracing, 
also made of brick. In certain places the 
sustaining walls are buttressed, which are 
braced against each other by a cast iron 
girder which runs below the level of the 
rails at a depth of about 15''. Throughout 
the whole length of the line an aqueduct, 
whose dimensions vary, is placed in the 



72 



THE STEEET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December, 1886 



center of the road. At the stations and 
along the way there are numerous ventila- 
tors which allow the air to be renewed in 
the suburban passages. 

The heaviest grade upon the Metropol- 
itan proper is 23 in a thousand, or 121' to 
the mile; the cr ves that are used do not 
exceed 266' radnis. The rail adopted is of 
the Vignole pattern, with a large base rest- 
ing upon stringers, to which it is fixed by 
ordinary wooden wedges. The stations 
upon the Metropolitan road, like those of 
interior roads and the suburbs of London, 
are placed upon the principal streets which 
cross the city. These streets are traversed 
continually by omnibus lires which take up 
and set down the passengers near the sta- 
tions. As far as these arrangements are 
coucer ed they are very similar to those of 
the French road at Auteuil. 

The buildings for the suburban stations 
are composed simply of a platform upon a 
evel with the public street; the lateral 
stair-cases give access to the plattorm of de- 
parture and arrival. The usage of waiting 
rooms is almost unknown; as is common in 
most English stations, the passenger does 
not stop there. The public waits upon the 
platform for the arrival of the train which 
it intends to take, so that its stoppage is 
reduced as much as possible by the neces- 
sity ol the service. 

To pass from most of the Metropolitan 
stations into the stations of those lines with 
which it connects, such ns Charing Cross 
and Victoria, the passenger is obliged to 
go a short distance on foot. This incon- 
venience presents itself especially upon the 
London suburban lines where the crossings 
are made at different levels from the roads 
with which they connect. Communication 
is obtained in these cases by covered pas- 
sages, giving access from one station to an- 
other. This is the case at the New Cross 
station at East London in its connection 
with the Brighton road. 

The engines have a peculiar arrangement 
which allows the engineer when he reaches 
a tuunel, to send back the gases which es- 
cape from the chimnty into a reservoir of 
cold water placed under the boiler. As it 
is essential that great care should be used 
on the part of the locomotive engineer in 
order that the steam pressure shall not fail 
him in the subterranean portions of the 
liue, it is necessary to force the fire in ad- 
vance and assure himself of reserve steam, 
which added to that which can be produced 
while passing through the tunnel will suf- 
fice for maintaining the speed of the en- 
gine. They thus avoid, for the most part, 
that inconvenience which will result to the 
passenger from the circulation of the trains 
through a tunnel filled with the smokefrom 
the locomotives. 

The Metropolitan cars have four axles at 
equal distances apart. They are composed 
of first class carriages containing 48 seats, 
mixed containing 60 seats, 20 first class and 
40 second class, those of the second and 
third class containing 80 places. Their 
weight is about 16 tons. The interior of 
the compartments averages about 6' 2* 
across, and the distance opposite the seats 



is 2'; a tall man can pass in and out with 
ease. In these carriages, as in all the Eng- 
lish carriages, the windows in the doors are 
alone movable. The regular windows are 
protected with longitudinal slats which pre- 
vent the passenger from sticking his head 
out. This protective measure is rendered 
necessary by the small space which separ- 
ates the sides of the tuunel from the body 
of the carriages. The coaches are lighted 
with gas by means of a reservoir placed un- 
der one or several of the vehicles. Their 
most salient advantages consist in the re- 
duction of the number of carriages and the 
diminution of the length of the trains. 
The interior dimensions of the Metropol- 
itan carriages allow the passenger to leave 
and enter the carriages very rapidly; they 
being on the level with the platforms, the 
stoppage of the train at the stations is re- 
duced as much as possible. 

The engines and cars are furnished with 
power brakes which permit the train to be 
more quickly stopped. Two trains on the 
Metropolitan road running in the same di- 
rection are not allowed to be between two 
consecutive stations; that is to say, a train 
cannot leave one station until the train 
whi'-h preceded it has left the following 
station. It is upon this principle that the 
exploitation of the Metropolitan road was 
based and its safety is assured. For this 
purpose telegraph stations to signal the de- 
parting trains have been placed at all the 
stations, but since the opening of the line 
the rapid developments of the circulation 
forced the company to place these signal 
offices at several points between two con- 
secutive stations. The original plan re- 
sulted in the necessity of the Metropolitan 
running their trains under such headway 
that one could clear the greatest distance 
which separated two consecutive stations 
before the other can run upon the blo:k. 

Between King's Cross and Farriugdon 
street the time required is four minutes. 
It would have been impossible to dispatch 
trains from either of these stations every 
two minutes, had they not put a telegraph 
station half way between them, where traius 
are stopped if the road is not clear on to 
the next station towards which the train 
was running. 

The Metropolitan also comprises a belt 
line which is operated by trains departing 
on the average every five minutes from its 
two extremities, Moorgate street and Man- 
sion House; a service from Moorgate street 
to Kensington (A. R.) and back, leaving 
every half hour; a service from Moorgate 
street to Hammersmith aud back, every fif- 
teen minutes, both operated by the Great 
Western; and finally special service from 
Moorgate street to Bishop's road. 

These different services represent on the 
part of the Northern Division of the Metro- 
politan a movement of 213 trains daily in 
each direction. If we add to this the trains 
of the Midland and of the Great Northern 
from Moorgate street to King's Cross, and 
those of the Great Western from Moorg ite 
st reet to Paddington,Uxbridge, Windsor and 
Reading, we have a total of 250 trains a day 
in each direction, or 500 trains running upon 



the line between half-past six o'clock in the 
morning and midnight. The passage oc- 
cupies fifty-eight minutes. 

In going from one end of the line to the 
other the passengers are not obliged to 
change cars, but it is not the same with 
those who go upon the brauch lines from 
St. John's Wood and from West Brompton ; 
in these cases they are obliged to change 
from one train to another at the junction 
points. 

The journey between the east and west 
of London, by means of the- Metropolitan, 
oocupies less time than by the other lines, 
because its route is more direct. A travel- 
er going from the City to Victoria, has the 
privilege, however, of using the Metropoli- 
tan line from Ludgate Hill, although there 
is no difference in the fare. In the first 
case the time required is seven minutes, 
and in the second thirty-five minutes. 

The fare, starting from Moorgate street, 
is 7 J cents first class, 6 cents second class, 
4 cents third class, to King's Cross. To 
Paddington it is 11} cents 7}, cents and 6 
cents. To Kensington (H. S.) and West 
Brompton it is 15} cents, 11} cents and 7} 
cents. For all stations beyond this, up to 
and including the Mansion House, it is 24 
cents, 17} cents and 11} ceuts. Trip tick- 
ets are sold at a reduced price. The Met- 
ropolitan and District both sell commutiition 
tickets over their line and also commutation 
tickets which are good over every line. 
These last are sold to the public at the fol- 
1 iwing prices : 

First Class. Second Class. 
Fori month, $8.42 $46.03 

'•3 " $21.71 $15.78 
" 6 " $41.00 $27.74 

"12 " $59.90 $50.66 

The Great Western, Great Northern, and 
Midland companies also sell commutation 
tickets which give the right to travel over 
their suburban lines and the Metropolitan 
as well. 

It will be readily understood that, with 
a movement of 500 trains a day and fares 
such as we have just mentioned, that the 
receipts of the Metropolitan will reach a 
very high figure. The capital originally 
spent for the construction of the Metro- 
politan amounted to £7,566,666, or over 
$36,000,000. The expense which the com- 
pany afterwards laid out in order to get in- 
to Broad street, amounted to $1,100,000, 
but part of this expense was covered by 
the rental of that property, which was util- 
ized for the line itself, and to which the 
line gave a very high value. 

The Great Northern, Midland, and South 
Eastern immediately entered on negotia- 
tions for the purchasing of station property 
along Farringdon, Red Cross, West street 
and West street Smitnfield, for the con- 
struction of freight depots. As these ne- 
gotiations were carried into effect, the 
c immerce of London, which really needed 
some warehouse of this kind in the center 
of the city, was satisfied, but it was. of 
course, a very expensive operation on the 
part of the companies. 

At first, for some time, the receipts of the 
District road increased in a very sensible 
manner to the detriment of the Metropoli- 
tan, and this could not be otherwise if 
the traffic between the termini, instead of 
being taken, as at first, by the single line, 
was divided between the two; this, how- 
ever, has ceased to be appreciable, the pas- 
sengers from Kensington (H. S.), Bromp- 
ton, etc., in going from the City, havipg 
now the advantage of using the District 
route, whose stations are very central, 
[To be Continued.) 



December, 1886. 



73 



Stephenson's Running (iear. 

The illustration presented in this con- 
nection is the running gear which has been 
adopted by the John Stephenson Co. as the 
standard. The jaws or pedestal block aro 
free from rigid contact with the car, being 
held in position by bolts and springs, these 



These will be made of rubber or steel, 
according to the specifications of the car, 
and are graduated so as to ride with equal 
ease on a loaded or light car. The jaw 
strap is a brace running underneath the 
box and bolted to the side of the jaw. 

In addition to the regular running gear 
there is a track cleaner which is an import- 



more gently than a stiff rod of iron or wood 
would do. If it is desired, this rubber 
cleaner may be replaced by a broom which 
will come down and sweep the tracks clean 
from snow or sand that may be heaped 
upon it, so that it may serve as an impor- 
tant auxiliary to the regular sweepers that 
are used for cleaning the streets in winter. 




STREET CAR BUILT FOR THE NEW YORK BROADWAY LiNE BY THE JOHN STEPHENSON COMPANY. 



springs being the well-known super-springs 
which contribute so much to the quiet and 
easy running of the car. The pedestal is 
made of the best quality of cast iron, and 
is strongly ribbed so as to avoid danger of 
breaking. The super-springs, which are 
placed immediately under the side sills, 
are made of fine quality of rubber, and 



carry the whole weight of the car. They 
have a hole through the middle through 
w hich a bolt passes, and this is so held in 
position by cushioned washers which carry 
no weight whatever but simply take up the 
slack in the bolt which is caused by the 
compression of the super-springs. The 
box is of the regular Stephenson pattern 
and carries the stirrup for the main springs. 



ant adjunct for cars running through thick- 
ly populated quarters. It consists of a loop 
placed around the axle and dropping down 
to catch the slide bar shown in the engrav- 
ing at the side of the car. This is so at- 
tached to the box that it always preserves 
the same elevation from the rail and does 
not vary with the vertical movement of the 



jaws. The bar is a solid slab of wrought 
iron and carries at its extremity a bracket 
which holds the rail cleaner in front of the 
wheel. This latter is made of rubber and 
is stiff enough to brush any obstacle from 
the track, and yet is not rigid enough to 
injure a child that should happen to fall 
upon the rails, simply brushing them 
aside, somewhat rudely of course, but much 



We also illustrate in this same connec- 
tion the car that has recently been built 
for the Broadway line in New York, and 
which was fully described in our issue for 
November. It will be seen upon inspection 
that the car is furnished with the running 
gear that we have just described. 



Ohio Tramway Association. 

The fifth annual meeting of the Ohio 
State Tramway Association was held at 
Dayton, November 17. The association 
has for its object the promotion and ad- 
vancement of all matters pertaining to the 
construction, equipment, and management 
of street railroads. The following papers 
were presented: " The Street Railroad 
Patrons," by A. E. Long, of Toledo;' "Char- 
ters and Grants," by A. E. Clark, of Cincin- 
nati ; "Unpopularity of Corporations — Cause 
and Remedy," by A. A. Thomas, of Day- 
ton; " Insurance," by Henry A. Everett 
of Cleveland. At the business session the 
following officers were elected: President, 
D. W. Shrivel, of Springfield; Vice-Presi- 
dent, James Dougherty, of Cincinnati; 
Secretary, H. A. Everett, of Cleveland; 
Treasurer, J. B. Hanna, of Cleveland; Exe. 
cutive Committee, T. F. Shipperd, of To- 
ledo. There are at present thirty-six 
street railroad companies in the state, of 
which twenty belong to the state association. 
The number of horses belonging to those of 
the association is 5,42-1 ; number of cars 
1,965; horses belonging to non-members ) 
671; cars, 162. 

Bribery is bribery. A street railway 
franchise obtained by bribery is substan. 
tially a franchise obtained by theft, and the 
great mass of street railway managers of 
this country so regard it. 




THE STEPHENSON RUNNING GEAR FOR STREET CARS. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December, 



1886. 




Monthly, $1.00 per Year. 

E. P. HARRIS, General Manager. 



American Railway Publishing Co., 



113 Liberty Street, 
New York. 



Lakeside Building, 
Chicago. 



Chicago, Lakeside Building, E. L. Powers, North 
western Manager. 

Boston, Mass., 185 SUMMER STREET, H. M. SWET- 

land, Manager. 

Philadelphia, 119 So. FOURTH St., J. H. McGraw, 
Manager. 



The Superintendent. 

It is a curious fact that the less a man 
knows, the less he thinks it necessary for 
another man to know in the same line; and 
if there is any piece of business to be trans- 
acted or an industry to be carried on, it is 
almost an impossibility to convince the ig- 
norant man that training will be of any 
particular value to the firm or corporation 
that is to engage the man. This is especi- 
ally true of the position of street railway 
superintendent. The road is owned, in 
nine cases out of ten, at the first, by men 
that have had no practical experience in 
the running of such a road, and they can- 
not realize that there can be any economy 
in the engagement of a man that has had 
the experience that they lack. 

Under these circumstances then it is not 
strauge that the sole recommendation of 
the superintendent that is engaged to han- 
dle the new road is, that he knows how to 
buy a horse, for even the most reckless of 
directors are a little afraid of the horse 
jockey and like to feel sure that the man 
that is to do their buying for them knows 
the difference between the heaves and a 
ring bone. 

But beyond this Tery essential thing 
there is in nine cases out of ten no inquiry 
made as to the other qualifications that are 
required for the successful prosecution of 
the work. It matters little the new man 
knows nothing about the construction of 
the cars that he is have the care of; that he 
has had no experience in the amount of oil 
and other materials that are necessary in 
order to get the best and most economical 
service; that the construction of the road 
bed is a sealed puzzle to him and that he is 
utterly ignorant of the thousand and one 
little details that will surely entail expense 
upon the corporation that employs him. 
To be sure he may be able to learn all of 
these things in time, but he will do it at 
the expense of the company that owns 
the road. If he is so very smart that this 
can be afforded there is nothing more to be 
said, but such a state of affairs rarely ob- 
tain and even if they did it might be con- 
sidered advantageous to give this very 
smart man the advantage of the experience 
of a man that has already held such a posi- 
tion and thus let him prow into the work. 



In short a road cannot do better than to 
engage the most competent man available 
tosupervise the manipulation that will fall 
to the duties of the superintendent. 



The Immediate Right to Wages. 

A case has been recently decided before 
the Supreme Court of the State of Minne- 
sota, upon the right of a discharged em- 
ployee to the immediate payment of his 
wages. The question before the court was 
whether upon the plaintiff being discharg- 
ed from the services of the company after 
being employed for only five days, a right 
of action at once arose for the recovery of 
his wages, or whether, by force of an al- 
leged usage, or from the inconvenience to 
which the obligation of immediate payment 
would subject the defendant, the right 
of actio u was deferred, so as to enable the 
defendant to make payment at its own con- 
venience. It was decided that the obliga- 
tion of payment arose at once, upon the 
termination of the contract for service, and 
that the right of action did exist, unless the 
case could be deemed to be an exceptional 
one. It was shown, however, that the usage 
of the company regarding its manner of 
paying those employees that were not up- 
on the regular pay roll had not been brought 
to the notice of the plaintiff; audit was held 
that there could be no implication on the 
part of the contract that would show that 
the plaintiff had entered into any such agree- 
ment and could be affected by the custom 
in question; under these circumstances, 
therefore, he would be entitled to the pay- 
ment of his wages as soon as he was dis- 
charged, aud that no regulation or usage of 
the employer, of which the servant is not 
chargeable, could affect the legal obliga- 
tions arising from the contract. It was fur- 
ther held that the same usage on the part 
of four other railroad companies did not 
show the existence of a custom that could 
be held by implication to be a part of the 
contract in question. Upon the facts of the 
case it was finally decided that the plaintiff 
was entitled to a judgment. 

The case in point was that of Thompson 
against the Minneapolis & St. Louis By. 
Co. 



Seatless Cars. 



The Bailway Engineer, in a recent issue, 
has an article upon a new arrangement for 
increasing the capacity of railway carriages 
and tramway cars. The principle upon 
which the invention is based is that when 
the cars are crowded in what we call rush 
trips in the morning and afternoon, there 
are large numbers of passengers, and in 
many cases a majority of those who are in 
the car, that are obliged to stand. While 
they are thus standing they are not only 
crowded against one another, but they very 
seriously inconvenience those passengers 
who are fortunate enough to have obtained 
a seat. The inventor takes as a fundamental 
principle by which he is to be guided, that 
inasmuch as some are obliged to stand, it is 
better that all should do so. He therefore 
constructs his seat with a hinge at the back 



and prevents them from falling by a stout 
bar placed before them, when they are 
folded back against the side or partition of 
the car, thus increasing the standing room, 
but removing all seating capacity. 

It will readily be seen that this arrange- 
ment will greatly increase the capacity of 
the car, as the passengers can be packed in 
like so many mummies, being allowed just 
enough floor space to stand upon. It is ex- 
ceedingly doubtful, however, or rather there 
is no doubt whatever in regard to the 
adoption of this method of car construction. 
Passengers would hardly care to be packed 
in like cattle in a box; and although the in- 
dividual may not have the good fortune to 
secure a seat, he would still be unwilling to 
have that luxury entirely dispensed with, 
and his chances of obtaining one utterly 
obliterated. If such cars are ever built we 
shall take great interest in watching the 
progress of its popularity with the traveling 
public, and will keep our readers posted in 
regard to everything which we know of the 
matter; but unless we guess very wide of 
the mark, this is the last that will ever be 
heard of the matter. 



Tenth Avenue Cable Cars. 

Mr. John H. Bobertson, in conjunction 
with his M. C. B. Mr. Pfingst, has turned 
out some new grip cars for the Tenth Ave- 
nue Cable Line, which are novelties in the 
way of car construction. They are light, 
short cars and intended solely for summer 
traffic, but the generally accepted princi- 
ples of car framing have been entirely dis- 
pensed with. 

The posts are made, in every case, of 
gas pipe, aud all the braces and sills are of 
ordinary gas pipe fittings, with the excep- 
tion of a single bracket at the top, which 
was specially fitted for the purpose. 
Through the courtesy of Mr. Pfingst we are 
enabled to give some details and dimen- 
sions of the car. 

The length is 14 ft. and width of the bot- 
tom frame 6 ft. \ in. The top frame is built 
and laid upon the lower one in the same 
way that the upper, or body, frame was 
made for the combination summer and win- 
ter cars which were illustrated in the Oc- 
tober issue. 

This upper frame is 7 in. in width. The 
lower sills are 3£ in. by 7f in. and the end 
sills are Z\ in. by 5£ in. The cross timbers, 
of which there are four in number, are 3 
in. by 3j in. for both the cross and end 
sills. The pit-hole for putting in and re- 
moving the grip, is placed in the center of 
the car between the wheels, in the same 
way as in the ordinary grip car, a trap door 
being made to fit nicely into the hole. The 
framing is \ in. thick. The platforms give 
ample width, and are 3 ft. 7 in. from the 
body of the car to the outside edge of the 
buffer timber. These latter are If in. thick 
and 8$ in. wide at the center, tapering 
down to 3 in. at the end. They are 6 ft. 4 
in. long, and are thus brought four inches 
inside of the upper frame. The platform 
is also 2 ft. above the track, and the dash- 
board 2 ft. 8 in. 



75 



Another feature which has been intro- 
duced, and will be somewhat of a novelty, 
is the fact that the steps are placed, and are 
available on the right hand of the rear plat- 
form only. This effectually prevents peo- 
ple from entering or going out between the 
rails, which in a cable road of course in- 
creases the safety or traveling. 

In the ordinary car, such as they are now 
using, the same thing is accomplished by 
the means of gates, which are to be kept 
closed upon the opposite track side, and no 
" one is allowed to enter upon the front plat- 
form, under any circumstances. This gives 
the conductor absolute control of the pas- 
sengers, or rather of the movements in the 
car as regards the outgoing and incoming 
of the passengers. 

The platform gates in the new cars are 
arranged with reference to the same idea. 
There is one which swings, and is to be 
kept open on the right hand side of the rear 
platform. The corresponding gate on the 
front platform is closed, and the gates up- 
on the other side are fastened and cannot 
be opened. 

The wheel centers are 7 ft. apart. The car 
stands rather high from the track, so high 
in fact, that no wheel houses are needed 
inside the car. This saves cutting the floor 
through and greatly facilitates the cleaning 
of the car. On the outside of the car, as an 
additional protection to the passengers, is 
the wire screen dropping down close to the 
pavement, and acting as a life guard or fen- 
der to keep obstacles, either animate or in- 
animate, off the track and away from the 
wheels. This is on the same plan as those 
which are used on all the cars under the 
coutrol of the Third Avenue Company. 

We have said that the posts carrying the 
roof are gas pipes. They are all of one inch 
gas pipe and there are twelve to the car; 
two for the doors, four for the corners, and 
four for the sides. 

The height from the floor to the roof 
boards inside of the car is 7 ft. 10 in. The 
height from the floor to the under side of 
the side plates is 6 ft. 2 1 in., the plates be- 
ing lj by 2| in. At the upper end of the 
steam pipe there is a fitting, and from this 
fitting there are wrought iron stays against 
which the sign boards are screwed and 
bolted. The board is 1 in. wide and § in. 
thick. It has a curve at the bottom edge, 
bringing it down between the pipes. The 
body of the car is a wire screen; that is, 
the portion usually occupied by the pan- 
els. 

The seats run lengthwise of the car and 
can be taken out at any time. They are 
made in exactly the same way as the park 
benches of cherry and basswood. The body 
hand rails for the use of passengers in exit 
and entry are bolted to the upright gas 
pipes. The trimmings are of bronze. The 
width of the upper deck is 3 ft. 2 J. in. at the 
bottom. 

There are 32 lights in the roof, 16 upon 
each side, of cathedral glass in different de- 
signs. White paint is used for the roof 
boards. 

In the door way there is an extra iron 
head on the end plate of the roof, and when 



screwed to it in this way, it makes a very 
fine finish. 

Storm curtains are, of course, placed up- 
on the sides of the car, which may be drawn 
down to the bottom of the side sills, thus 
enclosing the car in case of stormy weather, 
and giving the passengers most efficient 
protection. The paint of the pipes and 
screens on the sides and ends of the car are 
carmine. The platform, dashers, side sills 
running gear and boxes are white stripped 
with red. The sign boards and roof white 
with black stripes. The bumper iron on the 
platform projects i]} in. Underneath this 
bumper there is a swing drawbar The car 
has a very attractive appearance, and will 
draw the attention of any one who is at all 
familiar with car construction, on account 
of the marked departure of this car from 
cars as ordinarily constructed. It seems 
there is no good reason why a car such as 
this could not be constructed for winter use, 
with panels to be fastened to the sides. 



Champion Horse Nails. 

We illustrate some nails* which were on 
exhibition at the Cincinnati convention, 
that are most carefully made and especially 
adapted for different purposes. The two 
sets of illustrations which we are able to 




Removal. 

The STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL, issued 
since its first number; from 32 Liberty street, 
New York, will hereafter be published at 113 
Liberty street. 




LARGE HE 



showrepresent two sizes f heads which the 
company make. 

The nails are made from the best quality 
of Swedes iron, which is first carefully ex- 
amined for the detection of any defects and 




CITY HEADS. 

only those sections used which pass exami- 
nation. The two patterns shown show 
the heads as arranged for city, and for 
shoes carrying a large hole. These latter 
are adapted for re- setting and machine 
made shoes, the heads being so shaped that 
they fit the nail holes nicely and snugly 
without sticking out at the corners in an 
unsightly way. The nails are receiving a 
wide application throughout the East and 
West. 

"Champion Horse Nail Co., Appleton, Wis. 



Notes and Items. 

The Editors would consider it a favor If those who 
are Interested In street railway matters will send In 
any Items that may come to their notice of changes, 
extensions or Improvements. These memoranda 
will be duly Inserted under this heading, and the 
proper changes made In our Street Railway Direc- 
tory. 

Albany, N. Y. 

The Metallic Street Railway Supply 
Co. have issued a new illustrated catalogue 
of the Gibbon Metallic system. The cuts 
are perspective and sectional views of the 
road, as well as of the details of the rail and 
stringers, giving an accurate idea of the 
construction. 

Alvarado, Texas. 

A street railroad is in course of develop- 
ment ai this point, but it has not as yet ma- 
terialized and the promoters wait further 
developments before reporting progress. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 

The Ann Arbor Street Ry. Co. have in 
contemplation the construction of a street 
railway line. The length of the line has 
not yet been determined, but it will be 4 ft. 
8| in. gauge. The number of cars and the 
method of propulsion is also undecided. 
The officers are: President, Junius A. Beal; 
Vice-President, Edward Duffy; Secretary, 
Zina E. King; Treasurer, Louis B. Tay- 
lor; Superintendent, Thomas J. Keech. 
The capital is $20,000, and the office is at 
46 Main street. 

Appleton, Wis. 

The Appleton Electric St. Ry. Co. are 
operating four and one-half miles of track 
with five cars. It is operated upon the Van 
Depoele system. The following is a list of 
officers: President, J. E. Harriman; Vice 
President, N. B. Clark; Secretary, T. W. 
Orbison; Treasurer, Jos. Koffend. 

The Champion Horse Nail Co. are fur- 
nishing a large number of street railways, 
both in the East and West, with their ex- 
cellent horse nails. 
Ashtabula, O. 

The Ashtabula City Ry. Co. have made 
no changes during the past year. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

The Metropolitan Street R. R. Co. re- 
port six miles of track, four feet eight and 
a half inch gauge, aud are using a twenty 
pound rail, twenty cars, and eighty-four 
horses. The officers are: J. W. Rankin, 
President; [and G. S. Hanlutu, Secretary. 
The road contemplates building a one-half 
mile extension. The general office is Con- 
ner Hunter and Butler streets. 

Baltimore, IHd. 

The Baltimore & Powhatan Ry. Co. are 
using a 30-pouud rail. Their general of- 
fice is 436 Laurens street. 

Belleville, 111. 

The Citizens' Street Ry. Co. report 4a 
miles of track, of which about 2 miles has 
just been completed. They also report 7 
cars and 20 horses. The office is corner 
Main and High streets. 

Berea, Ohio. 

Mr. P. I. Pomeroy is Treasurer of the 



7d 



Berea Street R. R. Co. instead of Mr. A. H. 
Pomeroy, as previously reported. 

Binghainton, N. V. 

The Park Avenue Ry. Co. report one 
mile of track of a 4 foot gauge, 20 pound 
rail, and E. Ross as President; F. E. Ross 
as Treasurer, and E. A. Matthews as Secre- 
tary. The road is run in connection with 
the Wade Street road. 

Boston, Mass. 

New Brill Cars. Two elegant new cars 
arrived from Philadelphia last week and 
were put on the Union Square Line of the 
Boston Consolidated Railroad this morning. 
The cars contain all tbe modern improve- 
ments, and are fitted up quite handsomely. 
It is understood that there are more to fol- 
low.— Boston Herald. 

The Car Trace Friction Appltance Co. , 
manufacturers of the Reliable Sand Box, 
19 Tremont street, will furnish an entire 
equipment for the Metropolitan road. 
They are sending sand boxes to the follow- 
ing street roads: Hannibal Street Ry. Co.; 
Rochester City road; Pittsburg, Oakland 
& East Liberty; Pavonia Horse Railroad; 
and Gloucester St. Ry. The box is in use 
on the State street road in Albany, doing 
good service on a remarkably steep grade. 

As we go to press, we are informed that 
"William Reed, who has been for the past 
ten years Treasurer of the South Boston 
Horse R. R. Co., has been arrested on the 
charge of embezzlement of the company's 
funds to the amount of $35,000. He has 
been very active in looking after the affairs 
of the company, and has had the fullest 
confidence of the Board of Directors, and 
his unauthorized personal use of the 
company's funds began as long ago as 1881. 
He invested heavily at that time in Mexi- 
can Central securities and has succeeded, 
until a few days ago, in entirely concealing 
his operations from the other officers of 
the company, and it is said that if the dis- 
covery had not been made when it was Mr. 
Reed would have closed his stock at a profit 
and have made full restitution to the com- 
pany. A few days ago the annual election 
of the corporation was held and Charles H. 
Hersey was elected President, and Benja- 
min Dean became one of the directors. 
They seemed to kciow that the old manage- 
ment had been loose in its work of looking 
after the interests of the company, and be- 
gan an investigation. In looking over 
Reed's account they found several unpaid 
bills which they supposed paid some time 
previous. This led to the employment of 
an expert, who found that Reed had taken 
$69,500 in cash and an overissue of stock to 
the amount of $34,500, making $104,000 in 
all, and on discovery of this a warrant was 
issued for his arrest. He has made full 
confession to the President and Counsel 
of the road and has turned over to them all 
his property, including his seat in the Bos- 
ton Board of Brokers, which is valued at 
about $15,000, besides securities to the 
amount of $10,000. He has also made over 
all his stock contracts, and it is thought 
that this will fully cover the amount of his 
embezzlement. He has made no attempt 
to secure bail and was taken to jail. One 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



of the methods by which Mr. Reed accom- 
plished his purpose was that of accepting a 
draft in the name of the company and tak- 
ing a receipt for the original bill, then as 
that bill would furnish him a voucher of 
the payment, when the draft was presented 
the directors would order its payment with- 
out inquiring into the means by which it 
was incurred. Some of these drafts have 
been carried along four years on interest, 
others have been taken up. The overissu- 
ing of stock was accomplished by closing 
certain accounts as though the stock was 
sold and then taking one of the old certifi- 
cates which had been signed in blank and 
using it by closing of the stock. As the 
Treasurer had practically sole charge of 
the stock ledger he could do what he did 
without anybody's knowledge. The news 
of the defalcation caused a drop in the South 
Boston stock from 104 to 85, and owing to 
the doubt of the genuineness of the stock 
certificates of the company sales of its 
shares in the Broker's Board were enjoined. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

The Brooklyn Railway Supply Co. re- 
port that they are very busy just now and 
have had to employ quite a number of ex- 
tra mechanics to keep up with orders. They 
are building sweepers not only for use in 
large cities but for more medium sized 
roads in smaller cities than ever before. 
For plows they act as agents for cities 
about here and for the New England 
States for the Fleming Manufacturing 
Co.'s snow scrapers, which are sold at a 
price that bring them within easy reach of 
the smallest roads. They have also accept- 
ed the agency for Carpenter's patent turn- 
tables and transfer tables, the excellence of 
which they propose to demonstrate by 
tables in use in Brooklyn. 

The Atlantic R. R. Co. have now 297 
cars and 1,169 horses, being an increase of 
69 cars and 214 horses since our last report. 

The Brooklyn Cross-Town Ry. Co. are 
now using 50 and 60 pound rails instead of 
40 and 50 as previously reported. Mr. M. 
Joust has been appointed Secretary, reliev- 
ing Mr. Connor of that portion of his du- 
ties. 

JohnL. Partridge has succeeded Louis 
Fitzgerald as President of the Grand Street, 
Prospect Park and Flatbush Railway Co. 
Charles Crifields has been appointed Treas- 
urer. 

The present equipment of the Broadway 
Co. includes 199 cars and 750 horses, mak- 
ing an addition of 33 cars and 93 horses since 
their last report. 

Mr. Richardson, President of the Atlantic 
Avenue R. R. , recently appeared before a 
meeting of 300 Knights of Labor who were 
employees of the road, and spoke with them 
in regard to the relations between the com- 
pany and the men. He was there by spe- 
cial invitation, and in order that he might 
state the position which he occupied, he 
said that he had always tried to act fairly 
by them, that he had always made it a 
point of promoting the men to the places 
of starters, conductors and drivers, and 
was always opposed to bringing in new men 
and placing them over the old ones. When 



December, 188(3. 



he first assumed control of the road he had 
personal acquaintance with a majority of 
the men, but this was impossible now from 
the fact that the weekly payroll was $7,000 
instead of $1,200 as it was when he took 
charge. He denied that he had taken any 
steps to have the men who were engaged 
in the spring strikes punished in any way, 
but though he had been summoned before 
the grand jury and compelled to testify, 
his evidence was in no way prejudicial to 
any man engaged in the strike. He ex- 
pressed his regret that the same con- 
fidence was not manifested in him as in 
former years. It is said that about half of 
the employees of the road attended the 
meeting. 

The directors of the Brooklyn City 
R. R. Co. have reconsidered the 
resignation of President Hazzard, which 
was presented some months ago and laid 
upon the table. The fault that has been found 
with President Hazzard by tbe company is 
on account of the concessions which it is 
claimed he made to the Knights of Labor 
in the troubles of last spring. Mr. Hazzard 
retired from the control of the company on 
the 1st of December. 

It is said that one of the chief reasons for 
changing the jigger cars on the Brooklyn 
Cross-town line for cars similar to those 
run on Broadway was the large amount 
of counterfeit money passed on to the 
drivers. The company paid no attention so 
long as the cheating was confined to coins 
of small denomination, as dimes and quar- 
ters, but when it came to the manipulation 
of the silver dollar, they thought it was 
time to interfere. In one night, it is said, 
$85 were taken on the line. This was more 
than the drivers could afford to lose, as they 
are held accountable for all money receiv- 
ed by them. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

The Bridgeport Horse R. R. Co. have 
now six miles of track, and have increased 
their stock to 20 cars and 90 horses. 

Cedar Rapids, la. 

The Cedar Rapids & Marion St. Ry. are 
building about one mile new road on Six- 
teenth street. The "Central Park addition" 
will be the terminus of this line. Two new 
cars have been purchased and about ten 
horses will be added. The company are 
extending their city line from Sixteenth 
street about three-quarters of a mile. 

Charleston, S. C. 

The Middle Street Sullivan Island 
Ry. Co. are using 14 mules for their seven 
cars. 

Chester, Pa. 

The Chester Street R. R. Co. are now 
building two miles of extra road. 
Chicago, III. 

The Chicago West Division Elevated 
Ry. Co. has been incorporated with a capi- 
tal stock of $10,000,000. The company is to 
build and operate an elevated road from 
some point in the city between Lake Mich- 
igan and the south branch of the Chicago 
river, and between Lake street and Harri- 
son street, to a point on the west side of 



I 



December, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



17 



Cook county, between the lines of said two 
streets, extended west to said line, with 
branches leading therefrom to Humbolt 
Park, to the Stock- Yards, to Douglas Park 
and one to the corn«r of Western avenue 
and Blue Island avenue. The incorpora- 
tors are Anson H. Lawrence, Edward T. 
Cahill and George A. Dupuy. 

The following is a statement of street and 
other railways being run every day by the 
Van Depoele Electric Railway system. 
Some of them have besn running over nin^ 
months continuously. Appleton, Wis. — Op- 
erated by the Appleton Electric Street 
Railway Co. 4 J miles of road and 5 cars run 
separately, electricity generated by water 
power. Montgomery, Ala. — Operated by 
the Capital City Street Railway Co. 2 miles 
of road and 2 cars. Plant being completed 
to 10 miles of road and 12 cars. Steam 
power. Detroit, Mich. — Operated by the 
Dix Electric Railway Co. The " Dix road," 
2£ miles of road and train of 3 cars. Steam 
power. Port Huron, Mich. —Operated by 
the Port Huron Electric Street Railway 
Co. 4 miles of road and 4 cars. Windsor, 
Ont. — Operated by the Windsor Electric 
Railway Co. 2 miles of road and 
train of 2 cars. Being put in. Scranton, Pa. 
--For Scranton Suburban Railway Co. 3 
miles of road and 2 cars. 

The Electric Elevated Railway Co. 
received license of incorporation Oct. 25th. 
Capital stock, $5,000,000; to construct and 
operate electric railways in Chicago and 
Cook county; incorporators, Charles W. 
Rigdon, Silas S. Willard and George P. 
Everhart. 

The Pullman Car Co. of Chicago is 
building eight coaches for the Metropolitan 
Railroad of Kansas City and has the con- 
tract for forty 35 feet cars for the Grand 
Avenue road of the same city, all of which 
will be fitted with the Bemis gear. 

The Van Depoele Electric Mfg. Com- 
pany are manufacturing now the largest 
electric generator in the world; capacity, 
150 horse-power. The largest ones ever 
made before this were of 60 horse-power. 
This monster machine will be used by the 
Capital City Street Railway Company, of 
Montgomery, Ala., on their new electric 
street railway, which the Van Depoele Com- 
pany are equipping. 
Cleveland, O. 

Fulton Foundry have shipped within 
the last few days turntables to the follow- 
ing street railway companies: Three to 
East Harrisburg Pass. Ry. Co.; one to Ce- 
dar Rapids & Marion St. Ry. Co. ; two to 
Beatrice St. Ry. Co. ; two to Port Huron 
Electric Ry. Co. 

The Broadway & Newburg Street R. R. 
Co. have now 11 4-10 miles of track, are 
using a 43 pound rail, and have 26 cars, for 
which they require 165 horses. Mr. H. E. 
Andrews has succeeded Samuel Andrews as 
Vice-President, and Mr. J. J. Stanley is 
Superintendent. The general office is 1,373 
Broadway. 

The works of the Street Railway Supply 
successors to the Higley Journal 



Co., 



Box Co., have been destroyed by fire, with 
their entire contents. 



Clinton, In. 

J. M. Hartzell is making arrangements 
to push the street railway enterprise at 
this place. 

Columbus, O. 

The Glenwood & Green Lawn R. R. Co. 
have added two cars to their stock. Their 
office is No. 9 South High street. 

Des >! oincs, In. 

Capital City St. Ry. Co., incorporated 
J uly last, have just completed five miles 
road and will construct about ten more the 
coming year. Sixcarsareuow running, and 
more will be added at once. Thirty horses 
are used. All lines will be standard gauge, 
and next season s^me portions will be equip- 
ped with. Johnson Rail. 

The Des Moines Broad Gauge Street 
Ry. Co. report the following officers: Presi- 
dent, G. Van Gintel; Secretary, H. E. 
Teachout, and Treasurer, John Weber. 

The Des Moines Street Ry. Co. have 
only 12 miles of road instead of 14 as pre. 
viously reported, are using 25, 3C, 38 and 
52 pound rails, and have 18 cars and 125 
horses. 

The Capital City Street Ry. Co. report 
5 miles of track of 4 ftet 8 J inches gauge, 
cars and 30 horses. The officers are: 
President, G. Van Gintel; Secretary, H. E. 
Teachout, and Treasurer, J. Weber. 

Detroit, Mien. 

The Fort Wayne & Elmwood Ry. Co. 
have now 9 1-10 miles of track, 33 cars and 
212 horses. Mr. E. S. Heineman has suc- 
ceeded George B. Peases as Treasurer. 
The office is 129 Griswold street. 

The Michigan Stove Co. report them- 
selves well pleased with the results of their 
exhibit at the Cincinnati Convention. They 
report a fair amount of inquiry, and orders 
from various sections of the country, among 
which is one from Messrs. J. G. Brill & 
Co. , of Philadelphia, one from the Minne- 
apolis Street Railway Co., and different 
parts of the east, including Albany, Hart- 
ford, Gloucester, and other points, and are 
adding largely to the car stoves in De- 
troit. 

Dubuque, la. 

The Dubuque Street R. R. Co. report 7 
miles of track and the use of a 55 pound 
rail. They have also increased their num- 
ber of horses to 65. The office is on Coulier 
avenue. 

East Oakland, Cal. 

The Oakland, Brooklyn & Fruitvale 
Ry. Co. report two miles of track, a 
five feet six inch gauge, thirty -five pound 
rail, four cars and twenty-two horses. 
The officers are: President and Treasurer, 
H. Tubbs; Secretary, W. C. Mason, Super- 
intendent, James Dixon, and Purchasing 
Agent, J. Reed. The office is at 301 Cen- 
tral avenue. 

El Paso, Tex. 

The El Paso Street R. R. Co. report 
that the improvements now in progress 
consist of the addition of 3j miles of new 
track. They are using 20 and 30 pound 
rails; have 18 cars, which are hauled by 40 
mules. They are relaying 3,700 feet of 
track with the Johnson girder rail. The La 
Clede Car Co. of St. Louis are building 
them 7 new cars, and they also contem- 



plate building new offices and stables. A 
line of 13 miles is also in contemplation to 
Ysleta. The general offices of the company 
are on Seventh street. 
Emporia, Kan. 

The Emporia Cits Ry. Co. report that 
their gauge is three feet six inches, instead 
of five feet as we have heretofore reported 
it. They have eight cars and twenty-four 

orses. 
Erie, l'a. 

The Erie City Pass. Ry. Co. now report 
seven and three-fourths miles track. 

Eureka Springs. Ark. 

The Eureka Springs City Ry. Co., which 
we have previously reported, was incorpor- 
ated, but the scheme died out. 

Flushing! Mich. 

Th" report which has been circulated that 
a street railroad was to be built at this point, 
was based upon the the contemplated rail- 
road to Flint. No street railroad scheme 
is in existence. 

Fredonia, N. Y. 

The Dunkirk & Fredonia R. R. Co. 
report that their fares vary from five to fif- 
teen cents. 
Galesburgh, III. 

The College City Ry. Co. have now five 
miles of track, and are operating it with 
seven cars and twenty horses. L. W. 
Sanborn is President; A. S. ^ Hoover, Vice 
President, and Geo. S. Clayton, Superin- 
tendent and Secretary. 
Galveston, Tex. 

The Galveston City R. R. Co. have 
twenty-five miles of track, and have in- 
creased the number of their cars to eighty, 
which are hauled by 125 mules. The office 
is the corner of Twenty-first audi streets. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

W. .T. Hayes has succeeded C. A. Otis as 
President of the Grand Rapids Street Rail- 
road Co. 
Greeneastle, Ind. 

Ralph Rogers, not Rudolph Rogers, is 
Treasurer of the Greeneastle City Street 
Ry. Co. 

Greenville, N. J. 

The Daft Electric Light works recently 
gave an experiment of their motor before a 
number of railroad men, which it was said 
was successful. 

Glens Falls, N. Y. 

The following is a list of officers of the 
Glens Falls, Sandy Hill & Fort Edward Street 
R. R. Co. : President, Henry Crandall; Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, T. S. Coolidge, and 
Superintendent, Albert V. Brayton. 

Ilavcrbill, Mass. 

The Haverhill & Groveland St. R. R. 
Co. have thirteen and seven-tenths miles of 
track, and are using thirty and thirty -five 
pound rails. They have increased the 
number of cars to thirty- six, for which 131 
horses are required. Jackson B. Sweet has 
succeeded ^James B. White as President. 
The office is No. 3 Water street. 
Holyoke, Mass. 

The Holyoke St. Ry. Co. have three and 
one-half miles of track, they having added 
five cars aud nineteen horses, making thir- 
teen of the former and forty-five of the 
latter now in use. 



78 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Decimeik lhi& 



Hoboken, N. J. 

A petition has been presented to Presi- 
dent John H. Bonn of the North Hudson 
0. R. B. to restore the line of horse cars 
from the ferry through Hoboken to the 
Heights. The petitioners object to the 
withdrawal of the line, and the compulsion 
of the passengers to walk several blocks to 
reach a depot for an elevated train. For 
instance, aperson living in Monroe or Jack- 
son street, must walk a number of blocks 
before they reach their station, while the 
Court House cars carried them directly 
thither. Again, a person living in central 
Hoboken must either pay two fares or walk 
a number of blocks before they can reach 
the cars for the Heights. 

Hong Kong, China. 

A cable tramway is constructed from the 
town to the Peak, a range of very steep 
hills, on which are fine villa residences, 
and where the climate is more salubrious 
than near the harbor. The incline where 
they have to work is 4,800 feet long, and the 
line, which is partly single and partly 
double, is laid with 35 pound steel rails on 
steel sleepers. The gredients vary between 

I in 2 and 1 in 10, closely following the na- 
tural contour of the ground. The total 
height to which the carriages have to be 
raised is 1,300 feet, and the ropes, of which 
one is the working rope and the other the 
safety rope, run on separate sets of friction- 
rollers. The carriages are attached to each 
end of the ropes, aud as one pair of car- 
riages ascends the incline, the other pair 
descends. Each car is to contain sixty pas- 
sengers, the maximum lead being 7$ tons at 
each end of the ropes. The working rope 
is passed over a pair of drums eight feet in 
diameter, a id the safety rope over one drum, 
the drums being fixed at the top of the in- 
cline aud driven by two compound steam- 
engines, 40 nominal horse-power each. The 
speed of the car is to be six miles an hour. 

I I in cliinson, lias. 

The gauge of the Hutchinson Street By. 
Co. is four feet six inches, instead of three 
feet six inches. 
Ilion, N. Y. 

The Fbankfobt & Ilion Steeet By. Co. 
are running five cars. We add P. A. Skiff 
to our list of officers. Mr. F. Remington 
has been succeeded by J. L. McMillan as 
Treasurer, Mr. D. Lewis by John A. Gib- 
lin as Secretary, and Frederick Gates by J. 
J. Hannahs as Superintendent. 

Indianapolis. I ml. 

The Citizens' St. By. Co. are using 550 
mules for all their seventy cars. The office 
is No. 80 West Louisiana street. 

Jamestown, N. Y. 

The Jamestown Steeet B. B. Co. have 
now four miles of track, for which they em- 
ploy thirty-nine horses. B. N. Marvin has 
been succeeded by J. B. Boss as President. 
The other officers remain the same. 
Jersey City, N. J. 

The Jersey City & Bergen B. B. Co. 
are adding a large number of conductors 
and drivers to their list. They are con- 
stantly adding new cars to their several 
lines, which necessitates the employment 
of more help. 



The new horse car line of the Jersey City 
& Bergen B. B. Co., which crosses the new 
bridge over Morris canal in Bayonne, 
has been opened aud is regarded by the 
residents of Greenville, Bayonne, and 
Bergen Point as an event of great import- 
ance. The first car was hauled over the 
line by four handsome gray horses with 
new harness and flowing plumes, aud the 
car was gayly decorated with flags. The car 
was driven by George Bowly of Begister 
Fielden's office, aud on the car were Presi- 
dent Charles B. Thurston, Thomas M. 
Sayre, Edward F. Brooks, besides a num- 
ber of stockholders of the company. To 
these should be added officials from Bergen 
Point and Bayoune, aud the omnipresent 
reporter. The road is in excellent con- 
dition. The party went to McDonald's 
Biverside Hotel, where the event was duly 
celebrated. The road was formally opened 
on a later day. Seven handsome and com- 
modious jigger cars were put on, which 
number will be increased in connection 
with the needs of traffic. The fare from 
Jersey City ferry to Bergen Point will re- 
main the same as it now is to Greenville, 
namely five cents, and the passengers for 
Bayoune and Bergen will be transferred at 
the Greenville stables. The bridge has been 
entirely completed, and a force of laborers 
have laid a new track at Washington and 
York streets and also on Grand street 
through Heuderson and Grove streets. 
Next summer the company expect to run 
through open cars from the ferry to Bergen 
Point, a distance of about eight miles. 

Johnstown, N. Y. 

The Johnstown, Gloveesville & Kings- 
borq Horse B. B. Co. have only four miles 
of track instead of five and a quarter as pre- 
viously reported. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

The Kalamazoo Steeet B. B. Co. have 
only eight miles of track instead of ten as 
previously reported. They have thirty cars 
instead of twenty-eight, according to their 
last report. We add to our list of officers 
Mr. Wm. Dewiugas Vice Presideut; J. W. 
Boynton takes the position of Manager in- 
stead of Secretary; B, S. Jackson has suc- 
ceeded E. H. Brown as Treasurer, assum- 
ing also the position of Secretary. 
K as City, Mo. 

The Kansas City Cable Ry. Co. have 
now eight miles of track. Their rolling 
stock has been increased from ten to seven- 
ty-five cars. We add F. A. Tucker to the 
list of officers as Superintendent. The office 
is S. E. corner Ninth and Washington sts. 

The Metropolitan Street Ry. Co. are 
now operating several lines of horse rail- 
roads with a total mileage of llf miles, and 
contemplate changing some of them to cable 
lines, but just how far these changes will 
extend has uot yet been determined. The 
gauges of the roads operated are 4 ft. and 
4ft. 8i iu. The officers are C. F. Morse, as 
President; Vice President, Geo. H. Nettle- 
ton; Secretary, W. J. Perry; Treasurer, R 
W. Armour; Superintendent, E. J. Lawless; 
Chief Engineers, Knight & Benticon; Gen- 
eral Counsel, Pratt, Baumback & Ferry; 



Auditor aud Cashier, R. J. McCarthy. The 
capita] stock of the company is $1 ,250,000. 

Workis now in progress by which three 
miles of track will be changed to the 
cable system by spring. The whole system 
operates about sixty cars a day. 

The Jackson County Horse E. R. Co. 
is a part of the Metropolitan system. 
Knoxville, Teun. 

The Market Square & Asylum St. Ry. 
Co. report two miles of track of 5 ft. gauge, 
22 pound rail, 3 cars aud 18 horses. We 
add to the list of officers W. B. Hen- 
derson as Secretary, and L. O. Bogers as 
Superintendent. The general office is 148 
Gay street. 

The Mabey Bell & Hardy St. By. Co. 
report 4 miles of track, 4 cars and 29 
horses. M. E. Thompson is Superintend- 
ent and Mauager. 

The Meteopolitan Railroad is having 
eighteen grip cars built by the La Clede Car 
Co. of St. Louis. 

La I'chinout, N. Y. 

The Larchmont Manor Co. intend add- 
ing oue new car and a new switch in the 
spring. E. E. Flint is Secretary, and W. 
H. Campbell Superintendent. 

Lansing, Mich. 

The Lansing Teansit By. Co. is not a 
street railway, but a spur from the track of 
the Detroit, Lansing & Northern R. B. to 
serve the factories on the west side of the 
river. 

Lawrence, Mass. 

The Meebimac Valley Horse R. R. Co. 
have 6f miles of track. 
Lawrence, liaus. 

The Laweence Transportation Co. re- 
port 5J miles of track aud 8 cars as cor- 
rections to our last report. 

Lenox, Mass. 

Stephen D. Field of New York is getting 
out the plans for a new electrical railroad 
between Lenox and Glendale for the special 
accommodation of New York summer travel. 
The proposed line will run by the side of 
Stockbridge Bowl through Curtisville, 
where the power may be chiefly obtained. 
The estimated cost of the line is $150,000. 
Lewiston, Me. 

The Lewiston and Auburn Horse B. B. 
Co. report that they have now 10 miles of 
track, and are running 20 cars hauled by 60 
horses. This is an increase of 4 cars and 15 
horses since we received our last report 
from them. On the board of officers Charles 
C. Corbett has succeeded H. C. Packard as 
Treasurer, and J. E. Fairbanks succeeds 
E. P. Stinchfield as Superintendent. 

Lexington, Ky. 

The Lexington City B. B. Co. have now 
8 miles of track. B. P. Metcalfe has suc- 
ceeded John Cross as President. He also 
holds the position of Treasurer. Albert 
Cross has succeeded C. B. Diver as Vice- 
President and Manager. He also holds his 
old position as Secretary. 
Lincoln, Neb. 

The Lincoln Steeet By. Co. report 8 
miles of track, 13 cars and 100 horses. The 
road has also purchased the franchise and 
all the stock of the Capital City Ry. Co. , 



December, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



79 



aud the two will be consolidated under the 
name of the Lincoln Street Ry. Co., giving 
the latter 12 miles of track, 150 horses 
and 21 cars. A two-thirds interest iu the 
stock has been purchased by A. E. Touselin, 
President of the Chicago & Northern R. R. 
Co. and a Boston syndicate, who will imme- 
diately greatly improve the plant. 

London. Canada. 

The London Street Rt. Co. report 5 
miles of track, and will lay at least 1 mile 
more in the spring. 

L,oii« Island City, N. Y. 

The Riker Avenue & Sanlford's Point 
Ry. Co. have commenced operations. They 
will build two miles of track of 4 ft. 8i in. 
gauge, with 47 pound steel rails. Horses 
will be used as the motive power, but it has 
not been yet decided how many horses or 
cars will be used. The horses and rolling 
stock will be supplied, and the road mau- 
aged by the Steinway & Hunter's Point 
R. R. Co. The officers are: J. H. Hemp- 
stead, President; and Oscar P. Steins, Sec- 
retary. It is expected that the road will be 
open by June 1, 1887. The office is 109 
E. 14th street, New York. 

The Steinway & Hunter's Point Ry. Co. 
report sixty-eight cars aud 225 horses. 

Louisville, Ky. 

The Central Passenger R. R. Co. report 
49 miles of track of 5 feet gauge, 52 pound 
rail, 150 cars and 750 horses. B. DuPont 
is President, and T. C. Donnigan Secretary. 
The office is at No. 18 Walnut street. 
Lowell. Mass. 

The office of the Lowell Horse R. R. 
Co. is at 33 Hildreth street. They have 7| 
miles of track, 33 cars and 125 horses. 

Lynchburg, Va. 

Stephen Adams has assumed the office of 
President in addition to that of Treasurer, 
which he already held, of the Lynchburg 
Street R. R. Co. The office is at 811 Main 
street. 

Macon, Ga. 

The Macon & Suburban Street R. R. 
Co. report 10 miles of track and 5 ft. gauge. 
They will build extensions early in 1887. 

Manchester, N. H. 

The Manchester Horse R. R. Co. has 7 
miles of track. The office is on Depot 
street. 

Meriden, Conn. 

The officers of the new road now in pro- 
cess of construction are: G. R. Curtis, Pres- 
ident; Charles L. Rockwell, Secretary and 
Treasurer, and H. S. Wilcox, Auditor. 

Meridian, Miss. 

George F. Covert is President of the Ma- 
rine Street Ry. Co. instead of George S. 
Conant, as we have before reported. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

The Memphis City R. R. Co. report that 
they have now 80 cars in the place of 66 as 
at the time of their last report. We also 
add to our list of officers: S. P. Read, Treas- 
urer, and James Frost, Secretary. 

Michigan City, Intl. 

The Citizens' Street Ry. Co. report two 
miles of track, 4 ft. 8£ in. gauge, 30 pound 
rail, 4 cars and 16 horses. The officers are: 
William G. Knight, President; John Lyons, 
Vice-President; Jacob D. Henderson, Sec- 



retary ; Jerry H. Knight, Treasurer. The 
office is on West Washington street, South 
Bend, Ind. 
Middletown, Conn. 

The Middletown Horse R. R. Co. are 
using the 56 pound rail. John M. Douglas 
is President. The office is 166 Main Street. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

The office of the Milwaukee City R. R. 
Co. is at 209 West Water street. 
Mohawk, N. Y. 

C. W. Carpenter has succeeded J. Brown 
as President of the Mohawk & Iliou R. R. 
Co. 

Moline, 111. 

The Moline Central Street Ry. Co. re- 
port 1\ miles of trade . P. H. Wesselisuow 
President instead of Vice-President, suc- 
ceeding F. H. Velie, N. Y. Cady succeed- 
ing him as Vice-President. 

Muscatine, la. 

Mr. W. Hoffman has succeeded D. C. 
Richman as Vice-President of the Musca- 
tine City Railway Co. O. J. Chapman has 
retired from the position of Superintendent 
and no successor has as yet been ap- 
pointed. The company have now 34 horses 
and mules at work hauling the cars. 

Nat irk, Mass. 

The Natick & Cochituate St. Ry. Co. has 
now seven cars. We add to our list of offi- 
cers the names of Harrison Harwood Pres- 
ident, and Frank Hayes Clerk. 

New Albany, Intl. 

The office of the New Albany Street Ry. 
Co. is at the corner of Vincennes aud Spring 
streets. 

Newark, N. J. 

The Newark & Bloomfield St. Ry. Co. 
is now the Bloomfield division of the Ex- 
sex Passenger Ry. Co. 
New York, N. Y. 

Warneck & Toffler's exhibit of Roller 
Matting we omitted to mention in our list 
of exhibits at the Cincinnati Convention. 

Charles B. Miller, of 2 ; Coenties Slip, 
has established the business of manu- 
facturing the Magnolia anti-friction metal. 
The metal has undergone most severe tests, 
and has shown such results as to justify the 
interest of street railway men. 

Pomeroy & Fischer, 30 Frankfort street, 
New York, will succeed Adoljmus Kepple- 
man on the 1st of January as American 
representative of Noble & Hoare's var- 
nishes. 

The Street Railway Journal, establish 
ed in 1884 at 32 Liberty street, New York, 
has moved its offices to 113 Liberty street, 
where the publishers have secured much 
larger and more convenient quarters. They 
are now enabled to conduct the growing 
business of their editorial, publishing, and 
printing departments under one roof. They 
invite all their street railway friends to call 
aud see them in their new quarters. 

The One Hundred and Twenty-fifth street 
surface railroadhas been converted to acable 
road, the work of putting the cable in po- 
sition being begun at midnight of the night 
of November 23. Twenty-four horses were 
required to pull the cable along the road. 

There have been several experiments re- 



cently in the use of electric motors for trac- 
tion purposes iu New York. Among them 
was oue of the Sprague motor, which was 
exhibited on the 34th street branch of the 
Third Avenue Elevated R. R. The car, 
which is about the size of an ordinary car, 
was operated without brakes by a series of 
switches on the platform. The car was run 
back and forth several times between Third 
avenue and 34th street ferry. It is said 
that the main practical obstacle in the way 
of adopting the motor on the elevated sys- 
tem is the difficulty of handliug and fur- 
nishing the enormous power required by 
the 0.3 trains in operation at one time. This 
amounts to 11,700 horse power. 

Another experiment was made with the 
Julian electric street car on the Eighth 
avenue surface road. The car ran from the 
stables at 49th street, up to 61st street and 
back. The car is an ordinary horse car 
raised on an iron frame somewhat higher 
than the ordinary, and provided with eight 
electric storage batteries and motors. The 
storage batteries are inserted on the out- 
side under the seats of the car, and the mo- 
tor itself is entirely concealed in a space 
under the floor. The bearing is covered 
by a device on the platform, by means of 
which the car can be started, stopped and 
backed. The larger brace is used for stop- 
ping. This is the system of electric cars 
now in use in Brussels and Hamburg, and 
is being tried in Paris and Lisbon. The 
car is also lighted by electricity. 

According to Mayor Grace, the Aldermen 
have found a method of evading the law re- 
quiring the sale of street railroad franchises. 
It is said that the arrangements are so 
made in the case of the proposed 28th and 
29th street road, that the franchise was 
granted in such a way that only one road 
could bid for it. The Mayor promptly ve- 
toed this scheme, but it is thought prob- 
able that there will be enough votes in the 
board to override the veto. Again, in the 
face of a strong protest from the property 
owners, it has been voted to authorize the 
construction of a street railroad on that part 
of Fourth avenue above the Grand Central 
Depot. It was understood that when this 
avenue was used for a tunnel no railroad 
should be constructed on the surface ob- 
structing any space available for street 
traffic, but as the New York Times remarks, 
if they had the power the Aldermen would 
give the whole earth to the corporation 
provided they could get enough for it. 

The John Stephenson Co. seem to be 
as busy as usual. They are building cars 
for Ecuador and for various sections of this 
country, including Baltimore, Schenectady, 
Auburn, Pittsburg, Meriden, Orange, Jack- 
sonville, Lowell, and California. 

Judge Lawrence has entered a judgment 
for $43,861.21 in favor of the city, as lic- 
ense fees on the cars of the Third Avenue 
R. R. Co. 

The suit of Mrs. Annie E. Daly in Su- 
perior Court, against the Second Avenue 
line, to recover damages for injuries receiv- 
ed from being thrown from a car which 
started suddenly before she alighted, has 



80 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



Deoembeb, 1886. 



been decided, and a verdict given in favor 
of the company by Judge O'Gomtan. The 
counsel for the plaintiff, however, made a 
motion to set aside the verdict, and for 
another trial, on the ground of fraud. The 
fraud is claimed to be on the part of one of 
the witnesses, who claimed that she saw 
Mrs. Daly get off the car and trip over a 
rail, and afterwards told a friend that she 
knew nothing about the accident, but did 
not want the conductor to get into trouble. 

The demand of conductors and drivers 
on the Sixth Avenue line, for $1.50 to trip- 
pers to Carmine street, has been granted, 
and the trippers are to be paid that instead 
of $1.20 as heretofore. 

It has been proposed to reduce the wages 
of the trippers on the Eighth Avenue road 
from $1.75 to $1.50. A committee of men 
has been appointed to wait on the com- 
pany. 

North Adams, Mass. 

The Hoosao Valley Street Ry. Co. re- 
port that they have G miles of track laid to 
a gauge of 4 feet 8j inches, with a 40 pound 
rail. They are running 10 cars with 29 
horses and two steam motors. The officers 
are: William B. Baldwin, President; W. 
Cronkhite, Vice-President; S. Procter 
Thayer, Secretary and Treasurer, and G.W. 
Lincoln, Manager. 

There is no such road as the North 
Adams Street Ry. 

Orlando, Fla. 

The Orlando k Winter Park Ry. Co. 
contemplate building 6 miles of road to 4 
ft. 8| in. gauge. Steam motors will beused. 
The officers are: President, R. J. Gillham; 
Treasurer, T.J. Beeks; Superintendent and 
Engineer, J. H. Abbott. The capital stock 
is $100,003. The road will be opened this 
winter. 

Pawtucket, R.I. 

The Pawtucket St. R. R. Co. report four 
foot gauge, twenty-four cars and 100 
horses. The officers are: President, A. B. 
Chase; Vice President and General Mana- 
ger, G. F. Longstreet, and Treasurer, E. 
M. Littlefield. The office is on Broad street. 
Philadelphia, I'm. 

The Green & CoatesR. R. Co., forming a 
portion of the leased lines of the People's 
Passenger Railway Co., report Moses A. 
Bropsie as President and Lewis S. Ren- 
shaw as Secretary and Treasurer. The 
offices are on the northwest corner of Tenth 
and Chestnut streets. 

Peoria, 111. 

The East Block Peoria Horse R. R. Co. 
is in process of construction. It will be 1^ 
miles long, 4 ft. 8| in. gauge, laid with 30 
and 40 pound rails. At first 4 cars and 24 
horses will be used. The officers are: 
President, N. Giles; Secretary, R. R. 
Boureaud. The road is to be operated as 
a branch of the Central Horse and Cable 
road. The capital stock is $11,000. Work 
was commenced on November 1st, and the 
road will be opened about December 15th. 
Raleigh, N. C. 

The Raleigh St.^R. R. Co. was opened for 
traffic about the middle of November. It 
has five miles of track anltwo and one-half 
m>jd will hi ajuitf j.3fcel Tub gauge is 



four feet eight and one-half inches. It is 
laid with a thirty -five pound side bearing 
strut, and sixteen pound T steel rail. The 
road is run with six cars hauled by thirty- 
six mules. The officers are: Geo. M. 
Snodgrass, President; R. T. Gray, Treasur- 
er; J. F. Scott, Secretary and Superintend- 
ent, and F. H. Busbee, Attorney. The 
capital stock of the road is $25,000. 
The location of the office has not yet been 
determined. 
Salem, Mass. 

The Salem & Danvers St. Ry. Co. report 
twelve miles of track, twenty-four cars and 
117 horses, which makes an increase of 
seventy-two horses since our last report. 
Geo. A. Vickery has assumed the position 
of Treasurer in place of Geo. W. Wil- 
liams, still retaining his old position of 
Secretary. David N. Cooke has been 
promoted from the position of Assistant 
Superintendent to Superintendent, instead 
of W. B. Perkins, resigned. 

Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

The following is the list of officers of the 
Seneca Falls & Waterloo R. R. Co. : Geo. 
H. Stayner, President and Treasurer; C. 
H. Williams, Assistant Treasurer; Charles 
B. Haines, Vice-President and General 
Manager; A. G. Haines, Superintendent, 
and Henry S. Ide. Secretary. It may be 
added that Mr. A. G. Haines is also Vice- 
President of the Seneca Falls & Cayuga 
Lake R. R. Co., and General Manager of 
the Cayuga Lake Park Co. Mr. Charles D. 
Haines is President of the Hoosac Valley 
R. R. Co. , of North Adams. 

Springfield, 111. 

The Springfield City R. R. Co. report 
7 miles of track, employing 90 horses and 
mules. The officers are: President, A. L. 
Ide; Treasurer, William Ridgely; Secretary, 
George Brink erhoff. 
Springfield, Mass. 

The Bemis Car Box Co. are furnishing 
twenty-five sets of their patent car box and 
gear to the Chicago Passenger Ry.; forty 
sets to the Minneapolis St. Ry. Co. ; nine 
sets to the Eau Clair road; eight sets for 
the Detroit City road; besides a number of 
smaller orders. They also furnish Pullman 
and other leading builders, with boxes and 
gears. They are now located in their new 
office on Main street, near the depot. 

The Bemis Car Box Co. has done more 
than treble the business, during the past 
year, done by it the previous year. Their 
new office is at 227 Main street, opposite 
the depot. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

A correspondent writes as follows: "At 
the first meeting of this session of the 
Council nearly every street railway in the 
city presented bills asking for a change of 
motive power from horse to anything but 
steam. The St. Louis Cable & Western is, 
no doubt, the lever that has brought about 
the change of heart. 

"A number of new franchises was also 
asked for. 

"A bill for an elevated road running out 
St. Charles street and to connect at the 
western terminus with the West End Nar- 



row Gauge. This route will take the cream 
of the city. The Lindell road runs just one 
block to the north and Missouri road 
(Olive street) just two blocks to the south. 
It is safe to say it will not pass, however. 
Another important bill is that of the Grand 
avenue, Lafayette Park road, said to be 
cable. They propose to use the tracks of 
the Missouri (Olive street) line from Fourth 
to Thirteenth street, thence across Thir- 
teenth street to Clark avenue to Eighteenth 
street, over the Eighteenth street bridge, to 
Chouteau avenue, thence to Dolman street 
to Hickory to Mississippi avenue, Park 
avenue, California avenue and Russell 
avenue, Shenandoah, Grand avenue and 
Tower Grove Park. Bill Swift, the con- 
tractor, is fathering this bill, and says it's 
going through. It has a fine territory to 
draw from, a class of people who can all af- 
ford to ride. 

"Two different companies are desirous of 
occupying Grand avenue, with a cross- 
town line. Mr. Julus Walsh, the owner of 
the Citizens' Railway, has been anxious for 
someyearsto extend his line, whichalready 
occupies a portion of the street, but has 
been waiting for the completion of the 
Bridge before presenting his bill. He is 
now forestalled by the Shaw's Garden, 
Tower Grove and Fair Ground Railway. 
Mr. Walsh's bill has been presented, how- 
ever, and I think it would only be fair, all 
things being equal, to give it the prece- 
dence." 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

The Syracuse & South Bay Street R. 
R. Co., previously reported as a street rail- 
road is a steam railroad 15 miles long. 

E. F. Rice is President of the Seventh 
Ward Ry. Co. 

Taylorsville, N. C. 

It has been reported that Mr. Stevenson 
is contemplating the construction of a street 
railroad. That gentleman writes that no 
such scheme is on foot. 

Toledo, O. 

The Toledo Consolidated Street Ry. 
Co. report 19 miles of track, 50 cars and 225 
horses. We add John Gilmartiu as Super- 
intendent to our list of officers. 

Utica, N. Y. 

The Utica, Clinton & Binghamton 
Street R. R. Co. are adding l j miles of 
branch line. 
Waterbury, Conn. 

The Waterbury Horse R. R. Co. , listed 
in our last issue among the new roads, is now 
in operation. 
Worcester, Mass. 

The Worcester St. Ry. Co. have length- 
ened their track and added six open Brill 
cars, three open Jones cars, six Jones box 
cars, all equipped with Bemis gear and 
"alarm" registers. 

The Citizens' St. Ry. Co. are now opera- 
ting seven and one-quarter miles of track, 
and have their equipment complete. Their 
new stables are situated at opposite ends of 
the line. 

The Citizens' Street Ry. Co. report 7£ 
miles of track laid to 4 ft. 8£ in. gauge with 
45 pound rail. They have 19 cars and 100 
horses. H. S. Seeley has succeeded F. W. 
Brigtiam as Secretary and Treasurer. J. N. 
Akarman is Superintendent. 

The Worcester Street Ry. Co. report 
7J miles of track and 31 cars. H. S. Seeley 
has succeeded Henry S. Searls as Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. J. N. Akarman is 
Superintendent, and J. B. Chapin As- 
sistant Superintendent. 



December, 1886. 



81 



The Reliable Sand Box. 

We illustrate in this connection a new de- 
vice* which has recently been placed upon 
the market for the purpose of sanding or 
salting the rails of street railways, although, 
of course, it may be used for other pur- 
poses. It consists primarily of a hopper 
with a movable side, aud into this sand, 
gravel, or salt in any condition, may be 
placed. It matters nothing whether the 
sand and gravel contain large stones and 
are wet, or whether the salt is in large 
lumps, it is sure to be fed upon the track 
wherever it is desired it should be done, 
as the passage from the hopper is merely a 
shute. 

The device is operated by a treadle plac- 
ed in convenient position to be used by the 



was fed upon the rails withoiit the slightest 
difficulty, for the simple reason that each 
time the hopper closed the whole body of 
the sand was moved, and thus placing it 
in an unsettled state, and causing it to drop 
down upon the rails wherever it was desired 
that it should do so. Of course, it is not 
claimed that wet sand is better, or as good, 
as dry sand, but simply that the device can 
be used with wet materials when the dry is 
not at hand and convenient. 

The engraving, which we are enabled to 
present in this connection, shows very 
clearly the construction of the machine and 
how it is placed upon the car. There is no 
necessity of any cutting away of the seats, 
as it can be placed underneath them, and 
only requires that a hole should be cut in 
the floor large enough to allow the sand to 




The sides stand at an angle of about 45 de- 
grees to the vertical, making a right angle 
with each other. The box is 13£ in. high, 
10 in. wide, 30 in. long at the top of the 
shute and 3£ in. at the bottom. 



THE RELIABLE SAND BOX. 



driver with his foot, and the cap of this 
treadle being so adjusted that the opening 
into the hopper may be made sufficient to 
allow large gravel stones to drop 
through, or just a break to allow a stream 
of fine dry sand to pass. 

When the device is not in use, the cap can 
be lifted out by means of a chain aud drop- 
ped into a safe plane in convenient posi- 
tion so that passengers when standing upon 
the platform will not step upon it and thus 
sand the rails unnecessarily. The moving 
part of the hopper is so arranged that as it 
moves back and forth it can act as a crusher 
and pulverize the sand, which may be in 
lumps, or start it when it is wet. We saw 
a device of this kind in use some days ago, 
and although the sand was soaking wet it 

•Car Track Friction Appliance Co., W. T. Butler, 
19 Tremont row, Boston, Mass. 



pass through. It may be filled through the 
seat, or through the space between the top 
of the hopper and the seat, as may suit the 
convenience of the road using them. The 
mechanism for operating is merely a sys- 
tem of levers which it will be impossible to 
get out of order, and a stout spring to hold 
the hole in its proper position. 

It is solidly and substantially made of 
japanned or galvanized iron, and will stand 
a great amount of wear. It has been intro- 
duced upon a number of the Boston roads, 
among them the Metropolitan, which have 
adopted it for all cars upon their road. 

The advantages that are to be derived 
from such a device cannot but be thoroughly 
appreciated by street railway officers, in 
that it gives the driver a complete control 
of the car at all times. 

The details of the construction are these: 



Personal. 

J. N. Akabman, formerly with the Charles 
River road, is now acting superintendent 
for the Worcester Street Railway and the 
Citizens' Street Railway of Worcester, 
Mass. 

M. Napoleon Ney, President of the Geo. 
graphical Society of Paris, Col. Laus. 
sedat, Director of the Conservatory of Arts 
and Metiers, and Leon Chabert, engineer of 
the city of Paris, with several other distin. 
guished French officials, visited the Tenth 
avenue cable road, in company with Dr» 
Otto A. Moses, electric engineer, and D* 
J. Miller, on Saturday, Nov. 6th, 1886. They 
were very much interested in the working 
of the road. Cars were stopped, started and 
moved at various speeds for their special 
benefit. After the ride they inspected the 
machinery at the depot at One Hundred and 
Twenty-eighth street, and expressed them- 
selves as well pleased. 

At the meeting of the street railway com- 
pany held last evening, Mr. Orange J. 
Chapman, who has been Superintendent of 
the company since its organization, tender- 
ed his resignation, to take effect immedi- 
ately, aud Mr. Peter Donavan, the stable 
foreman, also resigned. Mr. Chapman has 
been the right man in the right place; he 
is a thorough superintendent, aud has been 
faithful to his trust, which is one of great re- 
sponsibility. During his term of office he 
has been ever zealous and watchful to the 
interest of the company, and that organi- 
zation owes the present excellent condition 
of its property to Mr. Chapman. In accept- 
ing his resignation it loses a good superin- 
tendent, and one whose place will be hard 
to fill. Mr. Fred Bloomer, who has had 
charge of the Muscatine Lumber Co.'s 
yards, has been elected foreman, and Mr. 
Chapman continues with the company until 
December 1, to assist Mr. Bloomer in ob- 
taining the "run of things." Mr. B. will 
make a good foreman and will be faithful 
to every trust reposed in him. — Muscatine 
(la.) Tribune. 



The Employees' Position. 

The public will sympathize with horse- 
railroad employees when they protest 
against working long hours for wages that 
will barely support them, but they will uot 
support them when they play the part of 
bullies and cowards. They Lave a right to 
demand more wages than they are receiv- 
ing, aud to strengthen their demands by all 
peaceable means, but they have no right to 
interfere with other men's work, or to in- 
sist by forcible means that they shall not 
sell their labor at what price they please. 
The disgraceful scenes which were enacted 
in New York have not advanced the inter- 
ests of street-railway men. They may gain 
a temporary advantage by such actions, but 
in the long run they will be looked upon as 
disturbers of the public peace, who have 
placed themselves on a level with the anar- 
chists, and will be given the go-by by all 
law-abiding citizens. — Ex. 



82 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



t)£OEMBEB, 1886, 



STREET RAILWAYS 

IN THE UNITED JJTATES & CANADA. 

Compiled from data furnished the editors of "The 
Street Railway Journal,"by the officers 
of the various roads. 

Abbreviations— m, miles; g, gauge; lbr, pounds 
rail to the yard ; c, cars ; h, horses ; mu, mules. 

Officers' addresses are the same postofflce as the 
company unless otherwise specified. 

AKRON, O.— Akron St. Ry. & Herdlc Co. 2% m* 
6c, 81 h. Pres. Ira M. Miller, v. Pres. James Christy, 
Treas. B. L. Dodge, Sec. F. M. Atterholt, supt. John 
T. Metlin. 

ALBANY, N. Y.— Watervllet Turnpike & R. R. 
Co. 15 m, 4-8% g, 26-45 lb. r, 31 c, 150 h. Pres. Chas. 
NewmaD, V. Pres. C. B. Tllllnghast, Sec. & Treas. 
Cautlne Tremper, Supt. Amos Free. Offices 1165 
Broadway. 

The Albany Ry. 14 m, 4-8 g, 54 c. 232 h. 33-47 lb r. 
Pres., supt. and Treas. John W. McNamara. Sec. 
Jas. H. Manning. Offices 3 & 5 N. Pear: st. 

ALLEUHENV CITY, PA.— Federal St. & Pleas- 
ant Valley Pass. Ry. 4.8 m, 5-2 g. no lb r, 22 c, 160 h 
and mu. Pres. Wm. McCreery, Sec. R. F. Ramsey, 
Supt. Wm. J. Crozler. Office, 129 Taggart street, 

People's Park Pass. R. R. Co. 4.2 m, 5-2 g, so lb r, 
10 c, 70 mu. Pres. Wm. McCreery, Sec. R. F. Ram- 
sey, Supt. Wm. J. Crozler. Office, 129 Taggart St. 

ALLENTOWN, PA. — Allentown Pass. R.R. Co. 
3% ni, 4-8% S, 19 lDS - r i 3 coaches, 22 h. Pres. Samuel 
Lewis, Treas. & Sec. Joseph E. Balliet. Supt. A. 
T. Brown. Office Hamilton St. Capital, $45,260. 

ALTON, ILL.— Alton & Ud. Alton Horse Ry. Co. 

ALTOONA. PA.— City Pass. By. Co. ot Altoona. 
3% m, 5-3 g, 43 & 45 lbs. r, 17 c. 40 h. Pres. John P. 
Levan, Sec. & Treas. L. B. Relfsnelder, Supt. John 
J. Buch. Capital, $68,000. 

AMSTERDAM, N. Y.— Amsterdam St. Ry. Co. 
\% m, 4-8 g, 25 lb r, 3 c, 10 h. Pres. Henry Herrlck, 
Treas. David Cady, Sec. M. L. Stover. Leased to 
Jas. R. Snell. 

APPLETON, Wis — Appleton E ectric St. Ry< 
4% m. 5c. Pres. J. E. Harrlman. V.-Pres. N. B. Clark, 
Sec. T. W. Orblson, Treas. Jos. Iioffend. 

ASHTABULA, O — Ashtabula City Ry. Co. 4 m, 

4- 8% g, 40 lb r,9c, 60 h. Owner & Prop. J no. N.Stewart. 
ATCHISON, KAN.— Atchison St. Ry. Co. 9 m, 

20 c, 65 h, 4-8 % g, 20-30 ib r. Pres. J. H. Beeson, Treas. 
H. M. Jackson, Sec. J. P. Adams. Gen. Supt. Geo. W. 
Carpenter. 

Gate City S R.R. t.Co 2% m, 4-8% g, 16 lb r, 7 c, 26 
h. Pres. L. B. Nelson, v. pres. L. DeGlve, Sec. & 
Treas. John Stephens, Solicitor, A. Rernharat. 

Metropolitan St. R.R. Co. 

West End & a 1 1 antic R.R. Co. 2m, 4-8% g, 20 lb r, 
6 c, 34 mu. Pres J. D.Turner, V. pres. T. L. Lang- 
ston, Sec. & Treas. B. H. Brumhead, Man. & Pur. 
Agt. Jno. S. Brumhead. 

ATLANTA, «A.— Atlanta St. Ry. Co. 13 m, 4-8% 
g, 42 lb O. B. rail, 40 two h cars, 150 horses. North 
Atlanta Line l m. Decatur St. Line 1.50 m. Mari- 
etta St. Line 2.50 m. McDonough St. Line i.50m. 
Peachtree St. Line 2.50 m. West End Line 2.50 m. 
Whitehall St. Line 1.50 rn. Pres. Richard Peters, 
Sec. & Treas. J. W. Culpepper, Supt. & Purch. Agt. 
E. C. Peters. Office, 49 Line st. 

Metropolitan St. R. R. Co. 6 m, 4 8% g, 20 lb r. 
20 c, 84 h. Pres. J. W. Rankin, Sec. J. S. Hanlutu. 
Office cor. Hunter and Butler sts. 

ATLANTIC, N. J — Atlantic City Ry. Co. 

AUBURN, N. Y.— Auburn & owasco Lake R.R Co. 
1% m, 4-8% g, 28-30 Ib r, 4c, 13 h. Pres. D. M Osborne, 
Sec. & Treas. C. B Rosters, Supt. B. F. Andrews. 

East Genesee & Seward Ave. Ry. Co. 2% m, 4-8% g, 
30 lb r, 6 c, 25 h. Pres. David M. Osborne, Sec. & 
Treas. C. B. Rosters, Supt. B. F. Andrews. 
AUGUSTA, GA. — Augusta & Summerville R.R. Co. 
6 m, 5 g, 3ulbr, 13 c, 42 h. Pres. Patk Walsh, Supt. 
Edw. G. Mosher. Auditor, Frank E. Petit, office 
513 McKinne St. 

AURORA, ILL.— Aurora City Ry. Co. 5 m, 4-8m 
g, 281b r, 7 c, : i', 30 mu. Pres. H. H. Evans, V. Pres". 
S. W. Thatcher, sec. A. J. Hopkins, Treas. E. W. 
Trask, Supt. I. B. chattle. 

BABYLON, N. Y— Babylon Horse R.R. Co. i%. 
m, 4-9 g, 60 lb r, 3 c, 3 h. Pres. W. F. Norton, Sec. 
Jos. M. Sammls, Treas. JohnR. Reid, Supt. David S. 
S. sammls. 

BALTIMORE, MD.— Baltimore & Powhatan Ry. 
Co. 6 m, 5-4% g, 3o lb r, 4 c, 18 h. Pres. & Treas. E. 
D. Freeman, Sec. R. B. Clark, Supt. I. M. Ketrick. 
Office 406 Laurens st. 

Baltimore city Pass. Ry. Co. 44 m, 151 c, 1051 h. 

5- 4% g, 46 & 47ibr. Pres. & Supt. Oden Bowie, 
Supt. car shops J. M. Blemdell, Supt. trucks, Boyer 
Parks. Treas John Bolgiano, Sec. S. L. Bridge. Office 
cor. Calvert* Baltimore Sts. 

Baltimore Union Pass. Ry. Co. 16 m, 5-4% g, 47 lbs 
r, 61 c, 391 h. Pres. N. Pen-in, Gen. Man. T. C. Rob- 
bins, Treas. E. P. D. Cross, Sec. Leon Fender, Ass't. 
to Gen. Man R. E. Robbins. Office cor. Huntington 
Ave. & Oak St. 

Baltimore & Catonsville Ry. Co. 6 m, 5-4% g, 35 lb 
r, 15 c, 51 h. Pres. J. C. Robbins, Supt. & Pur. Agt. 
G. W. Appleby. Office Pratt st. & Frederick av. 

Baltimore & Plmitco & Pikesvtiie R.R. Co. 

central Ry. Co. 11^ m, 2 sweepers 182 h, 5-4V g, 
401b r, 22c. Pres. Peter Thompson, sec. & Treas. 
Walter Blakistone. Office cor Preston st and Green- 
mount ave. 

Citizen's Ry. Co. 20 m, 5-4% g, 34 lb?, r, 42 c, 380 h. 
Pres. Jos. S. Hagarty, Sec. Wm. Hammersley, Supt. 
C. C. Speed, Treas. S. V. Keen. 

Highlandtown & Point Breeze Rv. Co. Cfty Div. 
6 m, 5-8 g, — lb r, 15 c, 9. h. Pt Breeze Dlv. 3 m, l 
loco, 4 c. Pres. Howard Munnikhuysen, Treas. 
Robt. D Morrison, Gen. Man. M. A. McCormlck. 

North Baltimore Passenger Ry. Co. 21 m, 5-4% g. 
45 lb. r, 72 c, 400 h. Pres. Jas. L. McLane, Treas. 
Dan'l J. Foley, Sec. Thos. J. Wilson. 



People's Ry. Co. 10% m, 5-4% g, 47-45 lb r, 30 c, 
200 h. Pres. T Edw. Hambleton, Treas. Gustavus 
Ober, Sec, Supt. & Pur. Agt. Wm. A. House, jr. Office 
Druid Hill ave. 

York Road R.R. Co. 

BATTLE CREEK, MICH Battle Creek Ry. Co. 

5 m, 3-6 g, 28 lb r, 8 c, 18 h, 3 mu. Pres. Geo. Det- 
J. White, V. Pres. H. H. B rown, Sec. Chas. Thomas, 
Supt. John A. White, Gen. Man. J. W. Hahn. 

BAY CITY, MICH.-Bay City St. Ry. Co. 7% 
m, 4-8% g, 18 lb r, 13 c, 35 h. Pres. James Clements, 
Treas. Wm. Clements, Sec. Edgar A.Cooley. 

BEATRICE, NEB.— Beatrice St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 
4-8% g, 25 lb. r, 4 c, 20 h. Pres. J. D. Kllpatrick, Supt. 

6 Purchasing Agt. J. E. Smith. 

BEAVER FALLS, PA.— Beaver Valley St. Ry. Co. 
3% m, 5-2% g, 38lbr, 5c, 34 h. Pres. M. L. Knight, 
V. Pres. Coi. J. Weyand, sec. & Treas. J. F. Merri- 
man, supt. L. Richardson. 

BELLAIRE, (/ Bellaire St. R.R. Co. 

BELLEVILLE, ONT., CAN.— Belleville St. Ry. 
Co. 1% m, 3-6 g, 28 lb. r. 5 c, 13 h Pres. D. Lockwood, 
Sec, Treas. & Man. S. Lockwood. 

BELLVILLE, ILL Clttzen's St. Ry. Co. 4% m, 

4-8% g, 16 lb r, 7 c, 20 h. Pres. D. P. Alexander, Man. 
& Treas. H. A. Alexander, Sec. J. E. Thomas, office 
N. E. cor. Main and High sts. 

BEREA, O.— Berea St. R. R. Co. l m, 3 r 6 g, 25 lb r, 
2c, 4 h. Pres. C. W. D. Miller, V. Pres, T. Chinchward, 
Sec. & Treas. F. I. Pomeroy, Supt. A. W. Bishop. 

BINGHAMTON, N. Y.— Washington Street & 
State Asylum R.R. Co. 4% m. 4 g, 16-35 lb r, 13 c, 23 
h. Pres. R. H. Meagley, V. Pres. Geo. Whitney, Sec. 
Ira J. Magley, Treas. F. E. Ross, Supt. Wm. Whitney, 

Blnghamton Central R.R. Co. 3% m (2% laid,)3. 
g, 28 lb r, 6 c. Pres. Geo. L. Crandall, Supt. Nelson 
Stow, Sec. Chas. O. Root, Treas. H. .1. Kneeland. 
Offices 65 Court st 

Blnghamton & Port Dickinson R.R. Co. 5 m, 4-8% 
g, 20-30 lb r, ioc, 23 h. Pres. Harvey Westcott, Sec. & 
Treas. G. M. Harris, Supt. N. L. Osborn. (Leased to 
Mr. Osborn). offices 112 State st. 

City Ry. Co. l m, 4 g, 25 lb r, 2 c, 5 h. Pres. & 
Man. R. H. Meagley, Supt. Wm. Whitney. Office, 
216 Fort st. 

Main, Court & Chenango St. R.R. 5 m, 4-8 g, 40 lb r, 
10 c, 25 h. Supt. & Lessee, N. L. Osborn. Offices 83 
Washington st. 

Park Ave. R. R. Co. 1 m, 4 g, 20 lb r. Pres. C. 
Ross, Treas. F. C. Ross, Sec. C. A. Matthews. Run 
in connection with the Wade St. R. R. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA.— Birmingham St Ry. Co. 
5% m, 4-8 g, 16 lb r, 13 c, 40 m. Pres. Geo. L. Morris, 
Supt., Sec. & Treas. W. H. Morris. 

East Lake Land Co. (see New Roads.). 

Highland Avenue R. R. 6% m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 5 c, 
28 h. Pres. H. M. Caldwell, Man. W. J. Milner. Supt. 
J. M. Lens, Eng. H, Schoel. Owners, The Elyton 
Land Co. 

Birmingham & Pratt Mines St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 4-8% 
g, 16 lb r, 6 c, 30 h. Pres. and Gen. Man. J. A. Van 
Hoose, sec. & Treas. Wm. Berney. 

BLOOMFIELI), N. J.— Newark & Bloomfleld R. 
R. (See N'ewark, N. J.) 

BLOOMING TON, ILL. — Bloomlngton & Normal 
Horse Ry. Co. 5?£ m, .-8% g, 36 lb r, 10 c, 60 ii. Pres. 
& Proprietor A. H. Moore, Sec. Edw. Sharp. 

BOONE, IA Boone & Boonsboro St. Ry. Co. 

l%m, 3g, 20lbr, 3 c, 10 h. Pres. L. W Reynolds, 
Treas. Ira B. Hodges, Sec. and supt. A. B. Hodges. 

Twin City & Des Moines Kiver Motor St. Ry. Co. 
6 m, 20 lbs. r, 3-6 g, 2 motors, 3 c. President & 
Supt. J. B. Hodges, Treas. A. B. Hodges, Sec. 
S. K. Huntsinger. 

BOSTON, MASS.— Boston Consolidated St. Ry. 
Co. 51% m, 4-8)3 g, 48-50 lb r, 359 c, 1720 h. Pres. 
Chas. E. Powers", Treas. Sam'l Little, Ass. Treas. 
John H. Studley, Jr., Gen. Supt. Julius E. Rugg. 
Capital, $1,700,000. Office, Tremont row, cor.Pem- 
berton sq. 

Boston & Chelsea R. R. Co., Pres. W. W. Wheildon; 
Treas. and Clerk, John H. Studley; (Operated by the 
Boston Consolidated St. Ry. Co.) 

Albany St. Freight Ry. Co. .93 m, 4 8% g, 90 lb r, 
no c, no h. Pres. Chas. L. Plerson, Treas. Geo. F. 
Child. Office. 439 Albany st. 

Lynn & Boston. 37 m, 4-8% g. 25-48 lb r, 175 c, 
748 h. Pres. Amos F. Breed, Treas. & Sec. E. Francis 
Oliver, Supt. Edwin C. Foster. Office, 214 Broadway, 
Chelsea, Mass., & 13 Tremont row. 

Metropolitan R. R. Co. 83 m, 48 to 54 lb r, 687 c, 
3543 h. Pres. C. A. Richards, Sec. Wm. P. Harvey, 
Treas. Chas. Boardman. Office, >6 Kilby st. 

So. Boston Ry. Co. 16 m. 4-8% g, 5o lb r, 199 c, 970 h. 
Pres. Chas. H.Hersey, v. Pres ttzra H Baker; Sec. & 
Treas. Wm. Reed, Supt. Daniel Coolidge. Office, 715 
Broadway, So. Boston. 

Somervllle Horse R. R. Co. (Operated by the Bos- 
ton Consolidated Street Ry. Co.) Pres. Sam'l E. 
Sewail, Treas. & Clerk, J. H. Studley, Jr. Office, 27 
Tremont row. 

Winnisimmet R. R. Co. 1.95 m, 4-8% g, 48 lb r, no 
c, no h. Pres. Wm. R. Pearmain, Chelsea, Mass. 
Treas. & Clerk, E. Francis Oliver. Office, 13 Tre- 
mont row. 

BRADFORD, PA.— Bradford & Kendall R.R. Co. 
1% m, 4-8% g, 38 lb r, 3 c, 4 h. Pres. James Brodey, 
Sec. Geo. H. Moon, Gen. Man. & Supt. Enos Parsons. 
Capital. £12,000. 

BRENHAM, TEX.— Brenham St. R.R Co. 2 m, 
4 g. 20 lb r, 3 c, 18 mu. Pres. T. J. Pampell, V-Pres. F. 
Krentzlin, Sec. John A. Randle, Treas. D. C. Glddings 
Man.E. B. Randle. Office, ,Gruber Bldg., North st. 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN.— The Bridgeport Horse 
R.R. Co. 6% m, 4-8% g, 42 lb r, 20 c, 90 h. Pres. Albert 
Eames, Sec. & Treas. F. Hurd, Supt. B. F. Lashar. 

Bridgeport & W. Strai ford Horse R. R. Co. 3% m, 
4 8% g, 45 lb r. 10 c, 40 h. Pres. David F. Hullister, 
Sec. & Treas. Henry D. Drew, Man. Henry N. 
Beardslev. 

BROCKTON, MASS Brockton St. Ry. Co. 11% 

m, 4-8M g, 35 lb. r, 32 c, 140 h. Pres. W. W. Cross. 
Treas. C. R. Fillerbrown; Supt. H.B. Rogers, Office, 
Main St. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y.— The Atlantic Avenue R.R. 
Co. of Brooklyn. 2S% m, (leased and owned). 4-8% 
g, 50-60 lb r, 297 c, 1169 h. Pres. William Richardson, 



Sec. W. J. Richardson, Treas. Newbery H. Frost. 
Office cor. Atlantic & Third Aves. 

Broadway R.R. Co. 12 m, 4-8% g, 50-60 lb r, 
199 c, 750 h. Pres. Edwin Beers, Sec. & Treas. Robert 
Sealey, Supt. Joshua Crandall. Office 21 Broadway, 

Brooklyn Cross Town R.R. Co. 16 m, 4-8% g, 50-60 lb 
r, 72 c, 413 h. Pres. Henry W. Slocum, V. Pres. Ezra 
B. Tmtle, Sec. M. Joust, Treas. John R. Connor, 
Supt. D. W. Sullivan. Offices 585 Manhattan Ave. 

Bushwlck R.R. Co. 28 m, 4-8% g, 45-50-60 lb r, 172 c, 
600 h. Pres. Frank Cromwell, V. Pres. Wm. H. Hus- 
ted, Treas. & Sec. S. D. Hallo well, Supt. Wm. M Mor- 
rison, office 22 Broadway, N. Y. 

The Brooklyn. Bushwlck & Queens County F.R. 
11 m 4-8% g, 42-47 lb r, 41 c, 117 h. Pres. Richard H. 
Green, V. Pres. James VV. El well, 59 south st. N. Y. 
Sec. John D. blwell, Treas. Wm. W. Greene. 

Brooklyn City R.R. Co. 87 m, 4-8% g, 45-60-64 lb r, 
835 c, 18 dummies, 3,309 h Pres. William H. Hazzard, 
v. Pres. Wm. M. Thomas, Sec. & Treas. Daniel F. 
Lewis, Asst. Sec. Francis E. Wrlgley. Offices 8 & 10 
Fulton st. 

Brooklyn City &■ Newtown R.R. Co. 13% m, 4-8%?? 
45-60 lb r, 128 c, 400 h. Pres. Col. John N. Partridge; 
sec. & Treas. Duncan B. Cannon; Supt. John L. 
Heins. Office cor. DeKalb & Central Aves. 

Calvary Cemetery, Greenpoint & Brooklyn Ry. Co. 

Coney Island and Brooklyn R.R. Co. 18 3-5 m, 45 
lb r, 4-8% g, 103 c, 344 h. Pres. James Jourdan, Sec. 
Ed. F. Drayton, Treas. John Williams, Supt. Wil- 
liam Farrell. Office cor. Smith & Huntington sts. 

Coney Island, sheepshead Bay & Ocean Avenue 
R. R. Co. 2%m,4-8% g, 4 c. Pres. A. A. McCiemue 
Pres. Daniel Mone, Sec. John McMation. Sheepser, 
head Bay, Treas. Horace Valkulyh. Office 16 Red 
Hook Lane. 

Crosstown Line, Hamilton Ferry to Bridge. 

Grand St. & Newtown R.R. Co. 13 m, 4-8% g, 50- 
60 lb r, 72 c, 250 h. Pres. Martin Joost, Sec. & Treas. 
Wm. to. Horwill, Supt. Walter G. Howey. Office 374 
Kent Ave. 

Grand Street, Prospect Park & Flatbush R.R. Co. 
11% m, 4-8% g, 50 lb r, 75 c, 220 h. Pres. Jno. L. 
Partridge, Sec. Duncan B. Cannon, Treas. Chas. 
Crelfelds, Supt. Jno. L. Heins. Offices Franklin 
Ave. and Prospect Place. 

Greenpoint & Lorimer St. R. R. Co. 5% m, 4-8% g, 
50 lb r, 36 c, 183 h. Pres. Geo. W. Van Allen, sec. 
Wm. B. Wait, Treas. C. B. Cottrell, Supt. Chas. E. 
Harris. Office, cor. Nostrand and Park aves. 

Prospect Park & Coney Island R. R. Co. 25 m, 
45-50 lb r, 4-8% g, 69 c, 214 h. Pres. A. R. Culver 
Treas. A. C. Washington, Sec. George H. Smith, Eng. 
Supt. R. Schermerhorn, Supt. Robert Attlesey. 
Offices 16 Court st. (Leased to Atlantic Ave. R. R. 
Co). 

Prospect Park & Flatbush R.R. 3 m, 4-8% g, 34 
lb r. 7o c, 360 h. Pres. Loftis Wood, Sec. & Treas. 
Sam'l ParkhiU, Supt. Loftis Wood. Offices 45 Broad- 
way. 

South Brooklyn Central R.R. Co. 8 ' 2 ' m, 4 8% g, 60 
lb r, 42 c, 193 h. Pres. Wm. Richardson, Sec. Wm. J. 
Richardson, Treas. N. H. Frost, supt. James Rud- 
dy. Offices. Atlantic & 3d aves. 

The New Wllliamsburgh & Flatbush R. R. Co. 17% 
m, 4-8% g, 47-50 lb r, 74 c, 255 h. Pres. Geo. W. Van 
Allen, 54 Ann St., New York, sec. W. B. Waltt, 34th 
St. & 6th Ave., New York, Treas. C. B. Cottrell, 8 
Spruce St., N. Y. City, supt. Chas. E. Harris, Nost- 
rand Ave. Carroll St., Brooklyn. 

Van Brunt St. & Erie Basin R.R. Co. 3 m, 4-8% 

g, 45 lb r, 7 c, 24 h. Pres. John Cunningham, Sec. & 
Treas. Edmund Terry. Offices, 264 Van Brunt st. 

BRUNSWICK, G A.— Brunswick St. R.R. Co. 

BUFFALO, ILL.— see Mechanicsburg, 111. 

BUFFALO, N. Y.-Buffalo St. R.R. Co. 17% m, 
4-8%g, 50 lb r, 96 c, 510 h. Pres. Henry M. Watson, 
V. Pres. P. P. Pratt, Sec. S. S. Spaulding, Treas. W. 
H. Watson, Supt. Edward Edwards. 

Buffalo East Side St. R.R. Co. 28 7-8 m, 4-8% g, 42 
lb r, 47 c, 218 h. Pres. S. S. spaulding, V. Pres. Joseph 
Churchyard, Sec. H. M. Watson, Treas. W. H. Wat- 
son, Supt. Edward Edwards. Office 346 Main st. 

BURLINGTON, IA.-Burllngton City R.R. Co. 
2% m, 4-8% g, 15-20 lb r, 9 c, 22 h. Pres. John Patter- 
son, sec. & Man. C. T. Patterson. Office 1401 Sum- 
mer st. 

Union St. Ry. Co. 8% m, 4-8% g, various r, 19 c, 85 

h. Pres. Geo. E. Rust, sec. & Supt. F. G. Jones. 
BURLINGTON, VT Winooskl & Burlington 

Horse Ry. Co. 3% m. 4-8 g, 25 lb r, 7 c, 24 h. Pres. 
W. A. Woodbury, V. Pres., F. C. Kennedy, Supt, K. 
B. Walker, Treas. L. E. Woodhouse, Clerk, o. W. 
Walls. Office, Winooskl ave. 

CAIRO, ILL.— Cairo St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 3-6 g, 25 lb 
r, 3 c, 9 h. Pres. J. A. Goldstlne, V-Pres. H. Bloms, 
Supt. & Treas. Thos. Lewis, Sec. H. Schulze. 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS.-Cambridge R. R. Co.51-59 
m, 4-8% g, 50 lb r, 255 c, 1,428 h. Pres. Prentiss Cum- 
mlngs, Treas. & Clerk Franklin Perrin, Exec. Com. 'I. 
M. Spelman, P. Cummings, O. S. Brown, Clerk of Di- 
rectors, O. S. Brown, Supt. Wm. A. Bancroft. 

CAMDEN, N. J.— Camden & Atlantic St. Ry. 

Camden Horse R.R. Co. 9 m, 5-1 g, 35-52 lb r, 26 c, 
85 h. Pies. Thos. A.Wilson, Sec. Wilbur F. Rose, 
Treas. & Supt. John Hood. Office 1125 Newton Ave. 

CANTON, O.— Canton St. Ry. Co. 4% m, 4 g, 28 
lb r, 11 c, 58 h. Pres. & Treas. G. E. Cook, sec. John 
F. Clark, Supt. O. S. Stanton. Office, 4 E. 7th st. 

CAPE MAY, N. J.— Cape May & Schellenger 
Landing Horse R. R. 

CARTHAGE, MO.— 

CEDAR RAPIDS, IA.— Cedar Rapids & Marion 
Ry., 13% m, 4-8% g, 22-28-35 lb r, 11 c, 40 h. Pres. W. 
Greene, V.-Pres. O. T. Richmond, sec. N. B. Con- 
signy, Treas. C. G. Greene, Supt. Wm. Elson. Office 
11 N. Second st. 

CHAMPAIGN, ILL.— Champaign R.R. Co. 

LTrbana & Champaign St. R.R. Co. (See Urbana.) 

CHARLESTON, S. C— Charleston City Ry. 
Co. 8 %m, 4-8% g, 38-40 lb r, 32 c, 1 15 h. l mu. Pres. 
Jno. S. Riggs, Treas. Evan Edwards, Sec. and Asst. 
Treas. Frank Whllden, Foreman Jno. Mohlenhoff. 
Office 2 Broad st. 

Enterprise R.R. Co. 15 m, 5 g, 42 lb r, 29 pass, c 



December 1886. THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 88 



SOME INFORMATION OF VALUE 




I'KEPAKED BY 

J. E. GOMBAULT, 

Ex Veterinary Surgeon to the French Gov't Studs. 

A speedy and reliable cure/or all Lameness and 
very many diseases and ailments of Burses, Cattle 
and other Animals. Supersedes all Blister and 
actual Cautery and leavesno scar or blemish. 

A Pamphlet with full directions should accom- 
pany every bottle. 

Nane genuine without the siqnatureof 
LAWRENCE, WILLIAMS & CO., 
Sole Importers <t Proprietors ( 

for the v . 8. & canadas. ( CLEVELAND, O 



The above is an exact Fac-Simile of the Label on 
every genuine bottle of GOMBAULT'S CAUSTIO 
IiALSAM, the Great French Veterinary Remedy, only 
the back-ground of label is bright redin color, 
other is a worthless imitation. 



Any 



To Druggist and Public in regard to 
COMBAULT'S CAUSTIC BALSAM, 
The Great French Veterinary Remedy 

Office of Lawrence, Williams & Co., ) 
Sole Importers and Proprk-tors for the U. S. and V 
Canadas. Cleveland, Ohio. ) 

As we have, at very great expense, intro- 
duced the genuine GOMBAULT'S CAUSTIC 
BALSAM in this country, and its great value 
is being appreciated wherever it is known, and 
being anxious to protect its reputation, and also 
dealers and the public from being imposed upon 
with any imitation of the genuine article, we 
have procured from Mb. Gombault, who is the 
sole proprietor and only living manufacturer of 
the genuine GOMBAULT'S CAUSTIC BAL- 
SAM in the world, a certificate, of which the 
following is a true and exact copy, and all who 
are interested should not fail to read it carefully: 

Nogent-stjr-Marne; "i 
ECG. GOMBAULT Near Paris, France, V 
Negotlant Feb. 28, 1884. J 

a NOGENT Sur Marne (Seine). 



To all Druggists and the Public of the United 
States and Canadas : 
I, the undersigned, Eugene Gombaulf, of 
Nogent-sur-Marne (Seine), France, do hereby 
certify that I am the sole and exclusive pro- 
prietorand preparer of the Veterinary Remedy 
known in the United States and Canadas as Gombault's Caustic Balsam, originally invented 
and for many years prepared by my late father, Joseph E. Gombault (deceased), ex-Veterin- 
ary Surgeon to the French Government Stud. 

I further certify that I have made a contract, under date of June 23, 1880, with Messrs. 
Lawrence, Williams & Co., of Cleveland, Ohio, U. S. A., under a twenty years' limit, which 
constitutes them my sole and exclusive agents for the genuine Gombault's Caustic Balsam for 
the United States and Canadas. I further certify that not onedrop of Gombault's Caustic Bal- 
sam has been, since date of above contract, or will be, shipped to any other party or parties 
except the said Lawrence, Williams & Co., in the United States or Canadas; and further 
decline any responsibility as to the genuineness or purity of any preparation offered in the 
United Stat es or Canadas purporting to be Gombault's Caustic Balsam other than that sold by 
Lawrence, Williams & Co., and bearing their trade-mark and label, as the said Lawrence, 
AVilliams & Co. are, to the best of my knowledge and belief, the sole and only importers of the 
genuine Gombault's Caustic Balsam to the United States and Canadas. 

I further certify that the Gombault's Caustic Balsam as put up and sold by Messrs. Law- 
rence, Williams & Co., in octagon-shaped bottles, with the signature of my deceased father, J. 
E. Gombault, around the neck of bottles, and label with red back-ground, printed in English 
language, and bearing fac-simile of the signature of Lawrence, Williams & Co., and their 
name blown into the glass on each side of said bottles, is the only genuine Gombault's Caustic 
Balsam that is sold in the markets of the United States to my knowledge or with my consent. 
I further certify that the preparation in above-described bottles is all prepared by me, and 
exported direct to the said Lawrence, Williams & Co., and introduced by them into the mar- 
kets of the United States and Canadas in strict purity, and is the genuine Gombault's Caustic 
Balsam. I feel grateful to the trade and public of the United States for the favor they 
have shown me by so liberally patronizing this preparation, and *o protect them from any 
possible imposition, and in order to 
give them all possible security in 
obtaining the genuine article, I 
thought it my duty to place this 
declaration before them, which I 
certify to be correct in every par- 
ticular. 

Very truly and courteously, 

SEAL. 



On the original of the foregoing, which we hold, the Mayor of Nogent-sur-Marne certifies to 
the individuality of Mr. Eug. Gombault, and to his signature, with his official signature and 
seal. It is also certified to by the Prefect of Department of Seine, Minister of Foreign Affairs 
of France, and the whole bears the certificate and seal of the United States Consul-General 
of Paris. We certify above to be correct. M. J. LAWRENCE & M. E. WILLIAMS. 
STATE OF OHIO, Cuyahoga County, ss. Cleveland, Ohio, April 25th, 1884. 

Personally appeared before me, M. J. Lawrence and M. E. Williams, of the firm of Law- 
rence, Williams & Co., and to me personally known, and after being duly sworn, stated that 
the foregoing was a true and exact translation of the original document as set forth, and a! 
the statements made therein are true and correct. Before me a Notary Public in and for tin.. 
County of Cuyahoga, this 29th day of April, 1884. C. L. RICHMOND, Notary Public. 

[SEAL.] 

We think this will be sufficient evidence to convince all that the goods we are introducing 
are the only genuine Gombault's Caustic Balsam goods in this country, and hope this may 
prevent all dealers and consumers from being imposed upon with any imitations of this very 
valuable veterinary remedy. We would further caution all parties from being deceived by 
any French labels or wrappings, as these can be as easily printed in this country as in 
France, and this is a well-known trick for counterfeiting many French preparations in this 
country, and should be accepted as no evidence of genuineness. 

Price $1.50. Sold by Druggists, or sent by us by express, charges paid, on receipt of price. 

Descriptive Circulars, with testimonials, sent to all applicants. Address, 

LAWRENCE, WILLIAMS &CO., CLEVELAND.O. 




Hi THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL, December, 1886. 



10 freight c, 95 h. Pres. A. F. Ravenel, Sec. & Treas. 
U. E. Hayne, Supt. T. W. Passallaigue. 

Middle Street Sullivan Island Ry. Co. 2% m, 4-8% 
g, 20 lb T r, 7 c, 14 mu. Pres. B. Callaghan, Sec. & 
Treas. Frank F. Wnllden, Supt. B. Buckley. Office 2 
Broad st. 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN.— Chattanooga St. R. 
R. Co. 5% no, 4-8% g, 25-4.) lo r, 12 c, 54 h. Pres. and 
Treas. J. H. Warner, Sec. C. R. Gaskill. 

CHESTER, PA. — Chester St. Ry. Co. 7% m, 5-2% 

g, 47 lb r, 14 c, 66 h. Pres. Richard Peters, Jr., Treas. 
Sam'l H. Seeds, Sec. & Manager E. M. Cornell. 

CHICAGO, ILL,.— Chicago City Ky. Co. 90 m, 4- 
8% g, 45-63 lb r, 697 c, 1,600 h, cable doing work of 2,500 

h. Pres. C. B. Holmes, Sec. H. H. Windsor, Treas. 
T. C Pennington, Supt. C. B. Holmes. Office 2,020 
State st. 

Chicago West Division Ry. Co. 45 '.j m, 4-8% g, 40 
r, 688 c, 3,825 h. Pres. J. K. Jones, sec. George L. 
Webb, supt. De Witt C. Cregier. Office, 59 State St. 

Chicago & Hyde Park St. — m, — g, — lb r, — c, 
— h. Pres. Douglas s. Clarke. 

Crosstown Pass. Ry. Co. (See New Roads.) 

North Chicago City R. K. Co. 45 m, 4-8% g, 45 lb r, 
375 c, 1,800 h. Pres. & den. Supt. V.C. Turner, V. 
Pres. Chas. T. Yerkes, Sec. & Treas. lllrain Crawford, 
Asst. Supt. Fred L. Threedy, Sunt. Horse Dept. 
Robt. Atkins, Purch. Agt. John W. Roach, Master 
Mechanic J. Miller. 

CHILLICOTHE, O Chllllcothe St. R.R. Co. 

l» 4 -m, 3g, I6 1br, 7 c, 10 h. Pres. E. P. Safford, 
sec. A. E. Wenls, Treas. William Poland, Supt. Ewel 
McMarttu. 

CINCINNATI, O.— Cincinnati Inclined Plane Ky. 
Co. 6% m, 5-2% g, 43 lb r, 25 c, 140 h. Pres. Geo. a. 
smith, sec. & supt. James M. Doherty, Tr. J. S. Hiii. 

Cincinnati st. Ky. CO. 96m, 5-2 g,42-52 lb r,250 C, 2,000 
li. Pres. J no. Kilgour. V. Pres. Albert G. Clark, 
Treas. R. A. Dunlap, Sec. & Auditor, Jas. A. Collins, 
Supt. J no. Harris, Pur. Agt. B F. Ilaughton. Office 
second floor ot Apollo Building. 

Columbia Si Cincinnati St. R.K. Co. 3% m, 3g, 40 
lb r, 3 c, 6 dummy o. Pres. & Auditor C. H. Kilgour, 
V. Pres. John Kilgour, Treas. & Sec. a. H. Meier, 
Mt. Lookout, o. supt. J.J. Henderson, Mt. Look- 
out, O. Office Station C. 

Mi. Adams \ Eden Park Inclined R.K. Co. .3% m, 
5-2% g, 42 lb r, 40 c,3 20 h. Pres. & Treas. J. p. Ker- 
per, sec. J. K. Murdock, Supt. Chas. Whitum. 

so. Covington & Cincinnati. (See Covington, Ky.) 

CLARKSV1LLE, TENN — Clarksvllle St. Ry. 
Co. 3 in, 4-8% g,16 lb T-r, 4c, 16 mu. Pies. John F. 
Shelton, Sec. & Treas. John W. Faxon, capital, 
$6,250. Office, Farmers' & Merchants' Nat. Bank. 

CLEVELAND, O.— The Brooklyn St. K.K. Co. 12% 
m, 4-8% g, 52 lb r, 70 c, 402 h. Pres. Tom. L. Johnson, 
V. Pres. A. J. Moxham, Sec. J. B. lioefgen, Treas. 
John McConnell, Supt. A. L. Johnson, office 1,301 
Pearl st. 

Broadway & Newburg St. R.R. Co. 11.4 m, 4-8% g, 
43 lb r, 26 c, 165 h. Pres. Joseph Stanley, V. Pres. 
H. E. Andrews, sec. & Treas. E. Fowler, supt, J. J. 
Stanley, office 1373 Broadway. 

Superior St. K.K. Co. 15 in, 4-8% g, 45 lb r, 46 c, 
225 h. Pres. Frank De H. Roblson, V. Pres. John 
Koch, Sec, Treas. & Supt. M. S. Kobison, Jr. 

The East Cleveland K.K. Co. 20% m, 4-8% g, 45 lb 
Bteel r, no c, 570 h. Pres. A. Everett, V-Pres. & 
M. C. B. Chas. Wason, Sec. & Treas. II. A. Everett, 
Supt. E. Duty. ( iffices, 1154 Euclid Ave. 

Woodland Avenue & West Side st. K.K. Co. 40 in, 
4-8% g, 43-4") lb r, 128 c, 6n5 h. Pres. M. A. Hanna, V. 
Pres. C. F. Emery, Sec. & Pur. a nt. J. B. Hanna, 
Gen. Supt. George G. Mulhern. Office, cor. Pearl 
and Detroit sts. 

South Side St. R. R. Co. 3% m, 3 g. 40 lb r, 8 c, 60 
h. Pres. Tom L. Johnson, supt. A. L. Johnson, sec. 
& Treas. J. B. Hoelgen. office 1301 Pea^l st. 

St. Clair Street Ry. Co.— m— g,— ibr— c,— Pres. Clias 
Hathaway. 

CLIFTON, CAN.— Niagara Falls, Wesly Park 
and Clifton Tramway Co. 3^ m, 4-8% g, 30 10 r, 8 c, 
40 h. Pres. J. H. Mooney, 28u B'way. N. Y. Treas. 
John N. Hayward, 52 B'way, N.Y. Sec. John H. 
Bache, Niagara Falls, Ont. 

CLINTON, IA.— Lyons & Clinton Horse K.K. Co. 
(See Lyons.) 

COLUMBIA, S. C— Columbia St. Ry. 4% m, 
4-8% g, 30 lbr, 6 c, is h. Pres. J. s. Pierson, New 
York, V. Pres. H. M. Pierson, New York, Treas. W. 
E. Lawton, New York, Sec. E. M. Cole, 32 Libertv st. 
New York. Capital, $50,000. 

COLUMBUS, tiA, — Columbus St. R.R. Co. 3 m, 
4-8% g. 16 lb r, 6 c, 25 h. pres. ciltf B. Grimes, Sec. 
L. g. schnessler, Treas. N. N. Curtis, Supt. J. A. Ga- 
bourgh. 

COLUMBUS, O.— Columbus Consolidated St. R.R. 
Co 19 m, 5-2 g, 30-52 lb r, 92 c, 350 h. Pres. A. Rodg- 
ers, V. Pres. H. T. Chittenden, sec. & Treas. E. K. 
Stewart, Supt. J. H. Atcherson. 

Glenwood & Greenlawn St. R.R. Co. 4% m, 3-6 g, 
24 lb r, 11 c, 19 h. Pres. A. D. Rodgers, V. Pres. B. S. 
Brown, Sec. R. R. Rl-kly, Tre.is. S. S. Rickly, Supt. 
Jonas WlUcox. Office 9 S. High si . 

CONCORD, N. H. — Concord Horse R. R. Co. 7M 
m, 3 g,34 lb r, 9 c, 15 h, 2 steam motors. Pres. & Supt. 
Moses Humphrey, Treas. H. J. Crippin, Clerk E. C. 
Hoag. 

CORTLAND, N. Y.— Cortland & Homer Horse Ry. 
Co. 4 m, 4-8% g, 25-30 lb r. 5 e,15 h, Pres. Chas. H. Gar- 
rison, Troy, N. Y. v. Pres. E. Mudge, sec. & Treas. 
G. E.Welch, Supt.B.B. Terry. Office25N. Main sr.. 

COUNCIL BLUFFS, 1A.— Council Bluffs St. R.R. 

COVINGTON, KY.— So. Covington & Cincinnat 
St. Ry. co. 17% m, 5-2% g. 43 lb r, 46 c, 296 h. Pres. 
E. F. Abbott, Sec. J. c. Benton, Treas. G. M. Abbott. 

COVINGTON, GA.-W. C. Clark & Co. (see new 
roads ) 

DALLAS, TEX. — Dallas St. Ry. Co. 4^ m, 4-8% 
g, 20-38 lb r, 12 c, 4 h, 72 mu. Pres. Wm. J. Keller, Sec. 
Harry Keller, Supt. C. E. Keller. 

Commerce & Ervay St. R.R. 1% m, 4-8% g, 20 lb r, 

5 c, 24 mu. Pres. A. C. Ardrey, Sec, Trea. & Man. H. 
W Keller. 

OANV1LLE, ILL.— Citizens' St. Ry. Co. 4% m, 4 
g, 20 lb r, 8 c, 41 m. Pres. Wm. P. Cannon, V. Pres. 

6 Gen. Man. Wm. Stewart, Sec. & Treas. Adam R. 
Samuel. 



DAVENPORT, I A. —Davenport Central St. Ry. 
Co 3 m, 4-8% g, 20 lb r, 14 c, 24 h,i5 mu. Pres. whit. 
M. Grant, V. Pres. W. L. Allen, Treas. J. B. Fldler, 
Su pt. J. W. Howard, Sec. o. s. McNeil. 

Davenport City Ry. Co. 3%m, 4-8% g, — lbr, 14 
c. 46 h. Pres. c. S. Watklns, sec. and Treas. s. D. 
Bawden. 

DAYTON, KY.— Newport & Dayton St. Ry. Co. 
2 m, 5-2% g, 44 lb r, 9 c, 36 U Pres. & Supt. w. w. 
Bean. 

DAYTON, O Dayton St. R.R. Co. 7% m, 4-8% g, 

44 lb r, 24 c, so h and mu Pres. J. w. stoddard, V- 
Pres. II. S. Williams, Sec. C. A. Craighead, supt. A. 
W. Anderson. 

Fifth St. R. K.Co. 7 m. 4 8% g, 45 lbr, ISC, 58 11. 
Pres. A. A. Thomas, Sec. D. B. Corwlti, Treas. R. I. 
Cummin, Supt. J. M, B. Lewis. Office, 7 E. 3d st. 

Oakwood St. Ry. Co. 6 m, 4-8% g, 38 lb r, 14 c, 
56 h. Pres. Charles B. Clegg, Sec. H. V. Perrlne. 

The Wayne & Kltth st. R. R. Co. 3% m .4-8% g, 
38 lb r, 6 c, 30 h. Pr^s. Geo. M. Shaw, Sec & Treas. 
Eugene Wlnchet, Supt. N. Routzahn. Office 29, 
Wayne st. 

DECATUR, ILL.— oecatur Horse Ry. Co. 

Citizens' street R. R. Co. 2 m, 4-8% g, 20 lb T r, 7 c, 
47 h & mu. Pres. D. S. Shellabarger, Sec, Treas. & 
Supt. A. E. Kinney. 

DENISON, TEX Denlson St. Ky. Co. 3 m, 

3-6 g, lfi lb r, 5 c, 22 mu. Pres. C. A. Walterhouse 
-upt. s. A. Kobinson. 

DENVER, COL.— Denver City Ry. Co. 24in, 3-6 
g, 16 lb r, i4c, 332 h. Pres. Geo. II. Holt, 10 Wall st. 
New York city, sec. G. D.L'hullier, 10 wall St., New 
York City, Treas. & Man. G. E. Randolph. 

Denver Tramway Co. 4 m,3-6 g, 16-18 lb r, Pc. Run 
by electricity. Pres. Rodney Curtis, V. Pres. John 
J. Klechman. Sec. Wm. G. Evans. 

DES MOINES, IA Des Moines St. K. R. Co. 

12 m, 3 g, 25-ao 38 52 lb r, 18 c, 125 h. Pres. W. Mc- 
Cain, V.-pres. C. W. Rogg, Sec. F. A. Sherman, Treas. 
G. B. Hippee. 

Dee Moines Broad Gauge St. Ry. Co. Pres. G. Van 
Giukel, sec. H. C. Teachout, Treas. John Weber. 

Capital City St. Ry. Co. 5 m. i-8!4 g, 6 c, 30 h. 
G. Van Ginkel, Sec. H. C. Teachout, Treas. J. Weber. 

1 >es Moines & Sevastopol St. Ry. Co (See Sevasto- 
pol, la). 

DETROIT, MICH.— Fort Wayne & Elmwood Ry. 
Co. 9.1 in, 4-8% g, 45 lb r, 33 c, 212 h. Pres. H. B. 
Brown, V. Pres. Edward Kanter, sec. N. W. Good- 
win, Treas. E. S. Helneman, Supt. Geo. S. Hazard. 
Office, 129 Grlswold st. 

Dlx Electric Ry. Co. 2% m, 3 c, electric motors. 

Detroit City Ry. 30 m, 4-8^ g, 40-43^ lb r, 130 c, 
700 h. Includes Jefferson Ave. line, Woodward Ave. 
lino, Michigan Ave. line, Gratiot Ave. line, Brush St. 
line, Cass Ave. line, Congress & Baker line. Pres. 
Sidney D. Miller, Treas. George Hendrle, sec. James 
Heugh, Gen. Supt. Robert Bell, M. M. John Willis. 

Grand River St. Ry. Co. 2% m, 4-8% g, 43 lb r, 13 c, 
110 h. Pres. & Treas. Jos. Dailey, Sec. J. W. Dalley, 
Supt. G M. Dalley. 

Highland Park Ry. Co. 3 m, 4-8% g, 42 lb r for % 
m In cltv limits, outside 35 lb T r, 2 c, electric motors. 
Pres. and Treas. Frank E. Snow, Sec. F. Woodruff. 
Capit 1, $50,000. Office, 92 Grlswold St. 

DOVER, N. II.— Dover Horse R.R. Co. 5 m, 3 g, 
30 lb r, 4 c, 14 h. Directors, Chas. H. Sawyer, Jas. 
E. Lothrop, C. W. Wiggln, Harrison Haley, Frank 
Williams, Treas. Harrison Haley. 

DUBU«tUE, IA.— Dubuque St. R.R. 7 m, 4-8% g, 
55 lb r, 21 c, 65 h. pres. J. A. Rhonberg, Sec. & Treas. 
B. E. Llnehan, supt. J. J. Llnehan. office Coulier 
ave. 

DLTLUTH, MINN. — Duluth St. Ry. Co. 5% m, 3-6 

g, 32-45 lb r, 18 c, 92 mu. Pres. Sam'l Hill, V. Pres. 
T. P. Wilson, Sec. & Treas. A. S. Chase, Supt. T. W. 
Hoopes. 

EAST OAKLAND, CAL Oakland, Brooklyn & 

Frultvale K.K. Co. 2 m, 5-6 g, 35 lb r, 4 c, i6 h. Pres. 
& Treas. H. Tubbs, Sec W. C. Mason, Supt. Jas. 
Dixon. Pur. Agt. J. Reed. Office, 301 Central ave. 

EAST SAGINAW, MICH. — East Saginaw St. 
Ky . co. — in, 4-8% g, 30 and 43 lb r, 23 c, 70 h. Pres. 
Walter A. Jones, Sec. and Treas. Chas. F. Shaw, 
Supt. A. Bartlett. 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL.— East St. Louis St. R.R. 
CO. 

EASTON, PA.— The Easton & So. Easton Passen- 
ger Ry. Co. 1 % m, 5-2% g, 45 lb r, 4 c, 20 h. Pres. H. 
A. Sage, Sec & Treas. H. W. Cooley, Supt. Elisha 
Burwell, So. Easton. Capital, $29,562. Office, 34S 
Northampton st. 

The West End Passenger Ry. Co. 1% m, 5-2% g, 45 
lb r, 6 c, 20 h. Pres. H. A. Sage, Sec. & Treas. H. W. 
Coolev, Supt. Samuel Berry. 

EAU CLAIR, WIS.— Eau Clair St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 
4_qi</ jr, 27 lb r, 16 c, 70 h. Pres. A. G. Kradstreet, 
NV'v York, V.-Pres. Geo. B. Shaw, Eau Clair, Sec. & 
Tie is. Weston Lewis, Gardiner, Me. 

ELGIN, ILL.— Elgin City Ry. Co. 2 c. Pres. Sec. 
Treas. Supt. & owner, B. C. Payne. 

ELIZABETH, N. J.— Elizabeth & Newark Horse 
R.R. Co. 14 m, 5-2%, 4-10% g, 30 lb r, 24 c, 74 h. Pres. 
& Treas. Jacob Davis, Sec. & Supt. iohn F. Pritchard. 

ELKHART, IND Citizens' Ry. Co. %y, m, 4-8% 

g, 30 lb r, 6 c, 30 h. Pres. F. W. Miller V. Pres. G. 
C. Johnson, Sec. E. C. Blckel, Treas. A. R. Burns. 

ELMIRA, N. Y.— The Elmlra & Horseheads Ry. 
Co. io m, 4-8% g, 25-30-40 lb r, 18 c, 34 h. Pres. & 
Treas. George M. Diven, V. Pres. Geo. W. Hoffman, 
Sec. Wm. S. Kershner, Supt. Henry C. Silsbee. Offi- 
cers, 212 E. Water st. 

EL PASO, TEX. - El Paso St. Ry. CO. 6m, 4-8^ g, 
20-30 lbr, isc, 4" mu. Pres. B. H. Davis, vice Pres. 
J. F. Cro-by, Treas. C. R. Morehead, Sec. & Supt. 
H.W.Marks. Offices, Seventh st. 

EMPORIA, KAN.- Emporia City Ry. Co. 3^ m, 

3- 6 g, 20 lb r, 8 c, 24 h. Pres. Van R. Holmes, Treas. 
A. F. Crowe, Sec. & Man. J. D. Holden. 

ENTERPRISE, MISS.— Enterprise St. Ry. Co. 
lv m, 3-6 g, 24 lb r, 2 c, 6 h. Pres. Jonn Kampe, V. 
Pres. E. B. Gaston, Sec. & Treas. J. W. Gaston. 

ERIE, PA.— Erie City Passenger Ry. Co. 7% m, 

4- 8>, g, 45 lb r, 20 c, 87 h. Pres. Wm. W. Reed, Treas. 
Wm. Spencer, Sec. W. A. Demorest, Supt. Jacob 
Berst. 



EVANSVILLE, IND. — Evansville St. Ry. Co. 12 

m, 4-8 g, 28 lb r, 31 c, 190 mu. Pres. John Gilbert, Sec. 
P. W Raleigh, Treas. John Gilbert, Supt. W. Bahr. 

FALL RIVER, MASS Globe St. Ry. Co. 12 m, 

4-8% g. 40-46-47 lb r, 40 c, 160 h. Pres. Frank S. Stev- 
ens, Tieas. F. W. Brlghtinan, Sec. M. G. B. Swift, 
Supt. John II. Bovvker, jr. 

FAR ROCK AWAY, N. V. -Village Ry. Co. 1 m, 
4-8% g, 47 lb r, 5c, 10 h. Pres. O. A. cheever, Treas. 
D. L. Haighi, sec. J. S. Armbach, supt. Kutus Mar- 
tin. 

FITCHBURG, MASS.— Fitchburg St. Ry. Co. 
3% m, 4-8% g, 6 c, 31 h. Pres. H. A. Willis, V. Pres. H. 
J. Wallace, rreas. B. F. Wallls, Sec. H. C. Hartwell, 
Supt. Wesley w. Sargent. 

FORT SCOTT, KAN.— Bourbon County St. Ry. 
Co. 1 m, 4 g, 22 lb r, 2 c, 4 m. Pres. Isaac ^tadden, 
V. pres. Benj. Files, Sec. Wm. Perry, Treas. J. H. 
Randolph. 

FORT SMITH, ARK.— Fort Smith St. Ry. Co. 
2 m, 3-6 g, 28 lb r, 5 c, 16 mu. Pres. Sam'l M. Loud, 
Sec. & Treas. Geo. T. Sparks. 

FORT WAYNE, IND. — Citizens' St. R.R. Co. 

FORT WORTH, TEX.- Fort Worth St. Ry. Co. 
7% m, 4 g, 25-38 lb r, 16 c, 73 m. Pres. K. M. Van- 
zandt, Treas. W. A. Huffman, Acting Sec. & Gen. 
Man. S. Mims, Supt. J. T. Payne. 

FRANKFORT, N. Y.— Frankfort & Ilion Street 
Ry. Co. 2% m, 5 g, 4 c. Pres. A. C. McGowan, Frank- 
fort, Sec. 1). Lewis, Ilion, Treas. P. Remington, Illon, 
Supt. Fredk. Gates, Frankfort. 

FREDDNI A, N. Y. — Dunkirk & Fredonia R.R.Co. 
3% m, 4-10 g, 25 lb r, 5 c, 9 h. Pres Wm. M. McKlns- 
try, Sec. & Treas. M. N. Fenner, Supt. Z. Elmer, 

AV il66lOCk 

FULTON, N. v.— Fulton & Oswego Falls St. Ry 
Co. 6,000 ft, 4 8% g. Gibbon's metallic stringer and 
r, 4 c, 12 h. Pres. Joseph Walker, Jr., V. Pres. N. N. 
Stranahan. Sec. and Treas. Chas. Lyman. Capital, 
$15,000. Office, 15 Broad st,, New York. 

GAINSVILLE, FLA. — Gains vllle St. Ry 

GAINSV1LLE, TEX. — Gamsville St. Ry. Co. 2% 
m, 3-6 g, 17 lb r, 4 c, 12 h. Pres. C. N. Stevens, V. 
Pres. J. T. Harris, Sec. & Treas. F. R. Sherwood. 

GALESBURG, ILL.— College City St. Ry. Co. 5 
m, 4-sy, g, 18-20-38 lb r, 7 c, 20 h. Pres. L. W. San- 
born, V.-Pres. A. S. Hoover, supt. &Sec. Geo. S. Clay- 
ton. 

GALVESTON, TEX.— Galveston City R.R. Co. 
25 m, 4-8>.. g, 30 lb r, 80 c, 225 mu. Pres. Wm. H. Sin- 
clair, Sec* & Treas. T. J. DeMerritt, Supt. M. J. Kee- 
nan. Office, cor. Twenty-first & I sts. 

Gulf city St. Ry. & Real Estate Co. 15 m, 4 g, 20-30 
lb r, 30 c, 90 mu. Pres. J. H. Burnett, Sec. & Treas. 
F. D. Allen. 

GLENS FALLS, N. Y.— Glens Falls, Sandy Hill 
& Fort Edward St. R. R. Co. Pres. Henry Crandali. 
Sec. & Treas. T. S. Coolidge, Supt. Albert V. Bray ton, 

GLOUCESTER, MASS.— Gloucester City R.K. 

Gloucester St. Ky. Co. Pres. & supt. Morris C. 
Fitch, V. Pres. Walter A Jones, Treas. Francis W. 
Humans, Sec. David s. Presson. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.— Street Ry. Co. of 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 14% m, 4-8% g 25-40 lb r, 29 c, 
190 h. Pres. W. J. Hayes, Cleveland, O., V. Pres. L. 
H. Wlthey, Grand Rapids, Treas. C. G. Swensberg, 
Grand Kaplds, Sec I. M. W eston, Grand Rapids, supt. 
A. Bevier, Grand Rapids. Office, cor. Washington & 
Indiana sts. 

GREEN CASTLE, IND.— Green Castle City St. 
Ry. Co. 2 m, 4-8% g, 23 lb r, 3 c, 12 h. Pres. & Supt. D. 
Rogers, Sec. James S. Nutt, Treas. Ralph Rogers. 

GREENVILLE, S.C.— Greenville City Ky. Co.i m 

5 g. _ ib r, 5 c, 20 h. Proprietors, Gilreath x. Harris. 
HALIFAX, N.s.— Halifax St Ky. Co. (Llm.) 7 m, 

4-8% g, 45-60 lbs. r, 15 c, 65 h, Pres. John Bothwell, 
Sec. & Treas. H. K. Adams. Supt. John C. Conlan. 
offices, Room 39, Drexel Building, New York, and 
Halifax, N. S. 

HAMILTON. O.— The Hamilton St. Rv. Co. 4 m, 
3 g, 2K lb r, 11 c, 12 h. Pres. James F. Griffin, Sec. O. 
V Parish. Treas. H. L. Morey, Supt. J. C. Blgelow. 

HANNIP VL, MO.— Hannibal St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 
4-8% g, 36 lb r, 6 c, 22 h. Pres. & Supt. M. Doyle, 
Sec* & Treas James O'Hem. 

HARR1SBURG, PA.— Harrlsburg City Pas- 
senger Ry. Co. 5 m, 5 2% g, 42-47 lb r, 26 c, 65 h, 
Pres. H. A.Kelker, V. Pres. Daniel Epply, Sec. John 
T. Ensminger, Treas. R. F. Kelker, Supt. S. B. Reed. 
Capital, $(.2,500. office. 27 South 2d st. 

HARTFORD, CONN.— Hartford & Wethersfleld 
Horse R.R. Co 12 m, 4-8% g, 45 lb r, 49 c, 250 h. Pres. 

6 Treas. E. S. Goodrich, Sec. Geo. Sexton. 
HAVERHILL, MASS.— Haverhill & Groveland 

St. Rv. Co. 13.7 m, 4-4% g, 30-35 lb r, 36 C. 131 h. 
Pres." Jackson B. Sweet, Treas. John A. Colby. Of- 
fice 3 Water st. 

HELENA, ARK.— Helena St. Ry. Co. 

HERKIMER, N. Y.— Herkimer & Mohawk St. 
Ky. Co. 1% m, 4-8% g, 25 lb r, 3 c. Pres. J. M. Ans- 
men, Sec. Joab Small, Treas. H. D. Alexander. 

HOBOKEN, N. J.— North Hudson County Ry. 
Co. 16% m, 4-7 g, 50 60 lb r, 116 c, 630 h Pres. John 
H. Bonn, Sec. F. J. Mallory, Treas. Fredk. Mlckel, 
Union, supt. N icholas Goetz, Union. 

HOLYOKE, MASS.-Holyoke St. Ry. Co. 3% 
m, 4-8% g, 35 lb r, 13 c, 45 h. Pres. Wm. A. Chase, 
Treas. C. Fayette Smith, Supt. H. M. Smith. 

HOT SPRINGS, ARK.— Hot Springs R.R. Co. 
3 m, 4 g, 25 lb r, 11 c, 30 h. Pres. S. W. Fordyce, Sec. 
C E. Maurice, Supt. J. L. Butterfleld. 

HOUSTON, TEX.— Houston City St. Ry. Co. 14 
m, 4-8% g, 20-30-40 lbr, 40 c, 118 m. Pres. Wm. H. 
Sinclair, Galveston, V. Pres. & Gen. Man. H. F. 
MacGregor, Houston, Supt. Henry Freund, Houston, 
Sec & Treas. E. H. Bailey. 

HUTCHINSON, KAN.— Hutchinson St. Ry. Co. 
2 m 4 6g, 20 lbr, 4 c, 24 h. Pres. A. L. Forsha. V. 
Pres. John Severance, Treas. S. W. Campbell, Sec. 
Fred. A. Forsha. Office, 5 Norlh Main st. 

ILION, N. Y. — Frankfort & Illon St. Ry. Co. 2% 
m 5g 25 lbr, 5c, 6h. Pres. A. C. McGowan, V. Pres. 
P. A. Skiff, sec. Jobn A. Giblln, Treas. J. L. McMil- 
lan. Supt. J. J. Hannahs. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND.-Cltlzens' St. Ry. Co. 
35 m, 4-8 y, g, 33-38-40-52 lb r, 70 c, 550 mu. Pres. A. W. 
Johnson, indlanapoUs, Treas. Tom L. Johnson, 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



85 



Cleveland, O. Sec. A. A. Anderson, Indianapolis, 
Man. W. T. Steele, Indianapolis, Auditor P. Wool- 
arldge, Louisville, Ky. Office 80 w. Louisiana st. 

JACKSON, MICH Jackson City Ky. Co. — m, 

— g, — lb r, 11 c, 40 h. Pres. Hiram H. Smith, Trwis. 
Samuel Hopewell, Gen Supt. Henry II. Smith. 

JACKSON, MISS Jackson City R. R. 1 V 2 m, 5g 

3c, 9mu. Pies, p.w.Peopies, sec. & Tr. J.B.Bradford, 
JACKSON, TENN. — Jackson Street Ky. Co. 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA Pine St. U.K. Co. 2}„- 

m, 5 g, 25 lb r, 4 c, 18 m. Pres. S. P>. Hubbard; V. 
Pres. J. M. Schumacher; Treas. J. C. Greeley; Sec. 
& Man. H. S. Ely. 

Jacksonville St. Ky. Co. 2% m, 5 g, 25 lb r, 10 c, 36 
m. Pres. H. S. Haines, Savannah, (ia., V. Pres. & 
Sec. Geo. K. Foster, Treas. W. P. Hardee, Savannah, 
Ga., Supt. G. W. Haines. 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL Jacksonville Ry. Co 

Supt. B. F. Slbcrt. 

JAMAICA, N. V.— Jamaica & Brooklyn U.K. Co. 
10 m, 4-8% g, 5(5-60 lb r, 29 c, 56 h. Pres. Aaron A. De- 
rauw, Sec. Martin J. Durea, Treas. Won Is Fos- 
lck, t~upt. Wm. M. Scott. 
JAMESTOWN. N. Y.— Jamestown St. l{y. Co 
4m. 4-8% g, 30-42 lb r, 13 c, 3<J h. Pres. J. B. Koss, 
V. Pres. F. E. GlUord, Treas. A. N. Broadhead. supt. 
G E. Matr.by, Sec. & Atty. C. R. I.ockwood. 

JERSEY CITY, N. J. — Jersey & Bergen K. R. 
Co. 28 m, 4-10 47-60 lb r, 80 c, 624 h. Pres. Chas. B 
Thurston, V. Pres. Wm. Keeney, Treas. C. B. Place, 
Sec. Warren E. Dennis, Newark, Supt. Thos. M. 
Savre. Office, 1 Exchange Place. 

JOHNSTOWN, N. Y The Johnstown, Glovers- 

vllle & Klngsboro Horse R.R. Co. 4 m, 4-8% g, 26 lb 
r, 6 c, 16 h. Pres. James Younglove, V. Pres. R. Fan- 
cher, Sec. & Treas., J. McLaren. 

JOHNSTOWN, PA.— Johnstown Pass. R.R. Co. 
1%i m, 5-3 g, 41-43 lb r,13 c, 76 h. Pres. James McMll- 
len. Sec. B. L. Yeagley, Treas. W. H. Rosensleet, Jr., 
Supt. D. J. Duncan. Capital. $100,000. 
JOLIET, IIiL — .Toilet City Ry. Co. 3^111,4-8^ 

g, 30 lb Johnson T r, 16 c, 30 h. & mu. Prop. J. A. 
Henry, Supt. A. Blschman, Treas. J. Hulslzer. 

JOPLIN, MO.— 

KALAMAZOO, MICH.— Kalamazoo St. Ry. Co. 

3 m, 4-8 g, 35 lb r, 30 c, 50 h. Pres. Fred Bush, v. 
Pres. Wm. Dewing. Sec. & Treas. R. S. Jackson 
Man. J. W. Bovnton. Office, 128 Mainst. 

KANSAS CITY, MO Kansas City Cable Ry. 

Co. 8 m, 4-8 g, 45 lb r, 75 c, 1 h, 10 dummy cars. 
Pres. Wm. J. Smith, Sec. W. H. Lucas, Eng. Rob - 
ert Glllham, Supt. F. A. Tucker. Office, S. E. cor. 
Ninth & Washington sts. 

Corrlgan Consolidated St. Ry. Co. 20 m, 4-1 g, 3C 
lb r, 80 c, 350 h. Pres. Bernard Corrlgan, Gen. Man. 
Thos. Corrlgan, Sec. Jas. T. Kelley. 

Grand Avene Ry. Co. 6 m, 4-SV g, 40 lb r, 25 c, 145 

h. Pres. C. F. Morse, V. Pres. and Gen. Man. W. II. 
Holmes, Engineers, Knight Si Bentlcon, Auditor, T. 
J. Fry, Supt. C. F. Holmes. 

Kansas City Electric Ry. Co. 1 m, 4 g, heavy 
girder r. 8 c, 4 electric motors (Henry system). Pres. 
W. W. Kendall, V. Ires. Hugh L. McElroy, Sec. & 
Treas. Warren Watson. Office, 1139 E. 5th st. 
Capital. $10,000. 

Kansas Cltv & Rosedale St. Ry. Co. 

Metropolitan St. Ry. Co. 11% m, 4-4 8)6 g, 66 c, 
Pres. C. F. Morse, v. Pres. Geo. H. Nettleton, Sec. 
W. J. Ferry, Treas. A. W. Armour, Supt. E. J. Law- 
less. Engineers. Knight & Bentlcon, Gen. Counsel 
Pratt, Baumback & Ferry, Auditor & Cashier, R. J. 
McCarty. Capital $1,250,000 

KEOKUK, IA.— Keokuk St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 4-8% g, 
27 lb steel r, 12 c, 40h. Pres. Jas. H. Anderson, Sec- 
Wm. E. Anderson. 

KINGSTON, NT., CAN. — Kingston St. R.R. 
Co. \ m, 3-6 g, o lb r, 10 c, 36 h. Pres. Robert Car- 
son, Sec. & Treas. F. Sargent, Man. William Wilson. 

KNOXVILLE, TENN.-Knoxvllle St. R.R. Co. 2 
m, 4-8^ g, 22 lb r, 5 c, 2 hacks, 30 h. Pres. W. P. 
Chamberlain, sec, Treas. Supt. T. L. Seaman. 

Mabry Bell Ave. & Hardee St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 4 8y g, 

4 c, 29 h. Pres. R. N. Hood, Sec. B. L. Smith, Supt. & 
Man. M. E. Thompson. 

Market Sq. & Asylum St. Ry. Co. 2 i m, 5 g, 22 lb r, 
3 c, 18 h. Pres. Peter Kern, Sec. W. B. Henderson, 
Treas. W. H. Slmmonds, Supt. L. O. Rogers. Office, 
148 Gay St. 

LACONIA, N. H.— Laconla & Lake Village Horse 
R.R. %M m, 3 g. 34 lbr, 5 c, 17h. Pres. A. G. Folsom, 
Treas. Edmund Little, Man. Sela S. Kennlston. 

LA CROSsE, Wis.— La Crosse City Ry. Co. 5 m. 
g, 45 lb r, 15 c, 65 h. Pres. B. E. Edwards, V. 
Pres. Geo. F. Gund, Treas. Fred Tillman, Sec. Jas. 
T. Daggart, Supt. (North Division), Peter Valler. 
Supt. (South Division), Geo. F. Smith. 

LAFAYETTE, INI).— LaFayette St. Ry. 2^ m, 
4-8)6 ff. 35 lb r, 6 c, 38 h. Pres V. B. Caldwell, LaFay- 
ette, Sec. & Treas. E. G. Jones, Decatur, 111., Supt. F. 
Greer, LaFavette. 

LAKE CITY, FLA — Lake City St. Ry. Co. 

LAMPASAS SPRINGS, TEX.— Lampasas City 

Ry. Co. 3i£ m, 4-8x g, 22 lb r, 6 c, 15 h. Receiver, 

Maddox. 

LANCASTER. PA Lancaster & Mlllersvllle St. 

Ry. Co.— m, 48% g, 30 lb r, 4c, 14 h. Pres. J C. Hager. 
V. Pres. H. S Shirk, Sec. & Treas. Chas. Dennes. 

Lancaster City St. Ry. Co. 1.1m, 5-2 g. 38 lb r, 6c, 
4h. Pres. W. D. sprecher, Treas. J. H. Baumgard- 
ner. Sec. Thos. B. Cochrane, Man. J. B. Lang. Gen. 
Offh e. 129 North Queen st. 

LARCHMONT, N. Y.— Larchmont Manor Co. 1% 
m, 4-8 g, 25 lb r, 2 c, 10 h. Pres. C. H. Murray, Sec. E. 
R. Flint, Treas. T. H. French, 38 East Fourteenth st 
N. Y. City. Supt. w. H. Campbell. 

fiA WHENCE, KAN.— Lawrence Transportation 
Co. 5y m, 4-1 g, 38 lb r, 8 c, 34 h. Pres. II. Tlsdale, 
Sec. W. H. Bangs. 

LAWRENCE, MASS.— Merrimack Valley Horse 
R.R. Co. m, 4-8% g, 48 lb r, 20 c,70 h. Pres. Wm. A. 
Russell. V. Pres. Jas Walton, Methuen, Clerk & Treas 
James II. Eaton, Supt. A. N. Kimball, Lawrence. 

LEWISTON, ME.— Lewlston & Auburn Horse 
R.R. Co. 10 m, 4-8% g, 32 lbr, 20 c, 60 h. Pres. Frank W. 
Dana, Treas. Charles C. Corbett, Supt. J.E.Fair- 
banks, Clerk, H. C. Little. 

LEXINGTON, KY. — Lexington City Ry. Co, 8 



m, 4-10 g, 20 lb r, 20 c, 85 h. Pres. & Treas. R. B. 
Metcalfe, V. Pres., Man. & sec. Albert Cross, Supt. 
Bert, cross. 

LEXINGTON, MO.— Lexington St. Ry. Co. 

LIMA, O.— Lima St. Ry. Co. 

LINCOLN, NEB Capital City Ry.Co. 4m, 4 8 1-2 

g, 25 lb r, s c, 64 h. Pres. & Treas. E. B. Durfee, Sec. 
& Supt H. B. Durfeee. 

Lincoln St: Ry. Co. 8 m, 4-8% g, 13 c, 100 h. Pres. 
Frank L. Sheldon, Supt. L. P. Young. 

LITTLE ROCK, ARK.— Little Rock st.Ry. Co.. 
4% m, 5-10 g, 30 lb r, 9c,80 mu. Pres. T.J.Darragh,Sec 
A. J. Thompson, Tres. C. F. Penzel, Sup.J.A. Garrett. 

Citizens' St. Ry. Co. 4% m, 4-10 g, 20 lb r, 22 c 80 h. 
Owned and operated by Little Rock Street Railway 
Co. Same offices. 

lock PORT, N. Y. (See New Roads.) 

LOGANSPORT, INI). — Logansport Ky. Co. 2 m, 
4g, 28 lb r, 6 c, 29 mu. Pres. Frank. G. Jaques, Sec. 
M. Jaques, Supt. Wm. P. Jaques. Office, Urbana, 111. 

LONDON, CAN.-London St. R.R. Co. 5 m, 4-8% 
g, 30 lb r, 12 c, 30 h. Pres. V. Cronga, Sec. Jas. II. 
Flock, Supt. Henry Thos. Smith. 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. — Stelnway & 
Hunter's Point R. R. Co. 30 m, 4-8% g, 47 lb r, 68 c, 
225 h. Pres. Wm. Stelnway, Stelnway Hall, N. Y. 
City. V. Pres. Henry A. Cassebeer, Jr.., Stelnway 
P. O., Long Island Cli y, N. Y. Sec. & Treas. Chas. F. 
Trethar, Stelnway Hall, N. Y. City. Supt. Chas. J. 
Campbell. Offices Stelnway Hall, N. Y. 

Dutch Kills & Hunter's Point R.R. — m, — g, — lb 
r, — c, — h Pres, R. J. Gleason. 

Long Island City & Newtown Ry. Co. 4% m, 4-8% g, 
45-55 lb r, 25 c, 60 h. Pres. Isaac Buchannan, N. Y. 
City, Sec. Geo. S. Crawford, Brooklyn. N. Y., Treas. 
Patrick J. Gleason, supt. Michael Conway. Offices 
112 Front st. 

LONG VIEW, TEX — Longvlew & Junction St. 
Ry. %m, 3-6 g, 2 c, i h. Pres. F. T. Rembert, Sec. 
R. B. Levy, Treas. F. L. Whaley, Supt. C. W. Booth, 

LOS ANGELES, CAL Boyle Heights R.R. Co. 

Central R.R. Co. and the Sixth & San Fernando St, 
R.R. Co. 7 m, 3-6 g, 16 lbr, 13 c, — h. Pres. E. T. 
Spencer, Sec. F. X. Palmer, Supt. J. A. Falrchlld. 

City & Central St. Ry. Co. 4% m, 3-6 & 4-8 g, — lb 
r, 2g cars, 167 h. Pres. I. W. Hellman, Sec. Fred 
Harkness, Supt. Wm. Hawks. 

Los Angeles & Aliso Ave. St. R.R. Co. 

Main St. & Agricultural Park Ry. Co. Pres. W. J. 
Broderlck, Sec. col. John Wheeler, Supt. Wm Hawks. 

Second St. Cable Ry. Co. 6 c and 6 grip c. Pres. 
Jesse Garnell, Sec. & Man. Edw. A. Hall, Eng. and 
Supt. Kibble. 

Temple. St. Cable Ry. Co. 8 c. and 8 grip c. Pres. 
Walter S. Maxwell, Supt. and Man. Col. A. H. 
Wands 

LOUISVILLE, KY.— Kentucky ; St. Ry. Co. 5m, 

5-2 g, — lb r, 22 c — h. Pres. T. J. Minary, Sec. & 
Treas. Thos. Donlgan. 

Central Pass. R.R. Co. 49 m, 5 g, 52 lb r, 150 c, 750 h, 
Pres. B DuPont, V. Pres. Thos. J. Mmery. Sec. T. C. 
Donnlgan. Office 18 Walnut st. 

Crescent Hill Ry. Co. 

Louisville City Ry. Co. 63 m, 5 g, 58 lb r, 214 c, — 
mu. Pres. Ma]. Alexander Henry Davis, Syracuse, n 
Y., V. Pres. St. John Boyle, Sec. & Treas. R. A. Watts, 
Supt. H. H. Litteil. 

LOWELL, MASS.— Lowell Horse R.R. Co. 7. 7m, 
4-8% g, 28-33-45 lb r, 33 c, 125 h. Pres. Wm. E. Living- 
ston, Gen. Man. J. A. Chase. 

Lowell & Dracut St. Ry. Co. 

LYNCHBURG, VA. — Lynchburg St. R.R. Co. 
<;% m, 5-1 g, 20-26 lb r, 6 c, 31 h. Pres. & Treas. Stephen 
Adams, Supt. William M. Payne. Office 811 Main st. 

LYONS, IA.— Clinton & Lyons Horse Ry. Co. 4% 
m, 3-8 g, 19-30 lb r, 15 c, 40 h. Pres. D. Joyce, V. 
Pres. & Man. R. N. Rand. 

MACON, GA.— Macon & Suburban St. R.R. Co. 10 
m, 5 g, 20 lb T r, 20 c, 90 mu. Pres. John S. 
Bransford, Nashville, Tenn., Sec. and Supt. Jno. T. 
Voss. Office. Elm st. 

MADISON, 1ND.— Madison St. Ry. o. 2% m, 4 
g, 15 lb r, 7 c, 8 h, 10 mu. Pres. Jacob Wendle, V.Pres. 
Peter F. Robenllus, Supt. & Treas. Chas. F. Tuttle. 

MADISON, WIS.— Madison St. Ry. Co. 2% m, 3 
g, 23 lb r, 8 c, 7 h, 24 mu. Pres., D. K. Tenney, Sec. 
and Treas. B W Jones, Supt. A. R. Kentzler 

MANCHESTER, N. H.— Manchester Horse R.R. 
7m, 3 g, 27-34 lb r, 14 c, 60 h. Pres. S. N. Bell, 
Treas. G. F. Smyth, Clerk J. A. Weston, Supt. A. Q. 
Gage. Office Depot st. 

MANKATO, 3IINN.— Mankato St.Ry.Co. 2m, 3-6g, 
27 lb steel r, 3 c, 12 h. Pres. and Man. W. M. Farr, 
Sec and Treas. John C. Noe, Capital, $50,000; office, 
313 So Front street. 

MAKSHALLTOWN, IA — 3 m, 4 g, 25 lb r, 7 C, 
20 h. Pres. B. T. Frederick, Treas. T. E. Foley, sec. 
C. C. Gillman, Supt. A. E. Short-hill. 

MARYSVILLE, CAL.— City Pass. R.R. Co. 

MAYSVILI /E, KY Maysville St. Ry. & T. Co. 

3 m, 20 lb r, 4-8)6 g, 6c, 32 mu. Pres. L. W. Robertson, 
Sec. & Treas. W. S. Frank. 

MECHANICSBURG, ILL. — Mechanlcsburg iz 
Buffalo Ry. Co. 3% m, 3-10 g, 16 lb r, 3 c, 4 mu. Pres. 
J. N. Fullenwelder, Treas. A. T. Thompson, Sec. H. 
Thompson. 

MEMPHIS. TENN.— M' mphis Cltv R.R. Co. IS m, 

5 g, 38-40 lb r, 80 c, 320 h. Pres. R. Dudley Frayser, 
V. Pres. Thos. 3arrett, sec. James Frost, Treas. S. 
P. Read Jr. Supt. W. F. Shlppey. Office 474 Main-st. 

MERIDIAN, MISS.— Meridian St. Ry.Co. 2 m, 
4-8 g, 161b T r, 5 c, 17 mu. Pres.Geo.S. Covert, V. Pres. 
and Sup. J. L. Handley, Treas. J. A. Kelly, Sec. R. M. 
Houston. 

MICHIGAN CITY, IND — Citizens' St. Ry. 
Co 2 m, 4-8^ g. 30 lb. r. 4 c, 16 h. Pres. Wm. G. 
Knight, V-Pres.Mohn Lyons, Sec. Jacob D. Hender- 
on, Treas. Jerry H.Knight. Office West Washing- 
ton St., South Bend, Ind. 

MIDDLETOWN, CONN.— Mlddletown Horse 
R.R. Co. 2 m, 6c, 36 lb. r, 30 h. Pres. JohnM. Douglas, 
Sec. & Treas. J. K. Guy, Supt. Joseph Lane, office 
166 Main st. 

MIDDLETOWN, O.— Mlddletown Horse R.R. Co. 

Mlddletown & Madison St. R.R. Co. 2 m, 5 9 g,— r, 4 
c,8 h, Pres. F. Gunchel, sec. and Treas. E. W. Gun- 
chel. 



MILLERS VILLE, PA.— Lancaster & Mlllersvllle 

St. R.R. Co. (See Lancaster, Pa.) 

MILWAUKEE, WIS.-Cream City R.R. Co. 81-6 
m, 4-8% g, 27-38 lb r. 74 c, 307 m, 2 h. Pres. Wlnfleld 
smith, VT Pres. Christian Preusser, Treas. Ferdinand 
Knehn, Sec.Wm. Damkoehler, Gen. Man. D. Atwood, 
Supt. H. J. C. Berg. 

Milwaukee City Ry. Co. 30 m, 4-8% g, 27 lb Iron & 
48 lb steel r, 81 c, 410 h. Pres. Peter Mc( ;eoch, Sec. <K 
Treas. Geo. O. Wheatcroft. Office 209 West Water st. 

West Side St. Ry. Co. Owner & Manager, Wash- 
ington Becker, Supt. McNaughton. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.— Minneapolis St. Ry. Co. 
62 m, 3-6 g, 27-35-45 lb r, 186 c, 1050 h and mu. Pres. 
Thos. Lowry, V. Pres. C. Morrison, Treas. W. W. 
Herrick. Sec. C. G. Goodrich, Supt. D. W. Sharp. 

MOBILE, ALA.— City R.R. Co. 17% m, 5-2 g, 35 
lb T-r, 68 c, :.'40 h. Pres. Jno. Magulre, Sec. I. 
Strausse, Treas. Myerl. Goldsmith, Supt. A. Moog. 

Dauphin & Lafayette Ky. Co. 2 m, 5-2% g, 40 lb 
r, 9 c, 10 h, 12 m. Pres. D.P. Hestor, V. Pres. & Seo.G. 
Y. Overall. Treas. & Acting sec. Jas. W. Gray, Pur. 
Agt. <fe Man. J. B. Robertson. 

Mobile & Spring Hill R.R. Co. 8 m, 5-2J6 g, 35 lb r, 
15 c, 35 h, 1 dummy. Pres. Daniel McNeill, Sec. & 
Treas. C. F. Sheldon, Man. F. Ingate. 

MOHAWK, N. Y.-Mohawk & Illon R.R. Co. 
\% m, 4-8)6g, 30 lb r, 4 c (contract for motive power). 
Pres. O.W. Bronson, V.Pres. C.W. Carpenter, Sec. H. 
1). Alexander, Treas. R. M. Devendorff, Supt. O. W. 
Bronson. 

MOL1NE, ILL.— Mollne Central St. Ry. Co. 2% 

m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 3 c, 10 h. Pres. P. H. Wessel, V. 
Pres. M. Y. Cady, Sec. W. R. Moore, Treas. C. F. 
Hemenway. 

Mollne & Rock Island St. Ry. Co. 5 rn, 4-8% g. 20 lb 
r, 13 c, 41 h. Pres. J. Huntoon, Sec. I. M. Hulord, 
Treas. C. Lyons, Supt. Wm. Gamble. 

MONTGOMERY, ALA.-Capltal City Electric 
St. Ry. Co.2 m,2c. Electric moton-. Pres. E. B.Joseph, 
Gen. Man. J. A. Gaboury, Treas. Thos. E. Hannon, 
Sec. Taylor Robert. 

MONTR HAL, CAN.— Montreal City Pass. Co. 2i 
m, 4-8 !^ g, — lb r, 76 c, 465 h. Pres. Jesse Joseph, v. 
Pres. Alex. Murray Sec. & Man. Ed. Lusher, Supt. T. 
II. Roblllard. 

MOULTRIE VILLE, S. C- Middle St. & Sulli- 
van's Landing Ry. 2^ m, 4-8% g, 20 lb r, 7c 4 h. 
Pres. B. Callahan, Treas. B. Buckley. 

MT. VERNON. N. Y Mt. Vernon St. Ry. Co. 

Mount Vernon&East Chester R.R. Co. 3% m,— g, 
— r, 7 c, 30 h. Pres. Wm. A. Butler, V Pres. Thos. 
Nichols, Sec. Jas. T. Byrne, Treas. Benj. L. Welt- 
helmer; office, 261 Broadway, N.Y. 

MUSCATINE, IA Muscatine Clt- Ry. Co. 3% 

n, 3-6 g, 21 lb r, 7 c, 34 h . & mu. Pres. Peter Musser, 
V-Pres. W. Hoffman. Sec, T. R. Fitzgerald, Treas. 
S. M. Hughes. 

MUSKEGON, MICH.— Muskegon Ry. Co. 4\ m. 
!-6g, 20 lb r, 8 c, 26 h, 8 mu. Pres. F. A. Nlms, V. 
°res. Chas. Merrlam, Boston. Mass.. Sec. Thomas 
Munroe. Treas. G. R. Sherman, Supt. C. H. Newell. 

NASHUA, N. H.— Nashua St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 3 g, 35 
lbr, 5c, 22 h. Pres, John A. Spalding, Clerk, R. D. 
Barnes, supt. Q. A. Woodward. Office, Kinsley St. 

NASHVILLE, TENN.— Nashville & Edgefield 
R.R. Co. Fatherland Street Railway Co. North Edge- 
field and Nashville St. R.R. Co., one management. 

5 m, 5 g, 16-20-32 lb r, 21 c, 100 mu. Pres. Jno. P. White, 
Sec. & Treas. H. B. Stunbiefield, Supt. D.Deaderlck. 

McGavock & Mt. Vernon Horse R.R. Co. 7% m, fa g, 
16-20-28-32 lb r, 25 c, 140 h & mu. Pres. John P White, 
V. Pres. B. F. Wilson, Sec. & Treas. H. B. Stubble- 
field, Supt . Dalngerfield Deaderlck. 

South Nashville St. R.R. Co. 4% m, 5 g, 16-20 lb r, 
10 c, 68 h. Pres. W. M. Duncan, Sec, Treas. & Supt. 
C. L. Fuller. 

NATICK, MASS — Natlck & Cochltuate St. Ry. 
3 m, 4-8% g, 35 lb r, 7 c, 17 h. Pres. Harrison Har- 
wood, Supt. Geo. F. Keep, Clerk Frank Hayes. 

NEW ALBANY, IND. — New Albany St. Ry. Co 

6 m, 4-1 \h g, 25 lb r, 15 c, 55 h. & mn. Pres. Geo. T. 
Vance, Treas. Letltla V. Vredenburgh, Supt. & Pur. 
Agt. Wm. L. Tlmberlake. Office cor. Vincennes and 
Spring sts. 

NEWARK, N. J.— Newark & Bloomfleld St. 
R.R. Co. consolidated with Essex Pass. Ry. Co. 

Essex Pass. R.R. 31 m, 5-2)4 S, 471b r, 107 c, 702 h. 
Pres, S. s. Bartin, Sec. F. F. Klrke, Supt. H. F. 
Totten. Paymaster, W. L. Mulford. Office, 786 
Broad st. 

Newark & Irvington St. Ry. Co., 7 m, 5-2^ g, 47 lb r, 
28 c, 130 h, Pres. S. S. Battln, Sec. W. L. Mulford, 
Supt. H. F. Totten. 

NEW BEDFORD, -MASS.— New Bedford & Fair- 
haven St. Ry. CO. 7% m, 4-8% g, 35-45-50 lb r,428 C, 140 

Pres. Warren Ladd, Treas. & Clerk, A. G. Pierce. 

Acushnet St. R.R. Co., 6 m, 4-8)4 g, 38 lb r, 29 c, 103 
h. Pres. Chas. E. Cook, Sec. & Treas. A. P. Smith. 

NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J.— New Brunswick 
Horse R.R. 4 m, 4-8^ g, 40 lb r, 5 c, 20 h. Pres. F. 
M. Delano, Treas. Carroll Sprigg. 

NEWBURGH, N. Y. — Newburgh St. R. R. Co. 
Pres. D. S. Haines, Sandy Hill. 

NEWBURYPORT, MASS. — Newburyport & 
Amesbury Dorse R.R. Co. 6 1-3 m, 12 c, 54 h. Pres. 
W. A. Johnson, Treas. N. H. Shepard, Sec. Geo. H. 
Stevens. Lessee. E. P. Shaw. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN.— Fair Haven & Westvllle 
R.R. Co. 7 m, 4% g, 42 lb r, 23 c, 150 h. Pres. H. B. 
Ives, Sec. & Tr. L. Candee, Supt. Walter A.Graham. 

New Haven & Centrevllle Horse R.R. Co. 2% m, 
4-8% g, 42 lb r, 4 c, 30 h. Trustee Cornelius Plerpont. 

New Haven & West Haven R.R. Co. (See West 
Haven). 

State Street Horse R.R. Co. 2)/ m, 4-8 g, 43ilb r, 4 c, 
40 h. Pres. C. A. Warren, Sec. & Treas. C. C. Blatchen. 

The Whitney Ave. Horse Ky. 2% m, 4-8% g, 25 lb r, 
3 c, 25 h. Pres. Geo. H. Watrous, Sec. George D. 
Watrous, Treas. Ell Whitney, jr. 

NEW MARLBORO, O.— Kankapot R.R. Co. 

NEW ORLEANS, LA.— Canal & Claiborne St. 
R.R. Co. 13 m, 5-2)< g, 37 lb r, 40 c, 200 h. Pres. E. J. 
Hart, Sec. & Supt. Jos H. DeGrange. 

Crescent City R.R. Co. 26 m, 5-2% g, 35-45 lb r, 90 c, 
400 h. Pres. Frank Roder, Sec. & Treas. Jno. J. Ju- 
den, Supt. A. V. smith. 



86 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December, 188ft. 



New Orleans St. R.E. Co. 

Orleans R.R. Co. — m, — g, — lb r, 32 c, HO h. 
& mu. Pres. & Supt. H. Larqule, Sec. & Treas. P. 
Cougot. Office, cor. White & Laliarpe sts. 

St Charles St. R.R. Co. 15 m, 5-2% g, 35 lb r, 60 c, 
366m. Pres. <fc Supt. Alden McLellan, Sec. V. Riviere. 

New Orleans & Carrollton K.R. Co. 8 m, 4-8% g, 30- 

45 lb r, 65 c, 200 h, 19 engines. Pres. Wm. Benthuy- 
sen, Sec. waiter F. Crouch, Supt. C. V. Halle. 

New Orleans City & Lake R.R. Co. 62 m, 5-2 s / 3 g, 

46 lb r, 200 c, 39 coaches, dummy engines, 800 mu. 
Pres.J.A.Walker,Sec.W.E. Leverlch, Supt. F. Wlntz. 

NEWPORT. KY.— Newport St. R.R. Co. 

NEWTON, MASS.— Newton St. Ry. Co. (See 
New Roads.) 

NEW YOI1K, N.Y.— Ninth Ave. R.R. Co. 16 m, 
4-8% g, 60 lb r, 52 c, 530 h. Pres. W. H. Hays, Sec. & 
Treas. James Affleck, Supt. Heman B. Wilson. Offi- 
ces, Ninth Ave., cor. 54th st. 

Broadway & Seventh Ave. R.R. Co. 16 m, 4-8% g, 
47-60 lb r, 150 c, 1,350 h. Pres. Henry Thompson, Sec. 
& Treas. Thos. B. Kerr, Supt. Henry A. Newell. 
Office 761, Seventh Ave. 

Central Crosstown R.R. Co. 5-22 m, 4-8% g, 52 lb r, 
45 c, 241 h. Pres. Geo. S. Hart, V. Pres. A. Cammack, 
Sec. & Treas. Milton I Masson, Office 365 Ave. A. 

Central Park, North & East River R.R. Co. 19 m, 
4-8% g, 60 lb r, 162 c, 1,225 h. Pres. J. H. Scrblner, 
V. Pres. C. D. Wyman, sec. H. Scrlbner, Treas. J. L. 
Valentine, Supt. M. W. A. Harris. Office, Tenth 
Ave., 53d. & 54th. st. 

ChambersSt. & Grand St. Ferry R. R. Pres. H. 
Thompson. 

Christopher Si Tenth St. R.R. Co. 5 m, 4-8 g. 45 lb 
r, 47 c, 29u h. Pres. Jacob Sharp, Treas. W. T. Hatch, 
Sec. Si Supt. G. W. Lynch. Office, 168 Christopher st. 

Dry Dock, East Broadway & Battery R.R. Co. 1H\ 1 
m, 4-8% g, 60 lb r, 187 c, 1,132 h. Pres. William White, 
Auditor E. T. Landon, Sec. & Treas. Richard Kelly, 
Supt. Fred F. White. Offices, 605 Grand st. 

Eighth Ave. R.R. Co. 20 m, 4-8% g, 60 lb r, 112 c, 
1155 h. Pres. W. H. Havs, Sec. & Treas. James Affleck, 
Supt. H. B. Wilson. Office, Eighth Ave. & 50th st. 

Forty-second Street Si Grand Street Ferry R. R. Co. 
10^ m, 8-4 g, 64 lb r, 50 c, 500 h. Pres. Chas. Curtis, 
Sec. & Treas. E. S. Allen, Supt. John M. Calhoun. 
Office, 653 W. 42d st. 

Forty-second St., Manhattanvllle and St. Nicholas 
Avenue Ry. Co. I8?i m. Pres. Dan'l D. Conover, 
Sec. and Treas, John P, Roberts, Supt, Abram L. 
Smith. Offices 42d street and 7th aves. 

Harlem Bridge, Morrlsanla & Fordham Ry. 16.37 m, 

4- 8% g, 45-60 lb r, 65 c,3 ish. Pres. and Supt, H. Sprat- 
ley, V. Pres. Richard M. Hoe, Sec. & Treas. wm. 
Catidwell. Office, North Third Ave, near 170 st. 

Houston, West Street Si Pavonla Ferry R.R. Co. 
112-3 m, 4-8j-„ g, 60 lb r, 50 c, 450 h. Pres. Rich, Kelly, 
Sec. & Treas. Daniel B. Hasbrouck. Office, 415 E.10 st. 

Jerome Park R.R. l 2-3 m, 4-8^ g, 50-56 lb r. Pres. 
Leonard M. Jerome, Sec. Fred A. Lovecratt, Treas. 
Theodore Moss. Office, cor. 5th. Ave. & 22d st. 

New York City St. Ry. Co. 10 m, [not In operation]. 
Pres. Loomls L. White, Sec. W. L. McCorkle, Treas. 
Wm. L. Skldmore. 

New York Si Harlem R.R. Co. 17% m, 4-8% g, 60-751b 

r, 161 c, 1,560 h. Pres V. Pres. & 

Sec. Cornelius Vanderbllt, Treas. Ed. V. W. Rossi 
ter. Supt. Alfred Skltt, Pur. Agt. P. S. Bemls. 

Sixth Ave. R.R. Co. 9y, m, 4-8>, g, 60 lb r, 127 c, 
1296 h. Pres. Frank curtlss, Sec. and Treas, Henry 
S. Moore, Supt, Edw E. Moore. Office, 75S6th Ave. 

South Ferry Ry. Co. 1% m, 4 8% g, 60 lb r, IS c, 
41 h. Pres. Hen ry Hart, Sec. Wm. N. Cohen, Treas. 
Albert J. Ellas, Supt. Chas H. Meeks. Office 20 
Whitehall st. 

St. Nicholas Si Crosstown R. R. Co. (See New 
Roads.) 

The Second Ave. R.R. Co. 28 in, 4 8% g, 60 lb r, 316 
9cars, 1750 h. Pres. W. Thorn, V Pres. J. Wadsworth, 
Sec. Si Treas. J. B. Underbill. Office Second Ave. cor. 
96th st. 

The Third Ave. R. R. Co. 16 m main line, 6% m 
10th Ave. cable line, 4 ni 125th street cable line, 4-8>«, 

g, 60 & 741b r, 318 c, 2150 h. Pres. Lewis Lyon, 739 
Madison ave., V. Pres. Henry Hart, 110 Tribune 
Building, Sec. Alfred Lazarus, 436 W. 61 st St., Treas, 
John Beaver, 211 E. 112th St., Supt. John H. Robeit- 
son, 307 E. 65th St. 

Twenty -third St. R.R. Co.14 m, 4 S\ g, 54 lb r, 102 c, 
692 h. Pres. Jacob Sharp, Sec. Thos. H. McLean, 
Treas. Lewis May, Act-Supt. George Ferry. Office 
621 West 23d st. 

NIAGARA FALLS, N. Y. — Niagara Falls & Sus- 
pension Bridge Ry. Co. 3% m, 4-8% g, 38-42 lb r, 8 
c, 36 h. Pres. Benj. Flagler, sec. W. J. Mackay, Treas. 
A. Schoellkopf. 

NORFOLK, VA Norfolk & City R.R. Co. 3!^m, 

5- 2 g, 44 lb r, 18 c, 65 h. Pres. John B. Whitehead, 
Treas. H. C. Whitehead, Supt. E. W. Savage. 

NORTH ADAMS, MASS.— Hoosac Valley St. Ry. 
Co. 6 m, 4-8%g. 40 lb. r, 10 c, 29 h, 2 steam motors. 
Pres. Wm. B. Baldwin. V-Pres. W. Cronkhite. Sec. & 
Treas. S. Proctor Thayer, Manager G. W. Lincoln. 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS.— Northampton St. 
Ry. Co. 3% m, 4-8% g, 32 lb r, 7 c, 26 h. Pres. Oscar 
Edwards, Sec. M. H. Spauldlng, Treas. <fe Sup. E. C. 
Clark 

NOR WALK, CONN.— NorwalK Horse R.R. Co. 

2 m, 4-10 g, — lb r. 7 c, 20 h. Pres. James W. Hyatt, 
V. Pres. & Sec. Edwin G. Hoyt, Sup. James W. Hyatt. 

NORWICH, CONN Norwich Horse R.R. Co. 

OAKLAND, CAL Alameda, Oakland & Pied- 
mont R.R. 
Berkley Villa R.R. 
Broadway & Piedmont St. R.R. Co. 
Fourteenth St. R.R. Co. 6 m. 5 g, 20-30 lb r, 6 c,— 

h. Pres. & Supt. Walter Blair, Sec. P. J. Van Loben, 
Oakland R.R. Co. 

Oakland, Brooklyn & FruitvaleR. R. Co. (See East 
Oakland.) 

OGDEN CITY, UTAH Ogden City Ry. Co. 

3 m, 4-8% g, 20 1br, 4 c, 21 h. Pres. L. W. Shurtle, 
Ogden City, V. P. & Supt. O. P. Arnold, Salt L ake 
City, Sec. & Treas. H. S. Young, Ogden City. 

OGDENSBURG,N.Y.-OgdensburgSt.Ry.Co.5m. 
4-8^ g, 2.5 lb. r, 6c, 18 h. Pres. W. H . Daniels, Treas. 
W. A. Egert, Sec. W. H. Daniels. 

«i»T^!A.N, N.Y.— Olean St, Ry, Co, 1% m, 3- 



25 lb r, 3 c, 8 h. Pres. M. B. Fobes, Sec. & Treas. M. W. 
Barse. 

OMAHA, NEB.— Omaha Horse Ry. Co. 15 m, 
4-8% g, 35 lb r, 40 c, 300 h. Pres. Frank Murphy, V. 
Pres. Guy C. Barton, Treas. W. W. Marsh, Supt. W. 
A. Smith. Cable (see new roads.) 

Omaha Tramway Co. 

ONEIDA VILLAGE, N. Y Oneida Ry. Co. 2 

m, 4-8% g, 47 lb r, 3 c, 6 h. Pres. Jerome Hickox, 
Sec. & Treas. W. E. Northrup, Supt. Chas. Bonta. 

OSHKOSH, WIS Oshkosh St. R R. Co. 3% m, 

4-8% g, 27 lb r, 9 c, 24 h. Pres. Leander Choate, V. 
Pres. F. Zentner, Sec. & Treas J. Y. Hull, Sup. F. L. 
Thompson. 

OSWEGO, N.Y.— Oswego St. Ry. Co. 2% m, 4-8% 
g, 45 lb r, 3 c, 23 h. Pres. Jas. F. Johnson, V. Pres. 
R. J. OUphant, Sec. Haynes L. Hart, Treas. Robt. G. 
Post, Gen. Man. James O'Connor. 

OTTAWA, ONT. — Ottawa City Passenger Ry.Co. 
3 m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 9 c, 40 h. Pres. Thomas C. Reef- 
er, V. Pres. R. Blackburn, Sec. James D. Fraser. 

Ottawa St. Ry. Co. 

OTTUMWA, IA.— Ottumwa St. R.R. Co. 2 m, 3-6 

g, 27 lb r, 4 c, 2 h, 14 mu. Pres. J. M. Hedrlck, Sec. & 
Treas. H. L. Hedrlck, Supt. C. M. Hedrick. 

Mineral Springs St. Ry. 1 m, 3% g, 16 lb T r, l c 4 h. 
Owner, L. E. Gray. 

PALATKA, FLA.— Palatka St. Ry. Co. 

PARIS. TEX. — Paris Ry. Co. 1% m,4-8% g, 22 lb 
r, 2 pass. 4 ftc, 16 mu. Pres. I. M. Daniel, Sec. Geo. M. 
Daniel. Treas. D. J. Latimer, Supt. C. G. Caviness. 

PATERSON, N. J Paterson & Passaic R.R. Co. 

7 m, 4-10 g, 33 lb r, 16 c, 24 h. Pres. John N. Ter- 
hune, Treas. John I. Brown, Sec. K. S. Brown, Man. 
Si Pur. Agt. Ambrose T. King, Supt. M. O. Rourke. 

Paterson City R.R. Co. 6% m, 4-8% g, 35 lb r, 12 c, 
'A h. Pres. Garrett iTanten, Treas. Helmas Romalne, 
sec Albert A. Wilcox. 

PAWTUCKET, R. I.— Pawtucket St Ry. Co. 8 
m, 54 lb r. 4 g, 24 c, 100 h. Pres. A. B. Chace, V-Pres. 
& Gen'l. Man. D. F. Longstreet, Treas. E. N. Little- 
field. Office Broad st. 

PENSACOLA, FLA PensacolaSt. Ry.Co. 

PEORIA, ILL.— Central City Horse Ry. Co. 4% 
m, 4-8% g, 40 lb r, 60 c, 135 h. Pres. H. R. Woodward, 
.iec. M. Pfleffer, Treas. Elliot Callender, Supt. John 
Strong. 

Fort Clark Horse Ry. Co.— m,— g,— lb r,— c,— h.— 
Pres. J. H. Hall. 

Peoria Horse Ry. Co. 7% m, 4-8% g, 40 lb r, 63 c, 
140 h. Pres. H. Woodward, sec. M. Pfelffer, Treas. 
H. N. Wheeler, Supt. John Strong. 

PETERSBURG H, VA Petersburgh St. Ry. Co. 

Z?l m, 4-8% g, 42 lb r, 9 c, 44 h. George Beadle, Pro- 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. -Citizens Pass. Ry. Co. 
10% m, 5-2 g, 45 47 lb r, 92 c, 120 h. Pres. John Mc- 
Carthy, Sec. & Treas. J. J. Adams, Sup. Sam'i Cllne, 
Office, n w cor. 18th and Susquehanna ave. capital, 

$192,5110. 

Empire Pass. Ry. Co. 8% m, 5-2 g, 45 lb r, 32 c, 250 

h, Pres. James McManes, Sec. and Treas. John I. 
Adams. Office, n w cor. 12lh st. and Susquehanna av. 

Frankford & Southwark Phila. city Pass. R.R. Co. 
18 m, 6-2 g, 471br, 102 c, 8 dummy c, 618 h. Pres. 
Henry Geiger, Sec. & Treas. Geo. S. Gandy, Supt. W. 
H. Janney. Capital, 8750,000. 

Germantown Pass. Ry. Co. 29% m, 5-2% g, 47 lb r, 
Cars and horses, leased. Pres. Craig D. Ritchie, 
Treas. Lewis S. Renshaw. Sec. R. H. Parks. Office, 
n w cor. 10th and Chestnut sts. 

Green & Coates R. R. Co. (Leased to People's Pass. 
Ry. Co.) Pres. MosesA. Dropsle, Sec. & Treas. Lewis 
S. Renshaw. Office N. W. cor. 10th. and Chestnut 
sts. 

Hestonville, Mantua & Falrmount Pass. R.R. Co. 20 
m, 5-2 g, 43 lb r, 50 c, 480 h. Pres. Charles F. Laffer- 
ty, Sec. & Treas. W. C. Foster. Office, 4,300 Lancas- 
ter ave. 

Lehigh Ave. Pass. Ry. Co. Pres. John Lamon, Sec. 
Chas. A. Porter, Treas. John L. Hill. [Track not laid.] 

Lombard <fi South Sts. Pass. Ry. Co. — m, 5-2 g, 43 
lb r, 51 c, 278 h. Pres. John B. Parsons, Sec. & Treas. 
Francis Hazelhurst Supt. Jno. M. Gaughen. Office, 
2,509 South st. 

People's Pass. Ry. Co. 44 m,5-2g, 47 lb r, 125 c, 1,080 
h. Pres. John B Parsons, sec. & Treas. Jno. C. Des- 
salet, Supt. Wm. Hagenswiler. 

Philadelphia City Pass. Ry. Co. 7 m, 5-2% g, 47 lb 
r, — c, — h. Pres. Wm. W. colket, Sec. & Treas. T. 
W. Pennypacker. (Leased to Phila. Traction Co.) 

Philadelphia Traction Co. 109 m, 5-2M g, 45-78 lb r, 
594 c 2,942 h. Pres. W. H. Kemble, V. Pres. P. A. B. 
Wldener & W L. Elklns. Treas. D. W. Dickson Of- 
fice, n w cor. 4lst and Haverford sts. 

Philadelphia & Darby Ry. Co. 6% m, 5-2^ g, 42 
lb r, road leased. Pres. C. L. Borle, Sec. and Treas. 
Wm. W. Colket. Office, 202 Walnut pi. Leased to 
Phila. City Pass. Ry. Co. 

Philadelphia & Gray's Ferry Pass. R.R. Co. 10 1-3 
m, 40 c, 200 h. Pres. Matthew Brooks, Treas. J. C. 
Dawes.Sec.J.Crawford Dawes. Suot.Patrick Lovett. 
Office, 36th st. and Gray's Ferry Rd. 

Ridge Avenue Pass. Ry. Co. 14 m, 5-2 g, 47 lb r, 55 
e, 352 li. Pres. E. B. Edwards, V. Pres. John Lam- 
bert, Sec. & Treas. Wm. S. Blight, Supt. Wm. Intres 

Second & Third Sts. Pass. Ry. Co. 37 m, 116 c, 669h. 
Pres. Alexander M. Fox, Treas. William V. Miller, 
Sec. Charles D. Matlack, Supt. David W. Stevens. 

Seventeenth & Nineteenth sts. Pass. Ry. Co. 7% m. 
Pres. Matthew S. Quav, Sec. & Treas. John B. Ped- 
dle. [Leased to Phllada. Traction Co.] 

Thirteenth & Fifteenth Sts. Pass. Ry. Co. 14 m, 5-2 

g, 43 lb r. 73 c, 452 h. Pres. Thos. W. Ackley, Sec. & 
Treas. Thos. S. Harris, Supt. Wm. B. Cooper. 

Union Pass. Ry. Co. 70 m, 348 c, 1/724 h. Pres. 
Wm. H. Kemble, Sec. & Treas. John B. Peddle, Supt. 
Jacob C. Petty. (Leased to Phila. Traction Co.) 

West Philadelphia Pass. Ry. Co. 18% m, 122 c, 646 

h. Pres. Peter A. B. Widener, Sec. & Treas. D. W. 
Dickson. (Leased by the Phila. Traction Co.) 

PHILLIPSBURGH, N. J.— Phillipsburgh Horse 
Car Ry.Co. 2^ m, 4-8 g, 35 lb r, 4 c, 13 h. Pres. 
Daniel Runkle, Sec. & Treas. James W. Long. 

PITTSBURGH, PA.— Central Pass R.R. Co. 3 m, 
16 c, 95 h. Pres. J F. Cluley, Sec. F. L. Stephenson, 
Treas. E. R. Jones, Supt. R. G. Hei ron. 

Citizens' Pass. Ry. Co. 16# m, 5-2 v, g, 47 lb r, 40 c 
337 h, Pres, Jno, G, Holmes, Sec O. M. Gormley 



Supt. Murry Verner. Treas. Jas. J. Donnell, Capital, 

$200,000. 

Federal St. & Pleasant Valley Pass. Ry. Co. 26 m, 
5-2% g, 46-50 lb r, 20 c, 154 h. Pres. Wm. H. Creery, 
Sec. R. F. Ramsey, Treas. James Boyle, Supt. Wm. J. 
Crozier, Allegheny City. 

People's Park Pass. Ry. Co. 2 m, 5-2% g, 45 lb r, 

10 c, 75 h. Pres. Wm. McCreery, Sec. R. F. Ramsey, 
Treas. James Boyle, Supt. Wm. J. Crozier, Allegheny 
City. 

Pittsburgh, Allegheny & Manchester Pass Ry. Co. 

5 m. 5-2% g, 46 lb r, 40 c, 275 h. Pres. Chas. Atwell, 
Sec. & Treas. Chas. Selbert, Supt. James C. Cotton. 
Manager J. P. Speer. 

Pittsburgh, Oakland & East Liberty Pass. Ry. Co. 

11 m, 5AM S, 47 lb r, 32 c, 110 h, 61 mu. Pres. J. T. 
Gordon, sec. John G. Traggardh, Treas. A. W. 
Mellon, Supt. H. M. Cherry. 

Pittsburgh Union Pass. R.R. Co. 5 m, 5-2% g, 45 It 
r, 29 c. 170 h. Pres. Chas. Atwell, Supt. James C. 
Cotton, Sec. & Treas. Chas. Seibert, Cash. Saml. C. 
Hunter. 

Pittsburgh & Birmingham Pass. R.R. Co. 3% m, 5- 
2% g, 48 lb r, 20 c, 170 h. Pres. W. W. Patrick, Sec 
D. F. Agnew, Treas. John G. Holmes. 

Pittsburgh & West End Pass. Ry. Co. 3% m, 5-2 g, 
35 lb r, 13 c, 75 h. Pres. John C. Rellly, Sec. & '1 reas. 
Thomas S. Blgelow, Supt. William J. Burns. 

Pittsburgh & Wilklnsburg St. Ry. Co. 

Second Avenue Pass. Ry. Co. 3% m, 5-2% g, 47 lb r, 
8c, 60 h. Pres. Geo. Fawcett, Sec. Jas. F. Fawcett, 
Treas W. J. Fawcett. 

South Side Pass. R.R. Co. 2% m, 5-2% g, 45 lb r, 12 
c, 80 h. Pres. D. Z. Brickell, Sec. & Treas. W. T. Wal- 
lace, Supt. W. M . Rosborough. 

Transverse Pass. Ry. Co. 6% m, 5-2 g, 52 lb r, 39 c, 
243 h. Pres. C. L. Magee, V. Pres. C. F. Kloprer.Sec. 

6 Treas. Wm. R. Ford, Supt. Miller Elliot. 
Wilklnsburg & East Liberty Ry. Co. (See new 

roads.) 

P1TTSTON, PA.-Pittston St. R.R. Co. 1% m, 
3c, 5 h. Pres. Thomas Griffith, Treas. M. W. Morris, 
Sec. William Allen. 

PLYMOUTH, MASS Plymouth & Kingston St. 

R. R. Co (See new roads.) 

PORT HURON, MICH Port Huron St. Ry. Co. 

6% m, 4-8% g, 7 c, 22 h. Pres. Jno. P. Sanborn, v.Pres. 
Frank A. Beard, Sec. Treas. & Man. J. R. WastelL 

Port Huron Electric St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 4 c. 

PORTLAND, ME.— ocean St. R.R. Co. 

Portland R.R. Co. 7% m, 4-8% g, 30-33-45 lb r, 34 c, 
154 h. Pres. H. J. Llbby, Treas. & Gen. Man. E. A. 
Newman, Supt. Geo. W. Soule. 

PORTLAND, ORE.— Portland St. Ry. Co. 2m, 

3- 6 g,25-421b r,n c,40 h. Pres.D. P. Thompson, Sec & 
Supt. c. K. Harbaueh. 

Multnomah St. Ry. Co. 2?£ m, 3-6 g, 30 lb r, 19 c, 65 
h. Pres. A. N. King, Sec. E. A. King. r=— 
-Transcontinental St. Ry.Co. 7 m, 3-6 g, 381br, 15 
c. 65 h. Prest. Walter F. Burrell, D. W. Wakefield, 
Sec, Tyler Woodward, Supt. 

PORTSMOUTH, O.— Portsmouth St. R. R. Co. 
2_m, 3-6 g, 18 lb r, 4 c, 10 h. Pres. James Skelton, 
Treas., Sec. & Supt. Enas Reed. 

POTTSVILLE. PA.— People's Ry.Co.9%m,16c,56h. 

POUGHKEEFS1E, N. Y City R.R. Of Pough- 

keepsie. 4 m, 4-8% g, 35-42 lb r, 11 c, 38 h. Pres. Geo. B, 
Adriance v. Pres. & Treas. Hudson Tayloi, Sec. A. 

B. Smith, Supt. C. M. Davis, office 491 Main St. 
PROVIDENCE, R. I.— Union R.R. Co. 53 m, 4- 

8% S, 47-54 lb r, 230 c, 1,300 h. Pres. Jesse Metcalf, 
V. Pres. Si Gen. Man. D. F. Longstreet. Sec. and 
Treas. C. A. Babcock. 

QUEBEC, CAN.— Quebec St. Ry. Co. 3 m, 4-8% 
g, 45 lb r, 9 c, 46 h. Pres. Chas. St. Michel, Quebec, 
V. Pres. G. R. Kenfrew, Quebec, Sec, Treas. & Supt. 
Samuel Moore. 

St. John St. Ry. Co. Llm, 1V 3 m, 4-8% g, 35 lb r, 4 c, 
23 h. Runs 4 'buses out 4 m. from city limits. 
Pres. Jos. W. Henry, V. Pres. A. Robertson, Sec. & 
Man. W. W. Martin. 

UU1NCY, ILL — Quincy Horse Ry. & Carrying 
Co. 6 m, 5 g, 71 lb r, 21 c, 118 mu. Pres. Lorenzo'Bull, 
Sec. C. H. Bull, Supt. E. K. Stone. 

RACINE, WIS Belle City St. Ry. Co. lm,4g,3 

lb r, 9 c— 40 h. Pres. John T. Fish, Sec. & Treas. E.S 
Dodge, Gen. Man. Geo. B. Hathaway. 

RALEIGH, N. C Raleigh St. Ry. Co. 7% m, 

4- 8\. g, 16 T steel r, 6 c, 36 mu. Pres. Geo. M. Snod- 
grass, Sec. & supt. J. F. scott, Treas. R. T. Gray, 
Atty. F. H. Busbee. Capital stock, $25,0(0. 

RAPID CITY. DAK.— Rapid City St. Ry. CO. 
Pres , Fred. T. Evans. 

READING, PA — Reading City Pass. Ry. Co. 
2 1-5 m, 5-2% g, 45 lb j, 19 c, 44 h. Pres. B. F. Owen, 
V. Pres. Jas. L. Douglass, See. & Treas. H. A. Muhlen- 
berg, supt. J. A. Riggs. 

Perkiomen Ave. Pass. Co. 2 1-5 m, 5-2% g, 46 lb r, 
13 c, 41 h. Pres. Chas. Breneiser, Sec. & Treas. Isaac 
Hiester, Supt. John B. Houp. 

RED OAK, IA Red Oak St. R.R. Co. l^rn, 4-2% 

g. flat r, 2c, 2h, 2 mu. Pres. J.W. Judkins, V.Pres. G. 
West, Sec. F. M. Byriket, Treas. & Supt.F.O. Judkins. 

RICHMOND, INU Richmond City Ry. Co. 3 m, 

8 g, 9 lb r, 10 c, 30 h. Pres. J. V. Miller, v. Pres. Jos. 
Rutliff, Treas. H. I. Miller, Supt. F. M. Francisco. 

RICHMOND, ILL.— Richmond St. R.R. Co. 

RICHMOND, VA Richmond CityRy. Co. 7 % m, 

4 8% g, 30-45 lb r, 40 c, 180 h. Pres. J. L. Schoolcraft, 
Sec. & Treas. Walter Kidd, Man. C. M. Bolton, Supt. 
Charles Selden. 

Richmond & Manchester Ry . & Imp. Co., 2%m, 26 h, 
4 c. Supt. B. R. Selden. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y Rochester City & Brighton 

R.R. Co. 37m, 4-8% g, 25-30-45 lb r, 142 c, 596 h, 
Pres. Patrick Barry, Sec. C. C. Woodworth, Treas. 

C. B. Woodworth, Supt. Thomas J. Brower. 
Citizens' St. Ry. Co. Pres. Wm. H. Jones, Sec. & 

Treas. J . E. Plerpont, Supt. S. A. Green. 

ROCKFORD, ILL Rockford St. Ry. Co. 6 2-5 

m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 13 c, 52 h. 16 m. Pres. Antkony 
Haines, V. Pres. L. Rhodes, Sec. Miss A. C. Arnold, 
Treas. N. E. Lyman, Supt. Fred. Haines. 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL.— Rock Island & Milan St. 
Ry.Co. 7 m. 4-8% g, 20-30-42 lb r, 10 c, 7 h. Pres. & 
Supt, Bally Davenport, Sec E, H. Hunt, Trers. J. F, 
Robinson, 2 m, with horses, 5 m, with motor. 



Deoembek, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



hi 



RONDOUT, N. Y Kingston City R. R. Co. 3 

in, 4-8% g, 40 lb r, 10 c, 40 h. Pres. James O. Llnds- 
ley, V. Pres. S. 1). Coykendoll, Sec. & Treas. John C. 
Romeyee, Supt. Wm. II. DeGarmo. 

RUTLAND, VT Rutland St. Ry. Co. 8 m, 4-8% 

g, ao lb r, 8 e, 3u h. Pres. M. Quln, sec. John N. 
Woodfln, Treas, A. II. Tuttle, supt. M. McKeough. 

SACRAMENTO. CAE.— Sacramento City Ry. Co. 
121-horse and 10 2-uorse c. Prop. R. S. Carey, Supt. 
Geo. W. Carey. 

SAGINAW, MICH City ot Saginaw St. R. R. 

Co. 2% in, 4-8% g, 42 lb r, 10 c, 60 h. Pres. David II. 
.lerome, V. Pres. ceo. P. Williams, Sec. & Treas. Geo. 
L. Burrows, Supt. Fred G. Benjamin. 

SALEM, MASS Salem & Danvers St. Ry. Co. 

12 m, 4-8% g, 35-45 lb P, 24 c, 117 h. Pres. Ben]. W. 
Russell, Sec. & Treas. G. A. Vlckery, Asst. Supt. 
David N. Cooke. 

Naumkeag St. Ry. Co. — m, 4-8% g, 30-35-45 lb r, 50 
c, I40h. Pres. Clias. Odell, Clerk Joseph F. Illckey, 
Treas. Henry Wheatland, Supt.Wlllard B. Ferguson. 

SALINA. N. V Woodlawn and Butternut St. 

Ry. Co. 

SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH Salt Lake City 

R.R Co. 13 m, 4-8% g, 20 lb r, 20 c, lir, mil. Pres. lohn 
Taylor, Sec. David MeKenzle, Treas. James Jack, 
Supt. Orson P. Arnold. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEX San Anlonio St. Ry. Co. 

15 m, 4 g, 30 lb r, 38 c, 125 inn. Pres. A. Belknap, San 
Antonio, V. Pres. F. W. Plckard, N. Y. City, Treas. 
I. Withers, San Antonio, Sec. E. R. Norton, Supt 
John Robb. 

Prospect II ill St. Ry. Co. 

SANDUSKY, O.— Sandusky St. Ry. Co. 2 m, - 

g, — lb r, — c, — h. Pres. Chas. B. Ods, Sec. & Treas. 
A. C. Morse, Supt. Clark Rude. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAE California St. R.R. Co. 

Central R. R. Co. 12 m, 5 g, 45 lb r, 31 c, 290 h, 
Pres. Chas. Main, V. Pres. S. C. Bisrelow, Treas. A. 
J. Gunnison, Sec. C. V. LeBreton, Supi. J. F. Clark. 

Clay St. Hill R. R. Co. 1 m. 3-6 g, 30 lb r, 11 c, 12 
dummy cars. Pres. Joseph Britton, V. Pres. James 
Moffit, Treas. Henry L Davis, Sec. Chas. P. Camp- 
bell, Supt. Joseph Britton. 

Geary St. Park & Ocean R.R. Co. 9% m, (5% m 
cable, 1% in steam) 5 g, 45 lb r, 39 c. Pres. Daniel 
Meyer, V Pres. R. F. Morrow, Treas. S. O. Bigelow, 
Supt. Johnson Reynolds, Sec, John N. Syme. 

Market St. Cable Ry. Co. 12' , m, 4-8% g, 37-38 lb r. 
1S2 c, 2 motors, 82 h. Pres. Leland Stanford, V Pres. 
Chas. F. Crocker, Treas. N. T. Smith, Sec. J. L. Will- 
cutt, Supt. H. i). Morton. Office, Fourth and 
Townsend streets. 

North Beach & Mission R.R. Co. 8 m, 5 g, 46 c, 400 

h. Pres. Carl Ahpel, Sec. H. w. Hathorne, Treas. 
Wm, Alvord, Supt. M. Skelly. 

Ocean Beach Ry. Co. (operated by Market St. 
'■able Ry Co.) 2 m. Pres. Leland Stanford, V. 
Pres. Chas. F. Crocker, Treas. N. T. Smith, Sec. J. 
L. Willcutt, Supt. II. D. Morton. 

Omnibus R.R. & Cable Co. 8% m, 5 g, 35-45 lb r, 50 
c, 364 h. Pres. Gustav Sutro, V. Pres. D. Callaghan, 
Sec. G. Ruegg, Supt. M. M. Martin. 

Park & Ocean R.R. Co. 4.62m, 35 and 40 lb r, 4-SJs 
g, 7 dummy engines, 16 pass, c, 6 flat and section <;. 
Pres. Chas. F. Crocker, V. Pres. Timothy Hopkins, 
Treas. N. T. Smith, Sec. J. L. Willcutt, Supt. H. 
D. Morton. 

Potrero & Bay View R.R. Co. 1% m, 5 g, 35 lb r, 
10 c, 43 h. Pres. Leland Stanford, V. Pres. Chas. 
Crocker, Treas. N. T. Smith, Sec. ■!. L. Willcutt, Supt. 
H. O. Rogers. 
Powell & Jackson St. R. R. Co. (see new roads.) 
Sutter St. R.R. Co. 5% m, 4-11 g, 35-45 lb r, 40 c, 
18J h. Pres. R. F. Morrow, Sec. A. K. Stevens, Treas. 
M. Schmltt, Supt. James McCord. 

Telegraph Hill R.R. Co. 1,560 ft, 4-8% g, 45 lb r, 
2 c, — h. Pres. Gustave Sutro, V. Pres. C. Kohler. 
Sec. & Supt. Chas. J. Werner. 

The City R.R. Co. 11 m, 5g, 45 lb r, 72 c, 280 h. 
Pres. R. B. Woodward, V. Pres. Geo. E. Raum, Sec. 
M. E. Willis, Treas. Jas. II. Goodman, Supt. William 
Woodward, Master Car Builder, Frank O. Landgram. 

SAN JOSE, CAE San Jose & Santa Clara R.R. Co. 

8% m, 4-8 and 3 g wide g, 40 lb r, narrow g 20 lb r, 25 
c, 75 h. Pres. s. A. Bishop, V. Pres. W. S. Mc- 
Murtry, Treas. Jacob Rich, Sec. E. M. Rosenthal, 
Man. Wm. Fitts. Office, 20 W. Santa Clara St. 

First St. R. R. & Widow Glen R. R. 4% m, 3 g, 20 
lbs. r, 6 c, 30 h, Jacob Rich, sole owner. Sec. E. M. 
Rosenthal. Office, 20 Santa Clara St. 
First St. & San Pedro St. Depot R.R. Co. 
Noith side Horse R.R. Co. 2& m, 3 g, 16 lb r, 3 c, 
10 h. Pres. & Man, Jacob Rich, sec. E M. Rosenthal, 
Treas. S. A. Bishop. 

Willow Glen R.R. 7% m, 3 g, 20 lb r, 8c, 30 h. Sole 
owner Jacob Rich, sec. E. M. Rosenthal, office 20 
W. Santa Clara St. 

SANTA BARBARA, CAL Santa Barbara St. 

R.R. Co. l m, 3-6 g, 3 c, 8 mu. Pres. A. W. McPhail. 

SARNIA, CAN Sarnia St. Ry. Co. 2%m, 4-8 g, 

32 lb r, 2 c, 9 h. Pres. J. F. Lister, Sec. & Treas. Thos. 
Symington, Supt. Henry W. Mills. 

SAUGATUCK, CONN.— Westport & Saugatuck 
Horse R.R. Co. (See Westport, conn.) 

SAVANNAH, liA City & Suburban Ry. Co. 18% 

m, 5g, 16-30 lb r, 49 c, 110 h, 3 engines. Pres. J. H. 
Johnson, Asst. J. W. Alley. Treas. E. Schmidt. 

Coast Line R.R. Co. 7 m, 5 g, 30 lb r, 17 c, 37 h 
Pres. Geo. Parsons, New York, Sec, Treas. & Gen. 
Man. R. E. Cobb, Savannah. 

SAYltE, PA Sayre St. Ry. Co. Pres. Howard 

Elmer. (See new roads.) 

SCRANTON, PA People's St. Ry. Co. 9% m, 

4-8% g, 25-52 lb r, 19 c, 70 h. Pres. Wm. Matthews, 
Sec. & Treas. .1. C. Piatt. 
Scran ton Suburban Ry. Co. (see new roads.) 

SEAKCY, ARK Searcy & west Point R.R. Co, 

8 m, 4-8>s g, 20 lb r, 7 c, 6 mu. Pres. A. W. Yarnell 
Sec. W. II. Ltghtle, Treas. Jasper Hicks. 

SEATTEE, W. T Seattle St. Ry. Co. 3% m 

4-8% g, 35 lb r, 5 c, 20 h. Pres. F. II. Osgooa, Sec. 
Geo. Klnnear. 
SEDALIA, MO.— sedalla St. Ry. Co. V4 m, 4-10 
, 22 lb r 6 c 85 h. Pres. Joseph D. slcher, V. Pres. 
ouls Deutsoh, Treas. F. II. Guentner, Sec. Chas. 
S. Conrad. 

SEEM A, AEA — Selma St. R.R. 2% m, 18 lb r, 5 



c, 8h. Pres. H. Gilman, Sec. & Treas. J. H. IIollls, 
Supt. W. liohlla. 

SENECA FALLS,N. Y — Seneca Falls & Waterloo 
R.R. co. 7 m, 4-8% g, 40 lb r, 4 c, dummies. Pres. & 
Treas. Geo. H. Stayner, Ass't. C. H. Williams, V- 
Pres. ec Gen. Man. Charles D. Haines, Supt. A. G. 
Haines, sec. Henrv S. Ives. 

SEVASTOPOL, IA.— Des Moines &. Sevastopol 
St. R.R. co. 1% m, 4g, 36 lb r, 2 c, 12 h. Pres. G. 
Van GInkel. Sec. G. C. Van Ginkel, Treas John 
Weber. Office, Main st. 

SHERMAN, TEX Sherman City R.R. Co. 3#m 

5 g, 20 lbr, 7c, 32 mu. Pres. C. W. Batsell, Treas. 
J. M. Batsell. Sec. C. W. Batsell, Jr. 

SHREVEPORT, LA Shreveport City R.R. Co. 

1% m, 4-4 g, 40 lb r, 6 c 14 h. Pres. Peter Youree. 

SILVER CLIFF, COL.— Sliver Cliff St. U.K. Co. 

SIOUX CITY, IA.— Sioux City St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 
4 g, — r, 8 c, 52 mu. Pre°. Fred. T. Evans, V. Pres. 
D. A. Magee. sec. & Treas. b'red Evans, Jr. 

SOUTH IJE'JO, INI).— South Bend Hallway Co 

6 m. 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 17 c, 49 h. Pres Jacob Woolver- 
ton. Treas Lucius ( lark, sec W G George. Office, 
212 W Market st, Utica, N Y. 

South Bend and Mishawauka St, Ry. Co, 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL Chicago Horse & 

Dummy R.R. 5m, 4-8 % g, —lbr, — c, — h. Pres. 

D. L. Huff, Treas. A. C. Calkins, See. E. R. Bliss. 
[Not In operation.] 

South Chicago City Ry. Co, 4 c, 8 h. Pres. An- 
drew Kehin. Sec. & Supt. A. KrlmWii, Treas II. 
Shearrer. 

SOUTH PUEBLO, COL. — Pueblo St. R.R. Co. 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL Citizens' St. R.R. Co. 

9% m, 3 6 g, 20-36 lb r, 29 c, 100 h. Pres. J. II. Schrlck, 
Treas. Frank Kelsch, Sec. Chas. F. Harman. 

Springfield City Ry. Co. 7 m, 4-8% g, 90 mu. & h. 
Pres. A. L. Ide, Treas. wm. Ridgely, Sec. Geo. Brink- 
erhoof. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS Springfield St. Ry. Co. 

4-8% g, 33-40 lb r, 30 c, 120 h. Pres. John Olmstead, 
Auditor L. E. Ladd, Clerk Gideon Wells, Treas. A. 

E. Smith, Supt. P. E. King. 
SPRINGFIELD, MO Citizens' Ry Co. of Spring- 
field and No Springfield, h l 4 m, 5-8% and 4-10 g, 30, 
33and4u lb r, 16 c, 70 h & mu. Pres" R C Kerens, V 
Pres B F Ilobart, Sec and Treas A M Longwell, 
Supt B] 15 smith, Ex-Com L II Murray, H F Den- 
ton. C B McAfee. 

SPRINGFIELD, O Citizens' St. R.R. Co. 10m, 

4g, 29 c. 135 h. Pres. D. W. Stroud, V. Pres. A. S. 
Bushnell, Treas. Rose Mitchell, Sec. F. S. Penfleld, 
Supt. W. II. Hanford. 

STATEN island, N.Y. — Staten Island Shore Ry. 

ST. CATHARINE'S, ONT St. Catharine's, Mer- 

rllton & Thorold St. Ry. Co. 5% m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 8 
c, 32 h. Pres. E. A. Smyth, Sec. S. R. Smyth, Supt. 
E. A. Smyth. 

ST. JOHN. N. B.— St. John St. Ry. Co. 7 m, 
4-8% g, 45-tO lb r, 15 c, 65 h. Pres. John R. Both well, 
Sec. & i'reas. John J. Pyle. Office Room 39 Drexel 
Building, New York, and St. John, N. B. 

ST. JOSEPH, MO Citizens' St. R.R. Co. 3 m, 

4-8% g, 28 lb r 14 c, 52 mu. Pres . Richard E. Turner, 
Sec. & Treas.' Arthur Kirkpatrick, gupt. John F. 
Men lam. 

Frederick Ave. Ry. Co. 1% m, 3 g, 16 lb r, 6 c, 16 h. 
Pres. Thos E. Tootle, V. Pres. Winslow Judson, Sec. 
W.D.B. Motter, Treas. Thos W. Evins, Sup. S. Rowen. 

St. Joseph & Lake St. R.R. Co. 

Union Ry. Co. — m, — g, 20, 30 and 52 lb r, 27 c, 110 
h. Pres Seymour Jenkins, Sec & Treas S Stein- 
acker, Supt Harvey E Lewis. Office, cor Highland 
and St. Joseph Avenues. 

ST. LOUIS, MO Baden & Si. Louis R.R. Co. 

3% m, 4-10 g, — lb r, 7 c, 21 h. Pres. George S. Case, 
V. Pres. William Z. Coleman, Supt. J. H. Archer. 

Bent on & Bellefontaine Ry. Co. 7% m, 4-10 g, 45 lb r, 
29 c, 200 h. Pres. J. G. Chapman, V. Pres. Chas. 
Parsons, Sec. &, Treas. Robert Mcculloch. 

Cass Avenue & Fair Grounds Ry. Co. 8% m, 4-10 g, 
38 lb r, 39 c, 285h. Pres. W. R. Allen. V. Pres. Geo. W. 
Allen, Sec.&Treas. J. W. Wallace, Supt. G. G. Gibson, 
Cashier O. H. Williams. 

Citizen's Ry. Co. — m, — g, —lb r, — c, — h. Pres. 
Julius S. Walsh. V. Pres. J. P. Helfenstine. 

Foresi Park, Laclede & Fourth St. Ry. Co. Pres. 
Chas. H. Turner, Sec H. B. Davis. 

Jefferson Ave. Ry. Co. Pres. John M. Gelkeson, 
Gen. Man. John Scullin, Sec. C. K. Dickson. 

Lindell Ry. Co. 13% m, — g, — r, 65 c, 475 h. Pres 
John H. Maquon, V. Pres. John H. Lightner, Sec. & 
Treas. Geo. W. Baumhoff, Supt. Jos. C. Llewellyn. 

Northern Central. 

Missouri R.R. Co. — m, — g, —lb r, — c, — h. Pres. 
P. O. Maffit, Sec. W. D. Henry. 

Mound City R.R. Co. Pres. John. Scullin, Sec. & 
Treas. C. M. Seaman, Supt, Jas. Sullivan. 

People's Line. Pres. Chas. Green, Sec. John Ma- 
noney. Supt. Patrick Shea. 

Southern Rv. Co. 7 4-5 m, 4-10 g, 35-52 lb r, 49 c, 250 
V. Pres. E- R. Coleman, Sec. J. S. Mlnary, Man. W. 
L. Johnson. 

St. Louis R.R. Co. 11 m, 4-10 g, 38-44 lb r, 58 c, 375 h. 
Pres. C. Peper, Sec. & Treas. R. B. Jennings, Supt. 
Cliiis IscIigt 

St. Louis Cable & Western Ry. Co. Pres. M. A. 
Downing, V. Pres. F. M. Colburn, Sec. & Treas. E. F 
Claypool, Man. Geo. F. Branham. 

Tower Grove & Lafayette Ry. Pres. Chas. Green, 
Sec. John Mahonev, Supt. Patrick Shea. 

Union Depot R.R. Co. — m, — g, —lbr, — c, — h. 
Pres. John scullin, V. Pres. & Treas. C. M. Seaman, 
Supt. Jas. H. Roach. 

Union Ry., Co. Pres. Julius S. Walsh, V. Pres. J. P. 
Helfenstine, Sec. & Treas. M. J. Moran, supt. Michael 
Moran. 

ST. PAUL, MINN.— St. Paul City Ry. CO. 37 m, 
4-8% g, 45-52 lbr, K2c, noo h. & mu. Pres. Thos. Lowry 
V. Pres. C. G. Goodrich, Sec. A . Z. Levering, Treas. 
Clinton Morrison, Supt. A. L. Scott. 

STONEHAM, MASS Stonelam H. R. R. Co. 

2% in, 4-8% g, 33 lb r, 10 c, 28 h. Pres A V Lynde, Mel- 
rose, Treas. & Cleric Lyman Dyke, Supt. John Hill, 

STILLWATER, MINN. — Stillwater St. Ry. Co. 

STILLWATER, N. Y. — Stillwater & Meehanlcs- 
vlUe St. Ry. Co, 4% ro, 4rC% g, 25-30 lb r, 3 c, 6 h- 



Pres. S. Rowley, V. Pres. W. L. Denison, Gen. Supt. 
Peter Van Veghten, Sec. &T'reas. Edw. I. Wood. 

STROUDSBU11GH, PA.— Stroudsburgh Passen- 
ger R.R. Co. 1 4-5 m, 4-8% g, 28-30 lb r, 3 c, 9 h. Pres. 
& Treas. .). Lantz, Sec. Jacob Houser. 

SYRACUSE, N.Y Syracuse & Onondaga R.R. 

Co. 2 3 5m, 4-8 g, 28-47 lbr, 9 c, 18 h. Pres. Peter 
Burns, V. Pres. Chas. P. clark, Sec. & Treas. Lyman 
C. Smith, Supt. W. B. Thompson. 

Central Clt.y Ry. Co. 2% m, 4-8)4 S, 40 lb r, 12 c, 37 
h. Pres. Daniel Pratt, V. Pres. Jonathan C. Chase, 
Sec. & Treas. James Barnes, Supt. George Crampton. 
4 Syracuse Savings Bank Building. 

Fifth Ward R.R. Co. 2% m, 4-8% g, 35-56 lb r, 8 c, 
30 h. Pres. P. li. Brayton, V. Pres. John D. Grey, 
Sec. & Treas. O. C. Potter, Supt. Hugh Purnell. Office 
W. Washington st. 

Genesee & ater St. R.R. Co. and Fourth Ward 
R.R. Co. 4 m, 4-8% g, 18-30 lb r, 10 c, 35 h. Pres. 
Robt. G. Wynkoop, V. Pres. Wra.ll. H. Smith, Sec. 
& Treas. Geo. J. Gardiner, Supt. W. J. Hart. Onon- 
daga Savings Bank Building. 

New Brighton & Onondaga Valley R.R. Co. ljg m, 
4-8 g, 16 35 lb r, 2 c, 6 h. 1 dummy. Pres. Matthias 
Britton, Sec. T. w. Meacham, Treas. J. II. Anderson, 
Supt. J. H. Anderson. 

Seventh Ward Ry. Co. Pres. E. F. Rice. 

Syracuse & Geddes Ry. Co. 2% m, 4 g, 30-45 lb r, 7 c, 
33 h. Pres. R. Nelson cere, v. Pres. Chas. C. Hubbell, 
Sec. & Treas. Rasselas A. Bonta, Supt. Wm. J. Hart. 
Gen offices, 1 Onondaga Co. Bank Building. 

Third Ward Ry. Co. Pres. W. B. Cogswell, Sec. 
& Treas. W. S. Wales. 

TAMPA, FLA Tampa St. Ry. Co. Sec. Geo. 

T. Chamberlain. 

TAUNTON, MASS.— Taunton St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 
4-8% g, 14 c, 45 h. Pres. Wm. C. Loverlng, Treas. 
Henry M. Loverlng, Clerk, orville A. Barker, Supt. 
Geo. C. Morse 

TERRE HAUTE, IND.— Terre Haute St. Ry. Co. 
4M m, 4-8% g, 28 lb r. 16 c, 48 h. Pres. T. C. Buntln, 
V. Pres. Josepluis Collett, Sec. John R. Hagen, Supt. 
John T. Shrlver. 

TEXARKANA, ARK — Texarkana St. Ry. Co. 

TOLEDO, OHIO.— Toledo Consolidated St. Ry. 
Co. 19 m, 4-8 g, 42 » a lb r, 50 c, 225 h. Pres. J. E. 
Bailey, Sec. A. E. Lang. Supt. John Gllmartin. 

Adams street Ry. Co. 

Metropolitan St. R;. . Co. 10 m, 3 g, 28-35 lb r, 31 c, 
101 h. Pres. & Sec. Jno. J. Shipherd ol Cleveland, 
'I'reas. H. E. Wells of Cleveland, Gen. Man. T. F. 
Shipherd, Supt. Jno. A. Watson. 

Monroe Street R.R. 

The central Passenger R.R. Co. of Toledo, O. 8 m, 

3 s, 27 lb r, 17 c, 70 h. Pres. F. E. Seagrave, Treas. & 
Man. A. R. seagrave, Supt. Joseph Murphy. 

TOPEKA, KAN.— Topeka City Ry.Co. 9 m, 4 g,25- 
48 lb r, 25 c, 90 h. Pres. Joab Mulvane, V. Pres. D.W. 
Stormont. St-c. & Treas. E. Wildes, Supt. Jesse Shaw. 

TORONTO, CAN.— Toronto St. Ry. Co. 60 m. 
4-10 3 4 g, 301b r, 160 c, 750 h. Pres. Frank Smith, Sec 
James Gunn, Supt. John J. Franklin. 

TRENTON, N. J.— Trenton Horse R.R. Co. 3 
m, 5-2 g, 43-48 lb r, 10 c, 33 h. Pres. Gen. Lewis Perrlne, 
Sec. & Treas. Lewis Perrine, Jr.,Supt.Thomas S Morris, 

City Ry. Co. 7 m, 5-2% g,35 lb r, 19 c, 110 h&m.Pres. 
Adam Ex ton, V. Pres. W. H. Sklrm, Sec.H. B. Howell, 
Treas. &Mang. Director Chas. Y r . Bamford. 

TRINIDAD, COL. -Trinidad St. R. R. Co. 1% m, 
3-2 g, 14 lb r, 2 c 8 mu. pres. S. H. Jaffa, Treas. F. 
B. Collier, Sec. R. L. W'ootten, Supt. H. E. Pearson. 

TROY, N.Y Cortland & Homer Horse R R. Co., 

4 m, 4-8% g, 25 30 lb r, 2 c, h. Pres. C. H. Garri- 
son. Trov, V. Pres. E. A. Fish, Cortland, N.Y., Treas. 
Jas. M. Milen, Cortland, Sec. S. E. Welch, Cortland. 

Troy & Albia Street Ry. Co. 3m m, 4 g, 35-45 lb r, 
9 c, 41 h. Pres. Thos. A. Knickerbocker, Sec. & Treas. 
Theo. E. Haslehurst, Supt. W. R. Bean. 

Troy & Lanslngburgh R.R. Co. 21% m, 4-8% g, 47 lb 
r, 91 c, 466 h. Pres. William Kemp, V. Pres. Charles 
Cleminshaw, Sec. & Treas. Joseph J. Hagen, Supt. 
L. C. Brown, Asst. Supt. C. H. smith. 295 River st. 

URBAN A, ILL.— Urbana & Champaign St. Ry. 
Co. 2 m, 4-8% g, 33 lb r, 4 c, 20 h. Pres.Wm. Park, 
Sec. & Treas. Frank G. Jaques, Supt. W. Park. 

UTICA, N.Y.— Utica, Clinton & Binghamton St. 
R.R. 12 m, 4-8% g, 43-56 lb r, 17 c, 82 h. Pres. 
Isaac Maynard, Sec. & Treas. Robt. S. Williams, Supt. 
Roger Rock. 

The Utica & Mohawk R.R. Co. 3^ m, 4-8% g, 25-04 
lbr, 9 c, 5h. Pres. Jas. F. Mann, Sec. Wm. E. 
Lewis, Treas. J. H, Sheehan. 

Utica Belt St. Ry. co. (See new roads.) 

VAILSBURGH, N. J.— Newark, so. Orange 
Ferry St. & Hamburg Place R.R. Co. 

VALEJO, CAL Valejo St. Ry. Co. 

VICKSBURG, MISS.— Vicksburg St. Ry. Co. 

Hill City R.R. Co. 

VINCENNES, IND.— Vlncennes St. Ry. Co. 

WACO, TEX Waco St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 4-8 g, 

14-18 lb r, 9 c, 44 h. Pres. E. Rotan, Sec. & Treas. W. 
R. Kellum, Supt. J. W. Sedbury. 

WALTHAM, MASS.— Waltham & Newton St. 
Ry.Co. 3>, m, 3-8)4 g, 30 lb r, 7 c, 18 h. Pres. R. E. 
Robblns, sec. & Treas. Henry Bond. 

WASHINGTON, D.C.— Capital, No O St. & So. 
Washington R.R. 13% m, 4 8 g, 35 lbr, 45 c, 176 h. 
Pres. C. White, Sec. & 'i reas. W. E. Boughton, Supt. 
Andrew Glass. 

A nacostla & Potomac River Ry. Co. 3 m, 4-8 g, 37 
lb r, 9 c, 24 h. Pres. H. A. Grlswold, Sec. Edward 
Temple, Treas. T. E. Smlthson. 

Columbia R.R. Co. of the District of Columbia. 2% 

jq. g, lb r, 19 c, 56 h. Pres. H. A. Willard, Sec. 

& Treas. Wm. II Clavette, Supt Thos. E. Benson. 

Metropolitan R.R. Co 21% m, 4-8 g, 38 lb r, 90 c, 400 
h. Pres. George W. Pearson, V. Pres. A. A. Wilson, 
Sec. & Treas. William W. Moore, Supt. L. W. Emmart 

Washington & Georgetown R.R. Co. 20 m, 4-8% g, 
42 lb r, 173 e, 850 h. Pres. H. Hurt, Sec. & Treas. C. M. 
Knones, Gen. supt. C. C. Sailer. 

WATER BURY, CONN.— Waterbury Horse R. 
R. Co. 5% m, 4-8% g, 40 lb. r, 13 c. 60 h. Pres. D. S. 
Plume, 'I reas. & Sec. E. F Turner. 

WATEltFORD, N. Y.— Waterford & CohoesR.R. 
Co. 2 m, 4-8% g, 45 lb r. Pres. Thos. Breslln, Sec. 
& Treas. C C. Ormsby. (Leased by the Troy a, Lan- 
slngburgn R.R. Co.) 



88 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December 1886. 



WATERLOO, I A Waterloo St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 3 

g, 20 lb r, 2 c, l baggage wagon. 9 h. Pres. Loran w. 
Reynolds, Sec. ana Treas. J. II. Kulin, Man. M. K. 
Kent. 

WEST HAVEN, CONN. — New Haven & West 
Uaven R.R. Co. H m, 4-8,'., g, 54 lb r, 24c, 115 h. Pres. 
Geo. R. Kelsey, Supt. V . W . Ward, '1 reas. 1). '1 row 
bridge, sec. Sam'l L. Smith. 

WESTPORT, CONN Westport & Saugatuck 

Horse R. R. (jo . l% m, 4-8^ g, 40 lb r. 3 c, 5 h. Pres. 

A. S. Hurlbutt, Sec and Treas B L Woodwenh, 
Supt E S Downe 

WHEELINti, W. VA. -Citizens Ry. Co. 10 m, 
5-2^ g, 45 lb r, 20 c, 55 h. Pres. Dr C. A. Wlngeiter. 
Sec. Van B. Hall, Supt. Michael I o.tus. 

Wheeling & Elm Grove R.R. 7 jij, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 12 
c, 4 Baldwin Motors. Pres. J. D. DuBois, Sec. E. J. 
Rutter, Supt. E. Hirsch. 

WICHITA, KAN.— Wichita City Ry. Co. 7% m, 
lie, 60niu, 4 h. Pres. B. H. Campbell, V. Pres., 
Treas. & Gen. Man. E.R.Powell, sec. G. W. I.ara- 
mer, Atty. E. c. Ruggles. 

WILKESBARRE, PA. — llkesbar re & Kingston 
Pass. R.R. 

coaivllie Passenger R.R. iv 2 m, 4 8x g, 20-34 lb r, 
3 c. 10 h. Pres. Geo. W. Klikendall, supt. A. S Orr, 
,Sec and Tre is Geo Loveland. capital, $62.675 

WILLIAiUSPORT, PA.-Wllllamspoit St. R.R. 
CO. 

WILMINGTON, DEL. -Front & Union St. Pass- 
enger Ry. Co. lhi m, 5-2 g, — lb r, 7 c, 20 h. Pres. 
Geo. W. Bush, Supt. Sam'l A Price, Treas. E. T. 
Taylor. 

Wilmington City Ry. Co. 6 m, 5-2K g, 45 lb r, 19 
c, 80 h. Pres. W. canby, Sec. & Treas. John F. Miller, 
supt. Wm. H. Burnett. 

WINDSOR, CAN.— Sandwich & Windsor Passen- 
ger It. K. Co. 

Winder & Walkervllle Electric Ry. Co. 2 m, 2 c. 

W1NFIELO, KAN. -Union St Ry Co 2%m 4 

g, 28 lb r, jc, 8mu Pres Shuler, V Pres H E 

Sllllman, Treas John D Pryor, sec John A Eaton 
Capital, $25,000 

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, CAN.— The Winni- 
peg St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 4 8)4 g, 35 lb r, 13 c, 75 h. Pres. 
Duncan AlacArthur, Sec. & Mangr. Albert W. Austin, 
Supt. Geo. A. Young. 

WINONA, MINN. — Winona City Rv. Co. 4 m, 3-6 
g, 27 lb r, 10 c, 39 h. Pres. John A. Mathews, V. Pres. 

B. H. Langley, Sec. & Treas. C. H. Porter. 
WOBl'RN, MASS.— No. Woburn St. Ry. Co. 

'i% m, 4 8 %g, 40 lb. r. 5 c, i h. Pres. & Treas. J.R.Car- 
ter. Supt. Dexter Carter. 

WORCESTER, MASS.— Worcester St. Ry. Co. 
7', m, 4-8^ g, 43-45 lb r, 31c, 151 h. Pres. Geo. H. 
seeley. Sec. & Treas. U.S. Seeley, Sup't. J. N. Akar- 
man. Ass't. Supt. J B. Chapln 

Citizens' St. Ry. Co 7H m, 4-8 '-g, 451b. r. 19 c. 100 h. 
Pres. Chas. B. Pratt, Sec. &Treas. H. S. Seeley, Supt. 
J N. Akarman. 

W YMORE, NEB Wymoreaud Blue Springs Ry 

Col. m. 3-6 g, 3 c, 8 h. Pres. E.P. Reynolds, Rock 
isand, 111., V. Pres. I. H. Reynolds, Gen. Man. Ben- 
Reynolds, sec. Treas. and Acting supt. E. P. Rey. 
nolds, Jr. 

YOUNGSTOWN, O.— Youngstown St. R.R. Co. 

ZANESVILLE, O.— Zanesvliie & Mclntlre St. Ry. 
Co. 3 m, 3-6 g, 38 lb r, 12 c, 54 m. Pres. J. Bergen, 
Sec. W. C. Townsend, Treas. T. B. Townsend. 



NEW ROADS. 

ANN ARBOR, MICH.— Ann Arbor St. Ry. Co* 
4-8 g. Pres. .1 unlus E. Beal, V. Pres. Edward Duffy, 
Sec. Zina P. King, Treas. Louis D. Taylor, Supt. 
Thomas J. Keech. Capital $20,000. Office, 46 Main st. 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA East Lake Land Co. 

7 m. 4-8% g, 45 lb r, 4-8 c, motor power. Pres. Robt. 
Jennlson, v.-Pres. a. A. Clisby, Treas. T. B. Lyons, 
Sec. S. M. Hanby. Capital $200,000. Work In pro- 
gress, to be complet ed in January, 18S7. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y.— Union Ry. Co. of the City 
of Brooklyn. 

COVINGTON, G A . — W. C. Clark & Co. incorpor- 
ators and owners. 1 in, 20 or 30 lb r, 2 pass, c, 2 flat 
c, pass, cars for l h. 6 to 8 mu. or h. Work will be 
commenced by Nov. 1 or delayed until spring. 

CHICAGO, ILL.— The Crosstown Pass. Ry. Co. 
of Chicago, 30 m, 4-8 1-2 g, 45 lb r, 75 c, 509 to 800 h. 
Pres. John J. Currar, Treas. Geo. P. Bunker, Sec. 
James A. Taylor. Capital stock, $1,000,000. Gen. of- 
fice, room 18, No. 164 Washington st. Time of com- 
mencement of work undecided. 

DANBURY, CONN Danbury St. Ry. Co. 4m, 

between Danbury and Bethlehem. Work In pro- 
gress. 

KANSAS CITY, MO Grand Avenue Ry. Co. 

(For officers see Directory). Now constructing: 8 
m, double track cable road. 

LOCKPORT, N. Y Lockport, St. Ry. Co. 

(Work In progress.) 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y — Riker Avenue &. 
Sandford's Point R. R. Co. 2 m, 4-8, 1 ,- g, 47 lb steel r. 
Pres. J. H. Hemptead, Sec. Oscar R. Steins. Capital 
$20,000. Work in progress; to be opened June l, 1887. 
Office, 100 E. Fourteenth St.. New York. 

MERIDEN, CONN.-Meriden St. R. R. 4 3 4 ' m, 
4-8^ g, 35 lb r, 12 c, 56 h. Pres. G. R. Curtis, 
Sec. & Treas. Chas. L. Rockwell, Auditor, H. S. Wil- 
cox, Man. John L. Blllard. Work in progress. 

NEW BRITAIN', CONN.— New Britain Tramway 
Co., chartered by C. S. Lander. 3,Vm. capital ?2i,000. 

NEW LONDON, CONN.— New London Horse Ry. 
Co. John Tebbetts, Incoporator. 

NEWTON, MASS.— Newton St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 
4 8% g, 5 c. 5 electric motors, 35 lb r. Pres. Horace 
B. Parker, V. Pres. LnciusG. Pratt, Treas. Herbert 
G. Pratt. Capital stock, $50,000. Present office, 87 
Milk st. Boston, Mass. Work will be commenced and 
the road opened m the spring of 1887. 

NEW YORK, N.Y".— St. Nicholas and Crosstown 
R. R. C o. (Incorporated and franchises partly 
granted.) 

OMAHA, NEB.— Cable Tramway Co. of Omaha. 
4 m, 4-8 1-2 g. 58 lb r, 10 c, each with grip; operated 
by cable. Pres. S. R. Johnson, V. Pres. L. B. Wil- 



liams, Sec. and Treas. C. E. Yost, Chief Engineer 
Robert Glllham. Capital stock, $300,000, General of- 
fice, 215 South 13th st. 

ORLANDO, FLA.-Orlando & Winter Park Ry. 
Co. 6 m, 4-8J,. g, steam motors Pres. R. J. Gillham, 
Sec. oeo. R. Newell, Treas. T. J. Beeks, Supt. & Eng. 
J. H. Abbott. Capital $100,000. To be opened in 
Feb. 1887. 

PEORIA, ILL. -East Bluff Horse R. R. Co. \% 
m, 4-8^ g, 30-40 lb r, 4 c, 24 h. Pres. N. Giles, Sec. R. 
R. Boureaud, Treas. M. E. Culver. Capital stock, 
$11,000. Work in progress. Road to be opened Dec. 

15, 1886. 

PLYMOUTH, MASS.— Plymouth & Kingston St. 
R.R. Co. 2% m, i8% g. xundecldeo, 6 to 10 c, 10 
toi2h. Capital stock, $25,000. Joseph D. Thurber 
and others incorporators. Work to be begun in 
spring of 1887. 

PITTSBURG, PA.— Wilkinsburg and East Lib- 
erty Ry. Co. 3 m, 4-81-2 g, Johnson T rails, Pres. Ed. 
Jay Allen, Sec. and Treas. W. H. Allen. To use about 
5 c and 20 h. Not decided when road will be open- 
ed. Capital stock, $15,000. Present office, 517 Woodst. 

SCRANTON, PA.— Scranton suburban Ry. Co. 
In process of construction, will use electric motor 
on Van Depoele system. 2% m, 4-8% g, 52-40 lb r, 
number of Of rs undecided. Pres. Edward B. Sturges, 
Treas. T. F. Torrey. Sec. Geo. Sanderson. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.— The Powell & Jack- 
son St. R.R co. 11 m, 3-6 g. Pres. W. J. Adams, V. 
Pres. II. H. Lynch, Treas. W. H. Martin, Sec, G. H. 
Waggoner. Capital stock, $2,000,000. Work in pro- 
gress, cable traction. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. — Butternut St. Ry. Co. 2m. 
To be built in the spring of 1887. 

SAYRE, pa.— Sayre St. Ry. Co. Pres. Howard 
Elmer. No work done. 

STAMFORD, CONN.— J. B. Curtis and W. W 
Jlllisbee, Incorporators. 

UTICA, N. Y. — Utica Belt Line St. Ry. Co. 8 m, 
15 c. Pres. Dr. C Tefft, V. Pres. W. A.Jones, Sec. 
and Gen. Man. Isaac J. Griffith, Treas. Chas. W. 
Mather. To be opened about Dec. l. Work now In 
progress. 

WINSTED, CONN.— Geo. S. Rowe, Incorporator. 

WICHITA, KAN Riverside and Suburban Ry. 

Co. Pres. J. o. Davidson, Sec. N. G. Lee. Capital 
stock $100,000. Work now in progress, road to be 
opened about January, 18S7. 



Clark's Tramways. 

Tramways Their Constkuction and Work- 
ing. Embracing a Comprehensive His- 
tory of the System; with an exhaustive 
Analysis of the various Modes of Trac- 
tion, including Horse-Power, Steam, 
Heated Water and Compressed Air; a 
Description of the Varieties of Rolling 
Stock; and ample Details of Cost 
and Working Expenses: the Progress re- 
cently made in Tramway Construction, 
&c, &c. By D. Kinnear Clark, M. Inst., 
C. E. With over 200 Wood Engravings, 
and 13 Folding Plates. Two Vols., large 
crown 8vo, 80s. cloth. Price $12. 

" All interested in tramways must refer to It, 
as all railway engineers have turned to the au- 
thor's work ' Railway Machinery.' "—Engineer. 



" An exhaustive and practical work on tramways, 
in which the history of this kind of locomotion, and 
a description and cost of the various modes of laying 
tramways, are to be found."— Building News. 



" The best form of rails, the best mode of construc- 
tion, and the best mechanical appliances are so fair- 
ly Indicated in the work under review, that any 
engineer about to construct a tramway will be ena- 
bled at once to obtain the practical information 
which will be of most service to him."— Athenaeum. 



AMER. RAILWAY PUBLISHING CO., 

1J3 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK. 



STREET RAILWAY STOCK QUOTATIONS. 



Corrected by H. L. GRANT, 145 Broadway, N. Y. City. 



New York Stocks. 


Par. 


Amount. 


Period. 


Rate. 


Date. 


Bid. 


Asked. 


lileecker St. & Fulton Ferry 


100 


$900,000 


J. & J. 


X 


January, 


1886 


28 


30 




1,000 


700,00 


J. & J. 


7 


July, 


1900 


116 


125 


Broadway & Seventh avenue 


100 


2.100,000 


Q-J. 


2 


January, 


1886 


190 


200 




1,000 


1,500,000 


a. & D. 


5 


June, 


1904 


104 


107 




1,000 


500,000 


J. & J. 


5 


July, 


1914 


103 


106 


Broadway Surface Guaranteed 


1,000 


1,500.000 


J. & J. 


5 


July, 


1924 


100 


Additional 


1,000 


1,010,000 


J. & J. 


5 


July, 


1905 




100 




10 


2,000,000 


<?.'&j'. 


2 


August, 


1886 


167 


192 




1,000 


800,000 






January, 


1686 


106 


110 


Brooklyn Crosstown 


100 


200,000 


A. & O. 


4 


April, 


11-86 


1C5 


170 




1,000 


400,000 


J. & J. 


7 


January, 


1R88 


105 


109 


Central Park North and East river. 


100 


1,800,000 


Q.-J. 


2 


Januaiy, 


1^86 


115 


118 


Con. mort. bonds 


1,000 


1,200,000 


J. & D. 


7 


December, 


19o2 


120 


123 




100 


650,000 


F. & A. 


2>£ 


February, 


18^6 


130 


135 




1,000 


250,000 


A. & O. 


7 


October, 


1898 


no 


116 




100 


000,000 


Q.-F. 


1% 


January, 


1886 


156 


160 




1,000 


250,000 


M. & N. 


6 


November, 


1922 


118 


125 


Dry Dock. East B'way & Battery.. . . 


:oo 


1,200,000 


Q.-F. 


2 


February, 


1866 




160 




500 


1,900,000 


J. & D. 




June, 


1893 


114 


1W% 




100 


1,200,000 


F. & A. 


a 


August, 


1914 


105 


107 




100 


748,000 


Q.-F. 


3 


August, 


1886 


220 


225 




1,000 


236,000 


A. & O. 


7 


April, 


1893 


111 


115 


42d St., Manhattan & St. Nlch. av. . 


100 


2,500,000 








35 


35X 




1,000 


1,200,000 


M &S. 


5 




1910 


109 


110 


2d mort. In. bonds 


1,000 


1,200,000 


J. & J. 


6 




1915 


50 


63 


Eighth Avenue— Stock 


100 


1,600,000 


Q.-J. 


2 


October, 


1886 


190 


200 




100 


1,000,000 


F. & A. 


6 


August, 


1914 


105 


110 


Houston, West St. & Pavonia Ferry 


100 


1,000,000 


Q -F. 


2 


August, 


1885 


120 


130 




500 


250,000 


J. & J. 


7 


July, 


1894 


112 


113 


Second Avenue— stock 


100 


500,000 


J. .& J. 


5 


July, 


1886 




180 






1,862,000 


M. & N. 




November, 


1909 


106 


107 




1,066 


550,000 


M. & N. 


7 


May. 


1688 


103 






100 


1,050,000 


M. & S. 


D 


August, 


1885 


180 


190 


1st mort 


1,000 


500,000 


J. & J. 


7 


July, 


1890 


112 


116 


Third Avenue— Stock 


100 


2,000,000 


Q.-F. 


3 


February, 


1886 


230 


240 




1,000 


2,000,000 


J. & J. 


7 


January, 


189" 


110 


112 


23d St.— Stock 


100 


600,000 


M. & N. 


5 


May, 


1885 


240 


250 


1st mort 


1,000 


250,000 


M. & N. 


7 


May, 


1893 


110 


113 




100 


800,000 




3 


September, 


1885 


90 


100 


Chicago St. Railway 


100 










1 


299 


325 



ZPIb-ila,. Street IE£ £111^7^3137- Stocks. 



Corrected by Robert Glendinning & Co., 303 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 





Par. 


Period. 


Amount. 


Rate. 


Date. 


Bid. 


Asked. 




50 


J Q - 


—J. 


$500,000 










Continental 


50 




& J. 


1,000,000 








130 


Frankford £ Southwark 


50 




—J. 


750,000 








310 




50 


I 


-J. 


1,500,000 








100 




50 


Q- 


-J. 


500,000 








121 




50 




2,050,000 






32 


33 
98 




50 




500,000 








50 




1,500,000 






40 




Philadelphia City 


50 


J. 


& J. 


1,000,000 






140 




Philadelphia « Gray's Ferry 


50 


J. 


& J. 


617,500 








84 




50 






5,000,000 






82^ 


84 




50 


J. 


"J: 


750,000 






225 




50 


Q- 




1,060,200 






195^ 


200 




50 


J. 


& j. 


500,000 












50 


J. 


& j. 


1.000,000 






143 


145 




50 


J. 


& j. 


1,250,000 






182 




West Philadelphia 


50 


J. 


& j. 


750,000 








200 



December, lfiSfi. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



89 



Shall the City Own the Horse Railroads? 

In bringing forward in the city council 
an order to have the city of Boston purchase 
the horse railroads, Mr. Cherrington is 
following out the suggestions of a number 
of the labor organizations. Several of these 
associations have formulated platforms in 
which the ownership and control of horse 
railways by the city are demanded. It is 
only natural that the plan should meet with 
opposition, as it would involve a change to 
which the community is not accustomed. 
But it does not follow on that account that 
it would not be a wise change to make. 
The managers of the various street railway 
systems are discovering that their compan- 
ies could be much more economically and 
efficiently managed if they were consolidat- 
ed into a single corporation, and ownership 
by the city would bring about that unity 
of management that is now looked upon 
as desirable. 

In the city of Paris the tram- 
ways and omnibuses are owned by 
a company that is worked under 
the supervision of the municipal 
government, and in its profits the 
municipal government has a con- 
siderable share. The city authori- 
ties direct when and where omni- 
buses and horse cars shall be run. 
There may be a section where the 
demand for transportation is so 
small as not to pay the company a 
profit for extending its system in 
that direction, and if left to itself, 
such an extension would not be 
made. But the government judges 
of the question on the ground of 
convenience as well as on the 
ground of profit, and compels the 
company to put down new tracks 
or establish a new line of omni- 
buses. So in the matter of main- 
taining a night service. It insists 
that the company shall run its cars 
and coaches at frequent intervals 
between sunset and sunrise, al- 
though the trips may be made without a 
profit during the hours after midnight. 

It may be said: "What reason is there 
for running horse cars at intervals during 
the entire night ? It would only be a very 
small number of people who would be ac- 
commodated thereby, and their accommo- 
dation would impose an added expense to 
the rest of the community. "While this 
argument may be true, it is equally appli- 
cable to other services which the municipal 
government now performs. We keep our 
streets lighted with gas from sunset to sun- 
rise, although it is probable that from 
midnight to 5 a. m. there is not one person 
in five hundred of our people who is accom- 
modated or benefited by the continuous il- 
lumination. 

If the city had control of the railroads, 
it is quite probable that it would be forced 
by public opinion to run horse cars, at 
least as often as once an hour, throughout 
the night, over each of the several routes, and 
it is also probable that it would be called 
upon to extend the tracks to a number of 



the suburban districts that are now poorly 
supplied with means of transportation, for 
the reason that the companies have seen no 
way toward an immediate profit by the con- 
struction of new routes. 

But the great obstacle in the way of such 
an acquisition on the part of the city gov- 
ernment is the uncertain character of mun- 
icipal control. If the city authorities could 
l>e implicitly trusted, it is probable that in 
these railroad affairs municipal manage- 
ment would be better than corporate man- 
agement; but not only is there no assur- 
ance of this kind to be given, but, on the 
other hand, there are many reasons for 
thinking that the horse railroad system 
would become a fruitful source of muni- 
cipal corrupt-ion. The thousands of con- 
ductors, drivers undatable employees would 
become, collectively, a powerful political 
factor, and we should have men, and pos- 
sibly Mr. Cherrington might be among 
their number, seeking to gain -^support at 




Kaestuer Portable Wrist Mill. 

The mill* illustrated in this connection 
was one that was on exhibition at the Cin- 
cinnati convention, and which has been 
extensively adopted by street railway 
companies for grinding feed for their h< >rses. 
It is convenient in form, easily handled, 
and portable. It is a stone mill, in which 
the French buhr stone is used. 
It is made in four sizes, 1G, 
20, 24 and 30 inch stones, and is adapted 
in this way to powers ranging from three 
to fifteen horse power. The mill is illus- 
trated in this connection on account of the 
interest which street railway men are tak- 
ing in the matter of grinding their own 
feed, and thus knowing what is fed to their 
horses; and from the fact that it seems to 
be a conceded point that it requires less to 
keep a horse in good condition when the 
feed is thoroughly ground and well mixed 
than when it is fed to them in a rough con- 
dition. The general appearance 
of the mill is clearly shown by our 
engravings and its arrangement can 
be readily studied therefrom. Of 
course, it can be placed in any 
position, and the hopper at the top 
made any size which is required. 
Adjustment is effected by the gear- 
ing shown at the end. 

*Chas. Kaestner & Co., Chicago, 111. 



KAESTNER'S PORTABLE GRiST MILL. 



election time for profitable municipal of- 
fices by voting to largely increase the rail- 
road men's pay, greatly lessen their hours 
of work, and in other ways make life ex- 
ceptionally easy for them. 

It is to be feared that if such an en- 
largement in municipal control was made, 
the city council would show itself much 
more solicitous for the comfort and welfare 
of the railroad operatives than of 
the comfort and welfare of the 
general public, that the railroads 
were built to accommodate. For this rea- 
son, until some assurance can be given that 
the system will be managed in an impartial 
and businesslike manner, it will hardly be 
safe for the city to undertake the perform- 
ance of duties that private corporations are 
now doing with a tolerable degree of effi- 
ciency. — Ex. 



A Fare-Box Episode. 

The Detroit Free Press gives 
the following concerning Lewis 
& Fowler's Small's fare collector: 

"In some of the St. Louis one- 
horse cars there are brass nickel 
carriers that run the whole length 
of the car. From any part of 
the car you can drop a nickel into 
one of these carriers and then 
watch it as it rolls along on its edge 
down the incline and finally goes 
rattling into the fare-box. I saw a 
Western ranchman come into a car, and 
after putting his fare in in the ordinary way 
he noticed a new-comer drop a nickel down 
the elevated railway. 

"The device aroused his utmost admira- 
tion. He at once changed a couple of dol- 
lars into five cent pieces. Then he took his 
place at the door and started two nickels 
simultaneously down each side of the car 
and offered to accept bets as to which would 
get into the fare-box first. He kept this up 
until his $2 worth of coin was gone, and 
wound up by saying, ' Well, that's the 
durndest contrivance I ever see.' " 



The new cable road on One Hundred and 
Twenty-fifth street, New York, was success- 
fully opened December 1, at 10 p. M. The 
cars are of the type designed by Supt. Itob- 
ertson and described in ourOctober number. 



1 



Success of Electricity in Scranton. 

We receive just as we go to press, a copy 
of the Scranton Republican, containing an 
account of the trial of the new Suburban 
Railway Co.'s electric motors in that city. 
The Van Depoele system is used, and the 
Republican speaks very enthusiastically of 
the success of the trial, says that rapid 
transit is practically solved in Scranton, and 
thinks the enterprise reflects great credit 
on those who have been instrumental in 
introducing electricity there. 

We hope to give further details of the 
road latter. 



90 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



t>KCEMBEfc, 1886. 



Manufacturers and Dealers in Street Railway Supplies, 



AUTOMATIC SWITCHES. Page. 

M. M. White & Co., o31 W. 23d St. N. Y 98 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 23d st. N. Y 121-123 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa.. 116 
Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty st., N. Y 101 

AXLES. 

F. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty st., N. Y 99 

Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn, N. Y .. .102-1(13 

A. Whitney & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa 98 

Frank H. A ndrews, 545 W. S3d St., H.Y.... 122-123 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa... 116 

BEARINGS. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 122-123 

John Stephenson Co., New York 128 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York ..109 

Edward c. White, 531 W. 33d St., New York 97 

Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn.N.Y ....102-103 

Chaplin Mfg. Co., Bridgeport, Conn 96 

Bemis Car Box CO., Springfield, Mass 113 

Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa.... 11 6 
Chas. B. Miller, 2V Coenties slip, New York. . 94 95 

BOXES, JOURNAL. 

A. Whitney & sons, Philadelphia, Pa 98 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N.Y 102-103 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 122-123 

Chaplin Mfg. Co., Bridgeport, Conn 96 

Bemis Car Box Co., Springfield, Mass 113 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa.. .116 
Chas. B. Miller, 2 1 ,. Coenties slip, New York.. 94-95 

BRAKE RODS. 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N Y 102-103 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co , Limited, Phlla., Pa. ..116 
Mallinekrodt St. Car Brake Co., St. Louis, Mo.. 97 
Mordecai M Wilson, Agent, Troy, N. Y 100 

BRAKE SHOES. 
Frank H. Andrews. 545 W. 33d St., N. Y ....122-123 

John Stephenson Co., New York 128 

Win. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa... 116 
Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 102-103 

CABLE GRIPS. 
J. H. Gould, 9th and Market sts., Phila., Pa. . . .115 
D. B. Anders, Philadelphia, Pa los 

CARS, NEW 

John steplienson Co., New York 128 

J. G. Brill & Co., Phlla., Pa 126-127 

The Feigel Car Co.,Hl8 Wall St., N.Y 108 

Brownell & Wight Car Co., St. Louis, Mo 107 

J. M. Jones' Sons, West Troy, N. Y 101 

Pullman's Palace Car Co., Chicago, 111 117 

CARS, SECOND HAND. 

Humphreys & Sayce, l Broadway, N. Y 92 

Brooklyn Railway Supply Co., 37 Walworth St., 
Brooklyn 120 

CAR HEATERS. 

The National stove Co., 243 Water st., N. Y....1O6 
The Michigan Stove Co., Detroit, Mich 100 

CAR STARTERS. 
C. B. Broadwell, 169 Laurel St., New Orleans, La. 98 

CAR LAMPS. 

Geo. M. Clute, W. Troy, N. Y 100 

Josephine D. Smith, 350 & 352 Pearl St., N. Y 104 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York... 109 
Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 102-103 

CAR PAINTING MATERIALS. 
Edw. E. JUlard, 1645 N. loth St., Phlla., Pa 101 

CAR WHEELS. 

A. Whitney & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa 98 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N.Y 102-103 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d st,., N.Y 122-123 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York. .109 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa .116 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phila., Pa.. Ill 

CAR WHEEL PRESSES. 
Watson & Stlllman, 204-210 E. 43d St., N.Y 100 

CAR SPRINGS. 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 102-103 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 122-123 

Richard Vose, 13 Barclay St., Y 124 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York. . .109 
The A. French Spring Co., Limited, Pittsburg, 
Pa., Pugh & Russell General Agents 105 

CAR SEATS. 
Bale & Kilburn Mfg. Co., 48 & 50 N. 6th St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 109 

Gardner & Co., 643 to 657 W. 4Sth St., N.Y 110 

CAR SASH. 
Ayers Patent. Sash Holder Co., Stewart Build- 
ing, New York City . 99 

W. L. Everit, New Haven, Ct '. .106 

CAR CEILINGS. 

Gardner & Co., 643 to 657 W. 43th St., N.Y 110 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 102-103 

CASTINGS. 

Bowler & Co., Cleveland, o 9s 

F. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty St., N. Y 99 
A. Whitney & Sons. Philadelphia. Pa 9s 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty st., N. Y 101 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 102-103 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d st., N.Y... 122-123 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila , Pa 116 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phlla., Pa.. ill 

CURVED RAILS. 

Frank H. Andrews. 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 122-123 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New ^ ork. 109 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 101 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa . 118 
Wm. Wharton Jr.. & Co., Limited, Phlla,, Pa... 116 
Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 102-103 

CROSSINGS. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y, 122-1°3 
Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut st. 

Philadelphia, Pa 109 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co. Limited, Phila., Pa' 116 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 102^103 

Bowler & Co., 10 to 24 Winter st., Cleveland, O. 98 



CURVED RAILS— Pat. Steel Grooves. Page. 
Wm. Wharton Jr. & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa 116 

CHANNEL PLATES. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y.... 122-123 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 101 

Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa.... 116 
CABLE ROADS. 

D. J. Miller, 234 Broadway, N. Y 99 

Frank H. Andrews, 515 VV. 33d St., N. Y ....122-123 

Poole & Hunt, Baltimore 113 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa... 116 
. ohnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 109 

Nettel & Oothout, 41 Liberty st. N.Y. City.... 97 
J. H. Gould, Uthand Market sts., Phila., Pa. . .115 
John A. Roebling's Sons Co., 117 & 119 Liberty 

St., N. Y 106 

O. W. Meysenburg & Co., 1S5 Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago, 111., and 204 N. 3d St., St. Louis, Mo ... . 93 
DOOR STOPS. 
Haycox Door Fastener Co., 1158 Euclid ave., 
Cleveland, O 97 

ELECTRIC RAILWAYS. 

Van Depoele Electric Manufg. Co 125 

PEED CUTTERS. 

Nordyke & Marmon Co., Indianapolis, Ind 101 

Belle City Mfg. Co., Racine, Wis 93 

FEED MILLS. 

Edward P. Allis & Co., Milwaukee, Wis 93 

Nordyke & Marmon Co., Indianapolis, Ind 101 

Chas. Kaestner & Co., 303-311 So. canal st., Chi- 
cago, 111 92 

FROGS. 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N.Y 92 

Frank II. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. / 122-123 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York.. 109 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa... 116 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phila., Pa. .111 
Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 109 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 102-103 

Bowler & Co., 10 to 24 Winter St., Cleveland, O. 98 
FARE BOXE<i. 
Wales Manuf. Co., 76 and 78 East Water st., 

Syracuse, N. Y 96 

Tom L. Johnson. Indianapolis, Ind Ill 

Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. . .102-103 

J. B. Slawson, 10 W. 46th st., New York 112 

John Stephenson Co., New York 128 

FARE ENVELOPES. 

Morgan Envelope Co., Springfield, Mass 93 

FAKE REGISTERS, STATIONARY. 
Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn. N.Y. . . .102-103 
Standard Index and Register Co, 138 Fulton st. 

New York 111 

Railway Register Mfg. Co., 1193 Bdy ., N. Y. . 121 

FAKE COLLECTORS. 
Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn.N. Y 102-103 

GUTTERS. 

Bowler & Co., Cleveland, O 98 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa.. .116 

GROOVED CURVES. 

Humphreys & sayce, 1 Broadway, N.Y 92 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y... .122-123 
Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York... 109 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty st.,N. Y 101 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa US 

Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co. Limited, Phila., Pa.. ..1)6 

GROOMING MACHINES. 
Ellis Pennington, 204 Walnut place, Phlla., Pa. . 96 

HARNESS. 

Charles E. Berry, Cambridge, Mass 96 

Rufus Martin & Co., 13 & 15 Park row, N. Y 101 

HYDRAULIC JACKS. 
Watson & Stillman, 204-210 E. 43d St., N. Y 101 

HORSE SHOES. 
P. F. Burke, 8611 Dorchester are., South Boston 99 

F. P. Roberge. 1741 Broadway, N. Y 100 

Bryden Forged Horseshoe Co., Catasauqua, Pa.114 

HORSE NAILS. 

Champion Horse Nail Co., Appleton, Wis 93 

Putnam Nail Co., NeponsetP. O., Boston. Mass 104 

KNEES. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33d st., N. Y. 122-123 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty st., New Y'ork 101 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York. 109 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa. 116 
Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia. Pa 109 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y '.'.'.'.102-103 

LUBRICANTS. 
The Leib Lubricating Co. , 196 Chicago St., Buf- 
falo, N. Y 7 99 

Rufus Martin & CO., 13 & 15 Park row, N. Y. . . . 101 

METALLIC RAILWAY. 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa. . 116 
Metallic Street Railway Supply Co., Albany N.Y 99 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 92 

D. F.Longstreet, Providence, R. 1 9s 

MATTING. 

Warneck & Toffler, 211 E. 22d St., N Y 101 

Lynn & Pettit, 707 Market St., Phlla.' . 99 
Edward Beadle, 1193 Broadway, N. Y !.'loi 

MOTORS — Elec'ric. 
Van Depoele Electric Mfg. Co., 203 Van Buren 
St., Chicago, 111 125 

PEDESTALS. 

John Stephenson Co., New York 128 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33d St., N. Y 122-123 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa... 116 

PANELS. 

Gardner * Co., 183 Canal st., N. Y no 



RAILS. Page 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 92 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, N. Y 109 

F. W. Jesup & CO., 67 Liberty St., N. Y 99 

Pennsylvania Steel Co., loo Broadway, N. Y 107 

Carnegie, Phipps & Co., Pittsburg, Pa 100 

Frank II. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y ....122-123 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 101 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa 118 

Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa.... 116 
O. W. Meysenburg & Co., 185 Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago, 111 , and 204 N. 3d St., St. Louis, Mo 93 

SAND BOXES. 
Car 1 rack Friction Appliance Co., 19 Tremont 
row, Boston, Mass 97 

STEEL RAILS. 

Carnegie, Phipps & Co., Pittsburg, Pa 101 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 92 

F. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty St., N. Y 99 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa ...116 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa 118 

Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 109 

O. W. Meysenburg & Co., 185 Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago, 111., and 204 N. 3d St., St. Louis, Mo 93 

SEATS & SEAT SPRINGS. 
Hale & Kilburn Manufg Co. Philadelphia, Pa.. .109 

SWITCHES. 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., 25th st. & Wash- 
ington ave., Philadelphia, Pa 116 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 92 

M. M. White & Co., 531 West 33rd st, N. Y 98 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. Y.122-123 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y' 102-103 

Johnson steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa 118 

Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut st., 

Philadelphia, Pa 109 

Bowler & CO., 10 to 24 Winter st., Cleveland, O. 98 

STREET RAILWAY BUILDERS. 
MetalUc St. Railway Supply Co., Albany, N. Y. 99 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Phila., Pa 116 

Delano & Richardson, 47 Broadway, N. Y 100 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 101 

Frank H Andrews, 545 West 33rd st., N. Y 122-123 

A. J. Hutchinson, 95 Liberty st., N. Y 99 

Neftel & Oothout, 41 Liberty st. N. Y. City 97 

M. W. Conway, 487 Monroe st. Brooklyn.N.Y.. 97 

STREET RAILWAY SUPPLIES. 

John Stephenson Co., New York 128 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 92 

Metallic St. Railway Supply Co., Albany, N. Y. . 99 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Bidg., N.Y 109 

F. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty st., N. Y 99 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 101 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 102-103 

Delano & Richardson, 47 Broadway, N. Y 100 

Frank II. Andrews, 543 West 33rd st., N. Y. .122-123 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa. ..116 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phlla., Pa.. ill 
Brooklyn Railway Suppiy Co., 37 Walworth St., 

Brooklyn 120 

Fulton Foundry Co., 202 Merwin st. Cleveland,0.li6 
M. W. Conway, 487 Monroe st. Brooklyn, N.Y. . . 97 

Edward Beadle, 1193 Broadway, N. Y. City 101 

Rufus Martin & Co., 13 & 15 Park row, N. Y 101 

O. W. Mysenburg & Co., 185 Dearborn st., Chi- 
cago. 111., and 204 N. 3d st., St. Louis, Mo 93 

STREET RAILWAY TOOLS. 
Wm. Wharton Jr. & Co. Limited, Phlla, Pa 116 

SNOW PLOWS. 
Frank H Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. Y 122-123 

Augustus Day, Detroit 112 

Brooklyn Railway supply Co., 37 Walworth St., 

Brooklyn 120 

Fulton Foundry Co., 202 Merwin st. Cleveland. .116 

TURNOUTS. 
Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co., 25th st. & Washington 

ave., Philadelphia, Pa 116 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. Y.122-123 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phlla., Pa. .116 
Bowler & Co., 14 Winter st., Cleveland, O 98 

TURN TABLES. 

W. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 101 

Frank II. Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. Y.122-123 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phila., Pa. .116 

Bowler & Co., 14 Winter st., Cleveland. 98 

O. W. Meysenburg & Co., 185 Dearborn St., Chi-fv* 
cago, 111., and 204 N. 3d St., St. Louis, Mo 93 

TRACK CASTINGS. 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 92 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd st , N. Y.122-123 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa.. .116 

Augustus Day, Detroit 112 

Way Foundry Co.. 23d & Wood sts., Phlla., Pa.. 11 6 
Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 109 

Bowler & Co., 14 Winter St., Cleveland, O 98 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 102-103 

O. W. Meysenburg & Co., 185 Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago, 111 ., and 204 N. 3d St., St. Louis, Mo .... 93 

TRACK SCRAPERS. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N.Y 122-123 

Brooklyn Railway Supply Co., 37 Walworth st., 
Brooklyn 120 

VARNISHES. 
John Babcock & Co., 2 Llbeny sq., Boston Mass. 92 
Parrott Varnish Co., Bridgeport, Conn 93 

WHEEL PRESSES. 

Watson & Stlllman, 204-210 K. 43d St., N. Y 100 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa..H6 

VETERINARY REMEDIES. 

Lawrence, Williams & Co., Cleveland, 83 

wm. Somervllle & Sons, 127 Erie St., Buffalo 97 

WHEELS. 

Frank II. Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. > .122-123 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N.Y 102-103 

A. Whitney & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa 98 

Bowler & Co., 14 Winter st., Cleveland, 98 



December, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



91 



PERSONAL DIRECTORY OF STREET RAILWAY 

SUPPLY MEN. 



Page. 

Allls, Edw. P. and Co., Milwaukee, Wis. Edw. P. 

Allls, Prop.; Edw. Reynolds, Supt 93 

Allyn, Chas. B., Pres. Brooklyn Railway Supply 

Co 120 

Allyn, Jno., Sec. and Treas. Brooklyn Railway 

Supply Co 120 

Anders, D. B., 8,313 Ridge ave., Phlla., Pa 108 

Anderson, A. A., Tom. L. Johnson, Indianapolis, 

Ind..,, HI 

Andrews, Prank H., F. T. Lerned, General Agent, 

645 West 33d St., N. Y 122,123 

Ayers Pat. Sash Holder Co., Stewart Bldg., New 

York 99 

Baldwin, A. L., Sec. and Treas. Standard Index 

and Register Co 119 

Baldwin, Ell, Pres. Standard Index & ReglsterCo 119 

Barbour, Geo. II., Sec, Mich. Stove Co 100 

Beadle and Courtney, Edw. Beadle, Chas. Court- 
ney, 1193 Broadway, N. Y 101 

Beadle, Edw., Beadle and Courtney 101 

Belle City Mfg. Co., Racine, Wis 93 

Bemls, S. A., Pres. The Bemls Car Box Co 113 

Bemls Car Box Co., The. S. A. Bemls Pres.; Geo. 
B. Hewlett, Sec. and Treas.; Geo. M. Hoadley, 
Supt.; Chas. G. Stearns, Agent (20 Piatt St., 

New York,) SpringQeld, Mass 113 

Berry, Chas. E., Cambridge, Mass 96 

Blnns, D. W., V.-Pres. Brooklyn Ry. Supply Co. 120 

Bowler and Co 98 

Braden, Oliver, 119 So. 4th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 98 

Brill, G. M., J. G. Brill and Co 126,12? 

Brill, J. G. and Co. J. G. Brill, G. M. Brill, Jas. 

Rawle, Philadelphia, Pa ...126,127 

Brill, J. G., J. G. Brill and Co 126,127 

Broadwell, C. B., New Orleans, La 98 

Brooklyn Railway Supply Co. Chas. B. Allyn, 
Pres.; D. W. Blnns, V.-Pres.; Jno. Allyn, 

Sec. and Treas 120 

Brownell and Wight Car Co. B. P. Brownell, 
Pres.; A. S. Partridge, Sec. and Treas. St. 

Louis, Mo 107 

Brownell, B. F. Pres. Brownell and Wight Car Co. 107 
Bryden Forged Horse Shoe Works, Ld. Oliver 
Williams, Treas.; T. F. Frederick, Supt.; 
J. B. White, General Sales Mang. (288 Green- 
wich st. New York) Catasauqua, Pa 114 

Burke, P. F. 360 Dorchester ave. So. Boston, Mass. 99 
Butler, W. T., Gen. Mgr. Car Track Friction Ap- 
pliance Co., 19 Tremont row, Boston, Mass. . 97 

Carnegie, Phlpps and Co., Pittsburg, Pa 100 

Carpenter, S. M. Prop. Fulton Foundry, Cleve- 
land, 116 

Car Track Friction Appliance Co., W. T. Butler, 

Gen. Mgr., 19 Tremont row, Boston, Mass 97 

Champion Horse Nail Co., Appleton, Wis 93 

Chaplin Mfg. Co., The, Bridgeport, Conn. D. C. 
Knowlton, Pres. Boston, Mass., W. C. Mead, 

Sec. and Treas., H. McKenzie Supt 96 

Clute, Geo. M. West Troy, N. Y loo 

Conway, M. W. 487 Monroe St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 97 

Courtney, Chas., Beadle and Courtney 101 

Craig, Wm. P. 93 Liberty St., N. Y 101 

Day, Augustus, Detroit, Mich 112 

DeLamater, L. M. Sec. John Stephenson Co. Llm. 128 

Delano, F. M. 47 Broadway, N Y 100 

Egerton, Alfred, Metallic St. Ry. Supply Co 99 

Emerick, John A. Pres. Johnston Railroad Frog 

and Switch Co 109 

Everlt, W. L. New Haven, Conn 106 

Felgel Car Co., — Feigel, Rogers, Mew Ut- 
recht, N. Y., and 108 Wall St., N. Y 101 

Fowler, Geo. L. Editor St. Ry. Journal 74 

Fowler, J. W. Pres. Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Coi02,i03 
Frederick, T. F. Supt. Bryden Forged Horse 

Shoe Works 114 

French, A.. Chairman The A. French Spring Co. 105 
French, J. E., Vice Chairman The A. French 

Spring Co 105 

French Spring Co., Llm., The A. A. French, 
Chairman; J. E. French, Vice Chairman; Geo. 
W. Morris, Gen. Mgr.; D. C. Noble, 

Secy, and Treas. Pittsburg, Pa 105 

Fulton Foundry, s. M. Carpenter, Prop. C.J. 

Langdon, Sec, Cleveland, 116 

Gardner and Co. Wm. Gardner, John M. Gard- 
ner, Samuel H. Gardner, 643, 657 W. 48th st. 110 
Gardner, Fred. Western Manager Michigan Stove 

Co., Chicago, 111 100 

Gardner, John M. Gardner and Co no 

Gardner, Samuel u. Gardner and Co no 



Page. 

Gardner, Wm., Gardner and Co 110 

Gibbon, T. H. Metallic St. Ry. Supply Co 99 

Glazier, H. A. Jarvis Engineering Co 107 

Gould Cable System, J. H. Gould, 9th and Market 

sts., Philadelphia, Pa 115 

Grant, J. A. Sec. Jarvis Engineering Co 107 

Gould, J. H. Gould cable system 115 

Gulbert, J. S. Richard Vose 124 

Hale and Kllburn Mfg. Co., Cheney Kllburn, 

Pres., H. S. Hale, Treas., J. Warren Hale, 

Sec, 48 and 60 N. Sixth st. Philadelphia Pa.. 109 
Hale, H. S. Treas. Hale and Kllburn Mfg. Co.... 109 
Hale, J. Warren, Sec. Hale and Kllburn Mfg. Co. . 109 

Harris, E. P. Gen. Man. St. Ry. Journal 74 

Haycox Pat. Door Fastener Co., W. E. Hay cox 

Manager, Cleveland, 97 

Haycox, W. E., Man. Haycox Pat. Door Fastener 

Co., Cleveland, O 97 

Hewlett,Geo. B. Sec. and Treas. Bemls Car Box Co 113 
Hoadley, Geo. M. Supt. The Bemls Car Box Co.. 113 
Holwell, A. K. Treas. Nordyke and Marmon Co. . . 101 

Humphreys and Sayce. 1 Broadway, N . Y 92 

Hutchinson, A. J. 95 Liberty st. N. Y 99 

Jarvis Engineering Co. K. M. Jarvis Pres., A. F 

Upton, Treas. andG. Man., J. A. Grant, Sec, 

H. A. Glasler, (Chicago) Western Manager . . . 107 

Jarvis, K. M. Pres. Jarvis Engineering Co 107 

Jesup, F. W. and Co., 65 Liberty St., N.Y 99 

Jillard, Edw. E. 1,645 N. Ninth St., Philadelphia 101 
Johnston, Edw. H. Man. Johnston Railroad Frog 

and Switch Co 109 

Johnson Steel St. Rail Co., Wm. Wharton, Jr., 

and Co., Ld., Pugh and Russell Agents, A. J. 

Moxham, Pres., Johnstown, Pa 118 

Johnson, Tom. L ill 

Johnston Railroad Frog and Switch Co., Jno. 

A. Emerick, Pres., Edw. H. Johnston, Man., 

Samuel Lees, Treas. Chester, Pa 109 

Jones' Sons, J. M. Walter A. Jones, Jones 107 

Jones, Walter A. J. M. Jones' Sons 107 

Kaestner, Chas., and Co., 303-311 S. Canal St., 

Chicago, 111 92 

Kllburn, Cheney, Pres. Hale and Kilburn Mfg. Co 109 
Knowlton, D. C, Boston, Mass., Pres. Chaplin 

Mfg. CO 96 

Langdon, C. J. Sec. Fulton Foundry 116 

Lawrence, Williams and Co., Cleveland, 83 

Lees, Samuel, Treas. Johnston Railroad Frog and 

Switch Co., Chester, Pa 109 

Leib Lubricating Co., Buffalo, N. Y 99 

Lerned, F. T. Gen. Agt. Frank H. Andrews. .122,123 
Lewis Danl. F. Treas. Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co.102,103 
Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Co., J. W. Fowler, Pres., 

Dan'l F. Lewis, Treas., H. C. Simpson, sec, 

E. Packer, L. E. Robert 102,103 

McGraw, J. H., Sec St. Ry. Journal 74 

McKenzie, H. Supt. Chaplin Mfg. Co 96 

Malllnckrodt Street Car Brake Co., St. Louis, Mo. 97 

Martin, Rufus and Co., 15 Park row, N. Y 101 

Marmon, D. W. Sec Nordyke and Marmon Co. . . . 101 
Mead, W. C. Sec and Treas. Chaplin Mfg. Co.. . . 96 
Metallic St. Ry. Supply Co., Alfred Egerton, T. 

H. Gibbon, Albany, N. Y 99 

Masson, Milton I., Estate of J. B. Slawson — 112 
Meysenburg, O. W., O. W. Meysenburg and Co.. 93 
Meysenburg, O. W., and Co, O. W . Meysenburg, 

A. J. Soderer. 185 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111., 

and 204 N. 3rd St., St. Louis, Mo 93 

Michigan Stove Co., Francis Palms, Pres., Geo. 

H. Barbour, Sec, M. B. Mills, Treas., Fred 

W. Gardner, Western Man., (Chicago), De- 
troit, Mich 100 

Miller, Chas. B..2.V Coenties slip, New York City. 94,95 

Miller, D. J., 234 Broadway, N. Y 99 

Mills, M. B., Treas. Mich. Stove Co 100 

Morris, Geo. W., Gen. Mgr. The A. French Spring 

CO 105 

Moxham, A. J., Pres. Johnson Steel St. Rail Co.. lis 
National Stove Co., J. R. Thomas, Treas., 243 

Water st., N. Y 106 

Neftel and Oothout. 41 Liberty st., N. Y 97 

Noble, D. C. Secy, and Treas. The A. French 

Spring Co 105 

Nordyke, A. H., Pres. Nordyke & Marmon Co. 101 
Nordyke and Marmon Co., Indianapolis, Ind., 

A. II. Nordyke, Pres.; D. W. Marmon, Sec; A. 

K. Hollowell, Treas 101 

Packer, E., Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Co 102,103 

Palms Francis, Pres. Mich. Stove Co 100 

Parrott Varnish Co., Bridgeport, Conn 93 



Page. 

Partridge, A. S., Sec. and Treas. Brownell and 

Wight Car Co 107 

Pennington, Ellis. 204 Walnut Place, Phil 96 

Pennsylvania Steel Co., 160 Broadway, N. Y., and 

208 So. 4th St., Philadelphia 107 

Poole and Hunt, Baltimore, Md 113 

Post and Co., Cincinnati, 110 

Powers, E. L., N. W. Mgr. St. Ry. Journal.... 74 
Pugh and Russell, D. W. Pugh, J. S. Fugh, F. D. 
Russell, Stewart Building, N. Y., Adams Ex- 
press Building, Chicago 109 

Pugh, D. W., Pugh and Russell 109 

Pugh, J. S., Pugh and Russell 109 

Pullman, Chas. E-, Pullman's Palace Car uo.... 117 
Pullman's Palace Car Co. Chas. E. Pullman Mgr. 
St. Car Dept. Chicago, 111., Pullman, 111., and 

Detroit, Mich 117 

Putnam Nail Co., Neponset P. O., Boston 104 

Railway Register Manufacturing Co., James 
McCredle, Pres., Beadle and Courtney, 119.3 
Broadway, New York), General \ gents; Buf- 
falo, N. Y 121 

Rawle, James, J. G. Brill and Co 126,127 

Reynolds, Edward, Supt. E. P. ALUs and Co 93 

Richardson, Philip, 47 Broadway, N. Y 100 

Roebling's, Sons, John A. Trenton, N. J., 1 7-n9 

Liberty st., N. Y 100 

Hoberge, F. P. ,1,741 Broadway, N . Y 100 

Robert, L. E., Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Co 102,103 

Russell, F. D., Pugh and Russell 109 

Shlppy, H. L., Manager N. Y. Warehouse Jno. A. 

Roebling's Sons Co 106 

Simpson, H. C, Sec. Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Co.102,103 

Silver, John S. Richard Vose 124 

Silver, Wm. S. Richard vose 124 

Slawson, J. B,, Estate, Milton I. Masson,Agenc, 
John Stephenson Co. , Lim. , Agents,365 Avenue 

A, New York 112 

Sleeper, Joseph A., Pres. Van Depoele Electric 

Manufacturing Co 125 

Smith, Charles G., Josephine D. Smith 104 

Smith, Josephine D. Josephine D. Smith, Chas. 

G. Smith 104 

Somerville, Wm., and Sons, Buffalo, N. Y 97 

soderer, A. J., O. W. Meysenburg and Co 93 

Standard Index and Register Co., Eh Baldwin, 
Pres.; W. S. Baldwin, Sec. and Treas.; A. L. 
Baldwin, C. B. Baldwin, representatives, 138 

Fulton St., N. Y 119 

Stearns, Chas. G., 20 Piatt st. N.Y.Agents, Bemls 

Car Box Co 113 

Stephenson, John, Pres. John Stephenson Co. Llm. 128 
Stephenson, John, Co., Llm., John Stephenson, 
Pres., L. M. De Lamater, Sec, Henry C. Val- 
entine, Treaa., 47 E. .27th St., N. Y. (Pugh 
and Russell General Representatives, which 

see.) 128 

Stiles, A. K., Manager Van Depoele Electric Man- 
ufacturing Co 125 

Street Railway Journal, E. P. Harris, General 
Manager; George L. Fowler, Editor; J. H. 
McGraw, Sec; H. M. Swetland, Treas.; E. L. 

Powers, N. W. Manager 74 

Swetland, H. M., Treas. Street Ry. Journal 74 

Thomas, J. R., National Stove Co 106 

Upton, A F., Treas. and General Manager, Jarvis 

Engineering Co 107 

Valentine, Henry C, Treas. Jno. Stephenson 

CO. Ld 128 

Van Depoele, Chas. J., Electrician, Van Depoele 

Electric Mfg. Co 125 

Van Depoele Electric Mfg. Co., Jos. A. Sleeper, 
Pres.; A. K. Stiles, Mang.; W. A. Stiles, Treas. 
C. J. Van Depoele, Electrician, Chicago, 111.. 125 
Vose, Richard, J. S. Gulbert, Jno. S. Sliver, Wm. 

S. Silver. 13 Barclay st. New York 124 

Wales Mfg. Co., W. S. Wales, Treas., Syracuse, 

N. Y 96 

Wales, W. S., Treas. Wales Mfg. Co 96 

Warneck and Toffler, ill East 22d st. New York. . 101 
Watson and Stillman, 204-210 East 43d st. N. Y. . 100 
Way Foundry Co., Way, Rhodes and Blankley, 

23d and Wood sts. Philadelphia, Pa Ill 

Wharton, Wm., Jr. and Co. Ld 116 

White, E. C, 531 West 33d st, New York 97 

White, J. B., 288 Greenwich st., General Sales- 
man. Bryden Forged Horse Shoe Works, Ld.. 114 

White, M. M. and Co. 531 West 33d st 98 

Whitney, A. and Sons, Philadelphia, Pa 98 

Williams, Oliver, Treas. Bryden Forged Horse 
Shoe Works 114 



92 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December, 1886. 



SPECIAL NOTICES. 
Rates for Special Notices. 

Advertisements of Street Railway Property 
"Wanted "or "For Sale," " Positions Wanted " or 
"Men Wanted," or similar matter inserted under 
tills heading at 10 c. per line, eight words to a line. 

FOR SALE. — Thirty-five second hand Toledo 
Heaters In good condition at $10 each, f. o. b. In 
New York City. Lewis & Fowler Manufacturing 
Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WANTED— Capitalist to Invest money In the 
best Cable Grip yet Invented. First-class 
Inducements and best of references. Reliable, care 
Street Railway Journal. 

WANTED— Second hand, reversible seats, open 
cars In good condition. Address, stating 
name of manufacturer, price, etc., Geo. W. Hersey, 
S. R. & B., 87 Summer street, Boston, Mass. 

WANTED— A reliable man as stable and track 
foreman who has had some experience in the 
street railway business. Address Erie City Pass. Ry. 
Co., care of Jacob Berst, Supt., Erie, Pa. 

WANTED— Position as Superintendent or Fore- 
man with some good street railroad, by a 
thoroughly practical and experienced street railroad 
man who has had 15 years' experience in the busi- 
ness; can refer to some of the most prominent street 
railroad men of the country. Address R. P. A., care 
Street Ry. Journal, 113 Liberty st., New York. 



WANTED— Position as Superintendent on a 
street railroad by an experienced man. N. 
Y. City references. Willing to go South or West. 
Parties wishing a good, steady man, and one able 
and willing to look sharp after all the minute details 
f a road, will please address Superintendent, care 
„tkeet Railway Journal, 113 Liberty St., New York. 



WANTED— A thoroughly reliable man exper- 
ienced in Street Railway practice, to organ- 
ize and manage a company, for the Introduction of a 
new system of propulsion. Patentee will furnish 
capital. An exceptional opportunity for a man of 
large street railway acquaintance and with the en- 
eib v and judgment requisite to success. Address, 
IXION, Street Railway Journal Office, 113 Liberty 
street, New York City. 

WANTED— A party with Capital to take one- 
half interest in horse and cattle grooming 
machine, now ready for operation, fully covered by 
patents. Will sell whole or one-half Interest. Full 
control given in either case. Patentee has other 
business. Cannot give it his attention. Address, 
SAFETY, care Street Railway Journal, 119 South 
4th St., Phila., Pa. 

SUPERINTENDENT.— Advertiser of ability and 
good managing capacity desires an engagement 
as superintendent of surface railroad; experienced 
in European and New York systems; would take full 
charge, including stables and treatment of sick 
horses if desirable ; first-class references. Address 
MANAGER, care Street Railway Journal, 113 Lib- 
erty street, New York. 

FOR SALE— Three second-hand Turntables 7ft. 
6in. in diameter, with guide plates all complete ; 
suitable for narrow-gauge roads of the Fulton 
Foundry, Cleveland, Ohio, pattern . Address Frank 
H. Andrews, 545 West 33d St., New York city. 

FOR SALE. — By Concord Horse Railroad, Con- 
cord, N. H., one horse railroad Passenger Sleigh, 
built expressly for the road by Abbott Downing & 
Co., in their best style, it is built car style with 
side windows ; well ventilated ; splendidly finished; 
upholstered with best of goods; seats eighteen pas- 
sengers inside and three outside with driver : we 
have carried thirty passengers; runs very easy with 
a pair of horses; it has run only three weeks; good 
as new ; the reason why we sell is we have put on 
steam motors on that part of the line; have no use 
for it. M. Humphrey, President. 



Second Hand One-Horse Street Cars 
in good condition, 

HUMPHREYS & SAYCE, 

1 Broadway, New York, 



See pages 94 & 95. 



FOR SALE. 

Steel Rails, T and Street Patterns, all 
weights; Spikes, Fishplates, Bolts, 
Wrought Iron Knees, Etc. 
Light Steel T Rails always on hand, 
Old Rails taken in trade, or purchased 
for remanufacture. 



HUMPHREYS & SAYCE 



No. I Broadway. New York 



JOHN BABCOCK C° 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



RAILWAY CAR VARNISHES 



The King of Portable Grinding Mills. 



Over 7,000 in use. 



BUILT IN FOUR SIZES: 

I 6, 20, 24 and 30 inches. 

Genuine French Buhr Stones. 



Suitable for any power 
from 2 to 15 horse. 

We guarantee our mills 
to do more and better grind- 
ing than can be done on any 
other make of mill having 
same size stones. 

CHAS. KAESTNER & CO., 




Live References in Every 
State and Territory. 



Every Mill Warranted to give 
Entire Satisfaction or 
Money Refunded. 



Send for Prices on 



Engines, 
Boilers, 
Pumps, Etc. 

ESTABLISHED 1863. 

Machinists, Founders and Mill Furnishers. Complete Grinding and Cleaning Outfits a Specialty. 

We refer to North Chicago City Ry. Co. using two of our 30 inch mills; Chicago City Ry. Co. using two of our 30 inch mills. 
Let u£ know what you wish to accomplish and we will guarantee to put in machinery that will satisfactorily do the work. 

Address 303-311 SOUTH CANAL STREET, Chicago, III. 



Deoembei, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



93 



The Belle Gity Feed and Ensilage Cutter 

IS THE BEST FEED CUTTER. IS THE STRONGEST, MOST DURABLE, AND ON THE WHOLE 

IT IS THE BEST FEED CUTTER IN THE WORLD. 
OUR TWO LARGEST SIZES HAVE SELF-FEEDING ARRANGEMENTS, AN ADVANTAGE NO 

OTHER CUTTER HAS. 

THEY CAN BE FED WITH A PITCHFORK AND ARE GUARANTEED TO SUIT EVERY TIME. 
WRITE FOR CATALOGUE, PRICE LIST, ETC., TO 

THE BELLE CITY MANUFACTURING CO., Racine, Wis., U. S. A. 




CHAMPION HORSE NAILS. 

Manufactured from very best Swedish Metal. Will 
not split. Are accurately pointed, tough, strong 
and hold the shoes. Soft enough to clinch readily ; 
stiff enough to drive without tending. All nails 
uniform and perfect. They are used In thousands of 
shops with the best of satisfaction, and are especial- 
ly liked by " floor -men " for their good reliable driv- 
ing. Made In two patterns, "lakge heads" and 

" CITY HEADS." 

QUALITY GUARANTEED. 

NOS. i, 50c; 5,28c; 6, 25c; 7, 23c; 8, 22c; 9, 21c; 10, 20c. 

Champion Horse Nail Co., Appleton. Wis. 



M Parrott Varnish Go,, 

§ 'IS VARNISHES. 

/°" \ Bridgeport, Conn., U.S.A. 

USE PARROTT o r > 


American Railway Pub. Co. 

Lakeside Building, CHICAGO. 113 Llbektt St. , NEW YORK. 




0. 1. MEYSENBURG & CO, 

Street Ry. Track Material. 

204 No. Third St., St. Louis. 185 Dearborn St., Chicago. 




FARE ENVELOPES, 


The Best Roller Feed Mill 

ON THE MARKET. 

;{|; "The Milwaukee Granulator." 

Jm^^.' ' Durable, 

W rite for Descriptive Circular, Prices, etc. 

IHgjpr Edw. P. AHis&Co, 

. , „ . _ ... Keliance Works, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Either Geared or Belt Driven. 


Spiin.gfi.eld, I<£ass. 



94 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December, 1886. 



MAGNOLIA ANTI-FRICTION METAL 

Best Known Anti-Friction Compound. 




MANUFACTURED BY 



CHARLES B. MILLER, 

NO. 2 1-2 COENTIES SLIP, NEW YORK. 



1 It Prevents HOT BOXES 

2 It will not CUT or HEAT Journals 

3 It is Tougher and more Durable than other 

Metals 

4 It is adapted to HIGH or LOW Speed Machinery 

5 It is Self-Lubricating, saving 50 per cent 

of oil 



6 It Increases the Motive Power 

7 It is the ONLY metal that protects and 

does not wear Journals 

8 It will stand the Heavy Work of SUGAR, 

SAW, ROLLING AND WIRE MILLS 

9 It is a success for Main Journal and Crank 

Pin Bearings and Gibs of Steam Ships 
and Steam Tugs 



New York Depository: 

Messrs B. S. Greeley & Co., 



Railway Supplies, No. 7 Dey st. 



05 



MAGNOLIA ANTI-FRICTION METAL. 

TESTS. 



J. S. Graham & Co. Manufacturers op Wood-work- 
ing Machinery. 
J. S. Graham. J. Kane. 

Rochester, N. Y., October 28, 1886. 
Chas. B. Miller, Proprietor, 
Samuel Singley, Inventor, 

Gentlemen,— We herewith hand you a report of 
the various tests we have made of your metal In 
comparison with the b<>st Genuine Babbitt Metal 
to be had. These tests were conducted with a view 
of ascertaining the merits of your metal, and to that 
effect we made them as severe as possible. They 
were made In a machine arranged for the purpose 
having twoboxesor bearings 4 V long, \y £ '' diameter 
and lined with metal averaging 7-32 of an inch thick. 

In these bearings, one of which in every test was 
lined with Magnolia Metal, and the other with the 
Genuine Babbitt Metal was placed a steel arbor 
with pulley. The box caps were put in place without 
bolts and were held in place by a soale beam lever 
properly weighted and having the fulcrums on top 
of box caps. No self-oiling bearings or cups were 
used in tsese tests, it having been decided best to 
apply the oil as occasion seemed to require, and giv- 
ing each bearing the same amount by counting the 
drops. We might say, however, that a fair amount 
of oil was used. 

The following Is a correct report of the different 
tests: 



Test No. 1, October 21, 1886. 

Started at 9 a. m. with a pressure on each bearing 
of 240 lbs., using lird oil. Number of revolutions 
850 per minute. At 10.30 A. M. changed the pressure 
to 150 lbs. on each bearing until 12 m., when both 
were found to be warm, but the one having the (i en. 



nine ltabbitt Metal very miicb li iijher In temper a- 
ture than the other. 

Started again at 1.30 r. m. under the same pres- 
sure (240 lbs.), and speed 850 revolutions per 
minute, and at the end of fifteen minutes increased 
the load or pressure on each box t0 38O lbs., using 
oil freely. After running forty minutes with tlilspres- 
sure it was again increased to 550 lbs. per bearing, 
and oiled at this time, receiving no more oil; after 
running fifteen minutes the Genuine Babbitt metn] 
melted or ran out. 



Test No. 2, October 23, 1886. 

The same testing machine was used and all other 
conditions were the same as In test No. 1, with the 
exception of speed and pressure. 

The bearings were rellned and fitted, and started 
again at 3.30 r. M. at a speed of 4,000 per min- 
ute; pressure on bearings 550 lb». Oil was used 
freely, and a small piece of tallow placed In the 
gateway. It ran one minute and the frictlonal re- 
sistance was too great for the belt to drive. At this 
time the Genuine Babbitt was the hottest. The 
pressure was changed to 238 lbs.; ran thirty min- 
utes and melted the Genuine Babbitt out. Mag- 
nolia metal showed very slight signs of fusion. 



Test No. 3, October 23, 1886. 

On this test in the same machine the length of 
bearings on journal was reduced to 2V long, which 
was in the center of the boxes; speed 4,000 per 
minute; pressure 150 lbs. on each box; ran forty- 
five minutes and increased the pressure to 23S lbs.; ran 
fifteen minutes and then adjourned test until the fol- 
lowing morning. 



Oct. 25th, continued the test with a speed of 
4,noo per minute; pressure 238 lbs.; ran fifty minutes 
and then found the end of the box cap (Iron) contain- 
ing the Magnolia metal touching the arbor greatly 
inducing friction; ran twenty nlnutes longer and 
burned the box out. 



Test No. 4, October 25, 1886. 

Same machine and conditions, except that the 
length of bearings was again made \%'< long; speed 
l,00Orevolutions per iniiiute;pressureon each box 
2 10 lbs.; ran twenty-five minutes and showed signs 
of fusion; then removed box caps and cleaned them 
off; started again at 160 lbs. pressure; speed 
4,000 revolutions per minute; ran fifteen 
minutes and Increased pressure to 240 lbs. on each 
box, and after running twenty-tive minutes melted 
the Genuine Babbitt enough to stop motion. 

Test No. 5. 

This test was made in the same machine, substi- 
tuting the ' ' Cooper " metal In place of the M agnolla, 
and the genuine Babbitt metal In the other box or 
bearing; speed 4,000 revolutions per minute; pres- 
sure 1G0 lbs.; after running fifteen minutes pres. 
sure was Increased to 240 lbs., and ran for twenty- 
five minutes, at which time both metals fused or 
melted, the Cooper metal, however, holding Its 
place much better than the Genuine Babbitt metal. 
Yours truly, 
(Signed) J. S. Graham, M. E. 
(Signed) John Kane, M. E. 
(Signed) W. E. Kepine, (Draughtsman.) 



MESSRS. J. S. GRAHAM AND JOHN KANE ARE MEMBERS OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS. 



TRADERS' NATIONAL BANK OF ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

October 28, 1886. 

Chas. B. Miller: Deab Sib,— We have known Messrs. J. S. Graham & Co. for many years. We consider them Honorable 
and Reliable business men. Worth a good property. 

Respectfully Yours, 

[signed] H. C. BREWSTER, Cashier. 



96 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December, 1886 



"PAY HERE." 

Fare Boxes and Change Receptacles for Street Gars. 

OUR NEW FAKE BOX NO. 3. 

The following are some points of superiority in this box over others: 

Simplicity of Construction, Quickness and Convenience of Cleaning, Securi- 
ty of Money Drawee, Beauty of Finish, and Much Cheaper in Price. 



We have just added to this box a very valuable Improvement, viz., a small 
mirror placed back of first slide or rest, which presents to driver's view the back 
side of fare as well as front, when resting on first rest. He can by this quickly 
detect any :-purious or mutilated coin or ticket that may be split and put in box. 

It often happens In all Fare Boxes, to the annoyance of driver and passenger, 
when several fares are resting on first slide, one or more coins are liable to be 
behind a ticket, and the driver 
cannot see them, and quite 
often a passenger is "rtuia 
up," when his fare is concealed 
behind the ticket, from the 
,,, v |H| driver. This arrangement 
gives driver view of both sides 
of fare. 





Box No 



Front or Passengers' 
View. 



The only satisfactory ar- 
rangement In use for making 
change with the driver. 



Descriptive and Illustrated 
circular on application. 
Get our prices before buying. 





NNINGTON'S 

ING MACHINE. 



Box No. 3. 
Back or Driver's 
View. 



WALES MFG.CO , 76 & 78 E.Water St., Syracuse. N. Y. 




The brush 5is"caused to revolve by gear wheels actuated by a flexible shaft, 
Both hands free to handle brush. Swings and turns In any direction. Direc- 
tion of motion quickly changed. The cheapest and best Grooming Machine yet 
nvented. Motion supplied by hand, steam or animal power. Rights to use or 
manufacture. For full particulars an 1 rates apply to 

ELLIS PENNINGTON, 

204 Walnut Place, Philadelphia, Pa. 



The Chariin Roller Bearing Tramwav- 




CAR BOX AND GEAR. 



LIGHT DRAFT EASY RIDING 
POSITIVELY DUST PROOF AND 



DURABLE 
OIL TIGHT 

Boxes Hold Sufficient Oil for One Year- No Waste Used 
for Packing nor Babbitting for Boxes 
Overcomes Friction in Taking a Curve 

Superintendent's Office, Highland Street Railway, 

No. 827 Shawmut Ave., Boston, August 19, 1886. 
Chaplin M'f'g. Co., Messrs:— In reply to your note I will say we have had a set of your 
Gearunder car, " Gov. Rice." for the past four years and it has proved very acceptable, so 
muchso that we have decided to put on 50 sets of your improved pattern. The wear on the 
Journal is imperceptible, and it is beyond question the easiest running gear in the market. 

Respectfully, J. E. rugg, Sup't. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



THE CHAPLIN MANF. CO., Bridgeport, Conn . 

Berry's Patent Hames and Regan Snap. 





i&illKrJIRPIirK 



1 New Ca(alocfue No.5 . - 




The collar is 



They have the advantage of easy adjustment. No buckles o- straps are used. They can be applied in an instant, being fastened to the collar, 
provided and there Is no strain upon the collar or the eyes of the horses. 
In case of accident the whole harness c in be removed at once. They are adaoied to the use of Fire Departments, Horse Railroads, Express Wagons, Teams ana 
Light Carriages, and are in use in over one hundred cities and towns in the United States and Canada. 



2ST T SITA 



They are made of the best gun metal and malleable iron, with a brass spring which is Inclosed In a water-tight socket and |made rust and dust proof. It Is an 
Impossibility for It to become detached. Write for Illustrated catalogue and prlcea. CHARLES E. BERRY, Cambridge, Mass. 



December, 1886 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



97 



NEFTELfcOOTHOUT 

ENGINEERS & CONTRACTORS, 



41 Liberty Street, 



New York- 



We make a specialty of street, railway work, acting as engineers, or will 
contract for the construction of new lines. Hepalrs promptly executed on 
out of town work. Estlm ites for warehouse tramways promptly furnished. 



. W. CONWAY, 

STEAM & STREET RAILWAY CONTRACTOR, 

AND DEALER IN 

ISBsiIlrosicL 3^£sitexla,ls- 

Estimates given. Curves and Switches laid at short notice. Office and Res- 
idence 

487 Monroe Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



THE CAR TRACK FRICTION APPLIANCE CO., 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



THE PAT. RELIABLE SAND BOXES, 

W. T. BUTLER, General Manager. No. 19 Tremont Row, Boston. 

These boxes are guaranteed to distribute upon the rail SAND, SALT or GRAVEL, WET or DRY. 

WM. SOMERVILLE * SONS, 

CELEBRATED 

ANTI-FEVER MEDICINE. 

The Anti-Fever Medicine has now been In use tor over 30 years as a specific la all Diseases of an Inflammatory Character In Horses and Cattle. Anti- 
Fever Medicine is a Certain Cure for Chills and Fever, Sore Throat, Inflammation of Lun^s, Coughs, Staggers, Inflammation of the Bowels, Spasmodic Colic, and 
Pleuro-Pneumonla in cattle. This valuable Medicine is now used by the Principal Stables in the Country, by the U. S. and American Express Companies, and many 
of the Street Car Companies. Try one bottle and you will be convinced of its value in your stable. Sold by all Druggists. PRICE $1 per bottle. Discount to 

^«UB A ffiE Wm. Somerviile & Sons, Buffalo Horse Infirmary, 127 Erie st- Buffalo, N-Y- 




T he Mallinckrodt Street Gar Brake Go. 

404 Market Street— Room 205, 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Manufacturers of the 

MALLINCKRODT 
STREETCAR ? 
BRAKE. 

See description on 
pages 428 and 429 of 
September number- 



john F. Mallinckrodt Pres 
Wm. Hoffmann Treas. 
mil Breunert Sec. 
Ed. L. Gottschalk As. Sec 
ft 





THE HAYCOX 

PATENT DOOR FASTENER. 

ADOPTED BY | 

All Cleveland Railway Companies, f 

a 

Patented May 5, 1885. t 

_ a 

| § Fastener detached, made of malleable iron, ~ 

2? weight about five pounds. gj 

k) % Especially adapted for Elevator Doors. 

% § Fur further particulars, prices, circulars, g, 

o £ etc , address ° 

• c 

Haycox Door Fastener Company, 

W. E. HAYCOX, Manager. 

11 ° 1158 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, 0. 




THEDAVIS1ETAL 



for CAR JOURNAL BEARINGS 

EDWARD C. WHITE, SOLE MANUFACTURER 

531 WEST 33D STREET, NEW YORK. 



08 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December, 1886. 




Car and Locomotive Wheels either Chilled or 
Steel Tired ; with or without axles- Street 
Railway Wheels; Turnouts and Turntahles 
Patent Chilled Face RR Frogs En- 
gine & Heavy Castings a Specialty. 




Graded Stable Cutter with Straight or Curved Cover 

Descent % inch per foot. Pieces 5 leet lengths; short pieces furnished to suit 
any length. Spouts to connect with sewer. 



B®" They control and make N. P. Bowler's Patent Street Rail- 
road Wheel. The tire of this wheel is cast separately from the 
hub aud spokes ; the latter is made of soft strong iron, and is 
perfectly free from strain — therefore can be made much lighter 
and more durable. The tires and the spokes or center of the 
wheel are made perfectly interchangeable so that when the tire or 
rim is worn out another can be put in its place by any employee 
with no other tool than a common wrench. 

Bowler&Co/winTersi. Cleveland, 0, 



KM. Whiter Co., 

531 WEST 33d STREET, 



NEW YORK. 





ALL IRON AND STEEL. 

The most permanent and very best form 
of railroad construction for public streets. 
Fully endorsed by city and town authori- 
ties. Send for circular. 

Trices furnished on application to 



Wm. Wharton, Jr, & Co., Lim., Phila., Pa., General Agents. 
Or D, F. Longstreet, Providence, R, I. 




OLIVER BRADEN, 

STEAM POWER 

Book and Job Printer, Lithographer and Engraver. 

P. S. Estimates furmsiied for all kinds of Wood Engraving and Electrotyplng- 
Printing of Descriptive Circulars or catalogues In the very best style. . 

Having had twenty years experience in the business I feel compe ent to attend 
to your wants. Address, 

OLIVER BRADEN, 119 So. Fourth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

The "BEOADWELL CAE STAETEE," 
having been subjected to practical tests, is now 
placed on the market at a very low price. 

C. B. BROAD WELL, 
169 Laurel Street, - New Orleans, La. 



ESTABLISHED 1847. 

A. WHITNEY & SONS, 

CAR WHEEL WORKS, 

PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

CAST CHILLED WHEELS, 

AXLES AND BOXES 

FOR EVERY KIND OF SERVICE. 

Street Railway Wheels of all Sizes. 



OWNERS AND BUILDERS OF 

H. DOUGLASS' 

Patent Automatic Switch 

FOR STREET RAILROADS. 

FRANK H. ANDREWS, Sole Aeent, 545 West 33d St., N.Y. 



December, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



99 




Dm 
Lubricant 




Trade Mark Pat. Mar. 13, 1883. 



Trade Mark Pat. Mar. 13, 1883. 



The Leading New Grease for Street Railways. 

The best Lubricant for street Railways known. Will run lor one year on on e 
packing. Cars will run easier packed with Dux, than with oil and waste. Why? 
Because we give you a better Lubricant. No drip from car boxes when packed 
with Dux, and therefore, keeps the car boxes and trucks clean. 

Try It, and You Will Use No Other Lubricant. 
Pittsburgh, Allegheny & Manchester Passenobk Railway Co..) 
Lcib Lubricating Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., August 13, 1885. j* 

Gentlemen— We have used Dux Lubricant for the past nine months. 
It has given entire satisfaction. In fact it is the best I have ever used. Think 
It fully as good as represented. Please ship us one (1) bbl. and oblige. 

Yours truly, J. C. COTTON, Supt. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The Leib Lubricating Co, 

196 & 198 CHICAGO STREET, - - BUFFALO. N.Y 




Ayers' Anti Rattler, 

FOR RAILROAD CAR WINDOWS. 
The Best and Cheapest 

ANTI-RATTLER IN THE 
MARKET. ALSO, 

Ayers' Pat. Sash Holder, 

FOR nOLDING CAR WINDOWS AT ANY 
HEIGHT. 
Manufactured by the 

AYERS' PAT. SASH HOLDER GO. 

Room 242, Broadway & Chambers St. 
Stewart building, new york. Send for Circulars. 





P. F. Burke, 



Successor 
to 



C.F.Dewick& Go. 



F. W. JESUP & COMPY., 

67 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, 

Street Railway Supplies, 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Steel Ralls, all patterns; Cars; Automatic Switches; Turntables; Curved 
Ralls; Channel Plates; Frogs; Crossings and other Track Castings, Knees, .fee. 
countersunk Spikes, specially adapted tor Center-bearing Rails. 



A.. J. HUTCHINSON, 

CONTRACTOR 

And PRACTICAL BUILDER of STREET RAILWAYS. 

Roads Relaid, Switches, Turnouts, "Warehouse Tracks. Materials Furnished. 



ROOM 11, 



95 LIBERTY STREET, N. Y. 



LYNN * PETTIT, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Machine Braided Cocoa Car Mats. 

707 Market Street, Philadelphia. 



Patent Steel Toe-Calks. 

Cold Iron Punching;, Chain Links, 
Washers, etc. 



Ik 360 DORCHESTER AVENUE, 

111 ^ SO. BOSTON, MASS 



{fond for Circulars 





Prest. & Treas., Hon. 
A. Bleeker Banks. 
Sec, A. Egerton. 
Engr. & Supt., O. H. 
Gibbon. 



The Metallic Street Railway Supply Co. 



G i it iio;\ ';■ 



PATENT. 



ALBANY, NEW YORK. 

Cheapest, quickest laid and most durable track known. Dispenses with all 
timbers, butts, smkes, knees, &c. Estimates lor building and relaying street rail- 
way tracks and full particulars sent on application. 

N.Y. Office, 1 Broadway, Humphreys & Sayce, Contracting Agents. 



CABLE EOADS. 

Am. System Traction Rope Railway, operated by Independent Duplicate Cables. 

FULLY PROTECTED 15 V PATENTS IN THE FOLLOWING 
COUNTRIES. 

UNITED STATES, 
ENGLAND, 
QERMANY, 
AUSTRIA,' 
SPAIN, 
ITALY, 

D. J. MILLER, ENGINEER, 
234 BKOADWAY, NEW YOllK. 



FRANCE, 

BELGIUM, 

DENMARK, 

VICTORIA, Australia, 

new south WALES, Australia. 



100 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Decembeb, 188(5 



USE PROF. ROBERGE'S PATENT HOOF EXPANDER, 

Which Cures Corns, Contrac- 
tion, Quarter-Cracks, &c. 

It is the best invention lor expanding a con- 
_. tracted foot, or keeping a sound foot in its 
natural shape. 

It is used and approved by the lending 
horse owners of the New York Driving Park, 
such as 

Robert Bonner, Frank Work, 

and hundreds of other gentlemen of repute. 

In ordering, send diagram of foot with 
price. Same will be forwarded free by mail. 

F. P. ROBERCE, 

VETEKINAKY SURGEON, 

1,741 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 

tw Lineral discount to the trade. They are kept by all first-class Horseshoers, 
Saddle and Hardware men. 




HAND POWER, LEVER AND HYDRAULIC PRESSES 




See page 197, July, 1885. 



Scr w and Hydraulic Jacks. 

" , s77"a/tsorL <2z Stillrrxsiri.- 
204 To 210 East 43d Street. N. Y. 

Wilson Brake Shaft. 

ENTIRELY NEW & NOVEL IN CONSTRUCTION. 
POSITIVE AND '.SURE IN ACTION. 

BRAKES SET WITHOUT COMPLETELY TURN- 
ING THE HANDLE. 

MADE ON THE PRINCIPLE OF A FRICTION 
CLUTCH. 
SIMPLE IN DESIGN. 

Saves Room, Adds to Available Braking Power, 
and Gives the Driver the Best Possible 
Control over the Car. 

Mordecai M. Wilson, Agent. 

TROY, N. Y. 



F. M. DELANO. PHILIP RICHARDSON. 

47 Broadway, New York. 

Organizers,Pramoters & Builders 

STREET RAILROADS. 

Dealers in Street Railroad Securities. Coirespondence invited. 

STEEL STREET RAILS. 

CARNEGIE, PHIPPS & CO., LIMITED 

48 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA. 



Section No. 17 
46 lbs. per Yard 



Clute's Patent Double 

Bottomed 

Street Car 

LAMP, 

Is one that assures safety, 
durability, and is perfect 
in regard to leakage. 

GEORGE M. CLUTE, Sole Manufacturer; 

Also Dealer in Car Reflectors, Chimneys. Burners, Etc. 
WEST TROY, N. Y. 

arland Car Heater 




o 



O o 



IB 03 

K > 

32 ° 

•° 3 



£3 to 



3} 

C3 
CO 




H3 



CD 



2 £ 
< , 

* CD 

B ~ 

cd 

■ f 
cd 

8 

o 



W 

p 



The Michigan Stove Company, 



SOLE MAKERS. 

Detroit, Mioh. Chicago, 111. 



Buffalo, N. Y. 



December, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



101 



Portable Grinding Mill Manufactory. 



EstaTblisIxed. 1351. 




Mills expressly adapted for use in 

STREET CAR STABLES. 

4-1 different sizes and styles. 

Feed Cutters, 
Corn and Cob Crushers, 
Corn Shellers, 

Roller Mills. 



Portable Engines 

AND BOILER, 

TREAD AND 
SWEEP HORSE POWERS 




Complete Outfits a Specialty. 

Describe Wants and send for Illustrated 



Price List and Circulars. 



ess 




IMordyke $c Marmon Co., Indianapolis, ind. 



RUFUS MARTIN & CO., 

13 & 15 PARK ROW, N. Y. 

Street Railway Construction, Equipment and Supplies, 

MARTIN'S IMPROVED CHANGE BELT. 



MARTIN'S STANDARD 



TP 



AXLE OIL. 



Also Harness, Bells, Wood and Cocoa Mats, Change 
Envelopes & Ry. Stationery. Correspondence solicited. 

WARNECK & TOFFLER, 




P. CRAIG, 

Street Railway Builder, 

and Dealer in Supplies. 
Office 95 Liberty St., N. Y. 



211 East 22*1 St., Now York, 

Sole Manufacturers and Patentees 
of the only 

"ROLLING WOOD MAT" 

In the market. This matting, either 
in round, square or flat slats, is ihe 
most convenient one for horse cars, as 
It Is a self cleaner and can easily 1 9 
repaired. 

Price, a running foot, 3 feet wide, 
only TOc. orders respect fully solicited. 



constantly on hand, Straight or Curved to 
any radius or length, at short notice. 



GROOVE RAIL FOR CURYE 

CURVING MACHINES of Best Style and Make. 

CnUfTlIT DKTPQ given on AUTOMATIC SWITCHES, TURNTABLES, 

orCililAL KAlEiO track castings, knees, .ioint plates, 
spikes and all other material for Railway Construction. 

Having Sad over 25 years' practical experience in Street Railway Construction 
feel confident In saying to parties who contemplate building will find it t their 
interest to correspond with me before making contracts or ordering material. 



EDWARD BEADLE. 

Sole Manufacturer of the 

EUREKA FOLDING MAT." 

The most durable, easiest cleaned and 
repaired wood mat ever mide. We would 
respectfully call the attention of Managers 
of Street Railways to our latest Improved 
Reversible Folding Mat, made to fit any size 
car. Sample order solicited. 

1193 Broadwny, New York. 
Factory, Crantord, N. J. 

EUREKA COLOR WOlt KS. 

Established for the Manufacture of Tare Colors. 

EDW. E. JILLARD, 

PAINTERS' MATERIAL, GLUE, ETC. 



Established 1856. 



Incorporated 188JJ. 



The Feigel Car Co., 



BUILDERS OF 



Cars for Street Railways. 



1645 NORTH TENTH STREET, 



Philadelphia. 



FACTORY 



Specialty In Strictly Pure Tinting Colors for Car, Carriage, Ship and House 
Painters' use. 



New Utrecht, N.Y. 



OFFICE 



iso. 108 Wall Street, NW 



162 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



OeoemSeb, 1886. 



THE LEWIS AND 

27, 29, 31, 33 and 35 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




PATENTEES AND MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

Improved "Alarm " Passenger Register. 

USED BY RAILWAY COMPANIES IN ALL PARTS OF THE COUNTRY, 

KEPT IN REPAIR ONE YEAR FREE OF CHARGE. 

Guaranteed the most Complete Machine in the U. S. for the purpose. 



t)BOEMBlIR, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



103 



FOWLER MFG Co 

Walworth St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 



MANUFACTURERS OF MATERIALS FOR 



Street and Cable Railway Construction 



KNEES 
SPIKES 

CHANNEL PLATES 

FROGS 

POINTS 

TONOUE SWITCHES 

GROOVED RAILS 
FOR CURVES 

BENT ANY DESIR- 
ED RADIUS 



THE LEWIS A10 



?i»:ll.ta_4J i 



IHJIII If! Mil 




PEDESTALS 
OIL BOXES 
BRAKE SHOES 
WHEELS & AXLES 
BRASS BEARINGS 
TURNTABLES 
SNOW SWEEPERS 
PLOWS 

ETC. ETC. ETC. 



^-"CT r r01v£-^.T , IC SWITCHES 



AND 





RAILROAD CASTS 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION AND MOST APPROVED PATTERNS. 

FOWLER'S IMPROVED 

RANDALL BOX & RUNNING GEAR, 



CATALOGUE FREE TO RAILROAD COMPANIES. 



102 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Dhoembeb, 188G. 



THE LEWIS AND 

27, 29, 31, 33 and 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




PATENTEES AND MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

Improved "Alarm" Passenger Register. 

USED BY RAILWAY COMPANIES IN ALL PARTS OF THE COUNTRY, 

KEPT IN REPAIR ONE YEAR FREE OF CHARGE. 

Guaranteed the most Complete Machine in the D. S. for the purpose. 



1)eoembm, 1880. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAi. 



103 



FOWLER MF'G Co 

Walworth St., Brooklyn, N.Y. 



MANUFACTURERS OF MATERIALS FOR 



Street and Cable Railway Construction 



KNEES 
SPIKES 

CHANNEL PLATES 

FROGS 

POINTS 

TONGUE SWITCHES 
GROOVED RAILS 

FOR CURVES 
BENT ANY DESIR- 
ED RADIUS 




PEDESTALS 
OIL BOXES 
BRAKE SHOES 
WHEELS & AXLES 
BRASS BEARINGS 
i TURNTABLES 



fc^lsOfm^l^' SNOW SWEEPERS 



PLOWS 

ETC. ETC. ETC. 



iLuTOMilTIC SWITCHES 



AND 



RAILROAD CASTINGS 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION AND MOST APPROVED PATTERNS. 

FOWLER'S IMPROVED 

RANDALL BOX & RUNNING GEAR. 

CATALOGUE FREE TO RAILROAD COMPANIES. 



104 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOTJRKAL. 



THE PUTNAM NAIL C°- 



Highest 
Award at the 




WELL 

TO YOUR 





Fig. 1. 



Fi«. 2. 




Centennial 
Exhibition. 



HORSES FEET. 



These drawings show how many horses are made lame and permanently in- 
lured by the use or the cold cut and sheared- pointed Nails, ihis process or 
manufacture produces lamination, causing the iron to form in layers and when 
driven into the foot, the horny fibers of which the hoot Is composed cause the 
nal to separate at the point, ana one portion passes into the foot. 

No. 4 represents one of these nails which was driven Into the hoot and sliv- 
ered in driving, one thin blade passing into the quick or sensitive sole; No. 5 
the thick blade or the nail passed out of the wall or the hool tor clinching. 
After a few days the horse was returned lame, and upon the removal of the shoe, 
a nail similar to the above was broken off, leaving the sliver in the foot : i-och- 
jaw ensued, from which the horse died. Upon dissecting the toot a portion or 
the nail was round to have penetrated through the coffin bone, as seen in t lg. d, 
letter A, thus sacrificing the life of a valuable animal. 

It requires but little observation and reflection, one would think, to airtve at 
the conclusion as to the kind of nails to be used in the horse's toot, whether a 
mangled piece of iron rendered DANGEROUS by the Cold Rolling and shearing 
process, or one made from t lie rod at a welding heat, where ail the fibers remain 
intact and a perfect oneness maintained and being pointed by the hammer, ren- 
dering such an accident as slivering utterly impossible. 

The foot is the most important member or the animal's body, to which the 
greatest care and attention should be directed; tor when it becomes injured or 

Address for Circulars, etc., 



diseased, no matter how perfect the other parts may be, the horse's services are 
diminished or altogether lost. Hence the value of a horse depends upon the con- 
dition of his feet. 

The horse at every step brings an immense power and weight to bear upon the 
foot. The hoot is a thiim of life and yields to the pressure. The Put am Nail 
being forged accommodates itself to the pressure of the hoof. It is far other- 
wise, however, with stiff rolled and cut nails. Thev remain rigid and their 
sheared edges are therefore pressed like sharp knives against the horny 
fiber. This Is what causes the broken and rotten appearance so frequently seen 
in horses shod with cheap cut nails. Can a horse owner afford to attempt, to 
save a few cenis in price ot nails and ruin his horse? Surely not, for the old 
adage is true as ever 

" NO FOOT, NO HORSE." 

As the remedy lies with the owner of the horse, it is for him to prohibit any 
cold-rolled or sheared nails being used in his horse's feet. 

The only Ilot-Forj.etl anil Ilaininer-I'ointed 1 1 orsc-Shoe Nail in the 

World 

that is not cut, clipped or sheared upon the point, and will not split in driving, is 

THE PUTNAM NAIL. 



THE PUTNAM NATL CO.. NEPONSET P. O., BOSTON, MASS. 

JOSEPHINE 0. SMITH, Successor to the late WlLLARD H. SMITH, 

350 & 352 Pearl Street, New York, 





No. 14.— Center Car Lamp. 



No. 13.— Two-light C ar Lamp as u c ed on Tenth 
Avenue (N.Y.)Cable road. 






No. 8.— Center Car Lamp as used on Tenth Avenue 
(N. Y.) Cable road. 



Small Head Light for Grip Cars and Stages. 




No. 1.— Center Car Lamp in general use throughout 



No. 3.— Box Lamp with drip cup. All kiads of trimmings pertaining to car lamps. the United states and Canada. 

MANUFACTURER OF W. H. SMITH'S PATENT RAILROAD CENTER LAMPS AND REFLECTORS. 



Deoembea, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



105 



A. FRENCH, Chairman. J. E. FRENCH, Vice-Chairman. GEO. W. MORRIS, Gen. Man. 1). C. NOBLE, Sec. & Trens. 



The A. French Spring: Company, Limited, 




PITTSBURG, PENNA. 






Pat. Ort. 3, 1876 ; April 1, 1879. 



SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF 



I. X. L. SPRING DRAFT OR TUG LINK. 



1. 




Full Size. 



Elliptic and spiral springs of all descriptions a specialty; also sole manufacturers of patent keg shaped springs for 



PUGH & RUSSELL, General Agents 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

BOSTON, NEW YORK, CHICAGO. 



STREET RAILWAY DEPT., 

NEW YORK & CHICAGO. 



106 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Decimbeb, 1886. 



THE NATIONAL CAR 




HEATER. 

IMPROVED. 

For Warming Horse 
or Street Rail- 
road Cars. 

It Is brick lined, has 
rotating and dump- 
ing grate, and safety 
door eaten. 

These car heaters 
are in successful op- 
eration on all of the 
street railway lines 
in the city of Brook- 
lyn, New York, and 
on railroad lines in 
the United States and 
Canadas, and give 
entire satisfaction. 

It is neat in ap- 
pearance, occupies 
but little space, Is an 
ornament to a car, 
is not costly In price, 
nor expensive in its 
operation. 

Sole Manufacturers, 

NATIONAL 

Stove Co., 

243 Water St., 

New York City. 



EVERIT'S GAR FLOOR. 



ire 1 "!!! 



HuyuiJjyyHl 



Dispenses with Mais of 
all kinds. 

Easily Repaired. 

Nothing to break or be 
stolen. 

Most easily cleaned of 
any floor in use. 

Can be swept or washed. 
Does not hold the dirt. 

Low in First Cost 
and High in 
Durability. 



W. L. EVERIT, 

New Haven, Conn. 



JOHN A. ROEBLINC'S SONS CO., 



^5 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Iron and Steel 




er-< 
Exs- 



WIRE ROPE FOR STREET CABLE RAILWAYS, 



SWITCH ROPES. 



PLOUGH ROPES. 



TELEGRAPH WIRE. 



JOHN A. ROERLING'S SONS CO, 



Works : Trenton, N. J. 

RRANCH OFFICES: 

215 Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

14 Drumm Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



H. L. SHIPPY, Manager, New York Warehouse 

117 and 119 Liberty Street, New York, 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



107 



ESTABLISHED 18a7. 



INCORPORATED 1875. 



7 



OAR COMPANY, 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

* BUILDERS OF 

Street Oars 

OP EVERY STYLE AND SIZE, 

For Horse, Cable or Other Motive Power. 

EXCLUSIVE MANUFACTURERS OF 

BROWNELL'S PATENT 

COMBINATION CARS 

FOR SUMMER AND WINTER SERVICE. 

JARV1S ENGINEERING CO., 

Engineers & Contractors 




J. M. JONES' SONS, 



AGENTS, 



Street Railway Car Builders 



WEST TROY, 



NEW YORK. 



PENNSYLVANIA 

STEEL COMPANY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



FOR ERECTING STATIONS 



FOR 



ELECTRIC POWER AND CABLE RAILWAYS, 



USING 



Jarvis Patent Furnace 

For Setting Steam Boilers to Barn Cheap Fuel, such as Wet Saw- 
Dust, Coal Screenings or Slack Coal. 

ALSO 

ARMINGTON AND SIMS ENGINES, 

Belting direct to Power Dynamos without using- Shafting. 

NO. 61 OLIVER STREET, ROSTON, MASS, 

SEND FOB CIRCULAR. 



Steel Rails 



Of T patterns, weighing from 16 to 76 lbs. per yard. 
CENTRE BEARING Street Patterns, 42 to 60 lbs. per 
yard, TRAM Street Patterns 45 to 47 lbs. per yard, 
and Street Patterns for STEAM ROADS. 



WORKS AT 

STEELTON, DAUPHIN CO., PENN. 



NEW YORK OFFICF 



160 Broadway. 



Philadelphia Offio« 208 South Fourth St. 



108 THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. December, 1886. 



ANDERS' 
CABLE RAILWAY GRIP 



Simple, Durable, Efficient. 



Cable may be dropped and picked up 

Without Leaving the Platform. 

The whole under the constant control of the gripman. 

Most efficient c'evice in existence for releasing and gripping cable in crossing other 
roads. Can be worked from either end of the car. 

Mechanism Simple and not liable to get out of order. 

The rope may be dropped at any time to a lower level than the path of the gripping 
device and again raised into the gripping jaws at the will of the gripman with perfect 
ease and safety. 

D. B. ANDERS, 

2313 Ridge Ave., ■ ■ ■ ■ Philadelphia, Pa. 



fraCEMBER, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



m 



I>. W. Push, J. S. Puffh, 



F. I>. Russell. 



PUGH& RUSSELL, 

STREET CARS, RAILS, 

AND EVERY DESCRIPTION OF 

STREET RAILWAY SUPPLIES. 



General Representatives of 

THE JOHN STEPHENSON COMPANY, Limited, 

NEW YORK. 
STREET CARS. 

General Agents of 

THE A. FRENCH SPRING COMPANY, Limited, 

PITTSBURG, PA. 
STREET CAR SPRINGS. 



Agents for New York District, Indiana, Miobigan and Ohio of 

THE JOHNSON STEEL STREET RAIL COMPANY, 

JOHNSTOWN, PA. 



NEW YORK, 

STEWART BUILDING, 

Broadway, Reacie and Chambers Sts. 
P. O. Box 3524. 



CHICAGO, 

ADAMS EXPRESS BUILDING, 

No. 183 Dearborn Street, 
Rooms 13 and 14 



THE HALE & KILBURN MAM. CO, 



Extensive mnkers ol Patented 

Street Car Seats 

of every description. 
Our Patent Spring Scats covered with 
Rattan or Carpet are fast being adopt- 
ed by the best railroads In the country. 

Seats for Steam Cars a Specialty. 

Owners and makers of all theCobb patents 



a e r- 
~ c - 
O 





Cut showing car with rattan seat and 
back wUtiuut springs. 
REPEUENC ES: 
Broadway llne(PulIman cars) NewYork 
Grand si. line, 3d and 4thave lines, NY 
Chicago City RR. Chicago W. Dlv. line, 
and New Adams street line, Chicago; 

East Cleveland R. K. Co. 
and Woodland Ave. and 
West Side R. R. Co. 
Cleveland: Union Line, 
, St. Louis; 2d& 3d St. R. 
H R. Co., Frankford and 
i|Southwark R. R. Co., 
1 Union Line, Chestnut* 
Walnut R.R., Ridge Ave 
R. R., or any other road 
InPhila.; and 100 others 
elsewhere. 



-0- 



Many R. R. Co's use our Rattan Pat. 
Canvas Lined Seats tor Scmmer and cov- 
er the same with carpet for Winter. This 
method of seating we recommend as 
durable and economical, for the reason 
both a Summer and Winter seat is ob- 
tained In one. 

Estimates & Particulars cheerfully 
given (mention this paper), satisfac- 
tion guaranteed. 

A TRIAL SOLICITED. 

OFFICES : 48 A .50 NO. SIXTH ST., | 

FACTORIES: 615 to 621 Filbert St., 

PHILADELPHIA, PA Cut of section ofcrossfi 




or summer car. 



JOHN A. EMERICK, President, EDWARD H. JOHNSTON, General manager, SAMUEL LEES, Treasurer. 

Johnston Railroad Frog & Switch Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Railway Switches, Stands, Frogs and Crossings. 

ALL SUPPLIES FURNISHED APPERTAINING TO 




team & Street Railways. 



Civil & Mechanical Engineers, Machinists & Contractors. 

Blue Prints and Bills Furnished on Application. Corkespondence Solicited. 

Works, Chester, Pa. Office, 307 Walnut Street, Philadelphia. 



110 



The street railway journal. 



^December, 1886. 



JOS. KINSEY, Prest. 



E. V. CHERRY, Vice-Prest. 



OLIVER KINSEY, Secy. 



POST & CO., Cincinnati, O., U.S.A. 



lanufacturers of and Dealers in 



Street Railway Supplies and Equipment. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Center Lamps, all sizes. 
Globe Brass End Lamps, 
Tin Box Lamps, 

Cable Car Head Lamps, 
Office Lamps. 

CAR TRIMMINGS. 

ALL STYLES. 

Street Car Gongs, 

Journal Bearings, 

Deck Lights. 




DEALERS IN 



Burners, Chimneys, 
Wicks, Lenses, 
Globes, Etc. 

TRACK MATERIALS. 

Spikes, Bolts, 
Rails, Shovels, 
Picks, etc., etc. 



Center Car Lamp. 



SPECIAL TRIMMINGS MADE TO ANY ORDER TO ANY DESIGN ESTIMATES FURNISHED. 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 



STREET CAR SEATS & BACKS. 




MAIN PANEL. 

3- \ In. w.w. 



FOOT PANEL. 

3-'„ln. w.w. 



THREE-PLY CAIt SIDES. 

Having given o lr three ply white wood car sides a thorough trial tor a 
number of years in our city street and railway lines, which test has left them as 
firm and good as the day they were put In, we unhesitatingly place these sides 
In the in irket as a superior article. They are composed of t hree white wood ( or 
poplar) veneers, each % Inch thick, the grain of the center layer running at right 
angles with the two outside layers. Hence they derive all the special and well- 
known advantages of glued up wood over single p y, namely : 
1st. They are fully 75 per ceot stronger, for they brace and stiffen ( the 
car 

2nd. They are lighter, being only 3-8 inch thick, and so do ot add so 

much dead weight to the car. 
3rd. They will not check or split by change of atmosphere 
4th. They will not split or crack when nailing into place , even inough 

the nail be placed near the edge. 
5th. Being laid over a form to suit the shape of the car frame or post 

they cannot buckle or twist, a feature which also adds strength to the 

car. 

For repairing cars these sides have no equal. 

Our Three Ply l!nr Seats and Bucks, so well known all over the world, 
are now the most popular seat and back in the market, and recommend them- 
selves especially for their Lightness, Cleanliness, Healthfuhiessand Beauty, as 
also their Cheapness and Durability. For they tire indestructible by moths (the 
great enemy of upholstering), and will not harbor vermin or insects, or carry or 
communicate contagion or disease, our trade In this line hasgrown in thirteen 
years to vast proportions, which in itse'f is a sufficient guarantee of their merits. 
They are made either perforated or plain to suit customers. Birch is the wood 
most generally used. Today fully one-half the railroads In t he country are usin^ 
these seats arid backs. We \vou;d also call attention to our Veneer Ceilinc for 
cars. They are made either plain, perforated or decorated, and greatly add to 
the beauty ot the car. For repairing cars they have no equal; for they are placed 
over t he carllnes and cover all the oxd paint and wood work. The woods general- 
ly used are Bireh, Birdseye Maple, Oak and Mahnaany. 



Or^^ElTDlSr'JEl'n Sz CO.. 

Manufacturers of Car Seats and Ceilings and Depot Seating:, 

OFFICE AND FACTORY : 643, 645, 647, 649, 651, 653, 655 and 657 West 48th St, New York. 
Sample and Salesroom : 206 Canal St., cor. Mulberry. 
Send for Catalogue. "Address all Communications to Office. 



December, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



11 



C 



astings for Crossings, Frogs, Switch- 
es, Curves, Turnouts, &c. Joint 
Plates, all sizes of Knees, and Standard 
Castings always on hand. 




ontracts taken and Estimates given for Construction 
of Street Railways and Supplying of all Materials 
used. Steel Grooved and Tram Rails Furnished at 
Special Rates. 



TOM. L. JOHNSON'S 

IMPROVED FARE BOX. 

NOW IN GENERAL USE IN CITIES THROUGHOUT THE U, S. 

Ornamental to any Car. 

REDUCTION IN PRICE WHERE TWO 
BOXES ARE PLACED IN ONE CAR. 





Roads Equipped with Boxes oh Tria], and if Lot Satis- 
factory, Returned Without Any Expense to the Com- 
pany trying them. 



Patented Oct- 14, 1873. 



BOX NO. 2. 



CHAKIOT PATTERN. 

Oneol 'the principal merits of these Fare Boxes over all others, consists In the fact that the fares are not turned out of sight at once by the drivers, leaving 
nothins but the bare word and memory of the parties as evidence of the payment, thereby making it easy for deception to be practised, even though an officer is on 
the car and is endeavoring to see that the driver is faithfully performing his duties. They are so constructed that the fares are kept in sight from one end of the 
road to the other, and at any point on the line an officer of the company, or indeed any other person, can tally passengers with the fares. The drops can easily 
carry from 75 to 80 fares, and can be counted without mistake, and counterfeit money can be easily detected. These boxes are very simple in construction, being 
cleared, when required, in five minutes, whereas any other box takes a much longer time. The glass fronts and drops render 1 hem so transparent that a per- 
son sitting In the further end of car can readily count the fares and make the tally, without making himself conspicuous In t he matter If desirable 1 hey are 
lighted from an outside lantern, (which is only on the car at night, and should be taken off during the day,) giving an excellent light, for the mi es can oe seen al- 
most as plain as by day. When the box is put In a car It can not be taken out or tampered with, unless the keys are obtained from the office, and can not be 
robbed without violence. Special attention given to correspondence on the subject of street railway construction, equipment and operation. Address an cor- 
respondence to 

A. A. ANDERSON, with TOM. L. JOHNSON, Indianapolis, lnd. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December, 1886 



DAY'S IMPROVED STREET RAILWAY TRACK CLEANERS. 



The cut represents a part of one end of the frame 
work of a 16-foot car with cleaners attached. 




These Track Cleaners need no extended statement of their great superiority 
over all others invented. The fact of over three thousand pairs being now In use is 
sufficient evidence of their necessity and utility. Are adaptableto all Kinds of 
rails and styles of cars. Clean Sr ow. Ice. Mud and Stones from the rail. The 
driver can raise or lower them instantly with one hand. To secure the largest 
benefit theyshouli be attached to every car. 

No estimate can be mad.' of their advantage in saving of horseflesh hand labor, 
salt, and the maklngor time in stormy weather. Since their Introduction new 
and valuable improvements have been made in their construct ion, mode of at- 
tachment, and convenience of handling. They are finished in a thorough, work- 
manlike manner of the be t material obtainable, the design being to manufac- 
ture the most efficient article in preference to other considerations. Price in- 
cludes right of use and is less than heretofore. 

Reference Is made to a few of the roads using these Cleaners. 

Detroit city Ry., Detroit, Mich .' 154 Pair 

Chicago City Ky , Chicago, I1L 400 " 

Rochester City & Brighton R. R. Rochester, N. Y ino " 

Albany Rv.. Albany, N. Y 75 «• 

Lynn & Boston II. R., Boston, Mass 68 •' 

Boston Highland Ry., Boston, Mass 46 " 

Grand Rapids Street Ry 48 " 

Nvimkelg Street Rv., Salem, Mass 69 " 

Bridgeport Horse Ry., Bridgeport, Conn 40 " 

Cream City Ry., Mllwauk. e, Wis 40 " 

Milwaukee City Rv.. Milwaukee, Wis 50 " 

Buffalo Street Ry., Buffalo, N. Y 32 " 

AUGUSTUS DAY, 76 State Street, cor. Park Place, 



This cut represents my Snow Plow, 23 of 
which are now in use. With four horses 
and two men they have handled two feet 
of snow, distributing it nine feet from the 
outside rail. 




It is adapted to single or double t rack roads, adjustable where necessary: built 
in the most thorough and substantial manner of the best matereial. The Plow 
is not int ended to supply the place of the small Track clean rs, but be auxiliary 
to them. For execution In deep snow, ease, and convenience inhandling, it sur- 
passes all others in use. orders :-hould be given three month in advance. 

Reference is made to the following roads that use them: — Detroit city Ry.. De- 
troit, Mich. (Two plows.) Rochester City & Brighton R.R , Rochester, N. Y. 
(Two plows.) cream City Rv., Milwaukee, v. is. W est Side street Ry , Mil- 
waukee, Wis. Chicago City Ry., Chicago, 111. ( three plows.) Grand Rapids 
Street Ry.. Grand Rapids, Mich Highland St. Ry., Boston, Mass. Buffalo St.. 
Ry., Buffalo, N. Y. (Two plows.) Johnstown Pass. Ry., Johnstown, Pa. Min- 
neapolis St. Ry., Minneapolis, Minn. (Two plows.) St. Paul st. Ry., St. Paul, 
Minn. (Two plows.) Kalamazo oSt. Ry,, Kalamazoo, Mich. Worcester St. Ry., 
Worcester, Mass. south Bend Ry., South Bend, Ind. Milwaukee City Ry., 
Milwaukee, Wis, 

For Further Information and Price, Address: 



Detroit, Michigan, U. S. A. 




These Boxes are of the latest a^d most approved 
pattern, and contain a front door, by opening which all 
of the glass Inside can be conveniently cleaned. This Is 
a late patent, and Is a very valuable improvement over 
the old method of taking the boxes apart for that pur- 
pose. They are well made and not liable to get out of 
order, cannot possibly be picked, and even if all the glass 
is broken no fare can be extracted from the drawer. 

The late J B. Slawson originated the "Fake Box Sts- 




C. Front View. 



C. Back View. 



tem," and all of his Boxes, Change Gates and Drivers' 
Change Box are protected by several patents, and par- 
ties using them are not liable to claims for inlringe- 
ments, as may be the case with some boxes which are 
now being offered for sale. 

These Boxes, etc., are now in use not only In the 
United States and Canada, but in Mexico, South Ameri- 
ca, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia— in fact, nearly 
all places where street cars are used. 




Change Slide. Outside 
View. 




CHANGE 























01 









Change Gate. Outside 
View. 

The prices have been great- 
ly reduced, and are made to 
fit the times. Orders will be 
promptly filled by addressing, 




D Front View. 



MILTON I. MASSON, Agent, 365 AVENUE A, NEW YORK 

or the JOHN STEPHENSON COMPANY, Limited, 47 EAST TWENTY-SEYENTH STREET, New York. 



December, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



113 



THE BEMIS CAR BOX COMPANY, 




Manufacturers of Cable Railway Plant- 
Machine Moulded Gearing for Mills and Factories. 



CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



114 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Decembeb, 1886. 



THE BRYDEN FORGED HORSESHOE WORKS, Limited 

catasauq.ua, penn. 




MANUFACTTJBEBS OP 



THE 



BRYDEN 

Forged Solid Calk 

<2s 3>v£"CJ"X 




These shoes are forged into shape under heavy drop hammers, greatly condensing the iron and adding very much to wearing qual- 
ities, making it nearly equal to steel in durability. 
The distinctive feature of our system of 
manufacture is, that it produces a finished 
shoe, calked, or plain, ready for attaching 
to the hoof. 



The crease is made low and the nail 
holes are punched well in and beveled to 
permit the nailhead to be well driven in, 
reducing the strain on the nails and insur- 
ing a firmly fastened shoe. 

The foot bearing of the shoe is level, thus 
materially aiding in the preservation of the 
hoof. 

It is not ne essaiy to heat the shoe in 
order to fit it. 

There are no welds in the shoe to break, 
the calks being solid fogged uj) from tbe 
web. 

Our Calked Shoe. A good, strong, reliable shoe 
A handy shoe for the Winter, easily sharpened, and, as 
No. 1 to No. G. Front and hind of steel or iron. 




The shoes have a good substantial clip 
drawn up from metal driven outside the 
regular outlines of the shoe for that pur- 
pose. The outer edge of the clip, when 
drawn up, coinciding with the outlines of 
the shoe, requires no robbing of the hoof 
wall to let in the clip. 

Among the street railways using our 
shoes are, the Third Avenue B. B. Co., 
Eighth Avenue B. B. Co., Broadway & 
Seventh Avenue B. B. Co. of New York 
city; Bush wick B. B. Co., Brooklyn City 
and Newtown B. B. Co. of Brooklyn; Phila- 
delphia Traction Co., Citizen's Passenger 
B. B. Co., Second & Tbird Street B. B. 
Co. of Philadelphia; Metropolitan B. B. Co. 
of Washington, D. C. ; North Chicago B. 
B. Co, Chicago City B. E. Co., West 
Division B. B. Co. of Chicago, 111. ; New 
Orleans City & Lake B. B. Co. of New Or- 
leans, La. 

We present illustrations of some of the 
many designs of shoes manufactured by us. 

to have on hand. The calks will not come off. Always ready to nail on. 
the calks will not break, will give as much service as steel. Made in sizes 




Our Frog Pressure Shoe. The advocates of 
the frog pressure system of horseshoeing have 
in this shoe the very thing they want. The best 
shoe made for curing corns or contracted feet. 
Made in sizes No. 1 to No. 6. Front and hind, 
iron, or steel. 

Our Plain Shoe. " The best railroad shoe 
made," so says one of the largest consumers of 

orseshoes in New York city. This shoe is used 
by the largest street railroads in New York city 
and Philadelphia. Made in sizes No. 1 to 6. 
Front and hind. 

Our Chicago Special. Designed to meet the 
wants of many of our western customers. Exten- 
sively used in Chicago, on the principal railroads 
and for custom work. A light calked shoe for 
shoeing trotting and driving horsis. Made in 
sizes No. 1 to No 4 of iron or steel. 




Our Calked Mule Shoe. Just the thing for street railway and coal mining work; solid calks. Made in sizes No. 1 to No. 5 in iron or steel. 

J. B. WHITE, Manager Sales Department. 



Dkoember, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



115 



The Gould Table System 



O F 



STREET RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION. 

Fully covered by patents In the United States and England. Patents applied tor In other European countries. 



CONSTANT TEARING UP 
OF THE STREETS 
AVOIDED. 




Sfx"8"'-7'lbs. I* 



The conduit Is placed at the side, doing away with the central conduit entirely. A conduit Is supplied for natural gas, steam, electric and telephone 
wires, etc. 

THE RAILS ARE TIED TOGETHER AT THE SURFACE. 




The construction of the grip is the simplest known. 

The slot which admits the grip is placed outside the rails. 

The inventor will make favorable terms with parties desiring- to put this system 
into operation. 

A capital chance for the right man to organize a company. 





N. B.— Parties Infringing on this Grip will be Prosecuted to the full Extent of the Law. 



Address all communications to 



J, H. GOULD, Ninth and Market Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 



116 



THE STEEET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December, 1886. 



S. M. CARPENTER, Prop. C. J. LANGBON, Sec'y. 

FULTON FOUNDRY, 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

STREET RAILWAY SUPPLIES, 

Carpenter's Patent Turn-tables and Transfer-tables, 

Open Wheels of all sizes and weights. Wheels and Axles of all 

sizes fitted on short notice. 

Chilled curve rail, Turnouts, Switches, etc., etc. Blue prints and Bills Furnished on Application, 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. Address, 

FULTON FOUNDRY, 

202 MERWIN ST. CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

WM. WHARTON Jr. & CO. Limited, 

Engineers, Manufacturers & Contractors, 

Twenty-Fifth Street and Washington Avenue, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Cable Railways, Grips, 

And All Appurtenances. 



The Oldest and Largest Manufacturers of Street Railway Track Appliances in the World. Responsible parties con- 
templating Building Renewals or Extensions will find it to their interest to correspond with us. 



December, 1886. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL, 



117 



Pullmans Palace Oar Co. 




Address all correspondence 



PULLMAN'S PALACE CAR CO., Chicago, 111. 



118 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOTTRNAL. 



December, 1886. 




THE GIRDER SYSTEM OUR SPECIALTY. 

THE 



JOHNSTOWN, PA. 



Section C. 88, No. 111. 



Section D.45,No.ll. 




SIDE BEARING GIRDER RAILS 



Patented February 20, 1883. 
Section E. 76, No. 117. 



OR 





Patented November 27, 1883. 



Section G. 58, No. 120. 



CENTER BEARING GIRDER RAILS. 





1 . f 

1 — w 













.Large Assortment of different Weights 
and Sections. 



Patented January 29, 1884. 



Patented January 29, 1884. 



Rolled Steel Switches, Frogs, Curve Crosses, Etc, 

We Furnish Every Detail Wanted in Track Work. 



Our customers are guaranteed against all suits for infringements on goods purchased from us and we further undertake to defend 
the patents covering the details of our Girder System. 

To those contemplating the use of the Girder System, we offer, FKEE OF COST, to survey their routes, and after consultation as 
to the best and most economical construction, to furnish lull and complete estimates of cost of the completed -work. Send for Illus- 
trated Catalogues. 



t>EOEMBER, 1886. 



THE STREET BAIL WAT JOURNAL. 



119 



Eli Baldwin, President. Walter S. Baldwin, Secy. & Treas. 

STANDARD INDEX AND REGISTER COMPANY, 

138 FULTON STREET, NEW YORK, 

SOLE LICENSEES AND MANUFACTURERS OF THE 
SIMPLE. IMPROVED DURABLE. 

STANDARD 



INFALLIBLE. INDEX & REGISTER. ECONOMICAL. 




ADOPTED BY THE LEADING RAILROADS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Besides indicating upon its face, the fares as the alarm is 
rung, this register i ndelibl y records them as well as the trips 
made upon a paper dial inside. This paper dial is removed at the 
end of the day and is a correct report of the fares registered each 
trip a nd the number of trips made, which cannot be altered or 
obliterated. 

We therefore claim our system of registering fares to be the simplest and 
best, and it positively stops an y collusi o n b etween employees. 

Testimonials confirming this statement from roads on which the "Stand- 
ard " has been used for the past five years will be furnished upon application. 



120 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Deckmbeb, 188(5. 



THE BROOKLYN RAILWAY SDPPLY COMPANY, 

37, 39 and 44 Walworth St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



U. S. A. 




RAILWAY 
SUPPLIES. 



AGENTS FOR 



Carpenter's Patent Turn-tables and Transfer-tables 

Simplest, Cheapest and Best in the World. Each Exhibited in Practical Operation. 

Write for Prices. 



Agents for Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island and 
Connecticut of the 

BOSS & WALKAWAY 

Snow Scrapers. 

Price, SIOO & $150. 

Only Two Horse Power. Cheapest Practical 
Horse Power in the World. 




All kinds Track and Stable Tools: Picks, Shovels, Rammers, Bars, Mauls, 
Tongs, Bending Machines at the Lowest Prices. 

Latest Improved Snow Sweepers of our Own Manufacture. 

Cylinder Brooms and many other improvements are patented. Rattan for refilling. Snow Plows. Sand 
Cars Exchanged. Sweepers of other makers refitted and sold cheap. 

37, 39 and 44 Walworth St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



11 



MO* 



MANUFACTURING 

MANUFACTURERS AND OWNERS OP THE 

Latest Designs, Improvements and Inven 
tions in Registers, Indicators, Classi- 
fiers and Punches, for the Record- 
ing of Fares Collected on 
Street and Steam Railroads. 




REQ/ Sr 



COMPANY. 



JAMES McCREDIE, Pres., Buffalo, N. Y. 



This company owus over ICO Patents em- 



bracing all the Valuable Features of Fare 
Registers, Indicators, etc., and was 
awarded three Medals at the 
Chicago Exposition of Rail- 
way Appliances. 



Benton Register. 



The Alarm Registering Punch. 

This Register, which is so generally used 
throughout the United States and Europe, 
we claim to be the most perfect check 
that has ever been placed before 
the public for the Collection 
and Registiation of Fares 
on Street Railroads, 
especially where 
different rates 




of Cash fare and tickets 
are to be collected. 



The Monitor Register. 




Railway com- 
panies desir- 
ing to use a 
Stationary 
Register will 
consult their 
own interest 
by examining 
this Register 
before adopt- 
ing any of the 
cheap devices 
now offered as 
it is the niont 
Reliable Reg- 
ister of its 
kind. For fur- 
ther particu- 
lars ;uldr. S3 




BEADLE & COURTNEY, Gen'l Apnts,^ l S& w £ 'ZIZZT™ 



114 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



December, 1886. 



FRANK H. ANDREWS, 




Improved Springs. 



WM.B. ISAACS. 258 Market St. San Francisco. 



December, 1886- 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



115 



FRANK H. ANDREWS, 



SUCCESSOR TO 





ANDREWS & CLOONEY, 

F. T. LERNED, Gen'l Agent. 

Manufacturers and Contractors for Constructing Street Railways. 

THE BUILDING OF 



CABLE ROA 



AND FURNISHING MATERIALS FOR SAME, A SPECIALTY. 

All Kinds of Steel and Steel Orooved Rails, 

Straight or Bent to any Radius, 

Knees, Fishplates, Spikes, Bolts, Etc., Etc. 

MACHINERY: 

Wheel Presses, Wheel Borers, Axle Lathes, Drills, Sc., 

EITHER FOR STEAM OR HAND POWER. 

Promptness and Reasonable Prices, 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 

Brancli Offices: 

BOSTON, ST. LOUIS, CHICAGO, 

37 Central Street. Southern Hotel. Lakeside Building. 

Represented in California by WM. B. ISAACS, 258 Market St, San Francisco. 



116 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



Decfmi.ep, IFRtf 



RICHARD VOSE 



13 Barclay Street, 



3 



^Tew Toik, 



PATENTEE AND MANUFACTURER OF 



Graduated Stree 




Patentei!, April 15th, 1S79. 



ADAPTED TO THE 

STEPHENSON, 
BEMIS, 
RANDALL, 
HIGLEYJ 
BRILL,; 
JONES, 
BALTIMORE, 
VOLK, 
CHAPLIN 

LACLEDE 
And all other Boxes. 







No. 0, for 10-ft. Light Cars. 
No. 1, for 10-ft. Cars. 
No. 2, for 12-ft. Cars. 
No. 3, for 14-ft. Cars. 
No. 4, for 16-ft. Cars. 
No. 5, for 16-ft. Cars. 

(Single Pedestal.) 

No. 1, Cushion, for 16-ft, 
Cars. 

No. 2, Cushion, for 12 anc] 
14-ft. Cars. 



TESTIMONIAL. 



MIDDLESEX RAILROAD CO., BOSTON, MASS. 

RicnARD Vosb. Dear Sir,— We have had in constant 
use upon this road for several years the '-Vose Grad- 
uated Spring," and they have given very general 
satisfaction. So much so that we shall continue to 
order them. Very truly, 

Chas. E. Powers, Prest. 



NO. CHICAGO CITY RY. CO., Chicago, III. 

Richard Vose, Esq. Dear Sir,— This company has 
had in use for the past seven or eight years your 
Patent Graduated Car Spring, and our experience 
leads us to the conclusion that they are all in every 
respect which you represent them to be. And cer- 
tainly all that we desire. Yours Respectfully, 

V. C. Turner, Prest. 



B'DWAY & 7TH AVE. R.R. CO., NEW YORK ClTT- 

Mr. Richard Vose. Dear Sir,— We have 125 cars 
equipped with your Graduated Springs. They have 
given entire satisfaction. They are undoubtedly the 
best In the market. Very Respfly, 

J. W. Foshay, Prest. 



BROOKLYN CITY R.R. CO.. Brooklyn N. Y. 

Richard Vose, Esq. Dear Sir,— Yours of May 27 
to Mr. Hazzard, Prest., has been referred to me for 
reply. And would say that we have now in use 
ai>out 60r> sets or your Patent Graduated Car Springs. 
And up to date have given perfect satisfaction. 
Yours truly, A. N. Dickie, supt. 

CHICAGO CITY RY. CO., Chicago, III. 

iviOH a.rd Vose Esq. Dear Sir,— Replying to your 
- /or of a recent date I beg to say that we have been 



using your Graduated Car Springs since 1R81 aDd 
have increased the number, until at the present time 
we are using 369 sets, and the same have invariably 
proved satisfactory. Yours truly, 

C. B. Holmes, Supt 



CAMBRIDGE R.R. CO., Cambridge, Mass. 

Col. Richard Vose. Dear Sir, — We have used 
your Graduated Street Car Springs for several years 
and I need only say with such success that we con- 
i iuue to use them. Very Respty, 

W. A. Bancroft, Supt. 



CINCINNATI I. P. R.R. CO., Cincinnati, O. 

Richard Vose. Dear Sir,— Send us 6 more sets of 
your new pattern Car Spring, same as the lot we 
ordered of you last Sept. in every way. This is the 
best answer we can make to your question of "How 
we like them." Yours truly, J. M. Doherty, Supt. 



LYNN & BOSTON R.R. CO., Chelsea, Mass. 

Richard Vose, Esq. Dear Sir,— All I can say in 
favor of the Vose Spring is that we continue to apply 
them to most of our new cars. Have about 60 cars 
equipped and think very well of them. If they could 
be produced for less money should think better of 
them. Very Respectfully Yours, E. C. Foster, Supt. 



CREAM CITY R.R. CO., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Gentlemen,— Yours of May 28 at hand, with re- 
gai d to your Car springs. We find they are the best 
in use. They come a little higher than the Barrel 
Spring, but they are much the better springs. 
Yours truly, H. J. C. Berg, Supt. 



LOWELL HORSE R.R. CO., Lowell, Mass. 

To whom it may concern : We have used the Rich 
ard Vose Graduated Car Springs for several years, 
and are well pleased with then. Should be unwil- 
ling to change them for any oiher All of our cars 
use these springs. Yours Respectfully, 

J. A. Chase, Treas. 



DAYTON STREET R.R., Dayton, O. 

Mr. Richard Vose. Sir,— We have eighteen cars 
equipped with your Patent Graduated sprint and 
will use your springs to replace all other kinds as 
fist as repairs are needed. Your springs give the 
best satisfaction to our company and p arous of any 
that we have ever tried. 

Yours Respectfully, A. W. Anderson, Supt. 



FT. WAYNE & ELMWOOD RY. CO., Detroit, Mich. 

Richard Vose, Esq. Dear Sir,— For the past four 
years we have b en using your Graduated Springs on 
allot our cars (3u). our Superintendent says that 
none of them have ever had to be repaired and that 
they are the best sorings we ever used. 

Yours truly, N. W. Goodwin, Sejy. 



DETROIT CITY RY., DETROIT, Mien. 

Richard Vose, Esq. Dear Sir,— I have your firor 
of the 20th ultimo. We have about 70 cars equipped 
with your springs. Our exoerience is that they wear 
well and give general satisfaction. 

Yours truly, Geo, Hendrie, Treaa.. 



bisoEMBER, 1886. THE STBEET KAILWAY JOURNAL ll? 




The Van Depoele Electric Manufacturing Company 

21 NORTH CLINTON STREET, CHICAGO, ILL., 

Owning the Van Depoele Patents for Electric Railways and 
for Van Depoele Motors, are prepared to equip railways with 
their Electric System. 

We claim to have the best and most economical Electric 
Motor in the World. 



We are not Selling Stock, but Doing Business. 

Would be pleased to furnish estimates to new companies or those desiring to extend lines 01 wanting more rapid transit. 

Van Depoele Electric Manufg. Co. 



118 



THE STEEET BAIL WAY h> OTJRNAL. 



December, 1886. 



J. G. BRILL & CO., 

PHILADELPHIA, 

BUILDERS OF 

Railw ay .& Tramway Cars 




December, 1886. THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 119 



J. G. BRILL & CO., 



PHILADELPHIA, 

BUILDERS OF 



Railway ^Tramway Cars 



126 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Deoembeb, 1886. 



JOHN STEPHENSON COMPANY 

(LIMITED), 

^ffeTOr York. 

TRAMWAY CARS 

MEDAL OF FIRST CLASS, WORLD'S INDUSTRIAL COTTON EXPOSITION, NEW ORLEANS, 1885. 




LIGHT ELEGANT, DURABLE. 

Every Description. 

Best Materials. 

Minimum Prices. 
ORDERS QUICKLY FILLED. CAREFUL ATTENTION TO SHIPMENTS. 
All Climates Suited. 




OCT 2 1890 
U WENT 




VOL. Ill, 



I NEW rOKR: I 
t 113 liberty .Street./ 



JANUARY, 1887. 



J CHICAGO: ) 
(Lakeside Building, f 



No. 3. 



William J. Richardson. 

The subject of our present sketch, Wil- 
liam James Richardson, was horn in the city 
of Albany, N.Y., October 
22, 1849, and is, therefore, 
in his thirty-eighth year. 
His early education was 
obtained in the experi- 
mental department of the 
State Normal school, at 
Albany, passing from the 
lowest to the highest 
class in that department. 
Leaving this school, he 
attended the Albany 
branch of the Bryant & 
Stratton series of busi- 
ness schools, until, incon- 
sequence of the election 
of his father, Mr. William 
Richardson, to the presi- 
dency of the Dry Dock, 
East B load way and Bat- 
tery Railroad Compai y, J % 
of New York, in the year | * 
1864, he removed (with - sf^ 
his parents) to New York 
City. He finished his 
business school education 
in the New York branch 
of Bryant and Stratti n's, 
and entered the English 
importing hardware i us- 
iness when sixteen years 
of age. 

For a year he worked 
at ten dollars a month, 
and at the end of two 
years and a half was re- 
ceiving twenty-five dol- 
lars a month. Few there 
are, probably, who be-' 
gin work in life receiving 
less compensation for an 
honest day's toil than he 
did. 

In 1876, Mr. Richard- 
son left his employers to 
assist his father in the railroad busi- 
uess in Brooklyn, Mr. Richardson, 
senior, having become the lessee, and 
to a large extent the proprietor, of the 
ines under the control of the Brook- 



lyn & Jamaica Bail way Company. After 
having 1 een so engaged for a period of two 
years, and desiring to devote himself 
to further study, and being, for- 



father having 





tunately, enabled to do so, Mr. Richard- 
son entered the collegiate department 
of the Brooklyn Polytechnic and 
Collegiate Institute, in which he re- 
mained three years. Upon leaving 



this institution, he becamethe superintend- 
ent of the Brooklyn, Carnarsie &Rockawny 
Beach Railroad and Steamboat Line, his 
become associated with 
another gentleman in 
leasing it. This position 
he filled for one year, un- 
til his father disposed of 
his interest in that line, 
when the son left the 
road and assisted him in 
connection with the busi- 
ness of running the lines 
of the Atlantic Avenue 
Railroad, then known as 
the Atlantic Avenue, East 
New York & Greenwood 
Railroad. 

In May, 1872, the At- 
lantic Avenue Railroad 
Company of Brooklyn 
was organized, and be- 
came the successoi of 
William Richardson, les- 
see, in the operation of 
the several street car 
lines under his control; 
and upon the organiza- 
tion of the said company, 
the subject of our sketch 
was elected secretary, 
which position he has 
held continuously ever 
since. 

In 1873 he married 
Mary Carrington Ray- 
mond, the second daugh- 
ter of John H. Raymond, 
LL. D., president of Vas- 
sar College, by whom 
he has become the happy 
father of six children, 
equally divided as to sex, 
all of whom are living 
but one. Mr Richard- 
son is a member of the 
Hanson Place Baptist 
Church, and is thoroughly 
active and prominent in 
connection with its progressive work, be- 
ing at the present time president of the 
Young People's Association. 

Upon the organization of the American 
Street Railway Association, in 1882, he was 



130 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Januauy, 188*1 



elected secretary and treasurer; and in the 
following year be was elected to similar 
offices in the Street Railway Association of 
the State of New York. To both of these 
offices in each Association he has since been 
an anally re-electeil. 

Mr. Richardson has crossed the Atlantic 
Ocean three times, in 1870, 1883 and 1885; 
the tirst time traveling extensively on the 
European continent, specially interested in 
City passenger transportation. On his first 
visit to the land of his forefathers, through 
the kindness of Myles Fenton, Esq., then 
general manager of the Metropolitan Rail- 
way, of London, he was afforded special fa- 
cilities for inspecting the underground sys- 
tem of transit in that great city. 

Mr. Richardson ascribes his success in 
life to the care with which he attends to all 



The Tenth Avenue Cable Buildings. 

We have already published several illus- 
trations in regard to the mechanism which 
is used in operating the cars on the Tenth 
Avenue Cable Line of New York. The il- 
lustrations referred to are those of the grip 
which was used, both originally and in a 
modified form, the hauling machinery and 
also the cars themselves. We are now 
enabled to present a perspective view of 
the building looked at from the south-west 
on the Tenth avenue front, also a plan 
showing the general arrangement of the 
machinery in tbebasement, and also another 
showing the tracks outside of the building, 
with the methods of leading off the dupli- 
cate cables, both for Tenth avenue and 
125th street. It should be recollected, in 



tower over the central portion where the 
offices are located. 

Back of the office there is a small machine 
shop and carpenter shop where repairing of 
the road is done, and the space on either 
side shown in the arches is occupied for 
the storage of cars. 

The stabling of what horses are used in 
the establishment; is provided for in the 
basement, and the side opposite to that 
which ou l- plan shows, for the use of driv- 
ing machineiy. These stables are fitted 
up with every appliance for the care of 
horses, but of course they are a small por- 
tion of the appliances of the building, as 
the main interest centers about the driving 
machineiy. 

The piers which were constructed for the 
front of the building are built with a con- 




FRONT ELEVATION OF THE TENTH AVENUE CABLE RAILWAY BUILDING, NEW YORK CITY. 



the details of his business. His offices re- 
quire the handling of a great many papers, 
and he tries so to order his work as to perma- 
nently dispose of each one as it comes into 
his hands, so as to avoid multiplying work 
unnecessarily. 

Very much of the success or failure of a 
man iu life is dependent upon the woman 
be marries. The influence of a good wife 
cannot be overestimated; and in hav- 
iug one Mr. Richardson has great reason 
to congratulate himself on the wise choice 
he made in the selection of a wife. She 
has. in the fullest sense of the word, been 
a helpmate to him; and her judgment, 
whether followed or not by her husbaud, 
iu matters concerning his business plans 
and welfare, about which he takes pleasure 
in advising with his wife, is invariably cor- 
rect. Such a wife is a treasure and we are I 
glad to know that her husband appreciates | 
her. 



this connection, that the engines placed in 
this building are used in driving a double 
cable on Tenth avenue, and also on 125th 
street. 

The two cables, or rather the second 
cable, is not run at all times, but only used 
in cases of emergency, when one of them 
breaks, or is otherwise injuredso as to ren- 
der it necessary to put it out of service. 

The Tenth avenue cable runs up Tenth 
avenue from 125th street to High Bridge, 
and the 125th street cable runs down Tenth 
avenue to 125th street, there separating 
and running cars east and west from North 
to East rivers. 

The building which forms the subject of 
this article was designed by Mr. Paul F. 
Schoen, and erected under his supervision, 
i It is a brick structure, with pointed stone 
trimmings, one story high in all parts, ex- 
cept that it is two stories with a low clock 



crete base 7 ft. squire and 2 ft. thick, up- 
on which is placed a foundation stone 5 ft. 
square and 12 in. thick, and on this is 
placed a concrete block 3 ft. square and 16 
in. thick. 

A concrete base, furthermore, is i ut down 
under all the walls, running back to a suit- 
able depth and with a thickness of 16 iu. 
This is composed of one part best approved 
cement, two parts sharp grit sand, ai dfour 
parts of small machine broken stone thor- 
oughly mixed and dumped in the trenches 
and well rammed down betweevi the curbs, 
which were set to the proper thickness. 

The base for the area wall on the Tenth 
avenue side is made 6 it. wide, with the 
thickness which we have already indicated. 

It may be mentioned also in this connec- 
tion, that the floors of the basement and 
areas are also made of concrete cement, 
which is composed of the same ingredients 



January, 1887. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



as thebase but is only 5 in. thick, aud has 
at the top, as finish, an inch thickness of 
best Portland cement, mixed in the propor- 
tion of one part sand to one part cement, 
and is finished perfectly smooth with just 
inclination enough to give it proper drain- 
age. The highest level is 18 l't. (> in. be- 
low the first story, and framed with a fall 
of 12 in. towards the opposite corner. 

The foundation stones which are placed 
upon this bed of cement are of blue build- 
ing stone with flat even surfaces, and are 10 
in. thick lot - the area walls, while a thick- 
ness of 12 in. is given to the piers, as we 
have already stated. These stones for the 



cement and two parts of sharp sand, and 
great care was taken that it should be mixed 
only as fast as it was used. All the walls 
and piers are well grouted on each course, 
so as to leave the walls a solid mass. 

The fronts of the building are faced with 
the best quality of Trenton front bricks, 
laid in red mortar in the best possible man- 
ner, and was afterwards cleaned down with 
aqua fortis and oiled with raw linseed oil. 
The brick work is tied every six courses. 

The front and interior of the building is 
handsomely trimmed with terra-cotta work 
of the best quality, and is laid in position 
in a fiim and substantial manner. 



In plastering the office buildings all the 
outside walls were prepared with 2 in. fur- 
ring of porous terra-cotta tiles, and finish- 
ed with hard finish, the ceilings also were 
finished in the same manner. 

The rear walls of the basement are pins- 
tered on the outside with a heavy coat of 
hydraulic cement, against which the ground 
is damped. 

This is to prevent the water coming in 
and rendering the lower steps damp. 

All the floors and roof, except those 
of the office building aud lantern of the 
main roof, are arched in between the iron 
beams with moulded brick and filled to the 



— I'-r-j -i4---!t-iI "j-r- I fl - ro-! "-rr 1 ri - 'vrr j j | _j . ■ J ] 




■ill} 



'Tin 



.L 



lS8tli STREET 




THE TENTH AVENUE CABLE BUILDINGS. FIG 2. 



piers are all in one piece; those for the sides 
filling the course to the full width, and are 
closely put together aud flushed up with 
spawis and cement mortar, wefl bedded to- 
gether. 

All the area walls, and theretaining wall, 
are built of blue building stone, faced with 
selected and hammer dressed stone, laid 
in cement mortar and neatly pointed. They 
are well bonded and fitted; one bond stone 
is furnished for every six feet, and the ce- 
ment mortar is composed of one part first- 
class cement and two parts sharp sand. 

The brick work is laid up with a good 
quality of North river brick, laid in cement 
mortar composed of one part best approved 



The windows and doors of the basement, 
and the first story on the street, are fur- 
nished with blue stone sills and lintels of 
proper width, aud carefully tooled. The 
sills are cut with a wash and prepared for 
an 8 in. reveal. 

The granite work for the bases of the 
columus in basement are 16 in. thick and 
3 ft. square with hammer dressed beds aud 
with tooled facing with a bevel. 

The granite door sills and steps for the 
rear door of the office building, as well as 
the side doors, are made of solid granite 
blocks 8 in. thick. 

The interior walls of the office building 
are built of hollow tile brick. 



lower flange of ii on beams. The five first 
courses are full 8 in. brick, and-the center 
course of s jlid brick. 

The roof is supported by cast iron columns 
spaced 23 feet apart from center to center, 
running from the Tenth aveiue frcnt back 
to the end of the building, and 23 feet 2 in. 
between centers, lunning parallel to the 
Tenth avenue line, except across the space 
occupied by the office building, where the 
spaces are 22 feet (j in., 12 feet 2 in., aLd 
22 feet 6 in. 

[uasmueh as the front of the building is 
199feetl0in. long, with a depth of 200feet, 
this spacing, allowing for the thickness of 
the walls, will give seven rows of columns 



TfiE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 1887. 



running in a line parallel with the Tenth 
avenue front, and a row of eight perpendi- 
cular to that front. 

There are 48 columns altogether instead 
Of 56, which would naturally be expected, 
on account of the space which is occupied 
by the office being run up with brick walls 
and no columns of any kind being used 
there at all. These columns are made of 
the best quality of cast iron, and were care- 
fully examined to see that they were all 
perfectly straight and free from blow holes, 
and that they were centrally cored. All 
the joinings of posts and columns were 
planed and turned true and smooth. All 
the iron work was given a good coat of me- 
tallic paint before it was set. 

The inside columns, which support the 
riveted girders, carry wrought iron floor 
beams. These columus vary from 1 1-4 
in. to 1 1-2 in. in thickness, according to 
the position in which they are placed, and 
in external diameter from 12 in. to 14 in. 

The intermediate columns cross the front 
of the building, and at the rear of thesbops 
were made square or of a rectilinear section. 



ers, 4 in. square, cut dovetailed, and laid 
16 in. apart, thoroughly bedded in the con- 
crete floor. 

The flooring is laid with 1 1-4 in. maple, 
3 in. wide, grooved and tongued, and 
blind nailed to every sleeper. 

The interior work of the officeis finished 
throughout with cherry and is made of 
carefully selected stock which, so far as 
could be determined, is perfect in every re- 
spect. It is all hand made work. All the 
frame work is mortised and tenoned, the 
panels are backbeaded, and the joints are 
tongued and grooved, with the sections 
bolted together. 

The three front doors and the other doors 
opening into the vestibule and main hall 
are sash doors, 2 1-2 in. thick, with fan- 
lights. 

The inside folding doors are2 in. thick, as 
are also the outside doors of the first story. 
All the doors are made of the best white 
pine, glued up in strips and veneered on 
both sides; the mouldings and panels are 
solid. The closet doors are paneled only 
on one side. All the area doors of the 



the best engineers. All the closets were 
thoroughly trapped, and supplied with 
vent pipes to carry off noxious gases, and 
soil traps were used wherever it was con- 
sidered necessary. 

The iron which is used in theiron pipes is 
carefully examined to see that it is free from 
holes and other defects, of uniform thick- 
ness, aud the pipes were coated with coal 
tar pitch applied hot before they were put 
into position. They were then firmly se- 
cured by wrought iron hooks and hangers. 
All the joints in the iron pipes were calked 
with picked oakum and molten lead, so 
that ine joints are made impermeaule to 
gases. 

Where connections were made with iron 
pipe, it was done by means of copper or 
brass sleeves or ferrules, of the same size 
as the lead pipe, set into the hub of the 
branch of the iron pipe and calked in with 
lead. All the lead pipe connections are 
made by wiped joints. 

The water pipes which are laid in ex- 
posed places were packed with mineral 
wool, or other substances which have the 




Am. Ru. Pui. 0: 



I HE TENTH AVENUE CABLE BUILDINGS FIG. 3 



All the columns and posts have bed 
plates 4 in. wider all round than the posts, 
and 2 1-2 in. thick. 

Where top plates are required, they are 
full depth of post or the bottom of girder, 
are carried and projected 6 in. beyond the 
supporting post and are 1 1-2 in. thick. 

The windows throughout, with a few ex- 
ceptions, have box frames of white pine, 
with 1 1-2 iu. ^hanging stile, and 1 1-2 in. 
pulley stile, with 1 3-4 in. stop bead. The 
frame follows the line of the arches on the 
outside, but is finished square on the in- 
side. 

They further have 1 3-4 in. sashes care- 
fully hung on brass axle pulleys with chains 
and fasteners. All the frames, except for 
the office building, are finished on the in- 
side with 3 in. oak wall plate, grooved and 
tongued into the frames and flush with the 
brick work. 

The frames were painted on the outside 
with metallic paint before they were set. 

The windows in the office building are 
made of cherry, with box frames, and are 
finished in the same way as those we have 
already specified for the m9in building. 

All the flooring for the office throughout, 
except the halls, is laid on chestnut sleep- 



basement are double 2 1-2 in. batten doors 
of yellow pine, in narrow strips. 

All the hardware which is used in the 
office building is of the finest quality of 
polished brass, or hard cast metal. This 
includes such items as kuobs, escutcheons, 
butts, hinges, latches, etc. 

The front of the first story, except the 
fanlights, is glazed with the best quality of 
French plate glass, and the entrance doors, 
vestibule and rear doors have glass with 
embossed line borJers. All the faulights 
of the front of the office building, and all 
borders, are glazed with ornamental color- 
ed cathedral glass. 

The wainscotting for all the rooms and 
halls and staircase is paneled and moulded 
with a paneled frieze made of stiles, and 
rails 1 1-4 in. thick, with moulded caps and 
bases. The wainscotting in the second 
story rooms is 4 feet high. Picture moulds 
are placed in all the rooms. Screens for 
conductors' and waitiug rooms corres- 
pond with the wainscotting, as also do the 
partitions on the second story. 

The plumbing for the whole establish- 
ment is carried on in the most careful and 
workmanlike manner, and closest attention 
was paid to sanitary laws, as laid down by 



effect of thoroughly protecting them from 
the action of cold. 

There are three lead mains running into 
the building, and on each of these pipes 
there is fitted up a 2 in. Worthington 
water meter. 

One of these leads runs to the boiler, one 
to the steam pump, and the other to the 
plumbing fixtures in the basement of the 
office. 

This latter supplies cold water to all the 
plumbing fixtures as high as the Cro'on 
pressure will raise it. 

The building is heated with steam taken 
from the boilers in the basemeut, ard for 
this purpose 22 radiators of approved pat- 
tern are located in the building. They are 
all provided with neat caps and bases and 
furnished with perforated iron tops, all 
neatly finished in gold bronze. The main 
supply pipe to these radiators is 3 1-2 in. 
inside diameter, and is connected to the 
outlets of the boiler with suitable valves. 
This pipe is extended into the office, and 
gradually reduced to 3 in., 2 1-2 in., and 
1 1-2 in. as the branches for risers and ra- 
diators are taken off. All these steam 
pipes are first covered with a layer of asbes- 
tos, then with best hair felt, and finally 



January, lSot. 



THE STKEET RAILWAY JOURNAL, 



133 



■wrapped with 10 oz. canvas, which is 
naatly sewed on, thus making the complete 
coating 1 1-4 in. thick. 

Referring now to our engravings, as we 
have already said, the illustration on 
page 130 is that of the perspective view 
of the building from the southwest. 

The columns which are shown in front as 
supporting the roof over the car storage 
portions, are made of granite blocks cut to 
a bearing and rough pointed on their ex- 
terior surfaces. 

Fig, 2 shows the plan of one-half the 
buildiug where the machinery is located. 
By careful examination of all the dimen- 
sions the maiu features of the building will 
be understood. This machinery is driven 
by two 28 by 48 in. engines built by Wil- 
liam Wright of Newburg, N. Y. 

All the arrangements have been made to 



gines for overhauling the cable are placed 
in the blank spaces in the right and left of 
the engraving. 

This machinery has already been fully 
illustrated in a previous number of the 
Street Railway Journal. 

The tightening arrangements for the 
cables, of which there are four, are placed 
in the long grooves or slots cut in the floor 
and outlined by the rows of columu shown 
in the right and left of the engraving. The 
arrangements used for tightening are simi- 
lar to those used for ordinary cable con- 
struction, where there is a movable carri- 
age running on tracks carrying the tail 
sheave and drawn back by a system of 
weights and levers placed at the back end 
of the groove. 

On the opposite side of thebuilding from 
where the machinery is located, are placed 



There is no reason why the building can- 
not be kept immaculately clean. 

There is also ample room for the storage 
of what fodder and railroad supjdies may 
be deemed necessary. 

Back of the machinery room the boiler is 
located. This is equipped with four hori- 
zontal return tubular boilers, 5l in. diame- 
ter and 16 ft. long, shown in Fig. 4. The 
bottom plate of each boiler is in one sheet 
7 ft. wide and 16 ft. long, so that the name 
does not come in contact with any of the 
riveted joints except at the front and back, 
where the heads are placed. The upper 
half of the shell is in three plates with the 
steam dome in the center. This latter is 40 
in. high and 3 ft. diameter with the man- 
hole on top, and two 4 in. steam nozzles. 

All the horizontal and circular seams are 
doubled riveted. The heads are 5 in. thick 




STEAD S CIRCULATING GENERATOR iN TENTH AVENUE CABLE BUILDING. FIG. 4. 



run these engines condensing, but owing 
to the lack of water, they are run at pres- 
ent as high pressure and the condensing 
apparatus is lying idle. This want of water 
is due to the fact that the Luilding is sit- 
uated at some distance from the North 
river, and all the water which is at present 
available is taken from the Croton water 
maiu, which is, of course, paid for by the 
thousand gallons and is too expensive to be 
used for condensing purposes. The engines 
are located in the drawing in the two long 
spaces near the center, one of which is 
nearly filled with dimension figures The 
cylinder end of the engine stands towards 
the street, and the ciank end runs in the 
blank space shown in the engraving and 
drives the main gears which are placed in 
the T shaped blank space in the center of 
the plan. The main drive gears and en- 



the stables and storage rooms of the com- 
pany. 

The stables, of course, are very few in 
number. They accommodate about a dozen 
horses, although not more than six or seven 
are actually kept there. The floor is cov- 
ered with concrete 5 in. thick as given in 
the specifications and so graded that it 
drains itself into the sewers. The flooring 
of the stables is the same, so that the whole 
of the room i3 made in one uniform manner, 
the stalls being placed in position after all 
the concrete work had been completed. 

In order to avoid having the horses stand 
upon the hard pavement the stalls are fur- 
nished with movable slatted floors which 
can be taken up at will and washed out. 
When this washing is done the water of 
course drains itself naturally into the sew- 
ers and is thus disposed of. 



with a hand hole in front near the bottom, 
so as to give access beneath the tubes for 
cleaning out. There are sixty 4 in. tubes 
in the boiler. The shell is of jj in. steel 
and of the best quality. Each boiler was 
tested by hydraulic pressure of 160 lbs. be- 
fore being put in position. They are set 
on an inclination of 2 in. dropping towards 
the back end. There is also a heavy flange 
riveted near the bottom at the back end, 
wilh a 6 in. pipe, which acts as a mud drum, 
having a 2 in. gate valve at the bottom to 
blow out sediment. 

The boilers are set in pairs and, as we 
have already stated, are four in number. 
The brick setting is 28 in. thick through- 
out, and arched over the top of the boiler 
foi escaping gases. 

There is a 30 in. pipe on the top of the 
flue at the back end which is connected to, 



134 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 1887 



a 5 ft. flue runniDg to the ch'mney. Each 
of these 30 in. flues runs iu to a 5 ft. flue, so 
that the boilers may be run together, or 
separately, if necessary. Each boiler has 
one of Stead's circulating generators at- 
tached to it. This attachment consists of 
a steel bridge wall 20 in. in diameter and 8 
ft. long, acting as a water bridge wall, and 
takes the place of the ordinary brick wall. 

It has, in addition to this, ten 3 in. pipes 
placed on each side of the brick work, which 
are 16 it. long, placed between the boiler 
aud brick work and round about the boiler 
door. They not only prevent the brick 
work from burning out, but add very ma- 
terially to the heating properties of the 
boiler. They are put iu an inclined position 
and coming out on the front of the bridge 
wall, pa«s back and forward on each side, 
by each of the side walls, and uuder the 
front end of the boiler above the water 
line. The bridge wall is further connected 
to the 6 in. mud drum by 3 in. pipes which, 
when the boiler is running, gives thorough 
circulatiou from the bottom of the boiler to 
the top. It is claimed that the circulation 
which is thus produced in the boiler carries 
the mud and scale and deposits into the 
mud dram where it can be thrown out from 
time to time. 

With the ordinary rating, these boilers 
would not probably run more than 100 
horse power, but with the data which we 
have at hand, we should judge that they 
are being worked at about 150 horse power. 
The boilers have now been running for 
about two years, and we are informed that 
they are as clem, practically, as when 
they were first put in, and that there have 
been no repairs, either to the boiler or 
brick work. Two of the boilers are now 
running the entire road, both from the 
Tenth Avenue aud 125th Street lines, 
without any difficulty. When the road was 
first opened the fuel used was that of ordi- 
nary merchant bituminous coal, and was 
coitiu? the c imp my about $24 a d iy for 
ruuniug the Tenth Avenue line alone. By 
repeated experiments aud careful adjust- 
ment of grates, tea., it has been found that 
the boilers would generate all the steam 
necessary for running, the Tenth Avenue line 
at a cost of about $13 a day. Since the 
125th street line has been added the coal 
consumption has, of course, been sent up 
some, but even now the whole fuel bill 
amounts to something less than $20 a day. 

It is the intention of the management, at 
an early day, to make careful tests of the 
actual cost of running the road, and we 
shall than hope ti publish accurate data in 
regard to the matter. 

It will be seen, however, when it is taken 
into consideration that the road is now run- 
ning sevei.teen cars on its Tenth Avenue 
line, and this iucludes the whole from 
East river to Tenth avenue and up to 
High Bridge, aud also running nine cars 
across 125th street from the North to East 
rivers, employing a force for its driving 
power of one chief engineer, three oilers, 
and three firemen, that the cost must be 
very much less than what would be required 
to. maintain the horses and stable them 



for twenty-six cars which are now run, 
especially if they hoped to maintain any- 
thing like the maximum speed of which 
they are capable, that of eight miles an 
hour. 

The engraving, Fig 3, gives the plan of the 
front of the building showing the arrange- 
ment of the cables uuder the sidewalk. 
The method of laying the duplicate cables 
will be readily seen from an examination 
of this plan. Each cable is led out by it- 
self and has a separate trough to run in in the 
building. The arrows show the direction 
that the cables take in running from and 
entering th'j building. The two cables that 
are shown coming out of the building and 
separating and then running up and down 
the street are the ones that run the cables 
on Tenth avenue, while those that run to 
the right together are the ones that run 
the 125th Street line. As we have already 
explained in a former issue only one of 
these duplicate cables is run at a time, the 



The grip is hung from the axle, as in the 
drawing, but of course it may be hung 
from any part of the car desired. It is 
preferable, however, that the first named 
connections should be made, on account of 
it always holding the grip at uniform dis- 
tances from the top of the rails, so that the 
deflection of the springs has no influence 
upon the grip, but the whole will run 
smoothly and evenly. 

The cable is hung on the car, pivoted by 
the pins mark r, by which a slight lateral 
motion is allowed, and all bending and 
binding of the grip in turning corners will 
be entirely avoided. 

The main plate, or what might be called 
the bed plate of the grip, maiked V, ha~ two 
thin metal plates, marked p, riveted to it. 

These form guides, as it were, upon 
which the sleeve or carriage of the grip, 
maiked S, will be raised or lowered. To 
this carriage is attached the gripping me- 
chanism, and all the attachments by which 




Curve 



ANDER'S CABLE GRIP. 



other being held for emergencies that may 
arise in the case of accident co its mate. 
The gearing in the building is so arranged 
that any single one or any possible combi- 
nations of two or more may be run without 
interfering in the slightest with those that 
it may be desired to keep at rest. 



Anders' Cable Grip. 

We illustrate in this connection a grip* 
which has been devised for use on cable 
cars, by means of which a cable can be 
dropped and picked up at any point along 
the line, and which is especially adapted 
for use where two cable lines cross each 
other, and it is necessary for one train to 
drop the cable in order to allow the other 
to pass over. The drawing from which 
our engraving is made, shows the working 
details of the grip, and which, with the ex- 
planation we are enabled to give, will make 
it perfectly clear to any one interested in 
this matter. 

•David B. Anders, 8313 Kldge avenue, Philadelphia. 



the cable is to be operated. The sleeve it- 
self is raised and lowered by means of the 
upright bar, marked I, which is flimly riv- 
eted, not only to the sleeve, but to the cross- 
bar at the top of the engraving, which is 
raised and lowered by the aution of the 
knee joint, marked u. 

This knee joint, it will be seen, is opera- 
ted by means of the lever marked p which 
simply pushes it backwards and forwards 
and allows the sleeve to fall by its own 
weight, aud then raises it again by the ac- 
tion of the joint. The sleeve carries the 
p arts mared H, which are so pivoted that 
the carrying rollers of the cable, marked A 2 , 
can be swung one side by means of a bar i, 
which is operated by a bell crank at the 
top of the device. As the bar i is moved, 
the wheels will be thrown in and out. The 
cable gripping device catches the cable at 
the sides, and not at the top and bottom, as 
is ordinarily the case, and this is clearly 
shown by the form of the jaws, marked G, 
in Fig. 2. These jaws are operated in turn 
by the bell crank shown at the top of the 
grip in dotted lines, and by means of the bar 



Janiiai t, 1 b<87. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



135 



running vertically to make the proper at- 
tachments. 

To operate the grip and make it grap- 
ple with the cable which is running on 
sheaves below, the bar i is first raised, 
which swings the piece H one side, so 
that the spools, or carrying rollers, h- ,wili 
not interfere with the rope as it enters the 
jaws. The operating bar is then forced 
down and the jaws are opened. The lifting 
bar I is then lowered with the wheel and 
all the gripping mechanism until the jaws 
pass over the rope. By depressing the 
bar i at that point the spools are swung 
under the rope, and the whole is lifted 
again by means of the bar I and the knee 
joint. The spools are thus raised above the 
sheaves and the rope is carried with it. 
Then by raising the operating bar o the jaws 
are forced ugaist the rope, imparting the 
motion to the car. 

In order to stop the car it is only neces- 
sary to loosen the rope from the cable and 
apply brakes to the wheels of the car. Of 
course, in running down, or stopping upon 
a grade, the cable may be gripped to a 
greater or less extent, and the car held in 
one position by the friction of the cable 
as it passes through the jaws. 



manner. The fifth pocket, on the right- 
hand side, is for the money change, and 
has an inner pocketof tin, giving additional 
security as well as facilitating the emptying 
of the money. The simplicity, lightness, 
durability and convenience of this belt com- 
mend it as desirable for the purposes for 
which it is intended. 



Martin's Change Belt. 

The cut below shows an improved 
change belt* which has recently been intro- 
duced. The belt is intended for the use of 
drivers who act also as conductors, and 
takes the place of the metal box, now in 
use, upon the dash board hand rail. As it 



J'lie American (Grinding Mill. 

The accompanying illustration rerjresenfs 
a mill* that has been especially designedfor 
the use of those parties that have a large 
amount of grinding to do and stea power 
with which to do it. It has a capacity of 
about thirty-five to fifty bushels of good 
feed per hour. 

It is built entirely of iron and steel and is 
very neatly designed as well as strong and 
durable. The burrs in thia mill are of 
the very best hard iron and it is claimed, 
will grind from one to three thousand 
bushels before wearing out. They can then 
be very easily replaced at a slight cost. 

Twenty-one sizes and styles of these 
mills are made, and adapted 
for use with steam, wind or 
water power. 

"Appleton Manufacturing Co., 
S. Canal St., Chicago, 111. 



Wood, of Boston, Did II. 

Here is a scene in a crowded Broadway 
car. Heavy swell, brown plaid «uit; quiet, 
nervy-looking gent in corner. H. S. gently 
rubs his knee against fine-looking lady stand- 
ing next to him. No notice taken. Then 
he steps on her toe, bound to make a mash. 
Lady can say nothing, but looks her annoy- 
ance. N. G. in the corner catches o i, 
humps himself, and John Lawrence Sullivan 
himself never s,ent in a better rib-roaster. 
The H. S. with the upper portion of plaid 
suit and contents went through that car 
window, no doubt much to the relief of the 
lady and greatly to the delight of the passen- 
gers after the quiet, brown-eyed but lively 
gentleman had explained why he struck 
out. Let the World get up a fund for new 
glass for that Broadway car and hang the 
mime of T. E. Wood, Boston, "striker," 
in red letters, on the outer wall. May he 
live long and prosper. 



If you are a man you are doubtless won- 
derii g how could the company be expected 
to keep a double set of cars and driveis 
lor raiivy days and special hours. Well, it 





MARTIN S CHANGE BELT. 



THE AMERICAN GRINDING MILL. 



is worn by the driver it does not require 
to be taken off and carried whenever he 
has occasion to leave the car. Nor can it 
become dented and insecure by any acci- 
dent that may happen to the car. The belt 
is made of carefully selected russet leather 
and is hand sewed and riveted throughout. 
It contains five pockets, each with an in- 
dependent and secure pocket, either with 
or without clasps. Four of the pockets are 
for change .envelopes, the pocket for 
" 10 cents " envelopes being somewhat 
larger than the others. The belt will hold 
ten dollars in change, divided in the usual 

•Rut'us Martin & Co., 18 Park row, New York. 



Cable Splice. 



Editor Street Railway Journal : 

Owing to the many newspaper articles 
already published in your journal on the 
subject of ''splices" and the different kinds 
of "splices," will Engineer Holmes, the 
President and Superintendent of the cable 
roads in Chicago, be kind enough to give 
us his experience during the five years of 
the operation of the cable roads in Chicago? 
And what system of splicing he is now 
using in the cables of his roads, which I 
learn is a successful method. 

Manufacturer, 

Hyde Park, 



is certainly a woman's view. And I don't 
see that it would be at all necessary to 
"double" the number of cars for special 
occasions; but the wants of the public are 
such as to absolutely require greater pro- 
vision for them than exists at present. 
Perhaps by the time the five years are up 
our aldermen will have advanced far em >u<;h 
in the direction of serving the city to con- 
sider favorably the project of running the 
street railways themselves. Then we shall 
have the ideal state of things that prevails 
in Paris, where public transit is a pleasure, 
nnd not an experience equally composed 
of fear, horror, and disgust. In the mean- 
time one would not wish one's bitterest 
enemy transmigrated at his decease into 
the quadrupedal muscle-motor of the To- 
ronto Street Railway. — Toronto Globe, 



136 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, tt&t. 



The London Railway System. III. 

CRYSTAL PALACE RAILWAYS. 

The Hues from the Crystal Palace which 
serve all the suburbs on the south of 
London, present, especially on the Syden- 
ham side, beautiful sites for residences and 
a country filled with verdure. The numer- 
ous festivals which are given at the Crystal 
Palace, summer and winter, draw a consid- 
erable number of visitors from all p irts of 
the metropolis. Ou the days of large 
festivals, or special exhb itions, the crowd 
comes from localities in the neighborhood 
of London, drawn from those places by the 
low fares which are offered by the railroad 
compa lies. Besides the fairs at the Crys- 
tal Palace, its permanent exhibition of 
prominent industries and arts, the beauty 
of its gardens, and the panorama which 
one enjoys from its galleries draw thither, 
especially in summer, large crowds of 
visitors. In addition to the curious drawn 
thither from the city we must add the 
inhabitants of Balham, Streatham, Lower 
Norwood and Sydenham, who use the 
Metropolitan daily in the transaction oi 
their business affairs. This active traffic 
is explained by the large number of roads 
which cross these localities. 

The Crystal Palace and its environs are 
served, either directly, or by connections 
with four companies, tlie Brighton, the 
Chatham, the South Western and the South 
Eastern. The two first lines each follow 
different routes. The two latter are long 
and are less convenient to the public. 

The Brighton has a heavy traffic between 
London Bridge and Victoria via the West 
End and Crystal Palace. The distance 
between them is sixteen miles and requires 
forty-five minutes for the passage. There 
are twenty-eight trains in each directiou. 
The Crystal Palace is twenty-five miles 
from London Bridge, and thirty-four miles 
from Victoria. 

At Clapham Junction, the Bright an 
connects, by means of the West London, 
with Kensington station (A. R.). This 
company, in connection with the South 
Western, has a short train service starting 
every half hour from the two terminals. 
The passage occupies eleven minutes. 

From Kensington to Victoria and London 
Bridge, the Brighton is in connection with 
the Metropolitan lines of London as fol- 
lows: 

The North Western, which runs into 
Broad Street; the Great Western; the 
Metropolitan; the District, etc. 

The eastern quarters are less effectually 
served under these connections with the 
Crystal Palace, but since the East London 
has run into Broad Street, travelers avoid 
the passage which they were formerly 
obliged to make in order to get access to 
the Brighton lines. 

The fares are the same to the Crystal 
Palace, whether the start is made from 
London Bridge or Victoria, and they are 
not changed if the passenger enters the 
train between these two points. The fare is 
thirty cents for first class, twenty -four cents 
for second class, thirteen cents for jjhir- 



class. Return trip tickets are sold, as upon 
all metropolitan lines, at a reduced rate. 

The North Western and North London 
roads sell, at their respective stations, in- 
cluding those between Poplar and Kensing- 
ton, first and second class tickets for the re- 
turn trip, including the entrance fee into 
the Crystal Palace. The price of these 
tickets varies for the days on which they 
are good. On days when the admission fee 
is twenty-fours cents, these tickets are sold 
at seventy-two cents first class, forty -eight 
second class. If we deduct from this the 
admission fee to the Crystal Palace, we 
see that the traveler can go from Finch- 
ley Road, for example, to the Crystal Pal- 
ace and return, that is to say, twenty -eight 
miles, for twenty -four cents. 

The Chatham road on its side, has a di- 
rect line from Victoria to the Crystal Pal- 
ace via Brixton, the South London and the 
line which branches off from Peckham Rye 
to serve Nunhead, Honor Oak and Forest 
Hill. It runs above the Crystal Palace, 
while the Brighton runs below. It is 
generally known by the name of the Crys- 
tal Palace High Level Line. 

Passengers coming from the city by way 
of Ludgate Hill to Brixton are obliged to 
change cars at the latter station, which is 
the point of departure for the trains run- 
ning north. The South London and Crys- 
tal Palace Co. have constructed a branch 
line, which, starting from the main line, 
joins that of the Chatham near the Camber- 
well road. 

The construction of this branch line per- 
mits direct trains, not only between the 
city, but also between the north of London 
and the Crystal Palace. The time of pas- 
sage from Ludgate Hill to the Crystal Pal- 
ace occupies thirty-five minutes, and that 
from Victoria to Crystal Palace forty-three 
minutes. 

The South Western has communication 
with the Crystal Palace by connections at 
Wimbledon with the Brighton. This route 
is more expensive and longer than the one 
we have just quoted. 

The South Eastern also takes passengers 
from Crystal Palace by way of Lower Syd- 
enham, but they have to make a short pas- 
sage on foot, which is objectionable to many 
visitors. 

By the short line from Nunhead to Black- 
heath, the Chatham runs from the foot of 
Greenwich, which overlooks these localities. 

Until the connection with Camberwell 
Road was made, the Chatham could not en- 
ter into any competition with the South 
Eastern, which had the advantage to taking 
its passengers into the City and West End 
without changing cars. This could not be 
done by the Chatham Road, as passengers 
from Ludgate Hill or Greenwich were re- 
quired to make two changes. For Victoria 
station, the advantage lies with the Chat 
ham, and in connection with the North 
Western and South Western, this com- 
pany controls the movement of passengers 
between Greenwich and the West End. 
This movement is very important, regard- 
less of the numerous omnibus lines which 
run from Greenwich to Victoria, and a 



tramway has been opened upon one of the 
principal streets which connects these two 
streets and also carries many of the passen- 
gers. 

The fare from Ludgate Hill and Victoria 
to the Crystal Palace by the way of Chat-^ 
ham, is the same as that from London 
Bridge and Victoria to this location by the 
way of Brighton road, 

As a complement to the suburban ser- 
vice of London, the Brighton runs from 
London Bridge to Streatham Junction, a 
train service of sixty-two trains each way, 
by the way of Tulse Hill and Peckham Rye. 

From Streatham Junction to Victoria 
there are only thirty-six trains a day. This 
line is far from offering the same conven- 
iences as the Brighton. 

CROYDON JUNCTION. 

Croydon Junction is ten miles from Lon- 
don, and is one of the most frequented re- 
sorts of the provinces. It is, at the same 
time, an important connecting point of the 
Brighton system. It has five stations at 
short distances from each other. 

From these different stations, with one 
exception, passengers going to London 
change cars according as they are going to 
London Bridge, Victoria or Kensington. 
The suburban service of the Brighton to 
Croydon, during the pleasant weather, is 
one of the most important of this company. 

HERNE HILL. 

Besides the local service, the Chatham 
has also numerous suburban trains to four 
stations placed about the London stations, 
namely: Heme Hill, Dulwich, Sydenham 
and Penge. Heme Hill holds a position in 
the Chatnam system almost equal to that 
of Brighton. All the trains, whatever they 
are, stop there. Here the division of the 
local trains from those of the main line is 
made, part running to Ludgate Hill and 
the others to Victoria. 

GREAT NORTHERN AND MIDLAND. 

These two lines, which start at short dis- 
tances from each other, cross the localities 
which formed, twenty-five years ago, the 
suburbs of the north of London, and which 
are to-day covered with houses. The ground 
is rough and hilly, so that the railroads only 
accommodate the lower quarters which are 
built upon the sides of the hills. 

The Great Northern has in the London 
suburbs about 9* miles of road and eight 
stations. 130 trains a day leave King's 
Cross station for these different places, one, 
running by the way of the North London, 
makes connections with the Great North- 
ern and runs into Broad street, and thus 
the latter have a station in the city. 

The Midland has about the same mileage 
in London as the Great Northern. The local- 
ities which are served in great part by the 
Great Northern, and in part by the North 
Western, are the same. This results from 
the similar position of the two lines. Its 
service includes 164 trains, serving ten sta- 
tions. The greater part of the trains of the 
Midland and Great Northern run from 
Moorgate street and from the southern lines. 

CHATHAM, MIDLAND AND GREAT NORTHERN. 

The line from Victoria to Ludgate Hill 
connects with the Metropolitan at Farring- 
don street and at Aldersgate street, giving 



January, 188*1. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



131 



common service between the Chatham, the 
Midland and the Great Northern. 

The Midland station at Saint Pancras is 
not connected directly like that of the Great 
Northern at King's Cross with the Metro- 
politan. 

The connection is made at Kentish Town, 
wl)9re all the passenger trains stop that eu- 
tei and leave Saint-Pancras station. 

The Midland trains, starting from Vic- 
toria or from Heme Hill, and those of the 
Great Northern running from Victoria only, 
cross London from the north to the 
south by the way of the Metropolitan 

The Chatham has a reciprocal agreement 
with these companies, and its trains run to 
King's Cross upon the Great Northern, and 
to Finchley Road upon the Midland. Be- 
sides these direct connections, which com- 
prise a very limited number ol trains, the 
communication between the Midland, the 
Chatham, and the Great Northern is ac- 
complished by way of Farringdon street 
and Aldersgate street, where travelers 
leave the trains of these latter companies, 
running iuto Moorgate street. 

This common service permits passengers 
coming from Dover and going beyond Lon- 
don to the north to cross the city by rail. 
In coming from HerneHill to Ludgate Hill 
the following is the case. Trains will be 
found which carry by connection via Willes- 
den Junction, or direct by way of the out- 
going trains of the Midland and Great 
Northern. 

The Chatham has, with these compan- 
ies, the same arrangements for through 
tickets as with the North Western at Vic- 
toria station. 

SOUTH WESTERN. 

The South Western, whose starting point 
is Waterloo, has, so to speak, no local ser- 
vice, although Wandsworth and Putney 
can be considered as the outskirts of Lon- 
don; but the suburb served is one of those 
most frequented by Londoners. It com- 
prises, besides this, a trip through the 
most charming and picturesque neighbor- 
hood of the metropolis. This part of the 
suburbs of the South Western is very simi- 
lar to that on the west of Paris or parts 
towards Reuil, Bougival, Marly and Saint- 
Germain. The great parks and gardens 
which you will meet there, and the Thames, 
which flows there more quietly and is cer- 
tainly purer than at London, and the air 
which we breathe has less smoke, all of 
which prove very attractive, and are feat- 
ures which are thoroughly appreciated by 
tne inhabitants of the city and West End. 
It is not astonishing, then, that railroads 
should be multiplied in this direction, and 
that from all parts of London the Metro- 
politan should desire to have connection 
with them. 

The South Western serves this suburb on 
both sides of the Thames. 

There is a train service of forty-five 
trains a day in each direction from Waterloo 
to Wandsworth, Putney, Barnes, etc., and 
a movement of fifty-four trains to Hammer- 
smith, Kew, etc. 

The lines on the right and left bank of 
the river communicate with Richmond, 



All suburban trains on the South West- 
ern, which have Waterloo as their point of 
departure or arrival, stop at Waux station, 
which is within the limits of London. 

THE COMMON SERVICE OF THE CHATHAM 
AND SOUTH WESTERN. 

By arrangement with the Chatham, the 
South Western runs a small number of 
trains to Ludgate Hill. Thus the service 
which goes to Kensington, Hammersmith, 
Kew, etc., starts alternately from Waterloo 
and Ludgate Hill. One connection, made 
a number of years ago, put the roads of 
the two companies in connection at Wands- 
worth Road. 

Frequent communication is established, 
besides, between Ludgate Hill and Clap- 
ham Junction by a special service between 
these two points, putting trains of the West 
London, those of the Richmond line, and 
of the main line of the South Western 
in communication with the trains of the 
Metropolitan. 

Finally, a connection is made several 
times a day between the main lines of the 
South Western, which starts from Wimble- 
don, and those starting from Ludgate Hill 
for the north. 

The South Western, by means of its dif- 
ferent connections, has a station in the 
city, that of Ludgate Hill. From its Wat- 
erloo station it connects with trains from 
Charing Cross to Cannon street, which 
takes passengers to the West End. In spite 
of the advantageous position, the South 
Western company found that the detour 
which they are obliged to make in order to 
get to Ludgate Hill is too long, and asked 
from Parliament a concession of embranch- 
ment from Waterloo to Blackfriirs. 

GREAT WESTERN. 

The original breadth of gauge adopted for 
the Great Western was about six feet eight 
inches. The principal line, having London 
as a point of departure, was built and ac- 
cepted with these dimensions. 

The inconvenience of this great breadth 
was not slow in making itself felt when it was 
found necessary to connect with the Metro- 
politan, which had a breadth of four feet 
four inches, and the most serious of all was 
the necessary transhipment at all points of 
connection with other lines, and the impos- 
sibility of taking in the trains of the Great 
Western or the cars of other companies. 

Of all the solutions proposed by the pro- 
motor of the broad gauge, that of Mr. Bru- 
nei was the only one adopted, which was 
the addition of a third rail upon the road 
where the rolling stock of the Great West- 
ern was circulated. This arrangement, 
complicated and imperfect as it was, was 
applied to the Metropolitan and West Lon- 
don, and permitted the cars of the Great 
Western to run, as we have said, to Moor- 
gate street and Victoria. 

In order that there should be no de- 
lay at connection points with other lines, 
and in order that they might change cars^ 
the company now decided to abandon 
its broad gauge and adopt the narrower. 

At a general assembly, the directors an- 
nounced to the stockholders that in the 
months of April or May of that year the 



road would be changed so that it would be 
the same as that of its connecting lines. 

This transformation remains historically 
in the records of railroad construction and 
is one of the most salient features in those 
of English roads. 

At that time, the Eastern Counties road, 
which is today called the Great Eastern, 
had adopted the narrow gauge, but at the 
time when the change was made this line 
was far from having developed anything 
like the importance of the Great Western. 

The most important metropolitan service 
of the Great Western is that from Moorgate 
street to Kensington and Hammersmith. 
Hammersmith, inl834, was a village only 
remarkable for its great number of country 
seats. A service of trainsran every hour from 
Fleet street and Charing[Cross, and put it 
in connection with the city. The population 
of Hammersmith today is engulfed in the 
metropolis, and is more than 22,000 inhabi- 
tants. To the carriages which ran from 
Fleet street numerous omnibus lines are 
the successors, which run every six minutes 
from the interior of London. In summer 
the steam cars run every fifteen minutes 
from London Bridge to Hammersmith. 

To these means of transport three lines of 
railroads have been added, (he South Wes- 
tern, running from Waterloo to Ludgate 
Hill, taking in at Kensiugton the passen- 
gers of the Metropolitan and the District; 
the Great Western, whose trains serve the 
line between Hammersmith and City Junc- 
tion ; and the North Western , which runs by 
way of the North and South Western Junc- 
tion Railway. 

These three lines give a movement of ten 
trains an hour. 

The passage requires thirty-nine minutes 
from Moorgate street, forty minutes from 
Ludgate Hill and Waterloo, and forty- 
eight minutes from Broad street. 

The fare, on the average, for the three 
lines, is seventeen cents for first class, 
thirteen and one-half cents for second class, 
and nine and one-half cents for third class. 

The Great Western service from Victoria 
has its trains run so that it connects with 
the main line from Southall, ten miles from 
Paddington, to those of the Chatham and 
Victoria, and those of the Brighton and 
South Western at Kensington (A. R.) 

This completes the enumeration of the 
principal line of the Metropolitan and Sub- 
urban Railways. We have given those 
combinations of train service which are the 
most interesting to the public, and those 
which permit the passage over the greatest 
distances of London and its suburbs with- 
out imposing long stops at connecting sta- 
tions. The experience of everyday, and 
the opening of new lines, renders changes 
of course inevitable and they are taking 
place from time to time. 

The public itself is furnished with time 
tables, both by the company and by 
Bradshaw, of those trains and service which 
we have not indicated here. 

In a future issue we will speak of the 
fares and the service which are offered to 
workmen, and the speed at which the 
trains ai - e run, 



138 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



Januauy, 1881. 



French Tramways. 

Judging from the official returns, tram- 
ways in Frauce do not appear to offer any 
inducement to the investor. The current 
number of the Bulletin du Ministere des 
Travaux Publics gives very detailed and 
tabulated information upon these undertak- 
ings and the results of working during the 
three months ending with March of thisyear. 
The statistics deal with about 430 miles of 
tramways, the property of thirty-two dif- 
ferent associations in all parts of France. 
From the tables referred to we learn that 
these Hues cost in round numbers $25,664,- 
000, or an average of about $61,468 a mile, 
of which $27,584 were expended in works, 
and $33,880 a mile on rolliug stock, or an 
average of 45 per cent of the former and 
55 per cent of the latter on the total outlay. 
These proportions do not represent indivi- 
dual cases, the variations being very wide. 



tramways system indeed is the only one 
that shows a favorable result, as it pays 
nearly six per cent on the capital, and in- 
dicates, both as regards first cost and work- 
ing expenses, ample evidence of skill and 
economy. The range in construction and 
expenditure is very great, and is not to be 
accounted for by anything shown in the 
tables. Rolling stock on the Bordeaux 
lines only cost $3,726 a mile; on the Mar- 
seilles line, $57,112, while the works were 
$21,780 per mile, as against $41,140 in Mar- 
seilles, and nearly the same iu Lyons and 
Paris. As concerns repairs also, the Bor- 
deauxlines cost only $1,119 for repairs dur- 
ing the first three months of the year, 
while those in Marseilles cost $6,490, and 
in Paris from $5,000 to $15,450 in the same 
time, the mileage for Bordeaux being 24; 
for Marseilles, 14.4, and for Paris 36, 29.7, 
and 44.2 miles. Of course it is possible 
that those companies whose expenses for 



PARTICULARS OF NINE PRINCIPAL TRAMWAYS IN FRANCE. 



Roads. 


Length 
Miles. 


Cost per mile. 


PercentaKe ot 
total cost. 


Gross Receipts. 


Working Ex- 
penses. 


Reven- 
ue on 
Capi- 
tal 
per 
cent. 




Works. 


Rolling 
Stock. 


Works. 


Rolling 
Stock. 


Marseilles. 


14.4 


141,000 


$57,1100 


42 


58 


t 04,0(10 


$ 07,278 


— 1.64 


Bordeaux. 


24.4 


21,81)0 


3,725 


85 


15 


1112,414 


04.856 


4- 5 .95 


Cambray Catlllon. 


IS. 5 


21,5(111 


5,275 


80 


20 


5,014 


3,872 


+ .42 


LUle. 


27.0 


28,70(1 


24,01111 


54 


40 


54,907 


50,910 


+ .04 


Valenciennes. 


30.11 


10, SOU 


5,080 


00 


40 


20.539 


12,023 


4-1.13 


Lyons. 


25.8 


39,600 


20,8011 




25 


106,673 


S2,0b0 


+ 1 .43 


Seine, (a) 


3«.0 


27,450 


87,12(1 


24 


76 


443,924 


12S,356 


+ 1 .52 


" (0) 


39.7 


38,960 


50,240 


30 


til 


154,333 


128,350 


+ .63 


" (c) 


42.2 


40,20(1 


38.300 


48 


52 


152,401 


155,499 


— .06 



Thus on theNimes tramways the works cost 
90 per cent and the rolling stock 10 per 
cent; on some of the Seine lines the re- 
spective percentages were 24 and 76, and on 
the Lyons tramways $724,800 were spent on 
works, and $1,698,400 on stock, or percent- 
ages of 85 and 15. During the three months 
ending last March the gross receipts on the 
various lines amounted in round numbers 
to $1,517,240, and the cost of working to 
$l,369,840,t leaving a net profit of $137,400, 
or 52 per cent on the capital invested. The 
tabular statement given below shows the 
position of nine of the leading French com- 
panies at the date mentioned above. 

The most unfavorable record is that of the 
Sevres-Versailles tramway, which cost 
$157,680, and the working expenses of 
which are nearly double the receipts, mak- 
ing a deficit of 6.22 per cent on the capital 
invested. There are rive different associa- 
tions controlling the Seine tramways: those 
marked (a) in the preceding table are worked 
by the Paris Municipality; those marked 
(b) by the northern suburban Paris Tram- 
ways Company, and (e) by the southern 
suburban Paris Company. Besides these 
there is a system controlled by the General 
Omnibus Company and another by the De- 
partment of the Seine. None of these con- 
cerns are nourishing, the highest return 
being 1.52 per cent, and the lowest a de- 
ficit of 1.71 per cent. It is worth noticing 
that only four companies had made any re- 
serve during the time under consideration 
for renewals, &c„ the Bordeaux and three 
pf the Paris companies. The Bordeaux 



repairs are so heavy may have been en- 
gaged on special renewals, and it is quite 
probable that in many cases receipts and 
expenditures may bear different proportions 
during the spring and summer months, but 
so far as the tables we have referred to in- 
dicate, there appears to be butone prosper- 
ous tramway undertaking in France. 



Cost of Feeding Horses. 

Editor Street Railway Journal : — 

I saw in the October number of the Street 
Railway Journal a statement of Superin- 
tendent Duty, of the East Cleveland R. R., 
on the cost of feeding horses. For the past 
sixyears I have had full charge of a road, 
and for the past four years have kept a 
record of the cost of feeding the horses. 
His report showed that it varied from 24| 
cents down to 18i cents on 550 horses. I 
have had only 39 horses for two years, and 
40 horses for four years. The cost is 27, 
26, 23 and 22 cents on this small number of 
horses. While his bran cost him $10 and 
$12 a ton, mine cost from $18 to $20 a ton, 
and his corn cost from 37 cents to 50 cents 
a bushel, mine cost from 45 to 73 cents a 
bushel, and hay costing from $12 to $15 per 
ton. 

I offer this statement modestly, knowing 
of course that it is higher than what is ob- 
tained by the larger roads, but think that a 
crawling down so closely to the figures of 
a large road with this small number of 
horses, is nothing to be ashamed of. 

C. M. Dayis, 

Poughkeepsie City R. R. Co. 



The Birmingham Cable Tramway. 

The construction of the cable tram- 
way from Colmore Row to the borough 
boundary in Hockley is about to be com- 
menced. In the early part of the summer 
Mr. E. Pritchard, M. I. C. E., who with 
Mr. Joseph Kincaid, M. I. C. E., of Lon- 
don, is engineer to the Central Tramways 
Company, paid a visit to America and in- 
spected the various cable systems in opera- 
tion in a number of transatlantic cities. The 
result of this visit was to convince him of 
the economical advantages of the cable 
principle, and to afford valuable informa- 
tion from an engineering point of view. In 
a number of particulars the construction 
of the line iu Birmingham will differ from 
that which is to be seen elsewhere, and will 
be a marked improvement upon the cable 
tramway in Highgate Hill, Loudon. The 
designs having been well thought out by 
the engineers, have received close examin- 
ation at the hands of the Borough Surveyor 
and the Public Works Committee, and 
have now been finally approved. Tenders 
for material and labor in accordance with 
specifications have been invited, and the 
work upon the line commenced. The 
Tramway Company have also begun opera- 
tions upon the laud they have acquired in 
Whitmore street, Hockley, for the purpose 
of the erection of driving machinery and 
sheds for the accommodation of rolling 
stock. The financial conditions under 
which the work is to be undertaken have 
been the subject of prolonged negotiations 
between the directors of the Central Tram- 
ways Company and the municipal authori- 
ties. An agreement was arrived at which, 
while fair to the company, will secure the 
Corporation from loss. The latter are to be 
the constructors and proprietors of the line, 
and the company will be lessees. There 
will be two miles and five furlongs of single 
line, the cost of constructing which is es- 
timated at from $111,000 to $125,000, or 
about $46,000 per mile. The company 
have deposited $12,000 per mile; and a 
sum to pay for taking up the cable rail if 
fouud useless or unremunerative, a contin- 
gency concerning wnich little fear is enter- 
tained. As the Central Tramways Com- 
pany, through their engineers, possess spec- 
ial advantages, it has been arranged that 
they are to stand in the relation of con- 
tractors to the Corporation for the purpose 
of constructing the line. The Corporation 
will provide the stonework which will besup- 
plied at cost price to the company, who will 
be paid for the work done as it progresses 
according to the Borough Surveyor's certi- 
ficate. It is expected that the tramway will 
be ready for opening by May next. The 
line is to be laid upon the three feet six inch 
gauge, corresponding with that of the newer 
tramways throughout the town, and the 
rails for the car wheels will be of similar con- 
struction, with the narrow groove for the 
wheel flanges. In the middle of the line 
will be two flat rails placed side by side 
at such a distance from one another as to 
make a narrow slot over a chamber in the 
roadway, through which the^cable runs 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



133 



and by means of which the oars may be at- 
tached to the cable through the operation 
of a gripping appliance. In some of tho 
existing tramways the cable chamber is 
piaotically a rectangular iron tube, but it is 
proposed to use instead of this a chamber 
or gutter of concrete about two feet six in- 
ches deep. At every four feet there will 
lie in this chamber a structure of wrought 
T iron called a " yoke," which will serve as 
a transverse sleeper to support both the out- 
side rails aud the slot rails. The latter 
will be attached by the tie-bars to the 
outer rails, so that the pressure of the stone 
sets of the roadway may not tend to push 
them together, and. eo close the slot. The 
structure of the yoke is something like the 
letter V, with au O lying iu the angle, ex- 
cept that the arms of the V are more widely 
opened and curved instead of straight. In 
the cable chamber there will be, at inter- 
vals of thirty feet, c ist irou or steel pulley 
wheels, revolving vertically, and afford- 
ing support to the cable. These wheels, 
which are about thirteen inches in 
diameter, are made somewhat heavy, and 
lie up >n baarings so as to run smoothly 
and without rattle. Wherever they occur 
there will be constructed by the side of the 
chamber a small manhole, through which a 
workman can reach the pulleys to grease 
them, or to lift one completely out and sub- 
stitute another incase of injury. In order 
not t.) catch dirt and wet falling through 
the si )t t ib pulleys a-id cable will run not 
immediately beneath but a little to one 
side of the opening. 

The cable wdl form a circuit running up 
the center of one line, round a horizontal, 
or nearly horizontal, pulley at the town end, 
back to Hockley through the chamber of 
the other line, and through the driving ma- 
chinery at the engine-house, and then back 
to the first line in an endless chain. For 
working the traffic it is proposed to use two 
vehicles, one called a "dummy," which has 
a gripper to hold on to the cable, and the 
other a passenger car, attached to the for- 
mer by a coupling. In some tramways the 
"dummy" is usedonlyfor thedriver orman 
controlling the gripper, but in the present 
instance it will in'obably be used to carry 
"outside" passengers, instead of then being- 
placed on the top of the second car. With 
regard to the gripper, it may perlnvps best 
be explained by supposing that the left 
hand were put down the slot, the fingers 
underneath the cable, and lifting it some- 
what from the pulleys on which it runs, 
and the thumb pressing upon the top. By 
holding it loosely the cable would run 
through the hand, but by pressing down 
the thumb it would be held fast, and carry 
the hand along with it. Not only this, but 
where necessary an arrangement could be 
made whereby the cable could be lifted 
sideways entirely out of the grasp. The 
gripper is an iron arrangement very much 
on this principle. That which answers to 
the fingers is a piece of iron having two 
little wheels to lessen the friction; while 
that which answers to the thumb is another 
piece of iron, which by the action of a lever 
is pressed down tightly on the cable so as to 



hold it fast. The working of this mechan- 
ism on a straight or nearly straight line 
looks pretty easy, but what will puzzle a 
good many people is how the cable is to be 
worked round a sharp corner like that at the 
top of Snow Hill, and how the cars are to 
be changed from the up to the down line. 
The line on this part is to be constructed 
over a subway, with iron gilders to support 
the road, and instead of vertical pulleys 30 
feet apart there will be a series of-horizon- 
tal wheels or sheaves, with a flange on the 
lower side only. These are comparatively 
close together, and will have this effect — 
that as a c ir ascends Snow Hill and turns 
the corner, the cable, instead of being nearly 
beneath the slot, will be found running 
round these sheaves rather nearer to the 
center of the curve, and the gripper will 
pull it sideways from each sheave as it 
passes, and thus avoid striking the horizon- 
tal pulleys, as by lifting the cable it avoids 
striking tho vertical pulleys in the straight 
portions. In order for the car to change 
from one line to the other an automatic ar- 
rangement will be made, just beyond the 
points, to release the cable from the grip- 
per, and it will for a short distance be car- 
ried at a lower level in the chamber, round 
a lar^e terminal pulley revolving in a pit, 
and then into the chamber of the return 
line, gradually rising until it reaches the 
level at "which it will slip into the gripper of 
the car, which, from the point at which it 
previously lost the cable, will ruu by gravi- 
tation, but controlled by a brake over the 
points on to the departure line. The ob- 
ject of the subway is that the sheaves on the 
curve and the terminal pulley may be con- 
stantly examined and attended to. 

The cable will be of about an inch in di- 
ameter, composed of sis strands of crucible 
steel (seven wires to a strand) twisted round 
a Manilla center, and tested up to 80 tons 
to the square inch. For driving it there 
will be provided at Whitmore street two en- 
gines of three hundred horse-power each. 
These, however, will suffice to work another 
current of cable up Soho Hill to Hands- 
worth, which may be expected to be con- 
structed hereafter. Large horizont d wheels 
utder the roadway near the brook will lead 
the cable into the engine-house, and it will 
there ruu round the driving pulleys, and 
also round some ingeniously-devised appli 
anoes for maintaining a uniform tension, 
aud for presenting a stretch of slack in 
which repairing operations may be per- 
formed. The aid of electricity will be in- 
voked to apprise the engineer of the break- 
age of any of the strands of the cable, so 
that he may know when to expect the dam- 
aged portion to pass through the engine- 
house. Upon an almost entirely hilly route, 
such as that between Colmore Row and 
Hockley, the traffic, if equal both ways, 
would be worked by a fraction over the 
power needed to move the weight of the 
cable. The inequalities of the traffic, how- 
ever, at certain times of the day will neces- 
sitate a considerable reserve of driving 
power. The depot in Whitmore street oc- 
cupies a site of about two acres, half of 
which will be oovered with buildings. The 



construction of the new line will enable the 
Wheeler street route to be opened for traf- 
fic. On that line steam engines will bring 
the cars to the junction with Constitutional 
Hill, where, they will be taken on by the 
ca'jle, and complete their journey to the 
middle of the town. — Birmingham Daily 
Post. 

The Original Home of Hie Horse. 

There is no doubt that the original home 
of the horse is not Europe, but Central 
Asia; for since the hortc in its natural state 
depends upon grass for its nourishment 
and fleetuess for its weapon, it could not 
in the beginning have thrived and multi- 
plied iu the thick, forest-grown territory 
of Europe. Much rather should its place 
of propagation be sought in those steppes 
where it still roams about in a wild stale. 
Here, too, arose the first nation of riders of 
which we have historic knowledge, the 
Mongolians and the Turks, whose ex st- 
enceeven at this day, is, as they were, 
combined with that of a horse. From these 
regions the horse spread in all directn rip, 
especially into the steppes of Southern and 
Southeastern Russia and into Tbrsce. until 
it finally found entrance in the other part 
of Europe, but not until after the immi- 
gration of the people. The assertion is at 
least strongly favored by the f.;ct that the 
further a district of Europe is from those 
Asiatic steppes—?', e., from the original 
home of the horse — t: e later does the tamed 
horse seem to have ma< 1 e its histoiic ap- 
pearance in it. The supposition is fuither 
confkrued by the fact that horse-raising 
among rduoost every tribe appears as an act 
derived from neighboiing (ril es in the East- 
ami North-east. Even in H< mer the ox ap- 
pears exclusively as the draught- animal in 
land operation at home and in the field, 
while the horse was used for purposes of 
war only. Its employment for military op- 
erations was deter mined by swiftness alone. 
That the value of the horse must originally 
have depended on its fleetuess can easily be 
inferred from the name, which is re pealed 
in all the branches of the Indo-Eur< pe: n 
language, nndsignifies nearly "hastening," 
"quick." The same fact is exemplified by 
the oldest poets, who, next to its Courage, 
speak most of its swiftness. — Popular Sci- 
ence Monthly. 

Clippings. 

The conductor is a lady's man. He is 
always looking after the fare. 

An ikon side bearing rail is reported to 
average about fifteen years for a lifetime. 
Stringers last eight years. 

A corn arises from the wiring in of the 
horn against the sensitive parts within the 
hoof. We know from experiei.ee how un- 
comfortable it is to wear a tight shoe, and so 
it is the same with the horse. 

The hoof, or horny box, is apparently 
the same to the horse as a shoe to man. 
Contraction of the hoof, may it be great or 
small, so, accordingly, does the horse exper- 
ience his sufferings to the degree of con- 
traction. 



140 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



JiHJABY, 1887. 




Monthly, $1.00 per Year. 



American Railway Publishing Co., 

113 Liberty Street, Lakeside Building, 
New York. (iiieaeo. 

E. P. HARRIS, President, 

J. H. McGRAVV, Secretary, 

II. M. SWETLANI), Treasurer. 

Chicago! Lakesidf, Building, E. L. Powers, North- 
western Manager. 

Roston, Mass., 185 Summer Street, H. M. Swet- 
land, Manager. 

Philadelphia, 119 So. Fourth Sr., J. IT. McGraw, 
Manager. 



We publish iu another column a report 
of the expenses and investment of some of 
the larger of the French tramways. It 
will be interesting to street railroad 
men as affording a means of comparison of 
the work which is done in France with that 
which is accomplished in this country. It 
is generally supposed that street railroad 
stock is the most paying of any that the 
public can invest in, in large places; but we 
see that in Marseilles, Lyons, and Paris, the 
dividends are very small, and in two cases 
the expenses exceeded the income. This is 
due, iu great part, to the fact that on French 
tramways the cars are never crowded and 
no one is allowed to enter unless there is 
a seat vacant; or, iu case of gentlemen, 
there is standing room on the plattorni. 
There are, in runny cases, four places on 
the rear platform where men are allowed 
to stand, and when a seat is vacant inside 
they take their turn in occupying it. The 
sign "Complete" hanging upon the outside 
of the car prevents people from entering, 
and this cuts down the income of the com- 
pany; for it is, of course, impossible for a 
company to run a car the whole length of a 
long line when it will be tilled only a small 
portion of that distance. It is undoubtedly 
this fact which cuts down the French in- 
come much below what would be ordinari- 
ly expected to be received in this country. 

It is interesting to note, too, the high 
percentage which the rolling. stock consumes 
iti the actual investment of the road, iu one 
case rating as high as seventy -six per cent 
for one of the Paris roads. This, although 
the line is a long one, is undoubtedly due 
to the fact that very many more cars must 
necessarily be run iu order to keej) up the 
system, which we have already indicated, 
of not admitting passengers when there 
fire no seats. 



Arbitration. 

Mr. Chauncey Depew in an address 
made at the opening exercises of the recent 
convention of the Brotherhood of Locomo- 
tive Engineers, made a strong point of 
the attitude that this association had taken, 
regarding their union with the 



Kuights of Labor, that had been so strenu- 
ously urged upon them. He said that they 
were so competent aud so reasonable and 
had been so just in their deliberations that 
every other business was laid aside and 
every one else dismissed when they knocked 
at the door of the office of any railroad 
president in the country. And this was 
because they came there in the conscious 
strength of pursuing their business better 
than any one else could tell it them. Now, 
had they sent a cabinet maker or piano 
tuner to argue their case the door would be 
closed, not because the cabinet maker and 
piauo tuuer might not be very worthy and 
valuable members of the community, but 
because they knew nothing of the subject 
they come to talk about. 

It is this same position that has been 
forced upon employers of other branches of 
labor, and especially of the street railway 
companies, whose men have allied them- 
selves in common league with the butchers 
and bakers and candlestick makers, to say 
nothing of the bonds uniting them with the 
rough scuff and rag-tag and bobtail of all 
creation. And then under the incitement 
of these associates and led by them in 
many cases, a loud hvie aud cry is raised 
by the noble champions of labor if, per- 
chance, a cigar roller is denied admission to 
the office of a railway president, where he 
has come to dictate the terms of wages 
and time under which a car driver is to 
work. 

No wonder the roads have been obliged 
to shut down on this kind of nonsense and 
have it distinctly understood that they are 
not open to arbitration with outside or- 
ganizations but will treat only with com- 
mittees appointed by the employees from 
among themselves. 

"Come, let us reason together," has come 
to mean, in the minds of the laborites, a 
long torrent of abuse on the part of the de- 
magogues and a silent acquiescence on the 
part of the manager, and it is no wonder 
that under these peculiar circumstances 
managers have been compelled to close 
their doors on all committees that have 
been moved by this kind of impulse. 

Art of Advertising. 

BY WM. H. BAILEY. 

In looking about us and seeing the im- 
mense incomes derived from many inven- 
tions and patent rights, we are apt to think 
that the inventors are remarkable men, 
and that it is only necessary to study out 
or hit upon some new a^d ingenious device 
to secure a fortune. But when we 
realize the fact that almost every intelligent 
and thoughtful mechanic has one or more 
wonderful inventions in his mind, or on 
paper, or in a model, we see that it is not 
a very difficult matter to study out an in- 
genious aud perhaps practical contrivance 
to accomplish almost any purpose in a me- 
chanical line, and therefore the great prob- 
lem to be solved in order to secure the 
fortune, is uot so much how to invent a 
good thing as it is how to make the public 
see it aud appreciate it, and get it into gen- 



eral use. There are today thousands of 
inventions far better thau those now in 
geueral use, formauy purposes, lying dor- 
mant for want of capital or proper manage- 
ment on the part of the inventors to intro- 
duce them to the consuming public. 

"Necessity is the mother of invention," 
and inventors are generally persons of very 
limited means, which are quickly expended; 
and in trying to obtain more capital with 
which to perfect and introduce their inven- 
tions, their patents become encumbered or 
"tied up" in some way and the business 
suspended. Or should sufficient capital 
become interested, the managers usually 
make a great mistake in thinking that the 
only way is to "push it" by employing 
salesmen or agents to travel and obtain 
personal interviews with buyers, and be- 
fore they are hardly aware of it their ex- 
penses have enormously exceeded their re- 
turns and they become discouraged and 
virtually abandon the enterprise. An old 
note broker once said to the writer, "There 
are two reasons why a note will not sell on 
the market, one is because it is not known, 
and another is because it is known too 
much." So with new inventions; you 
may push them too hard by ambitious 
salesmen promising too much, and getting 
users to adopt them in place of other ap- 
pliances nearly as good by causing them to 
expect too great a gain, and the result is 
you have disappointed your customers and 
made enemies of competitors whose ap- 
pliances you have displaced while they 
were yet doing good work. 

The policy of forcing a new invention 
into places where nothing of the kind is 
really needed, by misrepresentations and 
undue influence of personal solicitation, is 
not only very expensive but reacts by in- 
curring the ill will of all competitors and 
causing them to unite against it. 

The manager of every invention or speci- 
alty should bear in mind that although his 
field may be large it is already covered by 
other devices that are doing the work and 
answering the purpose and that no salesman 
can influence a sensible man to incur the 
expense of making a change so long as the 
old works well enough; consequently in 
nine cases out of ten if not ninety-nine out 
of a huudred, a salesman's call amounts to 
no more than a circular. 

The better method aud the one that has 
been proved by long experience of the most 
successful houses of this country to be the 
more economical, is to advertise constantly 
and attractively in such regular publica- 
tions as reach the desired trade, and issue 
circulars only to dealers and others who 
may be able to directly influence trade, 
and to employ salesmen or agents sufficient 
only to call where it is learned through 
other sources that there is a chance for bus- 
iness, and not waste valuable time and ex- 
pense in searching promiscuously over the 
whole field of possible purchasers. 

In these days of cheap printing, every 
important branch of business has its trade 
papers devoted expressly to its interests 
and every subscriber who is paying for his 
paper will at least glance through it, if he 



Januaby, 1887. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



141 



does not read it attentively, and it being a 
periodical visitor he will naturally, about 
the time he is expecting to want something 
in that liue, examine its advertising col- 
umns to see if there is anything new or 
different from that he is already familiar 
with, whereas a circular or paper sent to 
him occasionally and free of expense will 
seldom be noticed or preserved for refer- 
ence, unless if should arrive at the very 
moment when a purchase is under consid- 
eration; and I have known men to re- 
fer to advertisements, get the address and 
write for a circular, which they had just 
thrown into the waste basket under their 
desk. 

The value of a paper as an advertising 
medium does not depend upon the number 
of copies issued but directly upon the 
number of actual paying subscribers in the 
trade which the advertiser desires to reach; 
and herein lies the gist of the whole busi- 
ness and accounts for the unsatisfactory 
returns for large sums of money annually 
expended by many advertisers who give 
out their contracts promiscuously without 
making a thorough investigation into the 
claims of solicitors. 

" Don't buy a pig in the poke;" it is a 
comparatively easy matter to get a good 
looking paper and print off two or three 
thousand copies and send them to a list of 
names taken from a directory, and claim a 
wide circulation. But it takes years of 
time and thousands of dollars to get a large 
list of paying subscribers and to thoroughly 
establish a paper in the haunts of busy 
men so as to make it of much value to ad- 
vertising patrons. 

If a man desires an engine to give him 
forty horse power, he will not pay for it 
until he has had it proved to him that it will 
do the work and that those who make their 
advertising contracts on the same business 
principles are not constantly complainii g 
that they have spent a great deal of money 
in advertising and don't know that they ever 
received any benefit from it. 

The art of advertising consists not only 
in the selection of the best mediums but also 
in the preparation and setting of the matter 
so as to attract the eye and in furnishing for 
the reading columns brief and frequent 
items of news in which the name of the 
house is in some way connected. 

Money properly expended in newspaper 
advertising is beyond question the most 
profitable investment a manufacturer can 
make, but no one should expect a hundred 
dollar contract to produce results equal to 
a fifteen hundred dollar salesman, as mauv 
do. ' 



Working Expenses. 

" You are one of the parties who are 
buying up street railroads, I understand." 
" Yes." 

"I have a pretty big interest in a road 
at Louisville, and would like to sell." 

" Any other stockholders feel the same 
way ? " 

" Shouldn't wonder. It's a rare chance; 
horses are mighty cheap down there, and—" 

"Never mind about the horses; what's 
the price of Aldermen ? "—Exchange. 



Notes and Items. 

The Editors would consider It a favor If thoBe who 
are Interested in street rallwav matters will send In 
any Items that may come to their notice of changes, 
extensions or Improvements. These memoranda 
will he duly Inserted under this heading-, and the 
proper changes made In our Street Railway Direc- 
tory. 

Albany, N. Y. 

The Albany Railway Co. is laying 3,000 
feet of Gibbons' Metallic track. 
Binghainton, N. Y. 

The Binghamton Central R. R. Co. re- 
port that they have now laid three miles of 
track, which is one-half a mile addition to 
what they had at our last report. The name 
of Alonzo Evarts as Vice President has 
been added to our list of officers. 
Baltimore, I>Id. 

The People's Ry. Co. report thirteeu 
miles of track and thirty-eight cars, being 
an increase of two and one-half miles of 
track and eight cars over their last report. 

Boston, Mass. 

William Reed, the defaulting Treasurer 
of the South Boston Riilroad, has been 
sentenced to seven years in the State 
Prison. 

The Boston Consolidated Street Ry. 
Co. have now 375 cars and 1800 horses. J. 
H. Studley is Superintendent, with an 
office at 16 City Square, Charlestown. 

The Metropolitan Horse Railway Co. 
of Boston are undetermined as to which is 
to be the method of driving their cars in the 
near future — tne cable or the electric cur- 
rent. 

The Boston Consolidated Street Rail- 
way Co. has filed a charter in the Secre- 
tary of State's office, asking the Legislature 
for authority to construct, maintain and 
use railways in Brookline, Cambridge, Som- 
erville and Chelsea. Presid nt Powers ex- 
plains this petition by sayiug that it seems 
no more than just that his road should be 
given equal rights as those held by rival 
companies. There may be consolidation 
witn ri. ads running to Cambridge and Chel- 
sea, but it is not contemplated at present. 
It is not probable, Mr. Powers says, that 
the Consolidated will adopt the cable sys- 
tem this year, 1886, though it may do so in 
1887. He was of the opinion, however, 
that the use of an electric system was more 
probable than a cable. The cable system 
had not been thoroughly perfected, and un- 
less somethii g could be done to prevent 
the danger of breakage, which was at all 
timesliable, cables could not be relied upon 
except by roads possessed of double tracks. 
The Dalt and Sprague motors, and perhaps 
some others, Mr Powers said, had shown 
good lesults, and upon the whole were far 
more likely to be adopted than the cable 
system or surface roads. — Ex. 

The Metropolitan Street Railway Co. 
have laid a petition before the Selectmen 
of Brookline for a permit to lay tracks in 
Brookline on Beacon street, from the line 
of Boston to the intersection of Beacon 
with Harvard street, and there to connect 
with the tracks on Harvard street with its 
junction on Washington street, and then to 
the tracks on Longwood avenue. President 
C. A. Richards appeared for the Metropoli- 



tan, and argued that the town would re- 
ceive great advantages from having this 
method of communication with Boston, and 
that the present horse car accommodations 
were totally incompetent to do the work 
satisfactorily. He presented a petition 
advocating the location, containing 693 
names. In opposition to Mr. Richards, 
Mr. John Panter appeared for the 
West End, which is desirous of appropriat- 
ing the same location, and said his com- 
pany had otf'ered $100,000 for the street 
franchise, and certainly ought to be given 
the preference by the Board. Mr. Rich- 
ards also amended his petition with the con- 
sent of the Board, asking that he might op- 
erate his oars either by cable or electricity, 
as he might choose. The board have tak- 
en the two petitions under consideration, 
but no decision has yet been reached. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

President William Richardson is hav- 
ing the cable for the Park avenue road 
manufactured in Cleveland. He will put 
it to use as soon as it is completed. 

Brooklyn City Railroad Co. The 
resignation of President Wm. H. Haz- 
zard took effect on the first of Decem- 
ber. The office has been offered to and ac- 
cepted by Daniel F. Lewis, of the Lewis & 
Fowler Manufacturing Co., who has been 
Secretary and Treasurer of the Company. 

Crosstown R. R. Co. The large cars 
which are put on in place of the short "jig- 
gers " are what are known as " three- 
quarter " cars, and are eighteen inches 
shorter than the ordinary cars. It is expect- 
ed by the patrons of the route that conduc- 
tors will be put on these cars, but the old 
system of cash box collection is still main- 
tained. 

The Brooklyn Railway Supply Co. re- 
port that they are furnishing sweepers as 
fast as they can turn them out. Among 
roads using them for the first time are those 
of Trenton, New Brunswick, Harrisburg, 
New Haven, Bridgeport, Schenectady, and 
as far south as Memphis, Tenn., where 
the progressive Superintendent, Mr. Sem- 
mes, will leave nothing undone for the com- 
fort of his patrons. They have invented a 
new style of self ff eding sand car that is a 
great improvement over any old style. The 
first one goes to President Parsons of the 
People's Line of Philadelphia. Boss & 
Walkaway snow scrapers are selling rap- 
idly. 

Brooklyn Annex St. Ry. Work has 
begun on this ro id, formerly known as the 
East New York, Bay Side and Ozone Park 
Railroad. About a mile of track will be 
laid before Jan. 1st, and the road will be 
concluded as promptly as possible in the 
spring. The route is laid through the 26th 
ward of Brooklyn, which was formerly 
known as New Lots, and covers 8 miles of 
the most thickly settled streets of that ter- 
ritory. It is one of the most promising of 
the new roads on the list of those contem- 
plated in Brooklyn. The officers are: 
President, F. M. Delano, New York; Vice 
Presideut, H. H. Ad tins, Brooklyn; Treas- 
urer, Philip Richardson, New YorkjSecre- 



142 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 1881. 



tary, M. 0. Earle, Brooklyn. The Direc- 
tors include tbe gentlemen just named, 
with the addition of H. L. Terrell, New 
York; Wm. J. Gaynor and Peter Sutter, 
Brooklyn. The temporary offices of the 
company are at 204 Montague street, Brook- 
lyn, with Mr. Gayuor. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

The Disease Known as "pink-eye" pre- 
vails among the horses in this city. The 
street railroad compauies have eighty-seven 
horses sick. 

The Leib Lubricating Co. are meeting 
with very decided success in the introduc- 
tion of their Dux Lubricant. At a recent 
test made upon one of the most prominent 
New England railroads, the Master Car 
Builder sent in his report, showing the 
power required to start cars both on reverse 
curves and straight lines, that were oiled 
with the Dux Lubricant aud ordinary black 
oil. In almost every iustauce the car oiled 
with tbe Dux Lubricant started more easily 
aud the average of the whole number of 
tests, which was 43, showed a saving of 33 J 
per cent on the average over the car lubri- 
cated with oil, or that the latter required 
50 per cent more power to start it than the 
car oiled with Dux Lubricant. The cars 
were in both cases equally loaded and over 
exactly the sime track aud at the same 
speed. 

Charleston, >■>. C. 

The Charleston City By. Co. have 
now 110 harses instead of 115, and Evan 
Edwards has taken the duties of Secretary 
in addition to those of Treasurer, tbe trans- 
fer having been made of Assistant Treas- 
urer Frank Whilden. John Moklenhoff has 
been promoted to the position of Superin- 
tendent from that of foreman. 
Chicago, 111. 

The Chicago By. Co. has also presented 
au ordinance for right to ruu on Dearborn 
street, and claim that they are entitled to 
the grant and that they will not be required 
to obtain the consent of property owners. 
The Dearborn street property owners think 
that they can control the legislation regard- 
ing the disposal of their thoroughfare, and 
even if the old south side company have a 
right to the road, they claim that it ought to 
be laid aside, and their interests looked to. 

The Dearborn Street Br. Co. have pre- 
sented a petition to the city council asking 
permission to lay double tracks on Dear- 
born street from the river to Polk street. 
A majority of the property owners signed 
a petition for the road about a year ago. 
The Chicago Passenger Bailway Co. have 
an ordinance before the city council asking 
for a right to occupy Dearborn street, but 
has failed to secure the signatures of a 
majority of the property owners, and no 
action has been taken. 
Detroit, Mich. 

The Grand Biver Street By. Co. have 
now six and one-half miles of track laid, 
with a forty-five pound rail, are using fif- 
teen cars hauled by 160 horses. This is an 
increase in every respect over their last 
rerjort. 

EvaiiHville, Ind. 

The Evansville Street By. Co. have in- 



creased their track by two miles, making 
fourteen miles, aud are using fifty more 
mules than formerly, having now 240. W. 
S. Gilbert has succeeded P. W. Baleigh as 
Secretary and John Gilbert as Treasurer. 
The office is in the Merchant's National 
Bank building. 

Freeport, 111. 

The new Freeport street railway is com- 
pleted and thoroughly equipped for busi- 
ness. Hon. Jacob Krohn, President of the 
Second National Bank, is President of the 
company; F. C. Piatt, of Waterloo, Iowa, 
Vice President; W. G. Barnes, Treasurer, 
and John B. Taylor, Secretary. George 
D. Clinger is Superintendent and General 
Manager. It is well constructed and furnish- 
ed with rolling stock of first-class design and 
equipped with all the most recent improve- 
ments. 

Gloucester, Mass. 

The Gloucester City Bailroad Co. re- 
port 4 miles of track laid down, 4 ft. 6 in. 
gauge, with 35 lb. rails, and have 1,090 
horses. Morris C. Fletcher is President, 
Walter A. Jones Vice President, F. W. 
HomansTreasurer,D. G. Pearson Secretary. 
The office is on Bailroad avenue. 

Greenbush, N. Y. 

The North & East Greenbush Street 
Bailway Co. rerjort lj miles of track laid 
with 4 ft. 8£ in. gauge, 4 cars, 12 horses. 
A. Blukerbank is President and Treas- 
urer; J. Gascoigne is Superintendent. 

Helena, Montana. 

Helena, Montana, has the distinction of 
having built the first street railroad in the 
territory. It commenced running three 
cars built by the Pullman Co., about two 
months ago, aud two more of the same 
have recently been added. The staudard 
gauge is used, and the 2 J miles of track is 
equipped with the Johnson girder rail of 38 
lbs. to the yard. It is regarded by the 
inhabitants of the place as a great success, 
and 30 per cent premium has been offered 
for the stock. The officers of the road 
are C. W. Cannon, President; J. B. Wil- 
son, Vice President; L. A. Walk r, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 

Ithaca, V. 

A meeting has been held to consider the 
advisability of modifying the Ithaca Street 
Bailway franchise which has recently been 
passed. There are no objections to the 
changes asked with the exception of the 
matter of running the proposed road on un- 
paved streets. The Board seem to think 
that the railroad company ought to not 
only pave between tbe rails but also two 
feet on each side. This, however, they 
agreed to modify so that they simply be re- 
quired to pave their roadway. 

Jellerson, 111. 

Toavn of Jefferson St. By. Co. It is 
said that this compauy is a bona fide enter- 
prise, and that the capital stock of $200,000 
is all guaranteed. It is the intention of 
the compauy to begin the workj, of lay- 
ing tracks early in the spring, although the 
routes have not yet been selected. There 
is no street railroad of any kind at Jeffer- 
son, and it is said there is great need of 
one. 



Little Kock, Arh. 

The Little Bock Street Bailway Co. 
have now 5 miles of track. F. C. Beed has 
succeeded A. J. Thompson as Secretary 
and C. F. Penzel as Treasurer. 

Lios Angeles, Cal. 

The Main Street & Agricultural Park 
Bailway Co. report 8 miles of track laid 
with 3 ft. 6 in. gauge, 16 lb. rails, 12 cars, 
49 horses. Arthur C. Taylor is added to 
the list of officers as Secretary. Tbe Far- 
mers and Merchants Bank holds the office 
of Treasurer. 

The Temple Street Cable Bailway re^ 
port If miles of track laid with 3 ft. 6 in. 
gauge, and 16 lb. rails. P. Beaudry has 
succeeded Walter S. Maxwell as President, 
and F. Woods is now Secretary of tkecom- 
pauy. 

Meriden, Conn. 

The Meriden Street Bailroad Co. will 
lie opened about January 15. Daniel F. 
Barber is Superintendent. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

The Cream City Bailroad Co. has 17 • 
miles of track. 
Moline, 111. 

The Moline & Bock Island Bailroad 
is now in running order, with 5 miles of 
track, 8 cars and 40 horses, and two steam 
motors weighing 11 tons each. Eugene 
Lewis is President and Treasurer pro tern, 
and James Cazatt Superintendent. 

Muskegon, Mich. 

Wm. McLaughlin has succeeded C. H. 
Newell as Superintendent of the Muskegon 
Street Bailway Co. 
Nastiville, Tenn. 

The South Nashville Street B. R. Co. 
report that they are now using, in addition 
to their old style of rails, a 32 lb. girder 
rail, and they expect to build a branch 
road one mile long. Their office is on the 
coiner of S. Franklin and Cherry streets. 

Ncnburj i>ort, Mass. 

A New Street Bailroad is to be built 
early next spring, commencing at Plum 
Island, a noted summer resort near New- 
buryport, running across the Island to Fair 
street and Water street, in Newburyport. 
Its length will be a little more than four 
miles, the gauge 4 ft. 8 1-2 in. The capital 
stock is $40,000 and the charter has already 
been granted. The officers of the company 
will be E, P. Shaw, President and General 
Manager, and Eben Sumner, Treasurer. 
This route will afford two ways oi getting 
to the Plum Island hotel, as the Plum 
Island end commences at the river, where 
all the up river and Newburyport boats 
land their passengers. It will be in run- 
ning order by June 1st, 1887. 

New York. 

The Eighth Avenue Line is still looking 
towards electricity. 

Charles B. Miller has made F. Jor- 
dan, 200 Broadway, New York, state agent 
for the Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal. 

The Standard Underground Cable Co. 
are now laying the cables for the Western 
Union Telegraph Co. and for the New York 
Fire Department. 

The Third Avenue company are discuss- 
ing the project of cabling the Third avenue 



143 



line. This is probably due; to the success 
which they have obtained on the One 
Hundred and Twenty-fifth street and Tenth 
avenuelines, of which they have the control. 

James P. Coogan has presented a petition 
to the Board of Aldermen for the city's 
consent to build a new surface railroadfrom 
151st street and Seventh avenue to 147th 
street and Sixth avenue, and thence to 
129th street and Third avenue. 

Messbs. Rufus Mabtin & Co. have sold 
twelve of their " Benton " fare registers 
to the Meriden Horse R. R. Co. They have 
also sold the same company the balance of 
the equipment supplies. They report in- 
creasing sales of their change belt, which 
is a good indication of its merits. 

D. D. Conover, the old President of the 
Forty-second Street Railroad Company, is 
making an attempt to get a cross-town rail- 
road through Wall street. He has a plan 
for a roundabout road that would take law- 
yers, brokers, and business men around to 
the doors of almost all the office buildings. 

The following is the annual report of the 
Sixth Avenue Railroad in New York to the 
Railroad Commission: Gross earnings, 
$839,403; operating expenses, $594,009; 
other income, $4,200; charges, $85,663; di- 
vidends, 13 per cent, or $195,000; deficit 
for year. $31,069; surplus, September, 1885, 
$67,592; surplus, September, 1886, $36,523; 
cash, $92,503; profit and loss surplus, 
$36,523. 

The Board of Aldermen granted a fran- 
chise to the Melrose & West Morrisania 
Railroad Company to ran a railroad along 
a number of roads and avenues in the an- 
nexed district. The road is to be built with 
side-bearing rails, and at the end of ten 
years the company is to keep the streets 
clear of snow and ice. The railroad com- 
mittee have also under consideration the 
petition of the Bentley-Knight Co. to con- 
struct a road connecting the Pulton, Cort- 
landt and Chambers street ferries. 

The One Hundeed and Twenty-fifth 
Steeet Cable Line was opened to the pub- 
lic on the morning of December 1st. It 
was not intended to open the line so early 
bat after making a private trial of the road 
and getting everything in readiness, it was 
decided to begin at that time. The travel 
upon the road is quite heavy. There are 
nine cars which run entirely upon this 
street, besides seventeen which run to 
High Bridge. These latter cars run down 
Tenth avenue to One Hundred and Twenty- 
fifth street, and then eastward to the East 
river. This practically gives a service over 
One Hundred and Twenty-fifth street of 
twenty-six regular cars. The speed of the 
cable is eight miles an hour, and as the 
streets are clear the cars are run up to the 
maximum speed a good deal of the time. 
The fare on both lines is five cents. 

Mayor Grace has vetoed the resolution 
of the Board of Aldermen granting franchise 
to the North & East River RailrqadCo., 
which wishes to run an electric surface rail- 
way to connect with the various down town 
ferries. The objections are based upon the 



ground that fur m n re than 1,000 feet it is 
coincident with the Belt Line road, and 
also occupies more than 1,000 feet of the 
Ninth Avenue aud Bleecker Street roads. 
He concludes his objections in this way : — 
" In conclusion I desire to draw your at- 
tention to the fact that in order to operate 
this road upon the plan proposed it will be 
necessary to lay electrical conductors in the 
streets. It will be pertinent for you to in- 
quire in your reconsideration of the matter 
as to the effect which the Act of 1884 and 
1885 with reference to electrical subways 
may have upon this particular application. 
I will not, however, pursue that inquiry, 
as the objection already presented disposes 
of the matter so far as I am concerned." 

The Twenty-eighth and Twenty-ninth 
Stbeets Railboad Co., which has just 
secured its franchise over the Mayor's veto, 
was originally known as the Twenty-eighth 
and Thirtieth Streets Railroad Company. 
This secured its charter on April 24, 1884. 
The capital stock was 5,000 shares. The 
president was S. H. Hurd, the secretary 
and superintendent Frederick A. Bartlett, 
and the directors were Messrs. Hurd and 
Bartlett, E. N. Nichols, Nathan Seely, 
George H. Seely, W. H. Bitter and J. F. 
Harrison, the last named being the attor- 
ney of the corporation. The name of the 
company was changed to its present one on 
June 22, 1885, when the proposed route be- 
tween First and Ninth avenues, in Thirtieth 
street, was laid out in Twenty-ninth street. 
The general scheme of the road is to utilize 
Twenty-eighth and Twenty-ninth streets to 
cross the city and to connect the Twenty- 
third, Thirty-fourth and Forty-second 
streets ferries. The president now is Jon- 
athan H. Crane, secretary and treasurer of 
the Manhattan Brass Company, a large 
owner along the East River; the secretary 
is Mr. Bartlett, who has been active in 
promoting the road, and the treasurer is 
Mr. Harrison. The office of the company 
is in Temple Court. The directors are 
Jonathan A. Crane, Edward P. Beach, Sam- 
uel H. Hurd, Gilbert M. Speir, jr., 
Jared F. Harrison, New Rochelle; John 
W. Mercereau, Jr.,' and Frederick A. Bait- 
lett. 

According to the company's report to the 
Railroad Commissioners, the right of way 
cost $708.30 and the company says it has 
acquired consents representing $10,000,000. 
The total cost of the road as reported to the 
Commissioners up to September^ 1, 1885, 
was $1,690.30, the balance of $982 being 
set down as " cash realized." 

A director of the company denied em- 
phatically recently that anything had 
been paid to the Aldermen for the fran- 
chise. It was thought that last year they 
wanted " something," but this was refused 
and the franchise "had not cost a cent." 

Norri»toivn, Pa. 

Owing to the delay in the construction 
of the street railway known as the Norris- 
town Passenger R. R. Co., a committee has 
been appointed to go ahead with the or- 
ganization of a separate company. The cost 
of building and equipment will be about I 



$30,000. The projectors of the enterprise 
expect to begin work in the early spring. 
The par value of the shares will be $25 
each, and it has been decided that the fares 
shall lie only five cerjts. It is said that 
those who are prominent in the enterprise 
are confident that it will pay. The entire 
length of the route will be between three 
and a half and four miles. 
Quincy, Mass. 

New Steeet Railway. W. L. Faxon, 
John C. Randall and C. A. Faxon of Quincy 
have filed with the Secretary of State a 
petition to the legislature for incorpora- 
tion for the purpose of building a street 
radway in Quincy, to be operated by a 
motive power other than steam. The pro- 
posed route will connect the villages of 
West Quincy and Quincy Point with the 
center, covering about five miles. New 
York parties are ready to build the line 
and take a large amount of stock. The line 
would eventually run through Wollaston 
and Atlantic to Neponset, connecting at 
Field's Corner with the Dorchester avenue 
road and thence to Boston. 

Riclilield Springs, N. Y. 

New Road. A meeting has been held in 
the office of the Hon. James S. Davenport, 
to take into consideration the subject of 
building a street railway from the village 
to the lake, a distance of about lj miles. D. 
C. Hadcock of Syracuse submitted a propo- 
sition to furnish the capital to build and 
equip the road complete, taking all the 
stock. It is probable that the road will be 
built. 

Richmond, Va. 

New Routes. Two propositions have re- 
cently been placed before the City Coun- 
cil, one from the Union Passenger Railway 
Co. , asking for a permit to build a double 
track road from East 12th street to various 
streets beyond the grain elevator, another 
from the same point to the new reservoir, 
and agreeing that the road shall be com- 
pleted and in running order eighteen months 
from the granting of the petition. The 
company is to operate these cars by the 
use of horses and mules, or if they choose 
at any time they have the privilege of adopt- 
ing the cable or electric motor; locomotives 
will not be granted. The fares are to be 
five cents for passengers within the city, 
but if the passenger, without leaving the 
cars, shall return to any point nearer to 
that from which he started than a point 
from which he has passed a second fare 
shall be paid. The company alsc proposes 
to transport baggage, packages, mails and 
freight. They are to pay also 10 per cent 
of the net profits as taxes and assessments 
of the city. Mr. Pace's proposition is that 
of building a road encircling the city, reach- 
ing Libby and Church Hills, Chimborazo 
Park and Oakwood Cemetery. It is also 
proposed to embrace in this plan a connec- 
tion with Manchester over a bridge which 
is to be built. It is proposed further to use 
dummy engines on which some system of 
electricity can be adopted. 

Sr. Louis, Mo. 

The Engine House and Cab Baen of the 
cable line of this city were destroyed by 



144 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 1887 



fire recently. The engine, which cost 
$70,000, was badly damaged. Forty-two 
cars were burned. The total loss is about 
$75,000. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Tie-Up. As the result of the refusal of 
the Geary Street Cable Eailway Co. to 
grant its employees increased pay and re- 
duced hours, a tie-up was ordered on the 
morning of December 12th and one hun- 
dred men went out. The company, how- 
ever, ran several cars during the day with 
new hands. 

Scranton, l'a. 

The Scbanton Suburban Railway Co. 
has been opened. This is one of the first 
roads in the east which is run by electric- 
ity, the Van Depoele system being used. 
There are at present two cars upon the road, 
and one more has beeu ordered. On the 
afternoon of November 30th there was a 
trial trip at which several gentlemen who 
are interested in the promotion of the 
scheme, were present. The track was in 
the worst possible condition, being covered 
with snow and ice, which upon the heavy 
grades presented almost insuperable obsta- 
cles to the advance of a car, which is to be 
propelled with a motor, and depending for 
its progress upon the weight resting upon 
its wheels. The road is in some places qnite 
steep, running up grades of 300 feet to the 
mile and turning sharp curves. The car 
ran over the whole length of the road with- 
out difficulty, and experienced only some 
very slight delays, where it was obliged to 
melt the snow to the rails by turning the 
wheels before advancing. On the return 
trip it was mostly down grade, the car run- 
ning through the heavy slush which lay 
over the rails without any difficulty what- 
ever, and all connected with the scheme 
have expressed themselves as satisfied 
with the results. We have received from 
the Secretary of the company a time table 
which took effect on December 13th. The 
cars run every twenty-five minutes, com- 
mencing early in the morning at 7.5 a. m., 
the last car leaving the Valley House on 
the up trip at 10.50 p. M. The time of 
running the cars varies during the day from 
five to thirty-five minutes. 
Stamford, Conn. 

The Stampoed Horse Railroad Co. 
report 5^ miles of track, with a 4 ft. 8j in. 
gauge, and are running 10 cars with 40 
horses. F. M. Delano is President of the 
company, and Philip Richardson is 
Treasurer. 

Still water, N. Y. 

Vice President W. L. Denison has 
succeeded S. Rowley as President of the 
Stillwater & Mechanicsville Railway Co. 
The vice presidency is now filled by 
Lyman Smith. 

Toledo, O. 

The arrangement now is for both the 
Consolidated and the Metropolitan street 
ear lines to run cars to the new depot via 
Knapp street. There is a heavy fill on 
Knapp street, between Broadway and the 
depot, and the two companies have agreed 
to pay for that portion of the fill to be oc- 
cupied by the tracks. The Metropolitan 



company will pay two -thirds of this expense 
and the Consolidated company one-third. 
The division is thus made for the reason 
that the Metropolitan company will occupy 
three blocks of Knapp street, while the 
Consolidated company will occupy one 
block. There will no doubt be a double 
track from Broadway to the depot grounds. 
The two street car companies will meet 
with the city solicitor and the latter will 
draw an ordinance to govern all concerned. 
This will enable both lines to get their cars 
near the depot, and the people of almost 
the entire city can then get to and from the 
depot for a single fare of five cents. The 
new depot will thus be better accommodat- 
ed with street railroads than was the old 
one. 

Utica, N. Y. 

Deertield Corners, which is a suburb of 
Utica, N. Y. , has for a number of years 
been occupied as a place of residence by 
clerks and mechanics, who come into the 
city every morning and return in the even- 
ing. During the fall and spring, and win- 
ter, the roads are very disagreeable, and at 
one time a stage was run between the bridge 
and corners. It is no w,ho wever, the intention 
ot the head of the management of the turn- 
pike, Mr. A. D. Barber of Utica, to con- 
struct a street railroad running out to the 
suburb. 

Vonkers, N. Y. 

The Yonkers Railroad Co. is now being 
rapidly completed, and probably will be 
opened about the first of the month. Or- 
ders have been sent out that the road 
should be at once put in order for running 
the cars, and in order to do this it has been 
necessary to work night and day. The 
frost and snow have proved very obstinate 
and the pieces of earth, wheu excavated, 
are like so much stone. Switches are be- 
ing laid and the stables are very nearly 
ready for occupancy. The road will be 
four and one-half miles long, laid to a 4 ft. 
8i- in. gauge, with 42 and 48 lb. rails. At 
the opening of the road there will be about 
10 cars and 45 horses. The officers are: 
President, D. N. Stanton; Assistant Treas- 
urer, D. Perry Stanton, and Secretary, John 

F. Brennan. The capital stock is placed at 
$200,000. This is high, of course, for the 
length of road we have indicated, but it is 
the intention of the company to extend 
their lines very materially, and they have 
the franchise for building about twenty 
miles of road in the place. It is their in- 
tention to add about one-half mile of track 
very soon, so there will be five miles in all. 
The offices of the company are at the sta- 
bles on Main street, and the cars which 
they have just purchased were built by J. 

G. Brill & Co. of Philadelphia. 



Softening Leather. 

Mix boiled linseed oil, 1 pint; beeswax, 
2 ounces; burgundy pitch, 1 ounce; turpen- 
tine, 2 ounces. Melt all the ingredients 
together over slow fire. The mixtures 
should be well rubbed into the leather on 
both sides, but principally on the flesh side. 
— Harness. 



Bryden Forged Horse Shoes. 

These shoes are forged into shape on 
heavy drop hammers, which does its work 
in the same way as a drop forge, by con- 
densing the iron and adding very mater- 
ially to its wearing qualities, so that it is 
claimed it is nearly equal to steel in its 
durability. We have no data of compari- 
son in this mattei - , but from the strength 
and tenacity of drop forgings in general 
should think the claim might well be 
made. 

The distinctive feature of this system of 
manufacture is that it produces a shoe 
calked or plain and ready for applying to 
the hoof. The crease is made low, the holes 
punched well in, and beveled so as to per- 
mit the nail head to be deeply driven in, 
thus reducing the strain on the nail, and 
insuring a permanently fastened shoe. As 
the foot bearing of the shoe is level it ma- 
terially aids in the preservation of the hoof, 
and it is not necessary to heat the shoe 
in order to fit it. The shoes are not weld- 
ed in any place, as the calks are forged on 
solid from the web. 

The shoes have a good and substantial 
clip drawn up from metal driven outside 
the regular outlines of the shoe for the pur- 
pose ; the outer edge of the clip, when drawn 
up, coincides with the outlines of the shoe 
and requires no cutting away of the hoof 
wall to let it in. 

These shoes are at present used by the 
large street railways in New York, Phila- 
delphia, Chicago, New Orleans, Buffalo, 
Washington and Brooklyn. 



Can't Dismount from a Street Car. 

Some philosopher— not Emerson or Car- 
lyle, but one equally observant — has said 
that there are two things a woman cannot 
do; throw a stone without hitting some one 
behind her, and sharpen a lead pencil. To 
this list I think another might be added— 
she cannotleave a street car properly. Did 
you ever see her get out of one of those, 
especially the bobtail species, without won- 
dering why she escapes serious injury ? 
When she puts her foot on the platform 
(the size of it, the foot, not the platform, 
is, of course, material to the question,) she 
invariably turns her back to the horses and 
steps out in the opposite direction. She 
seems to have no ideas of the laws of pro- 
pulsion or gravitation, and never stops to 
consider that if the underpaid driver, who 
also acts as cashier, ticket-seller and con- 
ductor, were to start his horses a moment 
too soon she would be pitched- violently 
into the street. So far she has not met with 
an accident, but some day there will be a 
confused mass of striped stockings, disor- 
dered bangs and disarranged bustles on the 
cobble-stones, and when that time does 
come I can only echo the wish expressed in 
the last stanza of "John Gilpin" by say- 
ing, " May I be there to see."— Ex. 



Carbolic ointment is good to apply to 
running sores on a horse's leg, and is exten- 
sively used by veterinary surgeons. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



115 



White's Loose Wheel and Truck. 

The truck* aud wheel illustrated in this 
connection is one that is intended to do the 
work that is usually assigned to a loose 
wheel. 

The truck frame has the sides made of 
cast steel, ribbed outside and inside, and 
having a head or socket that allows the 
cross timbers to fit tightly into it, where 
they are drawn up with bolts, aud it is also 
so looped that there is space for the axle 
to WDrk up and down according to the 
load. Over the space a bracket is cast on 
the side of the frame, and another bracket 
bolted to the end of the axle, with a cross 
between them to carry the car. The large 
bolt also serves to stop the ends of the hol- 
low axle so that it will hold the oil. 

The axle is m ule about 5 in. in diame- 
ter, with a 2 in. hole through it. It also 
has a hole in the oenter and top of the axle 
by which it may be filled. The wheels are 
made hollow, running from the center of 




the axle out as far as may be needed to 
make the bearings from outside to inside as 
long as the diameter of the wheel, in other 
worda, making them square, on the prin- 
ciple that a square cannot be cramped on 
the curve. Two wrought iron bands are 
also shrunk near the center of the axle and 
held fast in add tiou with set screws. There 
is one loose baud with a lip on it which 
goes over theiuside of the hub, and has set 
screws to go through the tight baijd, by 
which the wear is taken up. The wheels 
also have the novel feature of doors which 
can be opened aud access given to the bear- 
ing aud hub. These bearings are made in 
quarters, with a dovetail at one end and 
bolt at the other to secure them. The axle 
bearings are cut in halves and secured in 
the same way, so they can be taken out 
and replaced when worn. Oil holes are 
drilled through the bottom of the axle and 
the Jialf sleeves that are around it, so that 
when the wheel is running it lubricates the 
uxle, as illustrated in our Figure 3. 

•K. T, While, H8 High st., Boston, Mass. 



The worn parts can thus be easily re- 
placed. The wheel is also made in three 
parts, steel tire, outside and inside hubs. 
These latter are cast separately and bolted 
together with the tire between them, bo 
that the tire, as well as the bearings, can 
be replaced when it is worn. The wheels 
will thus be seen to be independent and 
answer nil the purposes of a loose wheel. 
We are not informed of the weight of the 
structure, or an estimate of its cost. 



International Hail way Exposition at 
Paris. 

The prospectus of the grand Railway 
Exposition lhat is to be held in Parh in 
1887 lias been issued and we make the fol- 
owiug extracts therefrom: 

A grand celebration of the Semi-Centen- 
nial of Railways in France meets auecessity 
imposed upon us by our national prestige. 
England in 1885, the United States at 
Chicago, in 1883, Belgium in 1885, all cele 
brated the anniversary of that new science 
of railways that has so completely and effec- 
tually transformed the economic conditions 
of maukind in the space of half a century. 

France could not refrain from rendering 
homage to the greatest scientific issue of 
our epoch. Obeying the impulse, we have 
attentively studied the question to find the 
surest means of realization. 

There appeared to be certain iudispeusa- 
ble elements necessary to the success of our 
International Exposition, such as govern- 
ment and press support, the interest of man- 
ufacturers, favorable co-operation of for- 
eign countries, the concurrence of enlight- 
ened men and a board of directors devoted 
to the interests of the undertaking, and, 
moreover, carrying with it the necessary 
financial strength. 

We are happy to be able to confidently 
state that we have secured the advantages 
of all the above elements, aud have thereby 
beenledto establish four main sections for 
the celebration of the semi-centennial: 

1. International Exposition of Railway 
Appliances and Industries. 

2 International Railway Congress for 
the Discussion of Tariffs, Safety, Comfort, 
etc., etc. 

3. Official Ceremony of the Opening of 
the Line, Paris— St. Germain. 

4. Unveiling of a Statue to Marc Seguin, 
aud Railway Jubilee. 

The above 2 3ro o ramme way definitely 
adopted by the Committee of Organization 
at Paris, July 17, 1886. 

For a long time a special exhibition of 
railway appliances at Paris hasbeen consid- 
ered a necessity, the conclusion being fur- 
ther strengthened by the fact that much 
enthusiasm was expressed at the first exhib- 
ition of the kind, held at Darliugtou, Eng- 
land, in 1882, when the suggestion was 
made that such an exposition should be 
held in Paris. 

Such an undertaking affords p most fer- 
tile field of study and experience, aud good 
must result therefrom to all in anyway con- 
nected with the science and working of 
railways, and also to the people at large. 



At all the exhibitions held in all parts of 
the world since Darlington, the name of 
Paris has been unanimously received as a 
rendezvous for the railway world in the 
future. 

It isalso expected, andevery effort will be 
made to secure such a result, that the Rail- 
way Exposition in 1887 will be a fitting pre- 
lude to the Universal Exhibition to be held 
at Paris in 188!), and that a broader interest 
will be manifested in such exhibits as per- 
tain solely to railway interests than has 
hitherto bee i the case at universal exhibi- 
tions. 

For the Committee of Organization: 

President, Montaut, Ingenieur en Chef 
desPonts et Chaussees, Depute de Seine-et- 
Marne; Vice Presidents, Salvaire, Chef de 
Division h la Prefecture de la Seine, Oli- 
vier, Ancien Officier de Marine; Secretaries, 
Sautereau, Ingenieur Civil; Siucholle, In- 
genieur des Arts et Manufactures. 

The following circular has also been is- 
sued by Mr. John W. Weston, who has 
been appointed Commissioner General for 
the United States to the Exposition : 

An International Exposition will be held 
in Paris, from May to October, 1887, when 
a Railway Jubilee will be solemnly cele- 
brated. 

This exposition will comprise the various 
industrial and professional branches con- 
nected w'th railways, such as: Engineering 
and Mechanics, Locomotives, Machinery, 
Passenger Coaches and Freight Cars, Hoist- 
ing and Wrecking Apparatus, Apparatus 
or Heating and Lighting, Apparatus for 
Intercommunication, Couplers and other 
Railway Appliances, Building, Fuimishing 
and Conveyance Material, Metall rgical 
and Electrical Apparatus, etc. 

At the same time an International Rail- 
way Congress will be held by delegates 
from Railway Companies, Chambers of 
Commerce, Scientific and Professional So- 
cieties for the discussion of important ques- 
tions of Management, Exploitation, Main- 
tenance, Rolling Stock, Security, Traffic, 
etc. 

Manufacturers aud all others interested 
in theUnited States are earnestly invited to 
co-cperate in order to secure such an exhibit 
as will enhance their prospects of foreign 
trade, aud at the same time display the un- 
exampled progress of their country. 

John W. Weston, 
Com'r General for the United States, 

230-236 La Salle street, Chicago. 

Over 1,000,000 Passengers, it is said, 
have already been carried by the electric 
railways of the United States, and in 
Europe that number has been exceeded. 
The cost of electrical power thus applied 
is $12 per day as against $18 for horses, 
and the cost per passenger in 1885 was 83 
cents as compared with $1.55 in 1881. 



Corn when fed to horses in too great 
quantities will produce a superabundance 
of fat, but no muscle. It also tends to 
overheating and may result in violent per- 
spiring followed by the formation of scabs 
all over the body. 



146 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Januai.t, 1^87 



Test of an Electric Railway at the R. I. 
Locomotive Works. 

The Providence Journal says that upon 
the premises of the Rhode Island Locomo- 
tive Works there is laid a section of car 
track just one-tenth of a mile long, with 
curves aud gradients. Here may, upon 
occasion, be seen the somewhat singular 
sight of what appears to be an ordinary 
horse car, minus the horse, running 
smoothly and noiselessly at a rapid rate of 
speed, without any apparent source of 
power. A man standing in the driver's po- 
sition upon the front platform, with a turn 
of what upon the ordinary street car is the 
brake handle, stops the car, starts it, sud- 
denly or gradually at will, and regulates 
its speed, from a snail's pace to a five- 
minute gait, as he chooses. 

This is the practical test of the electric 
motor which, after a year of experimenting 
at the Locomotive Works, has been per- 
fected by the engineers of the Bentley- 
K 'light Company, of New York. They 
have made it especially to be applied to 
street cars and elevated railroads, and have 
already a number of contracts under way 
for its introduction in several cities. 

The horse car is precisely like those that 
travel our Btreets, and, indeed, was pur- 
ch ised of the Uaion Railroad Company, 
to be fitted with the electric appliance. 
Between the axles and underneath the 
floor of the car is a little machine that oc- 
cupies a sptos of 30 iuches square by 10 
deep. To this an electric current is con- 
veyed from a conductor in a sort of under- 
ground conduitnear the track — its position 
whether between the rails or to one side is 
immaterial — by means of a spring shoe or 
"plow" upon the card which bears upon 
the conducting rail with elastic pressure. 
This current is thus conveyed to the motor, 
which is nothing more than a sort of min- 
iature dynamo. Now, it is a principle in 
electric physics — a principle of compara- 
tively recent discovery and of great impor- 
tance — that while a dynamo, operated by 
outside power, generates a current of elec- 
tricity, that same current introduced into 
another dynamo will cause it to revolve 
and thus to generate power again. This 
principle of the "reversibility of the dyna- 
mo" is what renders possible the applica- 
tion of electricity to motive power, and is 
what is here employed. The current causes 
the motor to revolve, and the latter then 
communicates its motion to the axles of the 
car wheels through a system of gearing. 
This is the simple principle of the contriv- 
ance; but the perfection of the details has 
occupied many months of experimentation. 
Tue electric system in our streets would 
require but little change in existing appli- 
ances, the chief of which would be the 
underground electric conduit. This would 
ba smaller than that required for cable 
roads, aud much easier to keep clean, be- 
cause there is no mechanism inside, and it 
can be easily and constantly swept out by 
appliances upon the cars themselves. The 
fact that any desired speed can be main- 
tained, even so great as twelve miles an 



hour on outlying districts if desired, per- 
mitting also slowing up in going arouud 
curves and in crowded streets, is auother 
considerable advantage over the cable 
system. 

The tests that have been given under the 
new motor so far seem to have been suc- 
cessful. The car has been run under the 
many conditions that would be required of it 
in actual street work in cities; it has been 
run loaded heavily with people— forty have 
ridden in it at one time, causing no dimi- 
nution of the speed — it has been driven up 
steep grades and around sharp corners, 
started and stopped and run at slow speed, 
and apparently responded without failure 
to all such demands. 

Of course, this, to the minds of directors 
of street railways, which are run to make 
money, is but the beginning of the demon- 
stration that they would require. Economy 
is the most important element ; and this is 
a much more difficult matter to determine. 
With reference to a comparison with loco- 
motive engines, such as are used on ele- 
vated railroads, the engiueers of the electric 
company give figures which seem to indi- 
cate a decided advantage on the side of 
electricity. Locomotives can develop a 
horse-power by the use of from six to 
sixteen pounds of coal per hour. But a 
statioEary engine develops a horse-power 
from about two to two and one-half pounds 
of coal per hour at the outside. And of 
the power employed the electric motor 
wastes about fifty per ^cent, wherefore it 
can develop a horse -power from four pounds 
per hour. Furthermore, while every loco- 
motive requires two men, one of whom is 
in the highest and most expensive class of 
skilled labor, two engineers and three 
firemen are sufficient for the one or two 
engines operating the electric plant of a 
street railway system of 200 cars. The 
drivers of the cars can be taken from the 
same grade of labor as at present. The 
wear and tear of a stationary engine is, of 
course, insignificant compared with that on 
a locomotive, and the simplicity and solid- 
ity of the motors make the wear and tear 
upon them of insignificant amount. A 
comparison with the expense of a horse 
railroad line is, of course, more difficult 
and more a matter of conjecture, and the 
results could perhaps be definitely deter- 
mined only from the experience of both. 



Protection to Iron. 

Experiments made under the direction of 
the administration of the Dutch State rail- 
roads with various paints on iron plates are 
reported to have proved that the redlead 
paints resist atmospheric influences much 
better than those of brown-red andiron ox- 
ides. The red-lead paints adhered closer 
to the metal and possessed greater elastici- 
ty than the others. It was also found that 
better results were obtained if, before the 
paints were applied, the plates were pickled 
instead of being merely scraped and brush- 
ed. The test plates were pickled in muriatic 
acid, washed with water, thoroughly dried 
and, while warm, carefully oiled. As iron 



and steel are peculiarly liable to corrosion 
when in salt water, vessels made of them 
require special protection. This can be 
given by covering the metal with some alka- 
line or basic substance, or the oxide of 
some metal electro-positive to it. Caustic 
lime and soda are very efficient for this pur- 
pose, and act equally well when made into 
a paint with oil. But their efficiency is de- 
stroyed when they cease to be caustic or 
when they are saturated with carbonic acid, 
which they absorb freely from the air. 
Magnesia is equally efficient, and does not 
absorb carbonic acid. It therefore makes as 
good a material for a paint as could be de- 
sired, and, moreover, forms an excellent 
basis on which to lay an anti-fouling paiut, 
which it protects from the galvanic action 
of the iron by insulating it, while it does not 
affect the anti-fouling qualities. — Ex. 

The Preservation of Wood by a Simpli- 
fied Method of Injection. 

The preservation of railway ties and tele- 
graph poles having passed into the domain 
of absolute necessity, the Norwegians claim 
to have solved the problem by the use of a 
simple and economical method. A hole is 
bored with an auger about 30 iuches above 
the ground, and it is given as great an in- 
clination as possible down toward the cen- 
ter of the wood, the diameter being about 
one inch. This hole will contain from 100 to 
150 grammes of powdered sulphate of cop- 
per. The hole is closed by a wooden plug, 
with a handle on the outside. 

It will perhaps be difficult to explain or 
clearly demonstrate the action that takes 
place with this method of injection, since 
some natural crystals are formed. And by a 
very curious capillary action these crys- 
tals are worn out, if that expression 
can bo used. Their volume contin- 
ually diminishes, and at the end of three 
or four months the equivalent of what has 
disappeared must be added. 



A Gas Locomotive. — In Melbourne, 
Victoria, says the Journal of Commerce and 
Intercolonial Trade, a gas locomotive 
has been running for several months on one 
of the tramways, so far to the satisfaction 
of all concerned. The coal gas is carried 
in four copper ci ntainers, about 6 feet long 
by 16 inches in diameter, which, as the gas 
is compressed to about 15 atmospheres, 
hold 280 cubic feet, or sufficient for a run 
of 15 rnile3. In practice the gas has rarely 
been pressed to more than 100 lbs., as 
that gives an ample supply to run the loco- 
motive and its car twice on its journey. 
The reservoirs or containers are refilled as 
required at the station, ard the average 
consumption of gas per day of about eight 
trips, or 40 miles, is 729 cubic f(er, which 
in London would cost about 4i cents. The 
locomotive weighs 4* tons, and the car 35 
cwt., an Otto gas engine being the motor. 

We have received too late for insertion in 
this issue data from a Mexican consul, re- 
garding the street railway system of the 
city of Mexico. 



Januiry, 18S7. 



THE STIIEET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



147 



STREET RAILWAYS 

IN THE UNITED STATES & CANADA. 

Compiled from data furnished the editors of "The 
Street Railway Journai,"by the officers 
of the various roads. 

Abbreviations— m, miles; g, gauge; lbr, pounds 
rail to the yard; c, cars; h, horses; mu, mules. 

officers' addresses are the same postoffice as the 
company unless otherwise specified. 

AKRON, O.— Akron St. Ry. & Herdlc Co. 2\ m, 
tin, 81 h. Pres. Ira M. Miller, v. Pres. James Christy, 
Treas. B. L. Dodge, Sec. F. Si. Atterholt, supt. John 
T. Metlln. 

ALBANY, N. Y.— Watervllet Turnpike & R. R. 
Co. 15 m, 4-8,'j g, 86-45 lb. r, 31 c, lsu h. Pres. Chas. 
Newman, V. Pres. C. B. TUllnghast, Sec. & Treas. 
cautlne Tremper, Supt. Amos Free. Offices 1165 
Broadway. 

The Albany Ry. 14 m, 4-s g, 54 c. 232 h. 33-47 lb r. 
Pres., supt. and Treas. John VV. McNamara. sec. 
Jas. H. Manning. Offices 3 & 5 N. Pearl st. 

AbLEiiHENY tilTY, PA Federal St. & Pleas- 
ant Valley Pass. Ry. 4.8 m, 5-2 g, 50 lb r, 22 c, 160 h 
andmu. Pres. Wm. McCreery, Sec. R. F. Ramsey, 
Supt. Wm. J. Crozier. office, 129 Taggart st, 

People's Park Pass. R R. Co. 4.2 m, 5-2 g, 50 lb r, 
ioc, 70 mu. Pres. Wm. McCreery, Sec. R. F. Ram- 
sey, Supt. Wm. J. Crozier. Office, ]29 Taggart st. 

ALLENTOWN, PA.— Allentown Pass. R.R. CO. 
3X m, 4-8 >> g, 19 lbs. r, 3 coaches, 22 h. Pres. Samuel 
Lewis, Treas. & sec. Joseph E. Balllet. Supt. A. 
T. Brown. Office Hamilton st. Capital, $45,260. 

ALTON, ILL,.— Alton & Up. Alton Hoise Ry. Co. 

ALTOONA, PA.— City Pass. Ry. Co. of Altoona, 
Pa. sy m, 5-3 g, 43 & 45 lbs. r, 17 c. 40 h. Pres. John 
P. Levan, Sec. & Treas. L. B. Kelfsnelder, Supt. John 
J. Buch. Capital, $«8,000. a 

AMSTERDAM, N. Y.— Amsterdam St. Ry. Co. 
l \ m, 4-8 g, 25 lb r, 3 c, 10 h. Pres. Henry Herrick, 
Treas. David Cady, sec. M. L. Stover. Leased to 
Jas. R. Snell. 

ANN ARBDR, MICI I.— i «ee new roads, | 

APPI.ETDN, Wis — Appleton Electric St. Ry 
41* m. r,c. Pres. J. E Harrimnn. V.-Pres. N. B. Clark, 
sec. T. W. Orblson, Treas. Jos. Koffend. 

ASHTABULA, o.-Ashtabula Cltv Ry. Co. 4 m, 
\-8y g, 40 lb r,9c, 60 h. Owner & Prop. Ino.N.Stewart. 

ATCHISON. KAN. — Atchison st. Ry. Co. 9 m 
2.i c, 65 h. i-8y g, 20-3 i ib r. Pres. J. H. Beeson, Treas. 
ll. M. Jackson, Sec. J. P. Adams. Gen. supt. Geo. W. 
carpenter. 

Gate City S R.R. t.Co. 2? 4 m, 4-8^ g, 16 lb r, 7 c, 26 
h. Pres. L. u. Nelson, v. pres. L. DeGlve, Sec. & 
Treas. John Stephens, Solicitor, a. Remharat. 

Metropolitan St. R.R. Co. 

West End & Atlantic R.R. Co. 2m, 4-8>tf g, 20 lb r 
6 c, 34 mu. Pres J. D.Turner, v. pres. T. L. Lano-I 
ston, Sec. & Treas. B. H. Brumhead, Man. & Pur 
Agt. Jno. S. Brumhead. 

ATLANTA, GA. — Atlanta St. Ry. Co. 13 m, 4-8V 
g, 42 lb C. B. rail, 40 two h cars, 150 horses. North 
Atlanta Line l m. Decatur St. Line 1.50 m. Mari- 
etta St. Line 2.50 m. McDonough St. Line 1 50m 
Peachtree St. Line 2.50 m. West End Line 2.50 m 
Whitehall St. Line 1.50 m. Pres. Richard Peters, 
Sec. & Treas. J. W. Culpepper. Supt. & Purch Agt 
E. C. Peters. Office, 49 Line st. 

Metropolitan St. R. R. Co. 6 in, 4 8y g 20 lb r 
20 c, 84 h. Pres. J. W. Rankin, Sec. J. s. Hanlutu' 
Office cor. Hunter and Butler sts. 

ATLANTIC, N. J.— Atlantic CltyRy. Co. 

AUBURN, N. Y.— Auburn & owasco Lake R.R Co 
1 U m, i-8y g, 28-30 lb r, 4c, 13 h. Pres. D. M Osborne, 
Sec & Treas C. B. Kosters, Supt. B. F. Andrews 

East Genesee & Seward Ave. Ry. Co. 2v m i-8y S 
30 lb r, 6 c, 25 h. Pres. David M. Osborne, Sec & 
Treas. C. B. Kosters, Supt. B. F. Andrews. 
AUGUSTA, G A.— Augusta &SummervlUe R.R. Co. 
6 m. 5 g, 30 lbr, 13 c, 42 h. Pres. Patk Walsh, Supt. 
Edw, G. Mosher. Auditor, Frank E. Petit. Office 
513 McKinne st. 

AURORA, ILL — Aurora Cltv Ry. Co. 5 in, i-8y, 
g, 28 lb r, 7 c, ! ' , 30 mu. Pres. H. H. Evans, v. Pres 
S. W. Thatcher, Sec. A. J. Hopkins, Treas E w' 
Trask, Supt. I. B. Chattle. 

BABYLON, N. Y— Babylon Horse R.R. Co. \y 
m, 4-9 g, 60 lb r, 3 c, 3 h. Pres. W. F. Norton, Sec 
Jos. M. Sarnmis, Treas. John R. Reld, Supt. David s' 
S. sammls. 

BALTIMORE, MD.— Baltimore & Powhatan Ry 
Co. 6 m, 5-4><; g, 3d lb r, 4 c, 18 h. Pres. & Treas e' 
O. Freeman, sec. R. B. Clark, Supt. I. M. Ketrlck' 
Office 406 Laurens st. 

Baltimore city Pass. Ry. Co. 44 m, lfli c, 1051 h 
5-4;*- g, 46 & 47io r. Pres. & Supt. Oden Bowie' 
Supt. car shops J. M. Blemdell, Supt. trucks Bover 
Parks. Treas John Bolglano, Sec. S. L. Bridge. Office 
cor. Calvert & Baltimore sts. 



to Gen. Man R. e. Robblns. Office cor. Huntington 
ave. & Oak st. ° 

Baltimore & Catonsvllle Ry. Co. 6 m, S-iy g 35 lb 
r, 15 c, 51 h. Pres. J. c Robblns, Supt, & Put. Agt 
O. W. Appleby. Office Pratt st. & Frederick av. ' 

Baltimore & Plmlico & Plkesviue R.R. Co. 

Central Ry. Co. \\y m, 2 sweepers 182 h, 5-il4 e 
Si? 8 &T , , Pres - mer Th °rnpson, Sec. & Treas. 
Walter Blaklstone. Office cor Preston st and Green- 
mount ave. 

Citizen's Ry. Co. 20 m, 5-4}*" g, 34 lbs. r 42 c, 380 h. 
Pres. Jos. s. Hagarty, Sec. Wm. Hammersley, Supt. 
C. C. Speed, Treas. S. v. Keen 

Hlghlandtown & Point Breeze Ry. Co. City Diy 
c m, 5-8 g, — lb r, 15 c, 9„ h. Pt. Breeze Dlv. 3 m, 1 
4 t^ c ;. Pres - Howa rd MunnlUhuysen, Treas. 
Hobt. D Morrison, Gen. Man. M. A Mccormick 

North Baltimore Passenger Ry. Co. 21 m, 5-iy g, 

c 'i 00 h - Pres - Jas - L - McLane, Treat 
Dan'l J. Foley, Sec. Thos. J. Wilson. 1 



People's Ry. Co. 13 m, g, 47-45 lb r, 38 c, 

200 h. Pres. T Edw. Ilambleton, Treas. Gustavus 
Ober, sec, Supt. & Pur. Agt. Wm. A. House, Jr. Office 
Druid Hill ave. f 

York Road R.R.'Co. 

BATTLE CHEEK, MICH. — Battle Creek Ry. Co. 

5 m, 3-6 g, 28 lb r, 8 c, 18 h, 3 mu. Pres. Geo. D. 
J. White, V. Pres. H. U. Brown, Sec. Chas. Thomas, 
Supt. John A. White, Gen. Man. J. W. llahn. 

BAY CITY, MICH. — Bay City St. Ry. CO. 1% 
m, 4-8^ g, 18 lb r, 13 c, 35 h. Pres. James Clements, 
Treas. Wm. Clements, Sec Edgar A. cooley. 

BEATRICE, NEB. -Beatrice St. Ry. Co. i m, 
4-8^ g, 251b. r, 4 c, 20 h. Pres. J. D. Kllpatrlck, Supt. 
.v Purchasing Agt, J. E. Smith. 

BEAVER FALLS, PA Beaver Valley St. Ry. Co. 

3,'u m, 5-2X g, 38 lb r, :c,34h. Pres. M. L. Knight, 
V. Pres. C01. J. Weyand, Sec. & Treas. J. F. Merrl- 
man, supt. L. Richardson. 

BELLAIRE, O.— Bellaire St. R.R. Co. 

BELLEVILLE, ONT., CAN.— Belleville St. Ry. 
Co. 1J» m, 3-6 g, 28 lb. r. 5 c, 13 h Pres. D. Lock wood, 
Sec, Treas. & Man. s. Lockwood. 

BELLVIIiLE. ILL.— Citizen's St. Ry. Co. 1% m, 
4 s'j g, 16 lb r, 7 c, 20 h. Pres. D. P. Alexander, Man. 

6 Treas. U. A. Alexander, Sec. J. E. Thomas, office 
N. E. cor. Main and High sts. 

BEREA, o.— Berea st, r. r. Co. 1 V m, 3-6 g, 25 lb r, 
2c, 4 h. Pres. C. W. D. Miller, v. Pres, T. Chlnchward, 
Sec. & Treas. F. I. Pomeroy, Supt. A. W. Bishop. 

BINUHAMTON, N. Y.— Washington Street & 
State Asylum R.R. Co. iy m. 4 g, 16-35 lb r, 13 c, 23 
h. Pres. R. H. Meagley, V. Pres. Geo. Whitney, Sec. 
Ira J. Magley, Treas. F. E. Ross, Supt. Wm. Whitney, 

Blnghamton Central R.R. Co. 3\ m (3 m. laid.) 
3 g, 28 lb r, 6 c, 8 h. Pres. Geo. L. Crandall, V.-Pres. 
Aionzo EvartS, Sec. Chas. O. Root, Treas. H. J. 
Kneeland, Supt. Nelson Stow. Offices 65 Court St. 1/ 

Blnghamton & Port Dickinson R.R. Co. 5 m, 4-8^ 
g, 20-30 lb r, ioc, 23 h. Pres. Harvey westcott, Sec. & 
Treas. G. si. Harris, supt. N. L. Osborn. (Leased to 
Mr. Osborn). offices 112 State st. 

City Ry. co. 1 m, 4 g, 25 lb r, 2 c, 5 h. Pres. & 
Man. K. H. Meagley, Supt, Wm. Whitney, office, 
216 Fort st. 

Main, Court & Chenango St. R.R. 5 m, 4-8g, 40 lb r, 
10 c, 25 h. Supt. & Lessee, N. L. Osborn. Offices 83 
Washington st. 

Park Ave. R. R. Co. 1 in, 4 g, 20 lb r. Pres. C. 
Ross, Treas. F. C. Ross, Sec. C. A. Matthews. Run 
In connection with the Wade St. R. R. 

BIRMINGHAM, ALA Birmingham St Ry. Co. 

5y m, 4-8 g, 16 lb r, 13 c, 40 m. Pres. Geo. L. Morris, 
Supt., sec. & Treas. W. H. Morris. 

East Lake Land Co. isee New Roads. >. 

Highland Avenue R. R. c,y m, i-8y g, 30 lb r, 5 c, 
2S h. Pres. H. M. Caldwell, Man. W. J. Milner, Supt. 
J. M. Lens, Eng. H. Schoel. Owners, The Ely ton 
Land Co. 

Birmingham & Pratt Mines St. Ry. Co. 5 m, i-Sy, 
g, 16 lb r, 6 c, 30 h. Pres. and Gen. Man. J. A. Vail 
Hoose, sec. A Treas. Wm. Berney. 

BLOOMFIELD, N. .1.— Newark & Hloomfield K. 
R. (See Newark, N. J. ) 

BLOOMING TON, ILL.— Bloomington & Normal 
Horse Ry. Co. 5% rn, 4-S}£ g, 36 lb r, 10 c, 60 11. Pres. 
& Proprietor A. H. Moore, Sec. Edw. Sharp. 

BOONE, IA.— Boone & Boonsboro St. Ry. Co. 
1?^ m, 3g, 20 lbr, 3c, 10 h. Pres. L. W Reynolds, 
Treas. Ira B. Hodses, sec. and supt. A. B. Hodges. 

Twin City & Des Moines Klver Motor St. Ry. Co. 
6 m, 20 lbs. r, 3-6 g, 2 motors, 3 c. President & 
Supt. J. B. Hodges, Treas. A. B. Hodges, Sec. 
S. K. Huntsinger. 

BOSTON, MASS.— Boston Consolidated St. Ry. 
Co. 5l>.; m, i-8y g, 4S-50 lb r, 375 c, isoo h. Pres. 
Chas. E~. Powers, Treas. Sam'l Little, Ass. Treas. 
John H. Studley, Jr.. Gen. Supt. Julius E. Rugg. 
Supt. J. H studley. 19 City Square, Charlestown: 
Capital, Sl.700,000. 'Office, Tremont row, cor. Pem- 
berton sq. 7c 

Boston * Chelsea R. R. Co., Pres. W. W. Wheildon; 
Treas. and Clerk, John H. Studley. (Operated by the 
Boston Consolidated St. Ry. Co.) 

Albany St. Freight Ry. Co. .93 m, 4-S}.; g, 90 1Dr, 
noc, noli. Pres. Chas. L. Plerson, Treas. Geo. F. 
Child. Office, 439 Albany st. 

Lynn & Boston. 37 m, i-8y g. 25-48 lb r. 175 c, 
748 h. Pres. Amos F. Breed, Treas. & Sec. E. Francis 
Oliver, Supt. Edwin C. Foster. Office, 214 Broadway, 
Chelsea, Mass., & 13 Tremont row. 

Metropolitan R. R. Co. 83 m, 48 to 54 lb r, 687 c, 
3543 h. Pres. C. A. Richards, Sec. Wm. P. Harvey, 
Treas. Chas. Boardman. Office, 16 Kllby st. 

So. Boston Ry. Co. 16 m. 4-8 y, g, 5o lb r, 199 c, 970 h. 
Pres. Chas. H.Hersey, v. i res h./ra h Baker: Sec. & 
Treas. Wm. Reed, supt. Daniel Coolidge. Office, 715 
Broadway, So. Boston. 

somervllie Horse R. R. Co. (Operated by the Bos- 
ton Consolidated Street Ry. Co.) Pres. Sam'l E. 
Sewail, Treas. & Clerk, J. H. Studley, Jr. Office, 27 
Tremont row. 

Winnlsimmet R. R. Co. 1.95 m, 4-8,V g, 48 lb r, no 
c no h. Pres. Wm. R. Pearmam, Chelsea, Mass. 
Treas. & Clerk, E. Francis Oliver. Office, 13 Tre- 
mont row. 

BRADFORD, PA. — Bradford & Kendall R.R. Co. 
1 y, m, 4-8j^ g, 38 lb r, 3 c, 4 h. Pres. James Brodey, 
sec. Geo. H. Moon, Gen. Man. & Supt. Enos Parsons. 
Capital. $12,0110. 

BBANTI'ORD CAN. 

BRENHAM, TEX Brenham St. R. R Co. 2 m, 

4g. 20 lb r, 3 c, 18 mu. Pres. T. J. Pampell, V-Pres. F. 
Krentzlln, Sec. John A. Randle, Treas. D. C. Glddings 
Man. E. B. Randle. Office, .Gruber Bldg., North st. 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN.— The rtrldgeport Horse 
R.R. Co. 6>rf m, 4-8x g, 42 lb r, 20 c, 90 h. Pres. Albert 
Eames, Sec. & Treas. F. Hurd, supt. B. F. Lashar. 

Bridgeport & W. Strai lord Horse R. R. Co. zy m, 
4-8« g, 45 lb r. 10 c, 40 h. Pres. David F. Hulhster, 
Sec. & Treas. Henry D. Drew, Man. Henry N. 
Beardsley. 

BROCKTON, MASS.— Brockton St. Ry. Co. Uy, 

m, 4-8M g, 35 lb. r, 32 c, 140 h. Pres. W. W. Cross. 
Treas. C. R. Fillerbrown; Supt. H.H. Rogers, Office, 
Main st. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y.-Annex St. Ry.Co. (See new 
roads.) 



The Atlantic Avenue R. K. Co. ot Brooklyn. 2S?4 
m, (leased and owned), g, 50-60 II) r, 297 c, 1169 

h. I'res. W illiam Klchardson, sec. W. .1. Richard- 
son, Treas. Newbery II. Frost, office cor. Atlantic. 
k Third aves J 

Broadway R.R. Co. 12 in, 4-8>, g, 50-60 lb r, 
199 c, 750 h. Pres. Edwin Beers, Sea & Treas. Robert 
Sealey, Supt, Joshua Crandull. Office 21 Broadway, 

E. D. 

Brooklyn Cross Town R.R. Co. 16 m, 4-8^ g, 50-60 lb 
r, 72 c, 413 h. Pres. Henry W. Slocum, V. Pres. Ezra 
B. Tut tie, sec. M. Joust, Treas. John R. ( onnor, 
supt, D. W. Sullivan. Offices 585 Manhattan ave 

Bushw ick R.K. Co. 28 m, i-Hy g, 45-50-60 lb r, 172 c, 
600 n. Pres. Frank Cromwell, v. Pres. Wm. H. Bus- 
ted, Treas. & Sec. S. D. Hallowed, supt, Wm. M Mor- 
rison. Office 22 Broadway, N. Y. 

The Brooklyn. Bushwick M Queens County Kit. 
11 m i-sy g, 42-47 lb r. 41 c, 117 h. Pres. Richard II. 
Green, V. Pres. James W. Elwell, 59 South st. N. V. 
Sec. John D. Elwell, Treas. Wm. w. Greene. 

Brooklyn City R.R. Co. 87 m, 4-8^ g, 45-60-64 lb r, 
835 c, 18 dummies, 3,809 h Pres. Daniel F. Lewis, 

V. Pres. Wm. St. Thomas. Sec. & Treas. : 

Asst. Sec. Francis k. Wrlgley. Offices 8 a 10 

Fulton st. 

Brooklyn city Newtown R.R. Co. 13;'i m, 4-8>.<" 
45-60 lb r, lis c, joo h. Pres. col. John N. Partridge; 
Sec. <v Treas. Duncan B. Cannon; Supt. John L. 
Ileitis. Office cor. DeKalb & Central aves. 

Calvary Cemetery, Greenpolnt & Brooklyn Ry. Co. 

Coney Island and Brooklyn R.R. Co. 18 3-5 in, 45 
lb r, i-sy, g, 103 c, 344 h. Pres. James Jourdan, sec 
Ed. F. Drayton, Treas. John Williams, Supt. W il- 
liam FarrelL Office cor. Smith & Huntington sts. 

Coney Island. Sheepshead Bay & Ocean Avenue 
B. K. Co. 1*i m,4-«K g, 4 c. Pres. A. A. McClemne 
Pres. Daniel Mone, "Sec. John McMahon. Sheepser, 
head Bay, Treas. Horace Valkulyh. Office 16 Bed 
Hook Lane. 

Crosstown Line. Hamilton Ferry to Bridge. 

Grand St. .t Newtown R.R. Co. 13 m, 4-8' . g, 50- 
60 lb r, 72 c, 250 h. Pres. Martin Joost, Sec. a Treas. 
Wm. E. Horwill, supt. Walter G. Howey. office 374 
Kent ave. 

Grand Street, Prospect Park & Flatbush R.R. Co. 
Ilk m, i-sy g, so lb r, 75 c, 220 h. Pres. Jno. L. 
Partridge, Sec. Duncan B. Cannon, Treas. Chas. 
Crelfelds, Supt. Jno. L. Helns. Offices Franklin 
Ave. and Prospect Place. 

Greenpolnt & Lorlmer St. B. R. Co. 5k m. 4-8V g, 
50 lbr, 36 c, 183 h. Pres. Geo. W. Van Alien, sec. 
Wm. B. Wait, Treas. C. B. Cottrell, Supt, chas. K. 
Harris. Office, cor. Nostrand and Park aves. 

Prospect Park & Coney Island R. R. co. 25 m, 
45-50 lb r, 4-8i^ g, 69 c, 214 h. Pres. A. R. Culver 
Treas. A. C. Washington, Sec George H. smith, Eng. 
Supt, R. Schermerhorn, supt. Robert Attlesey. 
Offices 16 Court st, (Leased to Atlantic Ave. R. R. 
Co). 

Prospect Park & Flatbush R.R. 3 m, 4-8^ g, 34 
lb r. 70 c, 360 h. Pres. Loftls Wood, Sec. & Treas. 
Sam'l PurkhlH, Supt. Loftls Wood. Offices 45 Broad- 
way. 

South Brooklyn Central R.R. Co. 8 1 , m, 4 $y g, 60 
lb r, 42 c, 193 h. Pres.Wm. Richardson, Sec. Wm. J. 
Richardson, Treas. N. H. Frost, Supt. James Rud- 
dy. Offices. Atlantic & 3d aves. 

The New WTlliamsburgh & Flatbush R. R. Co. I7>s 
m, 4-S>£ g, 47-50 lb r, 74 c, 255 h. Pres. Geo. w. Van 
Allen, 54 Ann St., New York, sec. W. B. Waitt, 34th 
st. & 9th ave., New York, Treas. C. B. Cottrell, 8 
Spruce St.. N. Y. City, supt. Chas. E. Harris, Nost- 
rand ave. Carroll St., Brooklyn. 

Union Ry. Co (see new roaos.) 

Van Brunt St, & Erie Basin R.R. Co. 3 m, 4-8 ^ 

g, 45 lb r, 7 c, 24 h. Pres. John Cunningham, sec. & 
Treas. Edmund Terry. Offices, 264 Van Brunt st. 

BRUNSWICK, GA Brunswick St. R.R. Co. 

BUFFALO, ILL.— See Mechanicsburg, 111. 

BUFFALO, N. Y.— Buffalo St. R.R. CO. 17% m. 
4-8>£g, 50 lb r, 96 c, 51 j h. Pres. Henry SI. Watson, 
V. Pres. P. P. Pratt, Sec. S. S. Spauldlng, Treas. W. 
H. Watson, Supt. Edward Edwards. 

Buffalo East Side St. R.R. Co. 28 7-8 m, 4-8^ g, 42 
lb r, 47 c, 218 h. Pres. S. S. spauldlng, v. Pres. Joseph 
Churchyard, Sec H. M. Watson. Treas. W. H. Wat- 
son, Supt. Edward Edwards, office 346 Main st, 

BURLINGTON, IA.-Burllngton City R.R. Co. 
21., m, 4-8)^ g, 15-20 lb r, 9 c, 22 h. Pres. John Patter- 
son, sec. & Slan. C. T. Patterson, office 1401 Sum- 
mer st. 

Union St. Ry. Co. 8y m, 4-8^' g, various r, 19 c, 85 

h. Pres. Geo. E. Rust, sec. & Supt. F. G. Jones. 
BURLINGTON, VT.— Winooskl & Burlington 

Horse By. Co. 3ym.i-8g, 25 lbr, 7 c, 24 h. Pres. 
W. A. Woodbury, V. Pres., F. C. Kennedy, Supt, K. 
B. Walker. Treas. L. E. Woodhouse, Clerk, c. w. 
Walls. Office, Winooskl ave. 

CAIRO, ILL.— Cairo St. Ry. Co. 2 111, 3-6 g, 25 lb 
r. 3 c, 9 h. Pres. J. A. Goldstlne, V-Pres. H. Bloms, 
Supt. £ Treas. Thos. Lewis, Sec H. Schulze. 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS.-Cambrldge B. R. Co.51-59 
m, 4-8^ g, 50 lb r, 255 c, 1,428 h. Pres. Prentiss Cum- 
mlngs, Treas. & Clerk Franklin Perrin, Exec. Com. I. 
SI. Spelman, P. Cummlngs, O. S. Brown, Clerk of Di- 
rectors, O. S. Brown. Supt. Wm. A. Bancroft. 

CAMDEN, N. J.— Camden & Atlantic St. Ry. 

Camden Horse R.R. Co. 9 m, 5-1 g, 35-52 lb r, 26 c, 
85 h. Pies. Thos. A.Wilson, Sec. Wilbur F. Rose, 
Treas. & Supt. John Hood. Office 1125 Newton ave. 

CANTON, O.— Canton St. Ry. Co. iy m. 4 g, 28 
lb r, 11 c, 53 h. Pres. & Treas. G. E. Cook, Sec. John 

F. Clark, Supt. O. S. Stanton. Office, 4 E. 7th St. 
CAPE MAY, N. J.— Cape Slay & Sehellenger 

Landing Horse R. R. 
CARTHAGE, MO.— 

CEDAR RAPIDS, IA.— Cedar Rapids & Slarlon 
Ry., 13% m, 4 8H g, 22-28-35 lb r, 11 c, 40 h. Pres. W. 
Greene, v.-Pres. O. T. Richmond, Sec. N. B. Con- 
signy, Treas. C. G. Greene, Supt. Wm. Elson. Office 
11 N. Second st. 

CHAMPAIGN, ILL Champaign R.R. Co. 

Urbana & Champaign St. R.R. Co. (See Urbana.) 

CHATHAM. CAN. 

CHARLESTON, S. C— Charleston Clly Ry. 
Co. 8 >£in, 4-8^ g, 38 lb r, 32 c, 110 h. 1 mu. Pres. 
Jno. S. Rlggs, Sec. and Treas. Evan Edwnrds, Asst. 



148 



Treas. Frank Whilden, Supt. Jno. Mohlenhoff. 
Office 2 Broad st. k 

Enterprise R.K. Co. 15 m, 5 g, 42 lb r. 29 pass, c, 
10 freight c, 95 h. Pres. A. F. Ravenel, Sec. & Treas. 
U. E. Hayne, Supt. T. W. Passallalgue. 

Middle Street Sullivan Island Ky. Co. 2H m, 4-W 
g, 20 lb T r, 7 c, 14 mu. Pres. B. Callaghan, Sec. & 
Treas. Frank F. Whilden, Supt. B. Buckley. Office 2 
Broad st. 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN. — t hattanooga St. K. 
It. co. 5y m, 4-8% g, 25-45 lb r, 12 c, 54 h. Pres. and 
Treas. J. H. Warner, Sec. C. It. Gasklll. 

CHESTER, PA. — i hester St. Ky. Co. 7% m, 5-2)4 

g, 47 lb r, 14 o, 06 n. Pres. Richard Peters, Jr., Treas. 
sam'l H. Seeds, Sec. & Manager E. M. Cornell. 

CHICAGO, ILL.-Chicago City Ky. Co. 90 m, 4- 
8)4 g, 45 63 lb r, R97 c, 1,600 h, cable doing work of 2,500 

h. Pres. C B. Holmes, sec. 11. H. Windsor, Treas. 
T. C Pennington, Supt. C. B. Holmes, office 2,020 
State St. „ ,„ 

( 'hlcago West Division Ky. Co. 45' 4 m, 4-8% g. *> 
r, 688 c, 3,825 h. Pres. J. it. Jones, sec. George L. 
Webb, supt. De Witt C. Cregler. Office, 59 State st. 

Chicago & Hyde Park St. — m, — g, — lb r, — c, 
— h. Pres. Douglas S. Clarke. 

crosstown Pass. Ky. Co. (See New Koads.) 

North Chicago City R.K Co. 45 m, 4-8% g, 45 lb r, 
375 c, 1,800 h. Pres. & Gen. Supt. V.C. Turner, V. 
Pres. Chas. T. Yerkes, Sec. & Treas. Hiram Crawford, 
Asst. Supt. Fred L. Threedy, Supt. Horse Dept. 
Kobt. Atkins, Purch. Agt. John W. Roach, Master 
Mechanic J. Miller. 

CHILLICOTHE, O.-Chillicothe St. R.R. Co. 
l'^-m, 3g, 16 1br, 7 c, ion. Pres. E. P. Safford, 
sec. A. E. Wenis, Treas. William Polanel, Supt. Ewel 
Mc Martin. 

CINCINNATI, O.— Cincinnati Inclined Plane Ky. 
Co. 6)4 m, 5-2% g, 43 lb r, 25 c, 140 h. Pres. oeo. a. 
smith, sec. & supt. James M. Doherty, Tr. J. S. Hm, 

Cincinnati st. Ky. Co. 96m, 5-2 g,42-52 lb r,250 c, 2,000 
li. Pres. Jno. Kilgour. V. Pres. Albert G. Clark, 
Treas. It. A. Dunlap, sec. & Auditor, Jas. A. Coliius, 
supt. Jno. Harris, Pur. Agt. B F. Haughton. Office 
second floor of Apollo Building. 

Columbia & Cincinnati St. K.K. Co. 3% m, 3 g, 40 
lb r, 3 c, 6 dummy c. Pres. & Auditor C. H. Kilgour, 
v. Pres. John Kilgour, Treas. & Sec. A. H. Meier, 
Mt. Lookout, o. supt. J.J. Henderson, Mt. Look- 
out, O. Office Station C. 

Mt. Adams A Eden Park Inclined R.R. Co. 3% m, 
5-2% g, 42 lb r, 40 c,3 20 h. Pres. & Treas. J. p. ker- 
per, Sec. J. It. Murdock, Supt. Chas. Whltten. 

So. Covington & Cincinnati. (See Covington, Ky.) 

CLARKWV1LEE, TENN — Clarksvllle St. Ky. 
Co. 2 m, 4-s% g, 16 lb T-r, 4 c, 10 mu. Pres. John F. 
Shelton, Sec; & Treas. John W. Faxon. Capital, 
$6,250. Office, Farmers' & Merchants' Nat. Bank. 

CLEVELAND, O.— The Brooklyn St. R.R. Co. 12% 
m, 4-8% g, 52 lb r, 70 c, 102 h. Pres. Tom. L. Johnson, 
V. Pres. A. J. Moxham, Sec. J. B. iioefgen, Treas. 
John McConnell, Sunt. A. L. Johnson, office 1,301 
Pearl st. 

Broadway sc Newburg St. R.K. co. 11.4 m, 4-8'.. g, 
13 lb r, 26 c, 165 h. Pres. Joseph Stanley, V. pres. 
II. E Andrews, Sec. & Treas. E Fowler, Supt, J. J. 
Stanley. Office 1373 Broadway. 

Superior St. R.R. Co. 15 m. 4-8% g, 45 lb r, 46 c, 
225 h. Pres. Frank lie H. Robison, V. Pres. John 
Koch, Sec, Treas. & Supt. M. S. Koblson, Jr. 

The East Cleveland K.K. Co. 20% m, 4-8% g, 45 1b 
Kteel r, 110 c, 570 h. Pres. A. Everett, V-Pres. & 
M. C. 15. Chas. Wason, Sec. & Treas. H. A. Everett, 
Supt. E. Duty. Offices, 1154 Euclid ave. 

Woodland Avenue & West Side St. R.K. Co. 40 m, 
4-8% g, 43-43 lb r, 128 c, 6u5 h. Pres. M. A. Hanna, V. 
Pres. C. F. Emery, Sec. & Pur. Act. J. B. Hanna, 
Gen. Supt. George G. Mulhern. Office, cor. Pearl 
and Detroit stS. 

South side St. It. R. Co. 3% m, 3g. 40 lb r, 8 c, 60 
h. Pres. Tom L. Johnson Supt. A. L. Johnson, Sec. 
■K Treas. J. B. Hoefgen. Office 1301 Pea'-lst. 

St. Clair Street Ry. Co.— m— g,— lbr— c,— Pres. Chas 
Hathaway. 

CLIFTON, CAN. — Niagara Falls, Weslv Park 
and Clifton Tramway Co. 3)4 m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, ft c, 
40 h. Pres. J. H. Mooney, 280 B'way. N. Y. Treas. 
John N. Hay ward, 52 B'way, N.Y. Sec. John H. 
Bache, Niagara Falls, Ont. 

CLINTON, IA.— Lyons & Clinton Horse R.R. Co. 
(See Lyons.) 

COLUMBIA, S. C Columbia St. Ry. \M m, 

4-8)4 g, 30 lbr, 6 c, ish. Pres. J. s. Pierson, New 
York, v. Pres. H. at. Pierson, New York, Treas. W. 
K. Lawton, New York, Sec. E. M. Cole, 32 Liberty st. 
New York. Capital, $50,000. 

COLUMBUS, GA.— Columbus St. R.R. Co. 3 m, 
4-8% g, 16 lb r, 6 c, 25 h. Pres. Cliff B. Grimes, Sec. 
L. G. Schnessler, Treas. N. N. Curtis, Supt. J. A. Ga- 
bourgh. 

COLUMBUS, O.— Columbus Consolidated St. R.R. 
Co. 19 m, 5-2 g, 30-52 lb r, 92 c, 350 h. Pres. A. Roda- 
ers, V. Pres. H. T. Chittenden, Sec. & Treas. E. K. 
Stewart, Supt. J. H. Atcherson. 

Glenwood & Greenlawn St. R.R. Co. 4% m, 3-6 g, 
24 lb r, 11 c, 19 h. Pres. A. D. Rodgers, V. Pres. B. S. 
Brown, Sec. R. R. Ri'kly, Trens. S. S. Rlckly, Supt. 
Jonas WTllcox. Office 9 S. High st. 

CONCORD, N. H.— Concord Horse R. R. Co. 1% 
m, 3 g,34 lb r, 9 c, 15 h, 2 steam motors. Pres. & Supt. 
Moses Humphrey, Treas. H. J. Crippin, Clerk E. C. 
Hoag. 

CORTLAND, N. Y.— Cortland & Homer Horse Ry. 
Co. 4 m, 4-8% g, 25-30 lb r. 5 c,i5 h, Pres. Chas. H. Gar- 
rison, Troy, N. Y. V. Pres. E. Mudge, Sec. & Treas. 
G. E.Welch, Supt. B.B. Terry. Office 25 N. Main st. 

COUNCIL BLUFFS, IA . — Council Bluffs St. R.R. 

COVINGTON, KY. — So. Covington & Clncinnat 
St. Ry. co. 17?^ m, 5-2% g. 43 lb r, 46 c, 296 h. Pres. 
E. F. Abbott, Sec. J. C. Benton. Treas. G. M. Abbott. 

COVINGTON, GA.— W. C. Clark & Co. isee new 
roads.) 

DALLAS, TEX.— Dallas St. Ry. Co. 4& m, 4-8% 
g, 20-38 lb r, 12 c, 4 h, 72 mu. Pres. wm. J. Keller, Sec. 
Harry Keller, Supt. C. E. Keller. 

Commerce & Ervay St. R.R. 1% m, 4-3)4 g, 20 lb r, 
!"> c. 2* mu. Pres. A. C. Ardrey, Sec, Trea. & Man. H. 
W Keller. 

OANV1LLE, ILL. — Citizens' St, Ry. Co, 4% m, 4 



g, 20 lb r, 8 c, 41 m. Pres. Wm. P. Cannon, V. Pres. 
& Gen. Man. Wm. Stewart, Sec. & Treas. Adam It. 
Samuel. 

DAVENPORT, IA.— Davenport Central St. Ry. 
Co 3 m, 4-834 g, 20lb r, 14 c, 24 h,l5mu. Pres.Whlt. 
M. Grant, V. Pres. W. L. Allen, Treas. J. B. Fldler, 
Su pt. J. W. Howard, Sec. o. S. McNeil. 

Davenport City Ry. Co. 3? 4 m, 4-8% g, — lbr, 14 
c. 46 h. Pres. C. S. Watkins, Sec. and Treas. S. D. 
Bawden. 

DAYTON, KY.— Newport & Dayton St. Ry. Co. 
2 m, 5-2% g, 44 lb r, 9 c, 36 h Pres. & Supt. W. W\ 
Bean. 

DAYTON, O.— Dayton St. R.R. Co. 7% m, 4-8% g, 
44 lb r, 24 c, SO h and mu Pres. J. w. Stoddard, V- 
Pres. H. S. Williams, Sec. C. A. Craighead, Supt. A. 
W. Anderson. 

Fifth St. R. R. Co. 7 m, 4-8% g, 45 lb r, IS c, 58 h. 
Pres. A. A. Thomas, Sec. D. B. Corwln, Treas. R. I. 
Cummin, Supt. J. M, B. Lewis. Office, 7 E. 3d st. 

Oakwood St. Ry. Co. 6 m, 4-8% g, 38 lb r, 14 c, 
56 h. Pres. Charles B. Clegg, Sec. H. V. Perrlne. 

The Wayne & Firth St. R. R. Co. 3% m ,4-8% g, 
38 lb r, 6 c, 30 h. Prts. Geo. M. Shaw, Sec & Treas. 
Eugene Wlnchet, Supt. N. Routzahn. Office, 29 
Wayne st. 

DECATUR, ILL Decatur Horse Ry. Co. 

Citizens' Street R.R. Co. 2 m, 4-8% g, 20 lb T r, 7 c, 
47 h & mu. Pres. D. S. Shellabarger, Sec, Treas. & 
Supt. A. E. Kinney. 

DENISON, TEX.-Denlson St. Ky. Co. 3 m, 

3- 6 g, 16 lb r, 5 c, 22 mu. Pres. C. A. Walterhouse 
supt. s. A. Robinson. 

DENVER, COL.— Denver City Ry. Co. 24m, 3-6 
g, 16 lb r, t4 c, 332 h. Pres. Geo. H. Holt, 10 Wall st. 
New York City, Sec. G. D.L'huiller, 10 wall st., New 
York City, Treas. & Man. G. E. Randolph. 

Denver Tramway Co. 4 m,3-6 g, 16-18 lb r, Pc. Run 
by electricity. Pres. Rodney Curtis, V. Pres. John 
J: Riechman, Sec. Wm. G. Evans. 

I)ES MOINES, IA.— Des Moines St. R. R. Co. 
12 m, 3g, 25-30-38-52 lb r, 18 c, 125 h. Pres. W. Mc- 
Cain, V.-Pres. C. W. Rogg, Sec. F. A. Sherman, Treas. 
G. B. Hippee. 

Dee Moines Broad Gauge St. Ry. Co. Pres. G. Van 
Ginkel, sec. H. c. Teachout, Treas. John Weber. 

Capital City St. Ry. Co. 5 m. 4 8',- g, 6 c, 30 h. 

G. Van Ginkel, Sec. H. C. Teachout, Treas. J. Weber. 
Des Moines & Sevastopol St. Ry. Co (See Sevasto- 
pol, la). 

DETROIT, MICH.— Fort Wayne & Elmwood Ry. 
Co. 9.1m, 4-8% g, 45 lb r, 33 c, 212 h. Pres. H. B. 
Brown, V. Pres. Edward Kanter, sec. N. W. Good- 
win, Treas. E. S. lieineman, supt. Geo. S. Hazard. 
Office, 129 oriswold st. 

Dix Electric Ry. Co. 2% m, 3 c, electric motors. 

Detroit City Ry. 30 m, 4-8>< g, 40-43^ lbr, 130 c, 
700 h. Includes Jefferson Ave. line, Woodward Ave. 
line, Michigan Ave. line, Gratiot Ave. line, Brush St. 
line, Cass Ave. line, Congress & Baker line. Pres. 
Sidney D. Miller, Treas. George Hendrle, Sec. James 
Heugh, Gen. Supt. Robert Bell, M. M. John WllUs. 

Grand River St. Ry. Co. 6)4 m, 4-8% g, 45 lb r, 15 c, 
160 h. Pres. & Treas. Jos. Dalley, Sec. J. W. Dalley, 
Supt. C. M. Dalley. e 

Highland Park Ry. Co. 3 m, 4-8% g, 42 lb r for % 
m in cltv limits, outside 35 lb T r, 2 c, electric motors. 
Pres. and Treas. Frank E. Snow, Sec. F. Woodruff. 
Capital, $50,000. Office, 92 Griswold st. 

DOVER, N. H.— Dover Horse R.R. Co. 5 m, 3 g, 
30 lb r, 4 c, 14 h. Directors, Chas. H. Sawyer, Jas. 
E. Lothrop, C. W. Wlggin, Harrison Halev, Frank 
Williams, Treas. Harrison Haley. 

DUBU«|UE, IA.— Dubuque St. R.R. 7 m, 4-8% g, 
55 lb r, 21 c, 05 h. Pres. J. A. Rhonberg, Sec. & Treas. 

B. E. Llnehan, Supt. J. J. Llnehan. Office Coulier 
ave. 

DULUTH, 3UNN.— Duluth St. Ry. Co. 5% m, 3-6 

g, 32-45 lb r, 18 c, 92 mu. Pres. Sam'l Hill, v. Pres. 
T. P. Wilson, Sec. & Treas. A. S. Chase, Supt. T. W. 
Hoopes. 

EAST OAKLAND, CAL — Oakland, Brooklyn & 
Frultvale R.R. Co. 2 m, 5-6 g,35 lb r,4 c, S6h. Pres. 
& Treas. H. Tubbs, Sec. W. C. Mason, Supt. Jas. 
Dixon. Pur. Agt. J. Reed. Office, 301 Central ave. 

EAST SAGINAW, MICH East Saginaw St. 

Ry. Co. — m, 4-Sxs g, 30 and 43 lb r, 23 c, 70 h. Pres. 
Walter A. Jones, Sec. and Treas. Chas. F. Shaw, 
Supt. A. Bartlett. 

EAST ST. LOUIS, ILL. — East St. Louis St. R.R. 
Co. 

EASTON, PA.— The Easton & So. Easton Passen- 
ger Ry. Co. 1 \ m, 5-2% g, 45 lb r, 4 c, 20 h. Pres. H. 
A. Sage, Sec. & Treas. H. W. Cooley, Supt. Elisha 
Burwell, So. Easton. Capital, $29,562, Office, 34S 
Northampton st. 

The West End Passenger Ry. Co. 1 % m, 5-2 % g, 45 
lb r, 6 c, 20 h. Pres. H. A. Sage, sec. & Treas. H. W. 
Cooley, Supt. Samuel Berry. 

EAU CLAIR, WIS.— Eau Clair St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 

4- 8)4 g, 27 lb r, 16 c, 70 h. Pres. A. G. Bradstreet, 
Ne v Y'ork, v.-Pres. Geo. B. Shaw, Eau Clair, Sec. & 
Treas. Weston Lewis, Gardiner, Me. 

ELGIN, ILL Elgin City Ry. Co. 2 c. Pres. Sec. 

Treas. Supt. & Owner, B. C. Payne. 

ELIZABETH, N. J.— Elizabeth & Newark Horse 
R.R. Co. 14 m, 5-2)4, 4-1 0)4 g, 30 lb r, 24 c, 74 h. Pres. 
& Treas. Jacob Davis, Sec. i Supt. John F. Pritchard. 

ELKHART, IND — Citizens' Ry. Co. 3)4 m, 4-8>f 
g, 30 lb r, 6 c, 30 h. Pres. F. W. Miller, V. Pres. G. 

C. Johnson, Sec E. C. Bickel, Treas. A. R. Burns. 
ELMIRA, N. Y.— The Elmlra & Horseheads Ry. 

Co. 10 m, 4-8)4 g. 25-30-40 lb r, 18 c, 34 h. Pres. & 
Treas. George M. Dlven, V. Pres. Geo. W. Hoffman, 
Sec. W T m. S. Kershner, Supt. Henry C. Silsbee. Offi- 
cers, 212 E. Water st. k 

EL PASO, TEX. —El Paso St. Ry. Co. 6 m, 4-8)4 g, 
20-30 lb r, 18 c, 411 mu. Pres. B. H. Davis, Vice Pres. 
J. F. Cro-by, Treas. C. R. Morehead, Sec. & Supt. 

H. W. Marks. Offices, Seventh st. 
EMPORIA. KAN.— Emporia City Ry. Co. 3)4 m, 

3- 6 g, 20 lb r, 8 c, 24 h. Pres. Van R. Holmes, Treas. 
A. F. Crowe, Sec & Man. J. D. Holden. 

ENTERPRISE, MISS Enterprise St. Ry. Co. 

1 M m, 3-6 g, 24 lb r, 2 c, 6 h. Pres. John Kampe, V. 
Pres. E. B. G aston, Sec. & Treas. J. W. Gaston. 

ERIE, PA.— Erie City Passenger Ry. Co. 7% m, 

4- 8)4 g, 45 lb r, 20 c, 87 n, Pres, Wm. W, Reed, Treas. 



Wm. Spencer, Sec. W. A. Demorest, Supt. Jacob 
Berst. 

EVANSVILLE, IND Evansvllle St. Ry. Co. 14 

m, 4-8 g, 28 lb r, 32 c, 240 mu. Pres. John Gilbert, Sec. 
& Treas. W. S. Gilbert, office, Merchants National 
Bank, a 

FALL RIVER, MASS.— Globe St. Ry. Co. 12 m, 
4-8)4 g> 40-46-47 lb r, 40 c, 160 h. Pres. Frank S. Stev- 
ens, Treas. F. W. Brightman, Sec. M. G. B. Swift , 
Supt. John H. Bowker, jr. 

FAR ROCK AWAY, N. Y.— Village Ry. CO. lm 

4-8)4 g, 47 lb r, 5 c, 10 h. Pres. C. A. cheever, Treas. 
D. L. Haight, Sec. J. S. Armbach, Supt. Rutus Mar 

tlD. 

FITCHBURG, MASS.— Fltchburg St. Ry. Co. 
3K m, 4-8)4 g, 6 c, 31 h. Pres. H. A. Willis, V. Pres. H. 
J. Wallace, Treas. B. F. W r allls, Sec. H. C. Hartweli, 
Supt. Wesley W. Sargent. 

FORT SCOTT, KAN.— Bourbon County St. Ry 
Co. 1 m, 4 g, 22 lb r, 2 c, 4 m. Pres. Isaac stadden, 
V. Pres. BenJ. Flies, Sec. Wm. Perry, Treas. J. H. 
Randolph. 

FORT SMITH, ARK.— Fort Smith St. Ry. Co. 

2 m, 3-6 g, 28 lb r, 5 c, 16 mu. Pres. Sam'l M. Loud 
Sec. & Treas. Geo. T. Sparks. 

FORT WAYNE, IND.— Citizens" St. R.R. CO. 

FORT WORTH, TEX.— Fort Worth St. Ry. Co. 
7)4m, 4g, 25-38 lbr, 16c, 73m. Pres. K. M. Van- 
zandt, Treas. W. A. Huffman, Acting Sec & Gen. 
Man. S. Mlms, Supt. J. T. Payne. 

FRANKFORT, N. Y.— Frankfort & Illon Street 
Ry. Co. 254 m, 5 g, 4 c. Pres. A. C. McGowan, Frank- 
fort, Sec. D. Lewis, Ilion, Treas. P. Remington, Illon, 
Supt. Fredk. Gates, Frankfort. 

FREDONIA, N. Y. — Dunkirk & Fredonla R.R. Co. 
3)4 m, 4-10 g, 25 lb r, 5 c, 9 h. Pres. Wm. M. McKlns- 
try, Sec. & Treas. M. N. Fenner, Supt. Z. Elmer 
W T heelock. 

FREEPORT, ILL Freeport St. Ry. Co. i% m. 

Pres. Jacob Krohn, v.-Pres. F. C. Piatt, Sec. John li. 
Tavlor, Treas. W. G. Barnes, Supt. a Gen. Man. G 
D. CUnger. 1 

FULTON, N. "V Fulton & Oswego FallsSt. Ry 

Co. 6,000 it, 4 8)4 g, Gibbon's metallic stringer and 
r, 4 c, 12 h. Pres. J oseph Walker, Jr., V. Pres. N. N. 
stranahan, Sec. and Treas. Chas. Lyman. Capital, 
$15,000. Office, 15 Broad st,, New York. 

GAINSVILLE, FLA. — Gainsville St. Ry. 

GAINSVILLE, TEX. — Gainsville St. Ry. Co. 2)4 
m, 3-6 g. 17 lb r, 4 c, 12 h. Pres. C. N. Stevens, V 
Pres. J. T. Harris, Sec. & Treas. F. R. Sherwood. 

GALESBURG, ILL.— College City St.Ry.Co. 5 
m, 4-8)4 g, 18-20-36 lb r, 7 c, 20 h. Pres. L. W. San- 
born, v.-Pres. A. S. Hoover, Supt. &Sec. Geo. S. Clay- 
ton. 

GALVESTON, TEX.— Galveston City R.R. Co. 
25 m, 4-8)4 gi 30 lb r, 80 c, 225 mu. Pres. Wm. H. Sin- 
clair, Sec* & Treas. T. J. DeMerritt. Supt. M. J. Kee- 
nan. Office, cor. Twenty- first & I sts. 

Gulf City St. Ry. & Real Estate Co. 15 m, 4 g, 20-30 
lb r, 30 c, 90 mu. Pres. J. H. Burnett, Sec. <fe Treas. 
F. D. Allen. 

GLENS FALLS, N. Y.— Glens Falls, Sandy Hill 
& Fort Edward St. R. R. Co. Pres. Henry Crandali. 
Sec. & Treas. T. S. Coolldge, Supt. Albert V. Brayton, 

GLOUCESTER, MASS.— Gloucester City R. It. 

4 m 4 6 g, 35 lb r, 10, c, 90 h. Pres. Morris C. Fletcher. 
V.-Pres. Walter A. Jones, Sec. D. G. Penrson, Tres. 
F. W. Homans. Office, Railroad ave. 

Gloucester St. Ry. Co. Pres. & Supt. Morris O 
Fitch, V. Pres. Walter A Jones, Treas. Francis W 
Homans, Sec. David S. Presson. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.— Street Ry. Co. Of 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 14)4 m, 4-8)4 g- 25-40 lb r, 29 c, 
190 h. Pres. W. J. Hayes, Cleveland, O., V. Pres. L. 
H. Wlthey, Grand Rapids, Treas. C. G. Swensberg, 
Grand Rapids, Sec I. M. Weston, Grand Rapids, Supt. 
A. Bevler, Grand Rapids. Office, cor. Washington & 
Indiana sts. 

GREENBUSH, N. Y. — North & East Greenbush 
St. Ry. Co. 1 % m. 4-8 \ g, 4 c, 12 h. Pres. & Treas. 
A. Bleekerbanks, Supt. J.Gascolgne. 1 

GREEN CASTLE, IND.-Green Castle City St. 
Ry. Co. 2 m, 4-8)4 g, 23 lb r, 3 c, 12 h. Pres. & Supt. D. 
Rogers, Sec. James S. Nutt, Treas. Ralph Rogers. 

GREENVILLE, S.C.— Greenville City Ry. Co.l m 

5 g. — lb r, 5 c, 20 h. Proprietors, Gllreath x. Harris. 
HALIFAX, N.S.— Halifax St Ry. Co. (Llm.) 7 m, 

4-8)4 g, 45-60 lbs. r, 15 c, 65 h. Pres. John Bothwell, 
Sec. & Treas. H. K. Adams. Supt. John C. Conlan . 
Offices, Room 39, Drexel Building, New York, and 
Halifax, N.S. 
HAMILTON. O.— The Hamilton St. Ry. Co. 4 m 

3 g, 28 lb r, 11 c, 12 h. Pres. James F. Griffin, Sec O 
V. Parrlsh, Treas. H. L. Morey, Supt. J. C. Blgelow. 

HANNIP VL, MO.— Hannibal St. Ry. Co. 2 m 
4-8)4 g. 36 lb r, 6 c, 22 h. Pres. & Supt. M. Doyle 
Sec. & Treas. James O'Hern. 

HARRISBURG, PA.— Harrlsburg City Pas- 
senger Ry. Co. 5 m, 5-2)4 g. 42-47 lb r, 26 c, 65 h, 
Pres. II. A.Kelker, V. Pres. Daniel Epply, Sec John 
T. En=ruiager, Treas. R. F. Kelker, Supt. S. B. Reed. 
Capital. ?c.2.500. Office. 27 South 2d st. 

HARTFORD, CONN.— Hartford & Wethersfleld 
Horse R.R. Co. 12 m, 4-8)4 g, 45 lb r, 49 c, 250 h. Pres. 

6 Treas. E. S. Goodrich, Sec. Geo. Sexton. 
HAVERHILL, MASS.— Haverhill & Groveland 

St. Rv. Co. 13.7 m, 4-4)4 g. 30-35 lb r, 36 C. 181 h. 
Pres. Jackson B. Sweet, Treas. John A. Colby. Of- 
fice 3 Water st. 

HELENA, ARK.— Helena St. Ry. Co. 

HELENA, MON. — 1% m, 4-8 'i g, 381b r, 5 c. Pres. 
C. W. Cannon, V.-Pres, J. B. Wilson, Sec. & Treas. L 
A. Walker. 1 

HERKIMER, N. Y.— Herkimer & Mohawk St. 
Ry. Co. 114 m, 4-8)4 g, 25 lb r, 3 C. Pres. J. M. Ans- 
men, Sec. Joab Small, Treas. H. D. Alexander. 

HOBOKEN, N. J. — North Hudson County Ry 
Co. 16)4 m, 4-7 g, 50-60 lb r, 116 c, 630 h Pres. John 
H. Bonn, Sec. F. J. Mallory, Treas. Fredk. Mlckel, 
Union, Supt. Nicholas Goetz, Union. 

HOLYOKE, MASS.-Holyoke St. Ry. Co. 3)4 
m, 4-8)4 g. 35 lb r, 13 c, 45 h. Pres. Wm. A. Chase, 
Treas. C. Fayette Smith, Supt. H. M. Smith. 

HOT SPRINGS, ARK.— Hot Springs R.R. Co. 
3 m, 4 g, 25 lb r, 11 c, 30 h. Pres. S. w. Fordyce, Sec 
C E. Maurice, Supt. J. L. Butterfleld. 

HOUSTON, TEX.— Houston City St. Ry. Co, 14 



January, 1881. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



149 



RUFUS MARTIN 8t CO., 

13 Park Row, New York. 



MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEALERS IN 



STREET RAILWAY SUPPLIES. 



Martin's imp'd change Beit. Street Railway Stationery 




PATENT APPLIED FOR. 



^rics $2.00 net sacla.. 

SINGLE 4 DOUBLE HARNESS, HALTERS, WHIPS 
& BLANKETS, BODY & DANDY BRUSHES, 
CURRY COMBS, SPONGES & CHAMOIS, 



Harness Oils & Composition. 
Lubricants, Oils & Greases. 



OF EVERY VARIETY. 

Card Signs and Change Envelopes. 
Conductors' Badges, Numbers, etc. 

WHISTLES. 



Car Trimmings, 

Brake Shoes, 

Fare Boxes, 

Wood Mattings, 

Rubber Mattings 

and Treads, 

Registers, 

Indicators, 

and Punches. 



Correspondence Solicited. 



Send for Prices. 



150 



m, 4-8% g, 20-30-40 lb r, 40 c, 118 m. Pres. Wm. II. 
Sinclair, Galveston, V. Pres. & Gen. Man. H. F. 
MacGregor, Houston, Supt. Henry Freund, Houston, 
Sec. & Treas. E. H. Bailey. 
HUTCHINSON, KAN.— Hutchinson St. Ky. Co. 

2 m, 4 6g, 20 lbr, 4 c, 84 h. Pres. A. L. Forsha, V. 
Pres. John Severance, Treas. S. W. Campbell, sec. 
Fred. A. Forsha. Office, 5 North Main st. 

II. ION, N. Y.— Frankfort & lllon St. Ry. Co. 2% 
m, 5 g, 25 lbr, 5c, 6 h. Pres. A. C. McGowan, v. pres. 
P. A. Skiff, Sec. John A. Giblln, Treas. J. L. McMil- 
lan, supt. J. J. Hannahs. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IN I>. — citizens' St. Ry. Co. 
as m, 4-8% g, 33-38-40-53 lb r, 70 c, 550 mu. Pres. A. W. 
Johnson, Indianapolis, Treas. Tom L. Johnson, 
Cleveland, • O. Sec. a. A. Anderson. Indianapolis, 
Man. W. T. Steele, Indianapolis, Auditor P. wool- 
iridge, Louisville, Kv. office 80 W. Louisiana st. 

JACKSON, MICH.— Jackson City Ry. Co. — m, 
— g, — lb r, 11 c, 40 h. Pres. Hiram H. Smith, Treas. 
Samuel Hopewell, Gen Supt. Henry H. Smith. 

JACKSON, MISS.— Jackson City R. R. 1!<: m, 5g 
3c, 9mu. Pres, P.W.Peoples, sec. & Tr. J.B.Bradford, 

JACKSON, TENN Jackson Street Ry. Co. 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA Pine St. R.R. Co. 2V 

m, 5 g, 25 lb r, 4 c, 18 m. Pres, S. B. Hubbard; V. 
Pres. J. M. Schumacher; Treas. J. C. Greeley; Sec. 
& Man. H. S Ely. 

Jacksonville St. Ry. Co. 2% m, 5 g, 25 R> r, 10 c, 36 
nr. Pres. H. S. Haines, Savannah, Ga., V. Pres. & 
sec. Geo. R. Foster, Treas. W. P. Hardee, Savannah, 
Ga., Supt. G. W. Haines. 

JACKSONVILLE, ILL.— Jacksonville Ry. Co 
Supt. B. F. Slbert. 

JAMAICA, N. V.— Jamaica & Brooklyn R.R. Co. 
10 m, 4-8% g, 56-60 lb r, 89 c, 56 h. Pres. Aaron A. De- 
grauw, Sec. Martin J. Durea, Treas. Monis Fos- 
dlck supt. Wm. M. Scott. 

JAMESTOWN. N. Y. — Jamestown St. Ry. Co. 
4m. 4-8 j< g, 30-42 lb r, 13 c, 39 h. Pres. J. B. Ross, 
V. Pres. F. E. Glfford, Treas. A. N. Broadhead. Supt. 
(J E. Mattby, Sec. & Atty. C. R. Lockwood. 

JERSEY C1TV, N. J.— Jersey « Bergen R. R. 
Co. 28 m, 4-in k, 47-60 lb r, 80 c, 624 h. Pres. Chas. B. 
Thurston, V. Pres. Wm. Keeney, Treas. C. B. Place, 
sec. Warren E. Dennis, Newark, Supt. Thos. M. 
savre. office, l Exchange Place. 

JOHNSTOWN, N. Y. — The Johnstown, Glovers- 
viiie* Klngsboro Horse R.R. Co. 4 m, 4-8% g, 86 lb 
r, 6 c, 16 h. Pres. James Younglove, V. Pres. R. Fan- 
cher, Sec. & Treas., J. Mc Laren. 

JOHNSTOWN, PA fohnstown Pass. R.R. Co. 

7\ in, 5-3 g, 41-43 lb r,13 c. 76 h. Pres. James McMll- 
len, Sec. B. L. Yeagley, Treas. W. H. Rosensleet. Jr., 
Supt. D. ./. Duncan. Capital. $100,000. 

JOLIET, lf.L Jollet City Ry. Co. 3% m, 4-8% 

g, 30 lb Johnson T r, 16 c, 30 h. & mu. Prop. J. A. 
Henry, Supt. A. Blschman, Treas. J. Hulslzer. 

JOPLIN, MO.— 

KALAMA/.OO. MICH Kalamazoo St. Ry. Co. 

3 m, 4-8 g, 35 lb r, 30 c, 50 h. Pres. Fred Bush, v. 
Pres. Wm. Dewing. Sec. & Treas. R. S. Jackson 
Man. J. W. Bovnton. Office, 128 Mainst. 

KANSAS CITY, MO.— Kansas City Cable Ry. 
Co. 8 m, 4-8 g, 45 lb r, 75 c. 1 h, 10 dummy cars. 
Pres. Win. J. Smith, Sec. W. H. Lucas, Eng. Rob 
ert Glllharri, Supt. F. A. Tucker, office, S. E. cor. 
Ninth S Washington sts. 

Corrlgan Consolldaied St. Ry. Co. 20 m, 4-1 g. 3C 
ID r, so c, 350 h. pres. Bernard Corrlgan, Gen. Man. 
Thos. Corrlgan, Sec. Jas. T. Kelley. 

Grand Avenue Kv. Co. « m, 4-8% g, 40 lb r, 25 c. 145 

h. Pre*. C. F. Morse, v. Pies, and Gen. Man. \V. H. 
Holmes, Engineers. Knight <t Benllcon, Auditor, T. 
J. Fry. Supt. C F. Holmes. 

Kansas city Electric Ry. Co. l in. 4 8% g. heavy 
girder r, sc, 4 electric motors (Henry systemv Pres. 
W. W. Kendall. V. Ires. Hugh L. wcElroy. sec. ,t 
Treas Warren Watson. Office, 1139 E. 5th St. 
Capital, jhq.000. 

Kansas city & Kosedale St. Ry. Co. 

Metropolitan St. Ry. Co. IT', m. 4-4-8% g, 6fi c, 
Pt-es. C. F. Morse, v. Pres. Geo. H. Nettleton, sec. 
W. J. Ferry, Treas A. W. Armour. Supt. E. J. Law- 
less. Engineers. Knight &, Bentlcnn, Gen. Counsel 
Pratt, Hauuiback <v Ferrv, Auditor & Cashier, R. J. 
Mccarty. Capital $1,850,000 

KEOKUK. IA. -Keokuk St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 4-8j<j g. 
27 lb steel r, 12 c, 40h. Ives. Jas. 11. Anderson, Sec 
Wm. E. Anderson. 

KINGSTON, NT., CAN. — Kingston St. R.R. 

Co. >i m, 3-6 g, ;< lb r. 10 c, 36 h. Pres. Robert Car- 
son, Sec. & Treas. F. Sargent. Alan. William Wilson. 

KNOXVILLE. TENN.— Knox vllle St. R.li < o. 2 
in. 4-8% g, 22 lb r, 5 c. 2 hacks, 30 h. Pre? . P. 
chamberlain, sec, Treas. Supt. T. L. Seaman. 

Mabry Bell Ave. i Hardee St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 4 8% g, 

4 c, 29 h. Pres. H. N. Hood, Sec. B. L. Smith, Supt. a; 
M*n. M. E. Thompson. 

Market, Sq. & Asylum St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 5 g, 22 lb r, 

3 c, 18 h. Pres. Peter Kern, Sec. W. B. Henderson, 
Treas. W. H. simmonds, Supi. L. o. Rogers." Office, 
148 Gay st. 

LACONIA, N. H Laconla & Lake Village Horse 

R.R. 2Vm, 3g. 34 lbr, 5C, 17h. Pres. A. G. Folsom, 
Treas. Edmund Little, Man. Sela S. Kennlston. 

LA CROSsE, Wis.— La Crosse City Ry. Co. 5 m. 
4-6% g, 45 lb r, is c, 65 h. Pres. B. E. Edwards, V. 
Pres. Geo. F. Gund. Treas. Fred Tillman, Sec. Jas. 
T. Daggart, Supt. i North Division i, Peter Valler. 
Supt. (South Division), Geo. F. Smith. 

LAFAYETTE, iNO.-LaFayette St. Ry. 2% m, 
4-8% g, 35 lb r. 6 c, 38 h. Pres F. B. Caldwell, La Fay- 
ette, Sec. & Treas. E. G. Jones, Decatur, 111., supt. F. 
Greer, LaFavette. 

LAKE CITY, FLA Lake City St. Ry. Co. 

LAMPAsAS SPRLNGS, TEX.— Lampasas City 

Ry. Co. 3J£ m, 4-8% g, 22 lb r, 6 c, 15 h. Receiver, 

Maddox. 

LANCASTER. PA Lancaster & Mlllersville St. 

Ky. Co.— m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 4c. 14 h. Pres. J C. Hager. 
V. Pres. H. S Shirk. Sec. & Treas. Chas. Dennes. 

Lancaster City St. Ry. Co. um, 5-2 g. 38 lb r, 6c, 

4 h. Pres. W. D. Sprecher, Treas. J. H. Baumgard- 
ner. Sec. Thos. B. Cochrane. Man. J. B. Lang. Gen. 
OffUe. 129 North Queen st. 

LARCHMONT, N. Y.— Larchmont Manor Co. \ % 
m, 4-8 g, 25 lb r, 2 c, 10 h, Pres, C, H, Murray, Sec, E. 



E. Flint, Treas. T. H. French, 38 East Fourteenth st. 
N. Y. City, supt. w. H. Campbell. 

LAWRENCE, KAN.— Lawrence Transportation 
Co. 5% m, 4-1 g, 38 lb r, 8 c, 34 h. Pres. H. Tlsdale, 
Sec. W. II. Bangs. 

LAWRENCE, MASS Merrimack Valley Horse 

R.R. Co. 6V m, 4-8% g, 48 lb r, 20 c,70 h. Pres. Wm. A. 
Russell. V. Pres. Jas Walton, Methuen, Clerk & Treas 
James H. Eaton, Supt. A. N. Kimball, Lawrence. 

LEWISTON, ME.— Lewlston & Auburn Horse 
R.R. Co. 10 m, 4-8% g, 32 lb r, 2u c, 60 h. Pres. Frank W. 
Dana, Treas. Charles C. Corbett, Supt. J. E. Fair- 
banks, Clerk, H. O. Little. 

LEXINGTON, KY Lexington City Ry. Co. 8 

m, 4-10 g, 20 lb r, 20 c, 85 h. Pres. & Treas. R. B. 
Metcalfe, V. Pres., Man. &. Sec. Albert Cross, Supt. 
Bert, cross. 

LEXINGTON, MO.— Lexington St. Ry. Co. 

LIMA, O.— Lima St. Ry. Co. 

LINCOLN, NEB Capital City Ry.Co. 4m, 4 8 1-2 

g, 25 lb r, 8 c, 64 h. Pres. & Treas. E. B. Durfee, sec. 
& Supt H. B. Durfeee. 

Lincoln St: Ry. Co. 8 m, 4-8% g, 13 c, 100 h. Pres. 
Frank L. Sheldon, Supt. L. P. Young. 

LITTLE ROCK, ARK.— Little Rock St.Ry. Co.. 

5 m, 5-10 g, 36 lb r, 9c,?0 mu. Pres. T. J. Darragh,Sec. 

6 Tresa. F. C. Reed, Supt. J. A. Garrett. 

Citizens' St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 4-10 g, ^0-25 lb r, 22 c, 80 h. 
Owned and operated by Little Rock Street Railway 
Co. Same offices. 

LOCK PORT, N. Y. (See New Roads.) 

LOGANSPORT, IND.— Logansport Ry. Co. 2 m, 
4g, 28 lb r, 6 c, 29 mu. Pres. Frank. G. Jaques, Sec. 
M. Jaques, Supt. Wm. P. Jaques. Office, Urbana, 111. 

LONDON, CAN.— London St. R.R. Co. 5 m, 4-8% 
g, 30 lb r, 12 c, 30 h. Pres. V. Cronga, Sec. Jas. H. 
F'lock, Supt. Henry Thos. Smith. 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. — Stelnway & 
Hunter's Point R. R. Co. 30 m, 4-8% g, 47 lb r, 68 c, 
225 h. Pres. Wm. Stelnway, stelnway Hall, N. Y. 
City. V. Pres. Henry A. Cassebeer. Jr.., Stelnway 
P. O., Long Island Ciiy, N. Y. Sec. & Treas. Chas. F. 
Trethar, Stelnway Hall, N. Y. Cltv. Supt. Chas. J. 
Campbell. Offices Stelnway Hall, N. Y. 

Dutch Kills & Hunter's Point R.R. — m, — g, — lb 
r, — c, — h Pres, R. J. Gleason. 

Long Island City & Newtown Ry. Co. 4% m, 4-8% g, 
45-55 lb r, 25 c, 60 h. Pres. Isaac Buchannan, N. Y. 
City, Sec. Geo. S. Crawford, Brooklyn, N. Y., Treas. 
Patrick J. Gleason, supt. Michael Conway. Offices 
112 Front St. 

LONG VIEW, TEX Longvlew & Junction St. 

Ry. %m, 3-6 g, 2 c, 4 h. Pres. F. T. Rembert, Sec. 
R. B. Levy, Treas. F. L. Whaley. Supt. C. W. Booth, 

LOS ANGELES, CAL.— Boyle Heights R.R. Co. 

Central R.R. Co. and the Sixth & San Fernando St, 
R.R. CO. 7 m, 3-6 g, 16 lbr, 13 c, — h. Pres. E. T. 
Spencer, Sec. F. X. Palmer, supt. J. A. Falrchlld. 

City & central St. Ry. Co. 4% m, 3-6 & 4-8 g, — lb 
r, 2g cars, 167 h. Pres. I. W. Hellman, Sec. Fred 
Ilarkness. Supt. Wm. Hawks. 

Los Angeles & Allso Ave. St. R.R. Co. 

Main St. a; Agricultural Park Ry. Co. « m, 3-6, g, 
16 lb r. 12 c, 49 h.Pres. W. J. Broderlck, Sec. Arthur 
C. Taylor, Treas. The Farmers and Merchants' Bank, 
supt. Wm Hawks. Office,-6 commercial st. (/ 

Second St. Cable Ry. Co. 6 c and 6 grip p. Pres. 
Jesse Garnell. Sec. k Man. Edw. A. Hall, Eng. and 
Supt. Kibble. 

Temple. St. Cable Ky. Co. 1? 4 m, 3-6 g, 16 lb r, 8 c. 
Pres. P. Beaudry, Sec. f. Woods, Supt. Col. A. H. 
Wands fc 

LOUISVILLE, KY Kentucky St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 

5-2 g, — lb r, 22 c — h. Pres. T. J. Minary, Sec. & 
Treas. Thos. Donlgan. 

Central Pass. R.R. Co. 49 m, 5 g, 52 lb r, 150 c, 750 h, 
Pres. B DuPont, V. Pres. Thos. J. Minerv. Sec. T. C. 
Donnlgan. Office 18 Walnut st. 

Crescent Hill Ry. Co. 

Louisville City Ry. Co. 63 m, 5 g, 58 lb r, 214 c, — 
mu. Pres. Maj. Alexander Henrv Davis, Syracuse, n 
Y., V. Pres. St. John Boyle, sec. & Treas. R. A. Watts, 
supt. H. H. Litteil. 

LOWELL, MASS.— Lowell Horse R.R. Co. 7. 7m, 
4-8% g, 28-33-45 lb r, 33 c. 125 h. Pres. Wm. E. Living- 
ston, Gen. Man. J. A. Chase. 

Lowell & Dracut st. Rv. Co. 

LYNCHBURG, VA. — Lynchburg St. R.R. Co. 

04 m, 5-1 g. 20-26 lb r. 6 c, 31 h. Pres. & Treas. Stephen 
Adams, Supt. William M. Payne. Office 811 Main st. 

LYONS, IA.— Clinton i: Lvons Horse Rv. Co. 4% 
m, 3-8 g. 19-30 lb r. 15 c. 40 h. Pres. D. Joyce, v. 
Pres. & Man. R. N. Rand. 

MACON, GA. — Macon & Suburban St. R.R. Co. to 
m, 5- g, 20 lb T r, 20 c, 90 mu. Pres. John s. 
Branstord, Nashville, Tenn., Sec. and Supt. Jno. T. 
Voss. Office. Elm st. 

MADISON, IND.— Madison St. Ry. o. 2% m, 4 
g. 15 lb r, 7 c, 8 h, 10 mu. Pres. Jacob Wendle, V.Pres. 
Peter F. Robenllus. Supt. & Treas. Chas. F. Tuttle. 

MADISON. WIS.-Madlson St. Ry. Co. 2% m, 3 
g, 23 lb r, 8 c,-7 h, 24 mu. Pres., D. K. Tenney, Sec. 
and Treas. R w Jones, supt. A. R. Kentzler 

MANCHESTER, N. H. — Manchester Horse R.R. 
7m. 3 g, 27-34 lb r, 14 c. 60 h. Pres. S. N. Bell, 
Treas. G. F. Smyth. Clerk J. A. Weston, Supt. A. Q. 
Gage. Office Depot st. 

MAN K A TO, Mf NN. — Mankato St.Ry. Co. 2m, 3-6g, 
27 lb steel r, 3 c, 12 h. Pres. and Man. W. M. Farr, 
Sec and Treas. John C. Noe, Capital, $50,000; office 
313 So Front street. 

MAKSHALLTOWN, IA 3 m, 4 g, 25 lb r, 7 C, 

20 h. Pres. B. T. Frederick, Treas. T. E. Foley, Sec. 
C. C. Gillman. Supt. A. E. Short-hill. 

MARYSVILLE, CAL City Pass. R.R. Co. 

MAYSYIELE, KY Mavsvllle St.Ry. & T. Co. 

3 m, 20 lb r, 4-8% g, 6 c, 32 mu. Pres. L. W. Robertson, 
Sec. & Treas. W. S. Frank. 

MECHANICSBURG, ELL. — Mechanlcsburg & 
Buffalo Ry. Co. Z% m, 3-10 g, 16 lb r, 3 c, 4 mu. Pres. 
J. N. Fullenwelder, Treas. A. T. Thompson, Sec. H. 
Thompson. 

MEMPHIS, ten v. - MmphlsCltvR.R.Co. ism, 

5 g, 38-40 lb r, 80 c, 320 h. Pres. R. Dudley Frayser, 
v. Pres. Thos. Barrett, sec. James Frost, Treas. S. 
P. Read Jr. supt. W. F. Shippey. Office 474 Main-st. 

MERIDIAN, MISS Merldla n St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 

4-8 g, 16 lb T r, 5 c, 17 mu, Pres. Geo. S. Covert, Y, Pres. 



and Sup. J. L. Handley, Treas. J. A. Kelly, Sec. R. M 
Houston. 

MICHIGAN CITY, IND Citizens' St. Ry. 

Co 2 m, 4-8% g. 30 lb. r. 4 e, 16 h. Pres. Wm. G. 
Knight, V-Pres. John Lyons, Sec. Jacob D. Hender- 
on, Treas. Jerry II. Knight. Office West Washing- 
ton st., South Bend, lnd. 

MIDDLETOWN, CONN.— Mlddletown Horse 
R.R. Co. 2 m, 6c, 36 lb. r, 30h. Pres. JobnM. Douglns, 
Sec. & Treas. J. K. Guy, Supt. Joseph Lane, office 
166 Main st. 

MIDDLETOWN, O.— Mlddletown Horse R.R. Co. 

Mlddletown & Madison St. R.R. Co. 2 m, 5 9 g,— r, 4 
c, 8 h, Pres. F. Gunchel, Sec. and Treas. E. W. Gun- 
chei. 

MILLERSVILLE, PA.— Lancaster & Mlllersville 

St. R.R. Co. (See Lancaster, Pa.) 

MILWAUKEE, WIS Cream City R.R. Co. 17 

m, 4-8% g, 27-38 lb r, 74 c, 307 mu. Pres. Wlnfleld 
smith, V. Pres. Christian Preusser, Treas. Ferdinand 
Knehn, Sec.Wm. Damkoehler, Gen. Man. D. Atwood, 
Supt, H. J. C. Berg. h 

Milwaukee City Ry. Co. 30 m, 4-8% g, 27 lb Iron & 
4S lb steel r, 81 c, 410 h. Pres. Peter Mcdeoch, Sec. & 
Treas. Geo. O. Wheatcroft. Office 209 West Water si. 

West Side St. Ry. Co. Owner & Manager, Wash- 
ington Becker, Supt. McNaughton. 

3IINNEAPOLIS, MINN.— Minneapolis St. Ry. Co. 
62 m, 3-6 g, 27-35-45 lb r, 186 c, 1050 h and mu. Pres. 
Thos. Lowry, V. Pres. C. Morrison, Treas. W. W. 
Herrlck. Sec. C. G. Goodrich, Supt. D. W. Sharp. 1 

MOBILE, ALA City R.R. Co. 17% m, 5-2 g, 35 

lb T-r, 68 c, 240 h. Pres. Jno. Magulre, Sec. 1. 
Strausse, Treas. Myer I. Goldsmith, Supt. A. Moog. 

Dauphin & Lafayette Ry. Co. 2 m, 5-2% g, 40 lb 
r, 9 c, 10 h, 12 m. Pres. D.P. Bestor, V. Pres. & Sec.G. 
Y. Overall, Treas. & Acting see. Jas. W. Gray, Pur. 
Agt. & Man. J. B. Robertson. 

Mobile & Spring Hill R.R. Co. 8 m, 5-2^ g, 35 lb r, 
15 c, 35 h, 1 dummy. Pres. Daniel McNeill, Sec. a 
Treas. C. F. Sheldon, Man. F. Ingate. 

MOHAWK, N. Y.-Mohawk & lllon R.R. Co. 
IX m, 4-8%g, 30 lb r, 4 c (contract for motive power). 
Pres. O.W. Bronson, V.Pres. C.W. Carpenier, Sec. H. 
1). Alexander, Treas. R. M. Devendorff, Supt. O. W. 
Bronson. 

MOLINE, ILL.— Moline Central St. Ry. Co. iy, 

m, 4-8i 4 g, 30 lb r, 3 c, 10 h. Pres. P. H. Wessel, V. 
Pres. M. Y. Cady, Sec. W. R. Moore, Treas. C. F. 
Hemenway. 

Moline & Rock Island St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 4-8% g. 20 lb 
r, 8 c, 40 h, 2 steam motors. Pres. & Treas. iugene 
Lewis, Sec. I. M. Buford, Gen. Man. Geo. W French, 
Supt. Jas. Cazatt. 1 

MONTGOMERY, AEA.-Capltal City Electric 
St. Ry. Co. 2 m,2c. Electric motor,.. Pres. E. B.Joseph. 
Gen. Man. J. A. Gaboury, Treas. Thos. E. Hannon, 
sec. Taylor Robert. 

MONTR KAL, CAN.— Montreal City Pass. Co. 2] 
m, 4-8 H g, — lb r, 76 c, 465 h. Pres. Jesse Joseph, V. 
Pres. Alex. Murray Sec. & Man. Ed. Lusher, Supt. T. 
H. Roblllard. 

MOULTRIEVILLE, S. C- Middle St. & Sulli- 
van's Lancing Ky. 2% m, 4-8% g, 20 lb r, 7c 4 h. 
Pres. B. Callahan, Treas. B. Buckley. 

MT. VERNON. N. Y. — Mt. Vernon St. Ry. Co. 

Mount Vernon & East Chester K.K. Co. 3% m,— g, 
— r, 7 c, 30 h. Pres. Wm. A. Butler, V Pres. Thos. 
Nichols, Sec. Jas. T. Byrne, Treas. Benj. L. Welt- 
helmer; office, 261 Broadway, N.Y. 

3IUSCATINE, I A. — Muscatine Clt~ Ry. Co. 8% 
11, 3-6 g, 21 lb r, 7 c, 34 h . & mu. Pres. Peter M us^ r, 
V-Pres. W. Hoffman, sec, T. R. Fitzgerald, 'I less. 
S. M. Hughes. 

iMUSKEGON, MICH.— Muskegon Ry. Co. i% m 
1-6 g-, 20 lbr, 8 c, 17 h, 9 mu. Pres. F. A. Nln s, V. 
°res. Chas. Merriam. Boston, Mass., Sec. Thomas 
Munroe, Treas. G. R. Sherman, Supt. Win. McLaugh- 
lin, a 

NASHUA, N. H.— Nashua St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 3 g, 35 
lbr, 5c, 22 h. Pres, John A. Spalding, Clerk, R. D. 
Barnes, supt. Q. A. ;Woodward. Office, Kinsley st. 

NASHVILLE, TENN.— Nashville & Edgefield 
R.R. Co. Fatherland Street Railway Co. North Edge- 
field and Nashville St. R.R. Co., one management. 

5 m, 5 g, 16-20-32 lb r, 21 c. 100 mu. Pres. Jno. P. White, 
Sec. & Treas. H. B. Stui'blefield, Supt. D.Deadeilck. 

McGavock & Mt. Vernon Horse R.R. Co. 7% m, 5 g, 
16-20-2S-32 lb r, 25 e, 140 h & mu. Pres. John P White. 
V. Pres. B. F. Wilson, Sec. & Treas. II. B. Stubble- 
field, Supt. Dalngerfleld Deaderlck. 

South Nashville St. R. R. Co. 4% m, 5 g, 16-20-32 lb 
r, 10 c, 68 h. Pres. W. M. Duncan.:sec, Treas. & Supt. 
C. L. Fuller. Office cor. so. Franklin and cherry sis. / 

NATICK, MASS.— Natick & Cochltuate St. Ry. 
3 m, 4 8% g, 35 1b r, 7 c, 17 h. Pres. Harrison Har- 
wood, Supt, Geo. F. Keep, Clerk Frank Hayes 

NEW ALBANY, IND.— New Albany St. Ry. Co 

6 m, 4-11% g, 25 lb r, 15 c, 55 h. & mu. Pres. Geo. T. 
Vance, Treas. Letltla V. Vredenburgh, Supt. & Pur. 
Agt. Wm. L. Ttmberlake. Office cor. \ incennes and 
Spring sts. 

NEWARK, N. J.— Newark & Bloomfleld St. 
R.R. Co. Consolidated with Essex Pass. Ry. Co. 

Essex Pass. R.R. 31 m, 5-2J^ g, 47 lb r, 107 c, 702 h. 
Pres, S. S. Battin, Sec. F. F. Klrke, Supt. H. F. 
Totteu. Paymaster, W. L. Mulford. Office. 786 
Broad st. 

Newark & Irvington St. Ry. Co., 7 in, 5-2% g, 47 lb r, 
28 c, 130 h, Pres. S. S. Battin, Sec. W. L. Mulford, 
Supt. H. F. Totten. 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS New Bedford & Fair- 
haven St. Ry. Co. 7% m, 4-8% g, 36-45-50 lb r,428 C, 140 

Pres. Warren Ladd, Treas. & Clerk, A. G. Pierce. 

Acushnet St. R.R. Co., 6m, 4-8% g, 38 lb r. 29 c, 103 
h. Pres. Chas. E. Cook. Sec. & Treas. A. P. Smith. 

NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J.— New Brunswick 
Horse R.R. 4 m, 4-8 <4 g, 40 lb r, 5 c, 20 h. Pres. F. 
M. Delano, Treas. Carroll Sprigg. 

NEWBURGH, N. Y Newburgh St. R. R. Co. 

Pres. D. S. Haines, Sandy Hill. 

NEWBURYPORT, MASS.— Newburyport & 
Amesbury Horse R.R. Co. 6 1-3 m, 12 c, 54 h. Pres. 
W. A. Johnson, Treas. N. H. Shepard, Sec. Geo. H. 
Stevens. Lessee. E. P. Shaw. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN.— Fair Haven & Westvllle 
R.R. Co. 7 m, 4% g, 42 lb r, 23 c, 150 h. Pres. H. B. 
lyes, Sec. $ Tr. t, Candee, Supt. Walter A- Graham. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



151 



New naven Sz Centrevllle Horse R.R. Co. 2% m, 
4-8% %< 42 lb F, 4 c, 30 h. Trustee Cornelius Plerpont. 

New Haven & West llaveu U.K. Co. (See West 
Haven). 

State Street Horse R.R. Co. 2# m, 4-8 g, 43 lb r, 4 c, 

40 n. Pres. C. A. Warren, Sec. & Treas. C. C. Blatclieu. 
Tlie Whitney Ave Horse ny. 2% m, 4 8% g, 25 lb r, 

3 c, 23 h. Pres. Geo. H. Watrous, Sec. George D. 
Watrous Trei s. E 1 Wultney, Jr. 

NEW MARi-BOico, O.— Kankapot R.R. Co. 

NEW OUI.EANS, LA.— Canal «fc Claiborne St. 
R.R. Co. 13 m, 5-2 % g, 37 lb r, 40 c, 200 h. Pres. E. J. 
Hart, sec. & supt. <ios H. Deorange. 

Crescent city R.R. Co. 26 m, 5-2% g, 35-45 lb r, 90 c, 
400 h. Pres. Frank Roder, Sec. & Treas. Jno. J. Ju- 
den, Supt. A. v. smith. 

New Orleans St. R.R. Co. 

Orleans R.R. co. — m, — g, — lb r, 32 c, 140 h. 
Amu. Pres. Sz supt. II. Larqule, Sen. & Treas. P. 
Cougot. Office, cor. White & Laliarpe sts. 

St Charles St. R.R. Co. 15 m, 5-2?; g, 35 lb r, 60 c, 
366m. Pres. Sz Supt. Aiden McLellan, Sec. V.Kivlere. 

New Orleans Sz carrollton R.R. Co. 8 m, 4-8% g, 30- 

45 lb r, 65 c, 200 h, 19 engines. Pres. Wm. Benthuy- 
sen. Sec. Walter P. Crouch, Supt. c. V. Halle. 

New Orleans City Sz Lake R.R. Co. 62 m, 6-2% g, 

46 lb r, 200 c, 39 coaches, dummy engines, 800 mu. 
Pres.J.A.Walker.Sec.W.E. Leverich, supt. F. Wlntz. 

NEWPORT. KY.— Newport St. U.K. Co. 
NEWTON, MASS.— Newton St. Ry. Co. (See 
New Roads.) 

NEW YORK, N.Y.— Ninth Ave. R.R. Co. 16 m, 
*-8% g, 60 lb r, 52 c, 530 h. Pres. W. n. Hays, Sec. Sz 
Treas. James Affleck, supt. Ileman 13. Wilson. Offi- 
ces, Ninth Ave., cor. 54th St. 

Broadway Sz Seventh Ave. R.R. Co. 16 m, 4-8% g, 
47-60 lb r, 150 c, 1,350 h. Pres. Henry Thompson, Sec. 
& Treas. Thos. B. Kerr, Supt. Henry A. Newell. 
Office 761, seventh Ave. 

Central Crosstown R.R. Co. 5-22 m, 4-8% g, 52 lb r, 
45c, 241 h. Pres. Geo. S. Hart, V. Pre--. A. Cammack, 
sec. & Treas. Milton I Masson, Office 365 Ave. A. 

Central Park, North Sz East River R.R. Co. 19 m, 
4-8% g, 601br, 162 c, 1,225 h. Pres. J. H. Scrblner, 
V. Pres. C. D. Wyman, Sec. H. Scrlbner, Treas. J. L. 
Valentine, Supt. M. W. A. Harris. Office, Tenth 
Ave.. 53d. & 54th. St. 

Chambers St. Sz Grand St. Ferry R. R. Pres. H. 
Thompson. 

Christopher & Tenth St. R.R. Co. 5 m, 4-8 sr. 45 lb 
r, 47 c, 29U h. Pres. Jacob Sharp, Treas. W. T. Hatch, 
Sec. Sz Supt. G. W. Lynch, office. 16-; Christopher st. 

Dry Dock, East Broadway Sz Battery it. R. Co. 18^ 
m, 4-8% g, 60 lb r, 187 c, 1,132 h. Pres. William White, 
Auditor E. T. Landon, Sec. & Treas. Richard Kelly, 
Sunt. Fred F. White. Offices, 605 Grand st. 

Eighth Ave. It. R. Co. 20 m, 4-8% g, 60 lb r, 112 c, 
1155 h. Pres. W. II. Hays, Sec. Sz Treas. James Affleck, 
Supt. H. B. Wilson. Office, Eighth Ave. Sz 50th st. 

Forty-second si reet & Grand Street Ferry R. It. Co. 
lay m, 8-4 g, 64 lb r, 50 c, 500 h. Pres. Chas. Curtis, 
Sec. & Treas. E. S. Allen, Supt. John M. Calhoun, 
office, 653 \V. 42fl st. 

Forty-second St., Monhattanvllle and St. Nicholas 
Avenue Ry. co. 185i m. Pres. D.in'l D. Conover, 
Sec. an 1 rreas, John I'. Rooerts, Supt. *bram L. 
smith. Offices 42d street and 7th aves. 

Harlem m idge, Morrlsanla Sz Fordham Ry. 16.37 m, 

4- 8% g, 45-60 br, 65c,3lsh. Pres. and supt. U. sprat- 
ley, V. Pres. Itlchard M. Hoe, Sec. Sz Treas. wm. 
Caudwell. Office, North Third Ave. near 170 St. 

Houston, U'e-i street Sz Pavonla Ferry it. H. Co. 
1 1 2-3 m, 4-8j< sr. no ib r, 50 c, 450 h. Pres. Rich, Kelly, 
sec. & Treas Daniel B. Hasbrouek. Office,415 E.10 st. 

Jerome Park U.K. i 2-3 m, 4-8}<, g, 50-56 lb r. Pres. 
Leonard 1 M. Jerome. Sec. Fred A. Lovpcraft, Treas. 
Theodore Moss. Offi e, cor. 5th. Ave. & 22d st. 

New York City st. Ry, Co. 10 m, [not In operation]. 
Pres. Loomis ... White, Sec. W. L. McOorkle, Treas. 
Wm. L. Skidmore. 

New York & Harlem R.H. Co. 17% m, 4-8'>. g, 60-75 lb 

r. 161 c, 1,560 h. Pi es V. Pres. & 

sec. Cornelius V'anderblit, Treas. Ed. V. W. Rossi 
i>t. supt. Alfred Skitt, Pur. Agt. P. s. Bemls. 

Sixth Ave. H It. Co. 9% m, 4-8 v. g, (50 lb r, 127 c, 
1296 h. Pres. Prank Curtis*, sec. and Treas, Henry 
S. Moore, Supt, Edw E. Moore. Office, 75Sflth Ave. 

south F rrv liv. Co. 1 > 4 m. 4 Sj< sr, 60 lb r, 13 c 

41 h. Pres. Henry Hart, sec. Wm. N. Cohen. Treas, 
Albert J. Ellas, Supt. Chas II. Meeks. Office 20. 
Whitehall sr. 

st. Nicholas & Crosstown R. R. Co. (See New 
Roads, i 

The Second Ave. It. R. Co. 23m, 4 8 y, g. 60 11) r, 316 
9c irs, 1750 h. Pres. W. Thorn, V Pres. J. Wadsworth, 
Sec. & Treas. ,t. p. underbill. Office Second Ave. cor. 
96th si 

The Third Ave. It. R. Co. 16 m main line, 6% m 
10th A vp. cable line. 4 m 125th street cable line, 4" Hid 
g, 60 & 74 1b r, : 3l8c, 2150 li. Pres. Lewis Lvon. 739 
Madison ave., V. Pres. Henry Hart, 110 Tribune 
Building, sec. Alfred Lazarus, 136 w. fiist st,, Treas, 
John Beaver, 211 v,. 112th st., supt. John ri. Roneit- 
son, 307 E. R5i h st. 

Twentv-thlrd St. R.R. Co.14 m, 4Sij g, 54 lbr, 102 c, 
692 h. Pres. Jacob Sharp, Sec. Thos. H. McLean, 
62™west P 23d May ' Act - Su PV George Ferry, office 

NIAGARA PALI,S, N. Y. — Niagara Falls Sz. Sus- 
pension Bridge Ry. Co. 3% m, 4-8% g, 38-42 lb r, 8 
c, 36 h. Pres. uenj. Flagler, Sec. W. J. Mackay, Treas. 
A. Schnetlkopf. 

NORFOLK, VA.-Norfolk Sz Citv R.R. Co. 3Vm, 

5- 2 g, 44 lbr, 18 c, 65 n. Pres. John B. Whitehead, 
Treas. II. C. Whitehead. Supt. E. W. Snvage. 

NORTH ADAMS, MASS.-Hoos ic Valley St. Ry. 
Co. 6 m. 4-8^g. 40 lb. r, 10 c. 29 h, 2 steam motors. 
Pres. Win. B. Baldwin. V-Pres. W. Cronkhlte. sec. Sz 
ireas. s. P rootor Thayer, Manager G. W. Lincoln. 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. — Northampton St. 
Ry. Co. 3% m, 4-8% g, 32 lb r, 7 c, 26 h. Pres. Oscar 
Edwards, Sec. M. H. Spauldlng, Treas. Sz Sup. E. C. 

NOItWALK, CONN. — NorwalK Horse R.R. Co. 
2 m, 4 10 g, — lb r, 7 c, 20 h. Pres. James W. Hyatt, 
JX?h£% c - m wln G - H °y Su P- J ames W. Hyatt. 
NORWICH, CONN.— Norwich Horse R.R, Co, 



OAKLAND, CAL.— Alameda, Oakland Sz Pied- 
mont it. It. 

Berkley Villa R.R. 

Broadway Sz Piedmont St. R.R. Co. 

Fourteenth St. lt.lt. Co. 6 m. 5 g, 20-30 lb r, 6 c,— 
h. Pres. Sz Supt. Walter Blair, Sec. P. J. Van Lobea, 

Oakland R.R. co. 

Oakland, Brooklyn & FruitvaleR. R. Co. (See East 
Oakland.) 

OGDEN CITY, UTAH.— Ogden City Ry. CO. 
3 m, 4-8% g, 20 lb r, 4 c, 21 h. Pres. L. W. Shurtle, 
Ogden city, V. P. & Supt. O. P. Arnold, Salt Lake 
City, Sec. & Treas. H. S. Young, Ogden City. 

OKDENSBURG.N.Y.-OgdensburgSt lty.Co.5m. 
4-8 '-i g, 2i lb. r, 6c, 18 h. Pres. W. II . Daniels, Treas. 
V. A. Egert, sec. W. H. Daniels. 

"t-EAN, N. Y.— Olean St. Ry. Co. 1% m, 3-6 
25 lb r, 3 0, 8 h. Pres. M. B. Fobes, sec. Sz Treas. M. W. 
Barse. 

OMAHA, NEB.— Omaha Horse Ry. Co. 15 m, 

4-8^ g, 35 lb r. 40 c, 303 h. Pres. Frank Murphy, V. 
Pres. Guy C. Barton, Treas. W. W. Marsh, Supt. W. 
A. Smith. Cable (see new roads.) 
Omaha Tramway Co. 

ONEIDA VILLAGE, N. Y Oneida Ry. Co. 2 

m, 4-8% g, 47 lb r, 3 c, 6 h. Pres. Jerome Hlckox, 
Sec. Sz Treas. W. R. Northrup, Supt. Chas. Bonta. 

OSHKOSH, WIS Oshkosh St. It R. Co. 3% m, 

4-8% g, 27 lb r, 9 c, 24 h. Pres. Leander Choate, V. 
Pres. F. Zentner, Sec. Sz Treas. J. Y. Hull, Sup. F. L. 
Thompson. 

OSWEGO, N.Y.— Oswego St. Ry. Co. 2% m, 4-8% 
g, 45 lb r, 3 c, 23 h. Pres. Jas. F. Johnson, V. Pres. 
R. J. OUphant, Sec. Haynes L. Hart, Treas. Robt. G. 
Post, Gen. Man. James O'Connor. 

OTTAWA, ONT Ottawa city Passenger Ry.Co. 

3 m, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 9 c, 40 h. Pres. Thomas C. Keet- 
er, V. Pres. R. Blackburn, Sec. James D. Fraser. 

Ottawa St. Ry. Co. 

OTTUMWA, IA.— Ottumwa St. R.R. Co. 2 m, 3-6 

g, 27 lb r, 4 c, 2 h, 14 mu. Pres. J. M. Hedrlck, Sec. & 
Treas. H. L. Hedrlck, Supt. C. M. Hedrlck. 

Mineral Springs St. Ry. 1 m, 3% g, 16 lb T r, I c 4 h. 
Owner, L. E. Gray. 

PALATKA, FLA Palatka St. Ry. Co. 

PARIS. TEX Paris Ry. Co. 1% m, 4-8% g, 22 lb 

r, 2 pass. 4 ft c, 16 mu. Pres. I. M. Daniel, Sec. Geo. M. 
Daniel. Treas. D. J. Latimer, Supt. C. G. Cavlness. 

PATERSON, N. J.— Paterson Sz Passaic R.R. Co. 
7 m, 4-10 g, 33 lb r, 16 c. 24 h. Pres. John N. Ter- 
hune, Treas. John I. Brown, Sec. R. S. Brown, Man. 

Pur. Agt. Ambrose T. Klng r Supt. M. O. Rourke. 

Paterson City R.R. Co. 6% m, 4-8% g, 35 Ib r, 12 c, 
SI h. Pres. Garrett Planten, Treas. Helmas Romalne, 
sec. A Ibert A. Wilcox. 

PAWTUCKET, It. I.— Pawtucket St Ry. Co. 8 
m, 54 lb r. 4 g, 24 c, 100 h. Pres. A. B. Chace, V-Pres. 
& GenT. Man. D. F. Lengstreet, Treas. E. N. LUtle- 
fleld. office Broad St. 

PENSACOLA, FLA.— PensacolaSt. Ry.Co. 

PEORIA, ILL.— Central City Horse Ry. Co. 4% 
hi, 4-8% g, 40 lb r, 60 c, 135 h. Pres. H. It. Woodward, 
,<ec. M. Ptlefler, Treas. Elliot Callender, Supt. John 
Strong. 

Fort Clark Horse Ry. Co.— ni,— g,— lb r,— c,— h.— 
Pres. J. H. Hall. 

Peoria Horse Ry. Co. 7% m, 4-8% g, 40 lb r, 63 c, 
140 h. Pres. H. Woodward, Sec. M. Pfelffer, Treas. 
H. N. Wheeler. Supt. John Strong. 

PETERSBURG II, VA.— Peiersburgh St. Ry. Co. 
3? 4 ' in, 4-8% g. 42 ib r, 9 c, 44 h. George Beadle, Prop, 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. —Citizens Pass. Ry. Co. 
10% m, 5-2 g. 45 47 lb r, 92 c, 420 h. Pres. John Mc- 
Carthy, Sec. & Treas. J. J. Adams, Sup. SamT cilne, 
Office, n w cor, I2thand Susqueaanna ave. Capital, 
$192,500. 

Emnire Pass. Ry. Co. 8V m, 5-2g, 45 lb r, 32 c, 250 

h. Pres. James Mc.Manes, Sec. and Treas. John I. 
Adams. Officp, n w cor. 12ih st. and Susquehanna av. 

Frankford Sz southwark Pblla. city Pass. R.R. Co. 
18 m, 5-2 s, 47 lbr, 102 c, 8 dummy c, 618 h. Pres. 
Henry Gelger, Sec. & Treas. Geo. S. Gandy, Supt. W. 
11. lanuev. Capital, S750.0O0. 

Germ ntown Pas«. Ry. Co. 29% m, 5-2% g, 47 lb r, 
Cars and horses, leased. Pres. Craig D. Ritchie, 
Trets. Lewis s. Renshaw. Sec. R. H, Parks. Office, 
n w cor. 10th and Chestnun sts. 

Green sz Coates R. R. Co 1 Leased to People's Pass. 
Rv. Co.) Pres. MosesA. Dropsie, sec. Sz Treas. Lewis 
s' Renshaw. office N. W. cor. 10th. and Ches.nut 

liestonville. Mantua Sz Falrmount Pass. R.R. Co. 20 
m, 5-2 g, 40 lb r, 50 c, 480 h. Pres. Charles F. Laffer- 
ty, Sec. & Treas. W. C. Foster. Office, 4,300 Lancas- 
ter ave. 

Lehigh Ave. Pass.Ry. Co. Pres. John Iamon, Sec. 
Chas. A. Porter, Treas. John L. Hill. [Track not laid.] 

Lombard <e South Sts. Pass Ry. Co. — m, 5-2 g, 43 
lb r, 51 c, 27S h. Pres. John B. Parsons, Sec. Sz Treas. 
Francis Hazelhurst. Supt. Jno. M. Gaughen. Office, 

2,509 South !-t. 

People's Pass. Ry. Co. 44 m,5-2g, 47 lb r, 125 c, 1,080 
h. Pres. John B Parsons, Sec. Sz Treas. Jno. C. Des- 
salet, supt. Wm. Hagenswiler. 

Philadelphia city Pass. Ry. Co. 7 m. 5-8% g, 4T lb 
r, — c, — h. Pres. Wm. W. Colket, Sec. Sz Treas. T. 
W. Pennypacker. (Leased to Phila. Traction Co.) 

Philadelphia Traction Co. 109 m, 5-2% g, 45-78 lb r, 
594 c 2,942 h. Pres. W. H. Kemble, V. Pres. P. A. B. 
Widener & W L. Elklns. Treas D. W. Dickson. Of- 
fice, n w cor. 41st and Haverford sts. 

Philadelphia & Darby Ry. Co. 6% m, 5-2% g, 42 
lb r. road leased. Pre-;. C. L. Borle, Sec. and Treas. 
Wm. W. Colket. Office, 202 Walnut pi. Leased to 
Phlla. City Pass. Ry. Co. 

Philadelphia Sz Gray's Ferry Pass. R.R. Co. 10 1-3 
m, 40 c, 200 h. Pres. Matl hew Brooks, Treas. J. C. 
Dawes.See.J.Crawford Dawes. SUDt.Patrlck Lovett. 
Office. 36th st. and Gray's Ferry Rd. 

Ridge Avenue Pass. Ry. Co. 14 m, 5-8 g, 47 lb r, 55 
c, 352 h. Pres. E. B. Edwards, V. Pres. John Lam- 
bert. Sec. Si Treas. Wm. S., Blight, Supt. Wm. Inees. 

Second Sz Third Sts. Pass. Ry. Co. 37 m, 116 c, 669h. 
Pres. Alexander M. Fox, Treas. wniiam w. Miller, 
Sec. Charles D. Matlack, Supt. David W. Stevens. 

Seventeenth & Nineteenth sts. Pass. Ry. Co. 7% m. 
Pres. Matthew S. Quay, Sec. & Treas. John B. Ped- 
dle. [Leased to Phtlada, Traction Co.] 



Thirteenth & Fifteenth Sts. Pass. Ry. Co. 14 m, 5-2 

g, 43 lb r. 73 c, 452 h. Pres. Thos. W. Ackley, Sec. & 
Treas. Thos. S. Harris, Supt. Wm. B. Cooper. 

Union Pass. Ry. Co. 70 m, 348 c, 1,724 h. Pres. 
Wm. H. Kemble, Sec. Sz Treas. John B. Peddle, Supt. 
Jacob C. Petty. (Leased to Phlla. Traction Co.) 

West Philadelphia Pass. Ry. Co. 18% m, 122 c, 646 

h. Pres. Peter A. B. widener, Sec. & Treas. D. W. 
Dickson. (Leased by the Phlla. Traction Co.) 

PHILLIPSBURGH, N. J.— Philllpsburgh Horse 
Car Ry. Co 2^ m, 4-8 g, 351b r, 4 c, 13 h. Pres. 
Daniel Runkle, Sec. Sz Treas. James W. Long. 

PITTSBURGH, PA Central Pass R.R. Co. 3m, 

16 c, 95 h. Pres. J F. Cluley, Sec. F. L. Stepnenson, 
Treas. E. R. Jones, Supt. R. G. He ron. 

Citizens' Pass. Ry. Co. 16* m, 5-2# g, 47 lb r, 40 c, 
337 b. Pres. Jno. G. Holmes, Sec. C. M Gormley 
Supt. Murry Verner. Treas. Jas. J. Donnell, Capital, 
$200,000. 

Federal St. Sz Pleasant Valley Pass. Ry. Co. 26 m, 
5-2% g, 46-50 lb r, 20 c, 154 h. Pres. Wm. H. Creery, 
Sec. R. F. Ramsey, Treas. James Boyle, Supt. Wm. J 
Crozler, Allegheny City. 

People's Park Pass. Ry. Co. 2 m, 5-2% g, 45 lb r 

10 c, 75 h. Pres. Wm. McCreery, sec. R. F. Ramsey 
Treas. James Boyle, Supt. Wm. J. Crozler, Allegheny 
City. 

Pittsburgh, Allegheny Sz Manchester Pass Ry. Co 
5 m. 5-2% g, 46 lb r, 40 c 275 h. Pres. Chas. Atwell, 
Sec. Sz Treas. Chas. Selbert, Supt. James C. Cotton. 
Manager J. P. Speer. 

Pittsburgh, Oakland & East Liberty Pass. Ry. Co. 

11 m, 5-4% g, 47 lb r, 32 c, HO h, 61 mu. Pres. J. T 
Gordon, Sec. John G. Traggardh, Treas. A W 
Mellon, Supt. H. M. Cherry. 

Pittsburgh Union Pass. R.R. Co. 5 m, 5-2% g, 45 It 
r, 29 c. 170 h. Pres. Chas. Atwell, Supt. James C. 
Cotton, Sec. Sz Treas. Chas. Selbert, Cash. Saml. C 
Hunter. 

Pittsburgh Sz Birmingham Pass. R.R. Co. 3% m, 5- 
2% g, 48 lb r, 20 c, 170 h. Pres. W. W. Patrick, Sec 
D. F. Agnew, Treas. John G. Holmes. 

Pittsburgh Sz West End Pass. Ry. Co. 3% m, 5-2 g, 
35 lb r, 13 c. 75 h. Pres. John C. Rellly, Sec. Sz I reas. 
Thomas S. Blgelow. Supt. William -I. Burns. 

Pittsburgh Sz Wllklnsburg St. Ry. Co. 

Second Avenue Pass. Ry. Co. 3% m, 5-2% g, 47 lb r, 
8c, 60 h. Pres Geo. Fawcett, Sec. Jas. F. Fawcett, 
Treas W.J. Fawcett. 

South Side Pass. R.R. Co. 2% m, 5-2j< g, 45 lb r, 12 
c, 80 h. Pres. D. Z. Brlckell, Sec. Sz Treas. W. T. Wal- 
lace, Supt. W. M. Rosborough. 

Transverse Pass. Ry. Co. 6% m, 5-2 g, 52 lb r, 39 c, 
243 h. Pres. C. L. Magee, V. Pres. C. F. Klopter.Sec. 
Sz Treas. Wm. R. Ford, Supt. Miller ElUot. 

Wllklnsburg & East Llr.erty Ry. Co. (See new 
roads.) 

PITTSTON, PA. -Plttston St. R.R. Co. IV m, 
3c, 5 h. Pres. Thomas Griffith, Treas. M. W. Morris, 
Sec. William Allen. 

PLYMOUTH, MASS Plymouth Sz Kingston St. 

R.R. Co (See new roads.) 

PORT HURON, MICH. —Port Huron St. Ry. Co. 
6% m, 4-8% g, 7 c, 22 h. Pres. Jno. P. Sanborn, v.Pres. 
Frank A. Heard, Sec. Treas. Sz Man. J. R. WastelL 

Port Huron Electric St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 4 c. 

PORTLAND, ME.-Ocean St. R.R. Co. 

Portland R.R. Co. 7j<£ m, 4-8% g, 30-33-45 lb r, 34 c, 
154 h. Pres. H. J. Llbby. Treas. Sz Gen. Man. E. A. 
Newman, Supt. Geo W. Soule. 

PORTLAND, ORE Portland St. Ry. Co. 2m, 

3 6 g,25-421b r,li c,40 h. Pres.D. P. Thompson. Sec Sz 
Supt. C. K. Harbaueh. 

Multnomah St. Rv. Co. 2 ! i m, 3-6 g, 30 lb r, 19 c, 65 
h. Pres. A. N. King, Sec. E. A. King. 

Transcontinental St. Ry.Co. 7 m, 3-6 g, 38 lbr, 15 
c. 65 h. Prest. Walter F. Burrell, D. W. Wakefield, 
Sec. Tyler Woodward, Supt. 

PORTS-MOUTH, O.— Portsmouth St. R. R. Co. 
2 m, 3-6 s, 18 lb r, 4 c, 10 h. Pres. James Skelton, 
Treas.. Sec. & Supt. Enas Reed. 

POTTSVILLE. PA. — People's Ry. Co. 9,S; m,16c,56h. 

POUGHKEEPSIE, N. Y. -City R.R. of Pough- 
keepsle. 4 m, 4-8% g, 35 42 lb r. 11 c, 38 h. Pres. Geo. B, 
Adrtance V. Pres. Sz Treas. Hudson Tavloi, Sec. A. 
B. Smith, Supt. C. M. Davis. < iffice 491 Main St. 

PROVIDENCE, R. I.-Unlon R.R. Co. 53 m, 4- 
8% g. 47-54 lb r, 230 c, 1,300 h. Pres. Jesse Metcalf, 
V. Pres. Sz Gen. Man. D. F. Longstreet, Sec. and 
Treas. c. A. Babcock. 

QUEBEC, CAN.— Quebec St. Ry. Co. 3 m, 4 8^ 
g, 45 lb r, 9 c, 46 n. Pres. Chas. St. Michel, Quebec, 
V. Pres. G. R. Renfrew, Quebec, Sec, Treas. Sz Supt. 
Samuel Moore. 

St. John St. Ry. Co. Llm. 1JS m, 4-8% g, 35 ib r, 4 c, 
23 h. Runs 4 'buses out 4 m. from city limns. 
Pres. Jos. W. Henry, V. Pres. A. Robertson, Sec. Sz 
Man. W. W Martin. 

O.UINCY, ILL.— Quincy Horse Ry. Sz Carrying 
Co. 6 m, 5 g, 71 lb r, 21 c, 118 mu. Pres. Lorenzo Bull. 
Sec. C. n. Bull. Supt. E. K. Stone. 

RACINE, WIS Belle City St. Ry. Co. 4 m. 4 g. g 

lbr, 9c— 40h. Pres. John'!'. Fish, Sec. &Treas. E. S. 
Dodge, Gen. Man. Geo. B. Hathaway. 

RALEIGH. N. C— Raleigh St. Ry. Co. 7% m, 
4-8% g. 16 T steel r, 6 c, 36 mu. Pres. Geo. M. Snod- 
grass, Sec. Sz supt. J. F. scott, Treas. R. T. Gray, 
Atty F. H. Bnsbee. Capital stock, *25,0G0. 

RAPID CITY. DAK Rapid City St. Ry. Co. 

Pres Fred. T. Evans. 

READING, PA.— Reading City Pass. Ry. Co. 
2 1-5 in, 5-2^ g, 45 lb r, 19 c, 44 h Pres. B. F. Owen, 
V. Pres. Jas. L. Douirlass, Sec Sz Treas. H. A. Muhlen- 
berg, Supt. J. A. Rlggs. 

Perklomen Ave. Pass. Co. 2 1-5 m, 5-2% g, 46 lb r, 
13 c, 41 h. Pres. Chas. Breneiser, Sec Sz Treas. Isaac 
Hlester, Supt. John B. noup. 

RED OAK, IA.— Red Oak St. R.R. Co. lym, 4-2% 
g. flat r, 2c, 2h, 2 mu. Pres. J.W. Judklns, V.Pres. G. 
West, Sec. F. M. Byrlket, Treas. & Supt.F.O. Judklns. 

RICHMOND, IND.— Richmond City Ry. Co. 3 m, 
8 g, 9 lb r, 10 c, 30 h. Pres. J. Y. Miller, v. Pres. Jos. 
Rutllff, Treas. H. I. Miller, Supt. F. M. Francisco. 

RICHMOND, ILL.— Richmond St. R.R. Co. 

RICHMOND, VA.— Richmond CltyRy. Co. 7 % m, 

4 8% g, 30-45 lb r, 40 c, 180 h. Pres, J. L. schoolcratt, 



152 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 18fc ". 



Sec. & Treas. Walter KIdd, Man. C. M. Bolton, Supt. 
Charles selden. 

Richmond & Manchester Ky. & Imp. Co., 2) 4 m, 26 h, 
4 e. supt. B. It. Seiden. 

Richmond Union Pass. Ey. Co. (See new roads.) 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. — Rochester City & Brighton 
U.K. CO. 37m, 4 8)4 g, 25-30-45 lb r, 142 C, 596 h, 

Pres. Patrick Barry, Sec. C. C. Woodworth, Treas. 

C. B. Woodworth, supt. Thomas J. Brower. 
citizens' St. Ry. Co. Pres. Wm. H. Jones, Sec. & 

Treas. J. E. Plerpont, Supt. S. A. Green. 

KOCKFOED, ILL.— Rockford St. Ry. Co. 6 2-5 
m, 4-814 g, 30 1br, 13 c, 52 h. 16 m. Pres. Antkony 
halnes, V. Pres. L. Rhodes, Sec. Miss A. C. Arnold, 
Treas. N. E. Lyman, Supt. Fred. Haines. 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. — Rock Island & Milan S.t 
Ry. Co. 7 m, g, 80-30-42 lb r, 10 c, 7 h. Pres. & 
supt. Bally Davenport, Sec. E. H. Hunt, Trers. JF.. 
Robinson, 2 m, with horses, 5 m, with motor. 

EONDOUT, N. Y. — Kingston city R. R. Co. 3 
m, 4-8)4 g, 40 lb r, 10 c, 40 h. Pres. James G. Llnds- 
ley, V. Pres. S. D. Coykendoll, Sec. & Treas. John C. 
Romeyee, Supt. Wm. H. DeGaraio. 

RUTLAND, VT.-Rutland St. Ry. Co. 8 m, 4-8?, 
g, 20 lb r, 8 c, 3j h. Pres. M. Quin, Sec. John N. 
Woodflu, Treas, A. H. Tuttle, Supt. M. McKeough. 

SACRAMENTO. CAE. — Sacramento City Ry. Co. 
IS l-horse and 10 2-aorse c. Prop. R. S. Carey, Supt. 
Geo. W. Carey. 

SAGINAW, MICH.— City ot Saginaw St. R. R. 
Co. iy m, 4-8)4 g, 42 lb r, 10 c, 50 h. Pres. David H. 
Jerome, V. Pres. ceo. F. Williams, sec. & Treas. Geo. 
L. Burrows, Supt. Fred G. Benjamin. 

SAEEM, MASS Salem & Danvers St. Ry. Co. 

12 m. i-8y g, 35-45 lb r, 24 c, 117 h. Pres. Benj. W. 
Russell, Sec. & Treas. G. A. Vlckery, Asst. Supt. 
David N. Cooke. 

Naumkeag St. Ry. Co. — in, 4-8)4, g, 30-35-45 lb r, 50 
c, HOh. Pres. Chas. Udell, Clerk Joseph F. Hlckey, 
Treas. Henry Wheatland, Supt.Wlllard B. Ferguson. 

s A I j I N A. N. V Woodlawn and Butternut St. 

Ry. co. 

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. — Salt Lake City 
R. R Co. 13 in, 4-8)4 g. 20 lb r, 20 c, 115 mu. Pres. John 
Taylor, Sec. Davl'd McKen/.le, Treas. James Jack, 
Supt. orson P. Arnold. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEX. — San Antonio St. Ry. Co. 
15 m, 4 g, 30 lb r, 38 c, 125 mu. Pres. A. Belknap, San 
Antonio, v. Pres. F. W. Plckard, N. Y. City, Treas. 
I. Withers, San Antonio, Sec. E. R. Norton, Supt 
John Robb. 

Prospect Hill St. Ry. Co. 

SANDUSKY, O.— Sandusky St. Ry. Co. 2 m, - 

g, — lb r, — c, — h. Pres. chas. B. Ods, Sec. & Treas. 
A. G Morse, Supt. Clark Rude. 

SAN FRANCESCO, CAL.— California St.R.R. Co. 

Central R. R. Co. 12 m, 5 g, 45 lb r, 31 c, 890 h, 
Pies. Chas. Main, V. Pres. S. C. Blgelow, Treas. A. 
J. Gunnison, sec. C. V. LeBreton, Supt. J. F. Clark. 

Clay St. Hill R. R. Co. 1 m. 3-e g, 30 lb r, n c, 12 
dummy cars. Pres. Joseph Britton, v. Pres. James 
Mofrit, Treas. Henry L. Davis, Sec. Chas. P. Camp- 
bell, Supt. Joseph Britton. 

Geary St. Park & ocean R.R. Co. o^ m, (5?; m 
cable, 4\ m steam) 5 g. 45 lb r, 39 c. Pres. Daniel 
Meyer, V Pres. R. F. Mo; row, Treas. S. ('. Blgelow, 
Supt. Johnson Reynolds, Sec. John N. Syme. 

Market St. Cable Ry. Co. 12?, m, 4-8)4 g, 87-38 lb r. 
1S2 c, 2 motors, 82 h. Pres. Leland Stanford, V Pres. 
Chas. F. Crocker, Treas. N. T. Smith, Sec. J. L. Wtll- 
cutt, Supt. H. I). Morton. Office, Fourth and 
Townsend stn ets. 

North Beach & Mission R.R. Co. 8 m, 5 g, 46 c, 400 

h. Pres. Carl Ahpel, Sec. H. W. Hathorne, Treas. 
Wm. Alvord, Supt. M. Skelly. 

ocean Beach Ry. Co. (operated by Market St. 
«'.-.ble Ky- Co.) 2 m. Pres. Leland Stanford. V. 
Pres. Chas. F. Crocker, Treas. N. T. Smith, Sec. J. 
L. Willcutt, Supt. H. li. Morton. 

omnibus R. R. & Cable Co. 8)4 m, 5 g, 35-45 lb r, 50 
c, 364 h. Pres. Gustav Sutro, V. Pres. D. Callaghan, 
Sec. G. Ruegg, Supt. M. M. Martin. 

Park £ ocean U.K. Co. 4.02m, 35 and 40 lb r, 4-S>, 
g, 7 dummy engines, 16 pass, c, 6 flat aud section (-,. 
Preo. Chas. F. Crocker, V. Pres. Timothy Hopkins, 
Treas. li. T. Smith, Sec. J. L. Willcutt, Supt. H. 

D. Morton. 

Potrerofi Bay View R.R. Co. 1% m, 5 g, 35 1b r, 
10 c, 43 h. Pres. Leland Stanford. V. Pres. Chas. 
Crocker, Treas. N. T. Smith, Sec. J. L. Willcutt, Supt. 
H. O. Roneis. 

Powell & Jackson St. R. li. Co. (see new roads.) 

sutter St. R.R. Co. 5?4 m, 4-1 1 g, 35-45 lb r, 40 c, 
18 i h. Pres. R. F. Morrow, Sec. A. K. Stevens/l'reas. 
M. Schmltt, Supt. James McCord. 

Telegraph Hill R.R. Co. 1,560 ft, 4-8V g, 45 lb r, 
2 c, — h. Pres. Gustave Sutro, V. Pres. C. Kohler. 
Sec. & Supt. Chas. J. W erner. 

The City R.R. Co. 11 m, 5 g, 45 lb r, 72 c, 280 h. 
Pres. R. it. Woodward, v. Pres. Geo. E. Raum, Sec. 
M. K. Willis, Treas. Jas. H. Goodman, Supt. William 
Woodward, Mast er Car Builder, Frank O. Landgram. 

SAN JOSE,CAE san Jose & Santa Clara R.R. Co. 

fiv. in, 4-S and 3 g wide g, 4u lb r, narrow g, 20 lb r, 25 
c, 75 h. Pres. s. A. Bishop, v. Pres. W. S. Mc- 
Murtry, Treas. Jacob Rich, Sec. E. M. Rosenthal, 
Man. Wm. Fitts. office, 20 W. Santa Clara St. 

First St. R. K. & Willow Glen R. R. 4?4 m, 3 g, 20 
lbs. r, 6 c. 30 h, Jacob Rich, Sole owner. Sec. E. M. 
Rosenthal. Office, 20 Santa Clara st. 

First St. & San Pedro St. Depot R.R. Co. 

Noith side Horse R.R. Co. 2% m, 3 g, 16 lb r, 3 c, 
10 h. Pres. & Man, Jacob Rich, sec. E M. Rosenthal, 
Treas. S. a. Bishop. 

Willow Glen R.R . 7)4 m, 3 g, 20 lb r, 8c, 30 h. Sole 
owner Jacob Rich, Sec. E. M. Rosenthal. Office 20 
W. Santa Clara St. 

SANTA BARBARA, CAL — Santa Barbara St. 
R.R. Co. 1 m, 3-6 g, 3 c, 8 mu. Pres. A. W. McPhall. 

SARNIA, CAN Sarnia St. Ry. Co. 2ym, 4-8 g, 

32 lb r, 2 c, 9 h. Pres. J. F. Lister, Sec. & Treas. Thos. 
Symington, Supt. Henry W. Mills. 

SAUGATUCK, CONN. — Westport & Saugatuck 
Horse R.R. Co. (See Westport, conn.) 

SAVANNAH, OA.— City & Suburban Ry. Co. 18jH 
m, 5g. 16-30 lb r, 49 c, 110 h, 3 engines. Pres. J. H. 
Johnson, Asst. J. W. Alley. Treas. E. Schmidt. 

Coast Line R.R. Co. 7 m, 5 g, 30 Ibr, ]7 c, .37 li 



Pres. Geo. Parsons, New York, Sec, Treas. & Gen. 
Mau. R. E. Cobb, Savannah. 

SAYRE, PA.— Sayre St. Ry. Co. Pres. Howard 
Elmer. < see new roads.) 

SCRANTON, PA.— People's St. Ry. Co. !)>s m, 
4-8)4 g, 25-52 lb r, 19 c, 70 h. Pres. Wm. Matthews, 
Sec. & Treas. J. C. Piatt. 

Scranton Suburban Ry. Co. 2? 4 m, 4-8)4 g, 52-40 lb 
r, 3 c, operated by electricity. Pres. Edward B. Stur- 
ges, Treas. T. F. Torrev. sec. Geo. Sanderson. 1 

SEARCY, ARK.— Searcy & West Point R.R. Co, 
8 m, 4-8)4 g, 20 lb r, 7 c, 6 mu. Pres. A. W. Yarnell 
Sec. W. H. Llghtle, Treas. Jasper Hicks. 

SEATTLE, W. T.— Seattle St. Ry. Co. 3y m 
4-8% g, 35 lb r, 5 c, 20 h. Pres. F. H. Osgood, Sec. 
Geo. Klnnear. 

SEOALIA, MO Sedalia St. Ry. Co. 2% m, 4-10 

g, 22 lb r 6 c 25 h. Pres. Joseph D. sicher, V. Pres. 
Louis Deutsch, Treas. F. H. Guenther, Sec. Chas. 
S. Conrad. 

SELMA, ALA Selma St. R.R. 2)4 m, 18 lb r, 5 

c, 8h. Pres. E. Oilman, Sec. & Treas. J. H. liolils, 
Supt. W. Bohlia. 

SENECA FALLS, N.Y Seneca Falls & Waterloo 

R,R. Co. 7 m, 4-8?5 g, 40 lb r, 4 c, dummies. Pres. & 
Treas. Geo. H. Stayner, Asst. C. H. Williams, V- 
Pres. & Gen. Man. Charles D. Haines, Supt. A. G. 
Haines. Sec. Henrv S. Ives. 

SEVASTOPOL, IA.— Des Moines & Sevastopol 
St. R.R. Co. 1% m, 4g, 36 lb r, 2 c, 12 h. Pres. G. 
Van Glnkel, Sec. G. C. Van GinkeL, Treas John 
Weber. Office, Main tt. 

SHERMAN, TEX.— Sherman City R.R. Co. 3? 4 m 

5 g, 20 lb r, 7 c, 32 mu. Pres. C. W. Batsell, Treas. 
J. M . Batsell. Sec. C. W. Batsell, Jr. 

SHREVEPORT, LA — Shreveport City R.R. Co. 
1)4 m, 4-4 g, 46 lb r, c. 14 h. Pres. Peter Youree. 

SILVER CLIFF, COL. — Silver Cliff St. R.R. CO. 

SIOUX CITY, IA.— Sioux City St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 
4 g, — r, 8 c, 52 mu. Pres. Fred. T. Evans, v. Pres. 
D. A. Magee. Sec. & Treas. Fred Evans, Jr. 

SOUTH BEVB, IN I).— South Bend Railway Co 

6 m. 4-8.'... g, 30 lb r, 17 c, 49 h. Pres Jacob Woolver- 
ton, Treas Lucius Clark, Sec W G George. Office, 
212 W Market st, Utlca, N Y. 

South Bend and Mlshawauka St, Ry. CO. 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL Chicago Horse & 

Dummy R.R. 5 m, 4-8)4 g, — lb r, — c, — h. Pres. 

D. L. Huff, Treas. A. C. Calkins, See. E. R. Bliss. 
[Not in operation.] 

South Chicago City Ry. Co, 4 c, 8 h. Pres. An- 
drew Rehm, Sec. & Supt. A. KrimWii, Treas H. 
Shearrer. 

SOUTH PUEBLO, COL.-Pueblo St. R.R. Co. 

SPRINGFIELD, ILL Citizens' St. R.R. Co. 

9)4 m, 3 6 g, 20-36 lb r, 29 c, 100 h. Pres. J. H. schrick, 
Treas. Frank Reisch, Sec. Chas. F. Harman. 

Springfield City Ry. Co. 7 m, 4-8)4 g, 90 mu. & h. 
Pros. A. L. Ide, Treas. Wm. Rldgely,Sec. Geo. BrJnk- 
erhoot. 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS Springfield St. Ry. Co. 

4-8)4 g, 33-40 lb r, 30 c. 120 h. Pres. John Olmstead, 
Auditor L. E. Ladd, Clerk Gideon Wells, Treas. A. 

E. Smith, Supt. F. E. King. 
SPRINGFIELD, MO. — Citizens' Ry Co. of Spring- 
field and No Springfield, 5?4 m. asy and 4-10 g, 30, 
33 and 4« lb r, 16 c, 70 h & mu. Pres R C Kerens, V 
Pres B F Hobart, Sec and Treas A M Long well. 
Supt F B Smith, Ex-com L H Murray, H F Den- 
ton. C B McAfee. 

SPRINGFIELD, O Citizens' St. R.R. Co. 10m, 

4 g, 29 c. 135 h. Pres. D. W. Stroud, v. Pres. A. s. 
Bushnell, Treas. Rose Mitchell, Sec. F. S. Penfleld, 
Supt. W. H. Hanford. 

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y Staten Island Shore Ry. 

ST. CATHARINE'S, ONT.— St. Catharine's, Mer- 
rllton & Thorold St. Ry. Co. 5)4 m, 4-8)4 g, 30 lb r, 8 
c, 32 h. Pres. E. A. Smyth, Sec. S. R. Smyth, Supt. 
E. A. Smyth. 

ST. JOHN. N. B.— St. John St. Ry. Co. 7 m, 
4-8)4 g, 45-tn lb r, 15 c, 65 h. Pres. John R. Bothwell, 
Sec. & Treas. John J. Pyle. Office Room 39 Drexel 
Building, New York, and St. John, N. B. 

ST. JOSEPH, MO Citizens' St. R.R. Co. 3 m, 

4-8)4 g, 28 lb r 14 c, 52 mu. Pres. Richard E. Turner, 
Sec. & Treas.' Arthur Klrkpatrlck, Supt. John F. 
Menlam. 

Frederick Ave. Ry. Co. 1)4 m, 3 g. 16 lb r, 6 e, 16 h. 
Pres. Thos E. Tootle, v. Pres. Wlnslow Judson, Sec. 
W.D.B. Mott er, Treas. Thos W. Evins, Sup. S. Rowen. 

St. Joseph & Lake St. R.R. Co. 

Union Ry. Co. — m, — g, 20, 30 and 52 lb r, 27 c, 110 

h. Pres Seymour Jenkins, Sec & Treas S Stein- 
acker, Supt Harvey E Lewis. Office, cor Highland 
and St. Joseph Avenues. 

ST. LOUIS, MO Baden & St. Louis R.R. Co. 

3y m, 4-10 g, — lb r, 7 c, 21 h. Pres. George S. Case, 
V. Pres. William Z. Coleman, Supt. J. H. Archer. 

Benton & Bellefontatne Ry. Co. 7)4 m, 4-10 g, 45 lb r, 
29 c, 200 h. Pres. J. G. Chapman, V. Pres. Chas. 
Parsons, Sec. & Treas. Robert McCulloch. 

Cass Avenue & Fair Grounds Ry. Co. 8?;? m, 4-10 g, 
38 lb r, 39 c, 285h. Pres. w. R. Allen. V. Pres. Geo. W. 
Allen, Sec.&Treas. J. W. Wallace, Supt. G. G. Gibson, 
Cashier O. H. Williams. 

Citizen's Ry. Co. — m, — g, —lb r, — c, — h. Pres. 
Julius S. Walsh. V. Pr«s. J. P. Helfenstlne. 

Forest Park, Laclede & Fourth St. Ry. Co. Pres. 
Chas. H. Turner, Sec H. B. Davis. 

Jefferson Ave. Ry. Co. Pres. John M. Gelkeson, 
Gen. Man. John Scullin, Sec. C. K. Dickson. 

Llndell Ry. Co. I3y m, — g-, — r, 65 c, 475 h. Pres 
John H. Maquon, V. Pres. John H. Llghtner, Sec. & 
Treas. Geo. W. Baumhoff, Supt. Jos. C. Llewellyn. 

Northern Central. 

Missouri R.R. Co. — m, — g, —lb r, — c, — h. Pres. 
P. C. Maffit, Sec. W. D. Henrv. 

Mound City R.R. Co. Pres. John. Scullin, Sec. & 
Treas. C. M. Seaman. Supt, Jas. Sullivan. 

People's Line. Pres. Chas. Green, Sec. John Ma- 
noney. Supt. Patrick Shea. 

Southern Rv. Co. 7 4-5 m, 4-10 g, 35-52 lb r, 49 c, 250 
V. Pres. E- R. Coleman, Sec. J. S. Minary, Man. W. 
L. Johnson. 

St. Louis R.R. Co. 11 m, 4-10 g, 38-44 lb r, 58 C, 375 h. 
Pres. C. Peper, Sec. & Treas. R. B. Jennings, Supt. 

CliflS ISCllGF 

St. Louis Cable & Western Ry. Co. Pres. M. A. 



Downing, V. Pres. F. M. Colburn, Sec. & Treas. E. F 
claypooi, Man. Geo. F. Branham. 

Tower Grove & Lafayette Ry. Pres. Chas. Green, 
Sec. John Mahoney, Supt. Patrick Shea. 

Union Depot R.R. Co. — m, — g, — lb r, — c, — b. 
Pres. John scullin, V. Pres. & Treas. C. M. Seaman, 
Supt. Jas. U. Roach. 

Union Ry., Co. Pres. Julius S. Walsh, V. Pres. J. P. 
Hehenstine, sec. & Treas. M. J. Moran, Supt. Michael 
Moran. 

ST. PAUL, MINN St. Paul City Ry. Co. 37 m, 

4-8X g, 45-52 lb r, 82c, 600 n. & mu. Pres. Thos. Lowry 
V. Pres. C. G.Goodrich, Sec. A. Z. Levering, Treas. 
Clinton Morrison, Supt. A. L. Scott. 

ST. THOMAS, CAN. 

STAMiOKI), CONN.— Stamford Horse R. R. Co. 
5y m. i-8y, g, lu c, 40 h. Pres. F. M. Delano, Treas. 
Pnillp Richardson. 1 

STONEHAM, MASS Stoneham 8t. R. R. Co. 

2? s m, 4-8?4 g, 33 lb r, 10 c, 2b h. Pres A V Lynde, Mel- 
rose, Treas. & Clerk Lyman Dyke, Supt. John Hill. 

STILLWATER, MINN.— Stillwater St. Ry. Co. 

STILLWATER, N. Y Stillwater & Mechanics- 
vine St. Ky. Co. 4% m, 4-8j£ g. 25-30 lb r, 4 c, 6 n. 
Pres.jW. L. Denison, V.-Pres, Lyman Smith, Gen. 
Supt. Peter Van Veghten, Sec. & Treas. Edw. I. 
Wood. k 

STROUDSBURGH, PA Stroudsburgh Passen- 
ger R.R. Co. 1 4-5 m, 4 -8% g, 28-30 lb r, 3 c, 9 h. Pres. 
& Treas. J. Lantz, Sec. Jacob Houser. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y.— Syracuse & Onondaga R.R. 
Co. 2 3-5 in, 4-8 g, 28-47 lb r, 9 c, 18 h. Pres. Peter 
Burns, V. Pres. Chas. P. Clark, Sec. & Treas. Lyman 
C. Smith, Supt. W . B. Thompson. 

Central City Ry. Co. 2 ?, m, 4-8)4 g, 47 lb r, 12 c, 42 
h. Pres. Daniel Pratt, V. Pres. Jonathan C. Chase, 
Sec. & Treas. James Barnes, Supt. George Crampton. 
4 Syracuse Savings Bank Building. 

Fifth Ward R.R. Co. -iy m, 4-8)4 S, 35-56 lb r, 8 c, 
30 h. Pres. P. B. Brayton, V. Pres. John D. Grey, 
Sec. & Treas. O. C. Potter, Supt. Hugh Purnell. Office 
W. Washington st. 

Genesee & Water St. R.R. Co. and Fourth Ward 
R.R. Co. 4 m, 4-8)4 g, 18-30 lb r, 10 c, 35 h. Pres. 
Robt. G. Wynkoop, V. Pres. Wm. H. H. Smith, Sec. 
& Treas. Geo. J. Gardiner, Supt. W. J. Hart. Onon- 
daga Savings Bank Building. / 

New Brighton & Onondaga Valley R.R. Co. \% m, 
4-8 g, 16-35 lb r, 2 c, 6 h, l dummy. Pres. Matthias 
Britton, Sec. T. W. Meacham, Treas. J. H. Anderson, 
Supt. J. H. Anderson. 

Seventh Ward Ry. Co. Pres. E. F. Rice. 

Syracuse & Geddes Ry. Co. iy m, 4 8' • g, 30-45 lb r, 

8 c, 35 h. Pres. R. Nelson Gere, V. Pres. Chas. E. Hub- 
bell, Sec. & Treas. Rasselas A. Bonta, Supt. Wm. J. 
Hai t. Gen offices,'i Onondaga Co. Bank Building, a 

Third Ward Ry. Co. Pres. W. B. Cogswell, Sec. 
& Treas. W. S. Wales. 

TAMPA, FLA Tampa St. Ry. Co. Sec. Geo. 

T. Chamberlain. 

TAUNTON, MASS Taunton St. Ry. Co. 4 m, 

4-8)4 g, 14 c, 45 h. Pres. Wm. C. Loverlng, Treas. 
Henry M. Loverlng, Clerk, Orville A. Barker, Supt. 
Geo. C. Morse. 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. — Terre Haute St. Ry. Co. 
4% m, 4-8)4 g, 28 lb r. 16 c, 48 h. Pres. T. C. Buntin, 
V.Pres. Josephus Collett, Sec. John R. Hagen, Supt. 
John T. Shriver. 

TEXARKANA, ARK Texarkana St. Ry. Co. 

TOLEDO, OHIO.— Toledo Consolidated St. Ry. 
Co. 19 m, 4-8 g, 42 i 2 lb r, 50 c, 225 h. Pres. J. E. 
Bailey, Sec. A. E. Lang. Supt. John Gilmartin. 

Adams Street Ry. Co. 

Metropolitan St. Ry. Co. 10 m, 3 g, 28-35 lb r, 31 c, 
101 h. Pres. & Sec. Jno. J. Shipherd of Cleveland, 
Treas. H. E. Wells of Cleveland, Gen. Man. T. F. 
Shipherd, Supt. Jno. A. Watson. 

Monroe Street R.R. 

The Central Passenger R.R. Co. of Toledo, O. 8 m, 

3 g, 27 lb r, 17 c, 70 h. Pres. F. E. Seagrave, Treas. & 
Man. A. R. Seagrave, Supt. Joseph Murphy. 

TOPEKA, KAN Topeka City Ry.CO. 9 m, 4 g,25- 

48 lb r, 25 c, 90 h. Pres. Joab Mulvane, V. Pres. D.W. 
Stormont. Sec . & Treas. E. Wildes, Supt. Jesse Shaw. 

TORONTO, CAN Toronto St. Ry. Co. 60 m. 

4-IOJ4 g, 301b r, 160 c, 750 h. Pres. Frank Smith, Sec 
James Gunn, Supt. John J. Franklin. 

TRENTON, N. J.— Trenton Horse R. R. Co. 3 
m, 5-2 g, 43-48 lb r, 10 c, 33 h. Pres. Gen. Lewis Perrlne, 
Sec. & Treas. Lewis Perrlne, Jr., Supt.Thomas S M orris. 

City Ry. Co. 7 m, 5-2)4 g,35 lb r, 19 c, 110 h&m.Pres. 
Adam Exton, V. Pres. W. H. Sklrm, sec.H. B. Howell, 
Treas. & Mang. Director Chas. Y. Bamlord. 

TRINIDAD, COL.— Trinidad St. R. S. Co. \y m, 
3-2 g, 14 lb r, 2 c, 8 mu. Pres. S. H. Jaffa, Treas. F. 
B. Collier, Sec. R. L. Wootten, Supt. H. E. Pearson. 

TROY, N.Y Cortland & Homer Horse R R. Co., 

4 m, 4-8)4 g, 25-30 lb r, 2 c, h. Pres. C. H. Garri- 
son, Troy, V. Pres. E. A. Fish, Cortland, N.Y., Treas. 
Jas. M. Milen, Cortland, Sec. S. E. Welch, Cortland. 

Troy & Albia Street Ry. Co. 3y m, 4 g, 35-45 lb r, 

9 c, 41 h. Pres. Thos. A. Knickerbocker, sec. & Treas. 
Theo. E. Haslehurst, Supt. W. R. Bean. 

Troy & Lansingburgh R.R. Co. 21)4 m, 4-8)4 g, 47 lb 
r, 91 c, 466 h. Pres. William Kemp, V. Pres. Charles 
Clemlnshaw, Sec. & Treas. Joseph J. Hagen, s-upt. 
L. C. Brown, Asst. Supt. C. H. Smith. 295 River st. 

URBAN A, ELL.— Urbana & Champaign St. Ry. 
Co. 2 m, 4-8)4 g, 33 lb r, 4 c, 20 h. Pres.Wm. Park, 
Sec. & Treas. IYank G. Jaques, Supt. W. Park. 

UTICA, N.Y Utlca, Clinton & Blnghamton St. 

R.R. 12 m, 4-8)4 S, 43-56 lb r, 17 c. 82 h. Pres. 
Isaac Maynard, Sec. & Treas. Robt. S. Williams, Supt. 
Roger Rock. 

The Utlca & Mohawk R.R. Co. 3% m, 4-8)4 g, 25-04 
lb r, 9 c, 5 h. Pres. Jas. F. Mann, Sec. Wm. E. 
Lewis, Treas. J. H, Sheehan. 

Utlca Belt St. Ry. Co. (See new roads.) 

VAIESBCRGH, N. J.— Newark, so. Orange 
Ferry St. & Hamburg Place R.R. Co. 

VALEJO, CAE Valejo St. Ry. Co. 

VICKSBURG, MISS Vicksburg St. Ry. Co. 

Hill City R.R. CO. 

VINCENNES, END.— vincennes St. Ry. Co. 

WACO, TEX. — Waco St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 4-8 g, 
14-18 lb r, 9 c, 44 h. Pres. E. Rotan, Sec. & Treas. W. 
R. Kellum, Supt. J. W. Sedbury. 

WAETHAM, MASS.— Waltham & Newton t. 



January, 188*1. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



153 



Ky. Co. 3% m, 3-8)4 g, 30 lb r, 7 C, 18 It Pres. E. E. 
Robblns, Sec. & Treas. Henry Bond. 

WASHINGTON, I). C — Capital, No. O St. & So. 
Washington K.K. 13% in, 4 8 g, 35 lb r, 45 c, 170 h. 
Pres. C. White, Sec. & 'i reas. W. E. Boiigliton, Supt. 
Andrew Glass. 

Anacostla & Potomac River Ry. Co. 3 m, 4-8 g, 37 
lb r, 9 c, 24 h. Pres. II. A. Grlswold, Sec. Edward 
Temple, Treas. T. E. Smlthson. 

Columbia R.R. Co. ot the District of Columbia. 2% 

ji. - — g, lbr, 19 c, 56 h. Pres. H. A. Wlllard, Sec. 

& Treas. Wm. H Clayette, supt Thos. E. lienson. 

Metropolitan R.R. Co. 21% m, 4 8 g, 38 lb r, 90 c, 400 
h. Pres. George W. Pearson, v. Pres. A. A. Wilson, 
Sec. & Treas. William W. Moore, Supt. L. W. Emmart 

Washington & Georgetown R.R. Co. 20 m, 4-8)i g, 
42 lb r, 173 c, 850 h. Pres. II. Hurt, Sec. & Treas. C. M. 
Koones, Gen. Supt. C. C. Sailer. 

WATERBURY, CONN.— Waterbury Horse R. 
R. Co. b!4 m, 4-8,'s g, 40 lb. r, 13 c. 60 h. Pres. D. S. 
Plume, '1 reas. & Sec. E. P Turner. 

WATEllFORI), N. Y. — Waterford & CohoesR.R. 
Co. 2m, 4-8% g, 45 lbr. Pres. Thos. Breslln, Sec. 
& Treas. C C. Ormsby. (Leased by the Troy & Lan- 
slngburgh R R. Co.) 

WATERLOO, IA.— Waterloo St. Ry. Co. 2 m, 3 
g, 20 lb r, 2 c, 1 baggage wagon, 9 h. Pres. Loran W. 
Reynolds, Sec. and Treas. J. II. Kuhn, Man. M. K. 
Kent. 

WEST HAVEN, CONN. — New Haven & West 
Haven R.R. Co. 6 m, 4-8>, g, 54 lb r, 24c, 115 h. Pres. 
Geo. R. Kelsey, Supt. W. W. Ward, Treas. D. Trow 
bridge, Sec. SamT L. Smith. 

WESTPORT, CONN.— Westport & Saugatuck 
Horse R. R. Co . 1% m, 4-8% g, 40 lb r. 3 c, 5 h . Pres . 

A. S. Hurlbutt, Sec and Treas B L Woodwerlh, 
Supt E S Downe 

WHEELIISG, W. VA.— Citizens Ry. Co. 10 m, 
6-2 Jig, 45 lb r, 20 c, 55 h. Pres. Dr C. A. Wlngelter. 
Sec. Van B. Hall, Supt. Michael I o.tus. 

Wheeling & Elm Grove R.R. 7 aa, 4-8% g, 30 lb r, 12 
c, 4 Baldwin Motors. Pres. J. D. DuBols, Sec. E. J. 
Rutter, Supt. E. Hlrsch. 

WICHITA, KAN Wichita City Ry.Co. 7% m, 

lie, 60 mu, 4 h. Pres. B. H. Campbell, v. Pres., 
Treas. & Gen. Man. E. R. Powell, Sec. G. W. Lara- 
mer, Atty. E. C. Ruggles. 

WILiK.ESBAR.RE) PA. —likes ba rre & Kingston 

P&SS J£ 

Coalville Passenger R.R. 2 % m, 4-8% g, 20-34 lb r, 
3 c. 10 h. Pres. Geo. W. Klikendall, Supt. A. S. Orr, 
Sec and Treas Geo Loveland. Capital, $62,675. 

WILLIAMSPORT, PA Willlamsport St. R.R. 

CO. 

WILMINGTON, DEL. -Front & Union St. Pass- 
enger Ry. Co. 1& m, 5-2 g, — lb r, 7 c, 20 h. Pres. 
Geo. W. Bush, Supt. SamT A Price, Treas. E. T. 
Taylor. 

Wilmington City Ry. Co. 6 m, 5-2# g, 45 lb r, 19 
c, 80 h. Pres. W. Canby, Sec. & Treas. John F. Miller, 
Supt. Wm. H. Burnett. 

WINDSOR, CAN Sandwich & Windsor Passen- 
ger R.R. Co. 

Windsor & Walker vllle Electric Ry. Co. 2 m, 2 c. 

W1NFIELD, KAN Union St Ry Co 2%m 4 

g, 28 lb r, 2 c, 8 mu Pres Shuler, V Pres H E 

SUllman, Treas John D Pryor, sec John A Eaton 
Capital, $25,000 

WINNIPEG, MANITOBA, CAN.— The Winni- 
peg St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 4-8)* g, 351b r, 13 c, 75 h. Pres. 
Duncan MacArthur, Sec. & Mangr. Albert W. Austin, 
Supt. Geo. A. Young. 

WINONA, MINN.— Winona City Ry. Co. 4 m, 3-6 
g, 27 lb r, 10 c, 39 h. Pres. John A. Mathews, V. Pres. 

B. H. Langley, Sec. & Treas. C. H. Porter. 

WOBI EN. MASS.— No. Woburn St. Ry. Co. 
afi m, 4 8 %g, 40 lb. r. 5 c, 4 h. Pres. & Treas. J.R.Car- 
ter, Supt. Dexter Carter. 

WORCESTER, MASS Worcester St. Ry. Co. 

7)4 m, 4-8% g, 43-45 lb r, 31 c, 151 h. Pres. Geo. H. 
Seeley, Sec. & Treas. H. S. Seeley, Sup't. J. N. Akar- 
man, Ass't. Supt. J B. Chapln 

Citizens' St. Ry. Co IX m, 4-8" 'g, 451b. r. 19 c. 100 h. 
Pres. Chas. B. Pratt, Sec. &Treas. H. S. Seeley, Supt. 

J 1^ A I' ' L ! 1 1 1 I f 1 

W YMORE, NEB Wymore and Blue Springs Ry 

Col. 2% m, 3-6 g, 3 c, 8 h. Pres. E.P. Reynolds, Rock 
Island, 111., V. Pres. I, H. Reynolds, Gen. Man. Ben- 
Reynolds, Sec. Treas. and Acting Supt. E. P. Rey. 
nolds, Jr. 

YOUNGSTOWN, O Youngstown St. R.R. Co. 

ZANESVILLE, O.— Zanesvllle & Mclntlre St. Ry. 
Co. 3 m, 3-6 g, 38 lb r, 12 c, 54 m. Pres. J. Bergen, 
Sec. W. C. Townsend, Treas. T. B. Townsend. 



NEW ROADS. 



ANN ARBOR, MICH Ann Arbor St. Ry Co. 

4-8> 2 g. Pres. Junius E. Beal, V. Pres. Edward Duffy. 
Sec. Zlna P. King, Treas. Louis D. Taylor, Supt. 
Thomas J. Keech. Capital $20,000. Office, 46 Main st. 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA.— East Lake Land Co. 
7 m. 4-8)4 Si 4-"> lb r, 4-8 c, motor power. Pres. Robt. 
Jennlson, v.-Pres. A. A. Clisby, Treas. T. B. Lyons, 
Sec. S. M. Hanby. Capital $200,000. Work In pro- 
gress, to be completed in January, 18S7. 

BROOKLYN, N. Y Annex St. Ry. Co. In prog- 
ress, 10 be completed in spring of 18S7. Pres. F. M. 
Delano, New York, V.-Pres. H. H. Adams, Brooklyn. 
Treas. Philip Richardson, N. Y. Office, 204 Mon- 
tague St., Brooklyn, N. Y. l 

Union Ry.Co. of the City of Brooklyn. 

CHICAGO, ill.— The Crosstown Pass. Ry. Co. 
of Chicago, B0 m, 4-8 1-2 g, 45 lb r, 75 c, 500 to 800 h, 
Pres. John J. Currar, Treas. Geo. P. Bunker, Sec. 
James A. Taylor. Capital stock, $1,000,000. Gen. of- 
fice, room 18, No. 164 Washington st. Time of com- 
mencement of work undecided. 

COVINGTON, GA W. C. Clark & Co. Incorpor- 
ators and owners. 1 m, 20 or 30 lb r, 2 pass, c, 2 flat 
c, pass, cars for 1 h, 6 to 8 mu. or h. Work will be 
commenced by Nov. lor delayed until spring. 

DANBURY, CONN.-Danbury St. Ry. Co. 4m, 



be ween Danbury and Bethlehem. Work In pro- 
gress. 

KANSAS CITY, MO.— Grand Avenue Ry. Co. 
(For officers see Directory). Now constructing: 8 
m, double track cable road. 

LOCKPORT, N. Y.— Lockport, St. Ry. Co. 
(Work in progress.) 

LONG ISLAND CITY, N. Y. — Rlker Avenue & 
Sandrord's Point R. R. Co. 2 m, 4-8)-.. g, 47 lb steel r. 
Pres. J. H. Hemptead, Sec. Oscar R. Steins. Capital 
$20,000. Work in progress; to be opened June l, 1887. 
office, loo E. Fourteenth St., New York. 

MERIDEN, CONN.— Merlden St. R. R. i% m, 
4-8% g, 35 lb r, 12 c, 56 h. Pres. G. R. Curtis, 
Sec.*& Treas. Chas. L. Rockwell, Auditor, H. S. Wil- 
cox, Man. John L. Blllard. Supt. DanT F. Barker. 
To be opened about Jan. 15. 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN. — New Britain Tramway 
Co., chartered by C. S. Lander. 3X m. Capital $25,000. 

NEW LON DON, CONN New London Horse Ry. 

Co. John Tebbetts, Incoporator. 

NEWBURYPORT, MASS. 4 m, 

1-n' ■ g. Pres. & Gen. Man. E. P. Shaw, Treas. Eben 
Sumner, capital $40, ooo. To be built early in the 
spring and opened June 1. 

NEWTON, MASS.— Newton St. Ry. Co. 5 m, 
4 8% g, 5c. 5 electric motors, 35 lb r. Pres. Horace 
B. Parker, V. Pres. LnclusG. Pratt, Treas. Herbert 
G. Pratt. Capital stock, $50,000. Present office, 87 
Milk st. Boston, Mass. Work will be commenced and 
the road opened in the spring of 1887. 

NEW YORK, N.Y.— St. Nicholas and Crosstown 
R. R. C o. (Incorporated and franchises partly 
granted.) 

OMAHA, NEB.— Cable Tramway Co. of Omaha, 
4 m, 4-8 1-2 g, 58 lb r, 10 c, each with grip; operated 
by cable. Pres. S R. JoLnson, V. Pres. L. B. Wil- 
liams, Sec. and Treas. C. E. Yost, Chief Engineer 
Robert GUlham. Capital stock, $300,000, General of- 
fice, 215 South 13th st. 

ORLANDO, ELA.— Orlando & Winter Park Ry. 
Co. 6 m, 4-8>g g, steam motors Pres. R. J. Glllham, 
sec. ceo. R. Newell, Treas. T. J. Beeks, Supt. & Eng. 
J. H. Abbott. Capital $100,000. To be opened In 
Feb. 1687. 



PEORIA, ILL. — East Bluff Horse R. R. Co. 1% 
m, 4-8)$ g, 30-40 lb r, 4 c,:.'4 h. Pres. N. Giles, Sec. R. 
R. Boureaud, Treas. M. E. Culver. Capital slock, 
$ll,oo(). Work In progress. Road to be opened Dec. 
15, 1886. 

PLYMOUTH, MASS.-Plymouth & Kingston St" 
R.R. co. 2)4 m. 4 x% g, r undecided, 6 to ioc, 10 
to 12 h. Capital Stock, $25,000. Joseph D. Thuiber 
and others Incorporators. Work to be begun in 
spring of 1887. 

PITTSBURG, PA.— Wilklnsburg and East Lib- 
erty Ry. Co. 3 m, 4-81-2 g, Johnson T rails, Pres. Ed. 
Jay Allen, Sec. and Treas, W. II. Allen. To use about 
5 c and 20 h. Not decided when road will be open- 
ed. Opltal stock, 115,000. Present office, 517 Wood st. 

RICHMOND, V.\. -Richmond Un. Pass. Ry. «'o" 
v. Hechler, Jr., and others incorporators. To be 
completed before May, 1688. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.-The Powell & Jack- 
son St. R.R Co. 11 m, 3-6 g. Pres. W. J. Adams, V. 
Pres. H. H. Lynch, Treas. W. II. Martin, Sec, G. H- 
Waggoner. Capital stock, $2,000,000. Work In pro. 
gress. Cable traction. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y.— Butternut St. Ry. Co. 2m, 
To be built In the spring of 1887. 

SAYRE, PA.— Sayre St. Ry.Co. Pres. Howard 
Elmer. No work done. 

STAMFORD, CONN J. B. Curtis and W. W 

Jllllsbee, Incorporators. 

UTICA, N. Y Utlca Belt Line St. Ry. Co. 8 m. 

15 c. Pres. Dr. C Tefft, v. Pres. w. A.Jones, Pec. 
and Gen. Man. Isaac J. Griffith, Treas. Chas. W. 
Mather. To be opened about Dec. i. W ork now In 
progress. 

WINSTED, CONN.— Geo. S. Rowe, Incorporator. 

WICHITA, KAN.-Riverslde and Suburban Ry. 
Co. Pres. J. O. Davidson, Sec. N. G. Lee. Capital 
stuck $ioo,ooo. Work now In progress, road to be 
opened about January, 18&7. 

VONKERS, N. Y.-Yonkers R. R. Co. 4.', m, 
4-8J4 g, 42-48 lb r, lo c, 45 h. Pres. D. N. Stanton, Sec. 
John P. Brennan, Asst. Treas. D. Perry Stanton. 
Capital f2oo,000. Office, Main st. n To be opened 
early in Jan. 



STREET RAILWAY STOCK QUOTATIONS. 



Corrected by H. L. GRANT, 145 Broadway, N. Y. City. 



New York Stocks. 



Bleecker St. & Fulton Ferry 

1st mort 

Broadway & Seventh avenue 

1st mort 

2d mort 

Broadway Surface Guaranteed 

Additional 

Brooklyn City— Stock 

1st mort 

Brooklyn Crosstown 

1st mort bonds 

Central Park North and East river. 

Con. mort. bonds 

Christopher & Tenth 

Bonds 

Central Crosstown 

1st mort 

Dry Dock, East B'way &. Battery.. . . 

1st mort consol 

Scrip 

42d & Grand St. Ferry 

1st mort 

42d St., Manhattan & St. Nlch. av.. 

1st mort 

2d mort. In. bonds 

Eighth Avenue— Stock 

scrip 

Houston, West St. & Pavonia Ferry 

1st mort 

Second Avenue— Stock 

1st mort 

Consol 

Sixth Avenue 

1st mort 

Third Avenue— Stock 

1st mort 

23d St.— Stock 

1st mort 

Ninth Avenue 

Chicago St. Railway 



Par. 


Amount. 


Period. 


Rate. 


Date. 




Bid. 


Asked. 


100 


$900,000 


J. & J. 


3/ 

/A 


January, 


1886 


28 


30 


1,000 


700,00 


J. & J. 


7 


July, 


1900 


116 


120 


100 


2,100,000 


Q.-J. 


2 


January, 


1886 


190 


200 


1,000 


1,500,000 


J. & D. 




June, 


1904 


103 


106 


1,000 


500,000 


J. & J. 


5 


July, 


1914 


103 


106 


1,000 


1,500.000 


J. * J. 


5 


July, 


1«24 




100 


1,000 


1,000,000 


J. Si J. 




July, 


1905 




100 


10 


2,000,000 


Q.-F. 


2 


August, 


1880 


165 


192 


1,000 


800,000 


J. & J. 




January, 


1686 


106 


110 


100 


200,000 


A. & O. 


4 


April, 


1686 


165 


170 


1,000 


400,000 


J. & J. 


7 


January, 


1S88 


105 


109 


100 


1,800,000 


Q.-J. 


2 


January, 


1S86 




118 


1,000 


1,200,000 


J. & D. 


7 


December, 


1902 


119 


121 


100 


650,000 


F. & A. 


2% 


February, 


1866 


120 


121 


1,000 


250,000 


A. & O. 


7 


October, 


1898 


110 


116 


100 


600,000 


Q.-F. 


1* 


January, 


1886 


155 


160 


1,000 


250,000 


M. & N. 


6 


November, 
February, 


1902 


118 


125 


:oo 


1,200,000 


Q.-F. 


2 


1866 




160 


500 


1,900,000 


J. & D. 




June, 
August, 


1893 


110 


113 


100 


1,200,000 


F. & A. 


6 


1914 


105 


107 


100 


748,000 


Q.-F. 


3 


August, 


1886 


220 


225 


1,000 


236,000 


A. & O. 


7 


April, 


1893 


111 


115 


100 


8,500,000 








35 


35% 
108% 


1,000 
1,000 


1,200,000 


M & S. 


5 




1910 


107 


1,200,000 


J. & J. 


6 




1915 


45 


50 


100 


1,600,000 


Q.-J. 


2 


October, 


1866 


190 


200 


100 


1,000,000 


F. & A. 


6 


August, 


1914 


105 


110 


100 


1,000,000 
250,000 


Q — F. 


2 


August, 
July, 


1885 


120 


130 


500 


J & J. 


7 


1894 


112 


113 


100 


500,000 


J. & J. 


5 


July, 


1886 




180 




1,862,000 


M. & N. 


5 


November, 


1909 


106 


107 


1,000 


550,000 


M. & N. 


7 


May, 


1688 


103 


100 


1,050,000 


M. & S. 




August, 
July, 


1885 


190 


201 


1,000 


500,000 


J. & J. 




1890 


110 


112 


100 


2,000,000 


Q.-F. 


3 


February, 


1886 


220 


230 


1,000 


2,000,000 


J. & J. 


7 


January, 


1890 


110 


112 


100 


600,000 


M. & N. 


5 


May, 


1885 


240 


250 


1,000 


250,000 


M. & N. 


7 


May, 


1893 


110 


113 


100 


800,000 




3 


.September, 


1885 


90 


100 


100 












299 


325 



IPii-Ila,- Street IE3 £111^x^3137- Steele . 



Corrected by Robekt Glendinning & Co., 303 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Citizens 

Continental 

Frankford & Southwark 

Germantown 

Green & Coates.. 

Hestonville 

Lombard & South 

People's 

Philadelphia City 

Philadelphia x Gray's Ferry. 

Philadelphia Traction 

Ridge Avenue 

Setond& Third 

Seventeenth & Nineteenth . . . 

Thirteenth & Fifteenth 

Union 

West Philadelph ia 



Par. Period. 



50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



Q.-J. 
J. & J. 
Q.-J. 
Q.-J. 

Q.-J. 



J. & J. 
J. & J. 



J. & Q. 
Q. —J. 
J. & J. 
J. & J. 
J. & J. 
J. & J. 



Amount. Rate. 



$500,000 
1 ,000,000 

750,000 
1,500,000 

5no,ooo 

2,050,000 

500,000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 

617,500 
5,000,000 

750,000 
1 ,060,200 

500,000 
1,000,000 
1,250,000 

750,000 



Date. 



Bid. 



120 

31% 

40 
140% 

83 
225 



143 
162 



Asked. 



130 
310 
100 

121% 

33 

96>f 



200 
150 
200 



154 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 1881 



Manufacturers and Dealers in Street Railway Supplies. 



AUTOMATIC SWITCHES. Page. 

M. M. White & Co., d31 W. 23d St. N. Y 160 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 23d st. N. Y... .186-187 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa.. 171 

AXLES. 

F. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty St., N. Y 165 

Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn, N. Y ...178-179 

A. Whitney & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa 167 

Frank H. A ndrews, 545 W. S3d St., N. Y — 186-187 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa... 171 
BEARINGS. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 186-187 

John Stephenson Co., New York 192 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York ..162 

Edward c. White, 531 W. 33d St., New York 159 

Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn.N.Y ....178-179 

Chaplin Mfg. Co., Bridgeport, Conn 164 

Bemls Car Box Co., Sprlngfleld, Mass 170 

Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa.... 171 
Chas. B. Miller, 2% Coentles slip, New York 166 

BOXES, JOURNAL. 

A. Whitney & sons, Philadelphia, Pa 167 

Lewis* Fowler, Brooklyn, N.Y 178-179 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d st., N. Y 186-187 

Chaplin Mfg. Co., Bridgeport, Conn 164 

Bemls Car Box Co., Sprlngfleld, Mass 170 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa.. .171 
Chas. B. Miller, 2,V Coentles slip, New York. . . . 166 
BRAKE RODS. 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N Y 178-179 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co , Limited, Phlla., Pa... 171 
Mordecal M Wilson, Agent, Troy, N. Y 166 

BRAKE SHOES. 

Frank H. Andrews. 545 W. 33d St., N. Y ....186-187 

John Stephenson CO., New York 192 

Wm. Wliarton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa... 171 
Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 178-179 

CABLE GRIPS. 

J. H. Gould, 9th and Market sts., Phlla., Pa.. ..172 
D. B. Anders, Philadelphia, Pa 177 

CARS, NEW 

John Stephenson Co., New York 192 

J. G. Brill & Co., Phlla., Pa 190-191 

The Felgel Car Co., 108 Wall st., N.Y 167 

Brownell & Wight Car Co., St. Louis, Mo 173 

J. M. Jones' Sons, West Troy, N. Y 172 

Pullman's Palace Car Co., Chicago, 111 189 

CARS, SECOND HANI). 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 156 

Brooklyn Railway Supply Co., 37 Walworth St., 
Brooklyn 184 

CAR HEATERS. 

The National stove Co., 243 Water St., N. Y .... 175 

CAR STARTERS. 

C. B. Broad well, 169 Laurel St., New Orleans, La.. 160 

CAR LAMPS. 

Geo. M. Clute, W. Troy, N. Y 1C6 

Josephine D. Smith, 350& 352 Pearl St., N. Y 163 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York.. .162 
Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 178-179 

CAR WHEELS. 

A. Whitney & sons, Philadelphia, Pa 167 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N.Y 178-179 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N.Y 186-187 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York... 162 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa... 171 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phlla., Pa. .169 

CAR WHEEL PRESSES. 
Watson & Stlllman, 204-210 E. 43d St., NY., ....166 

CAR SPRINGS. 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 178-179 

Frank H. Andrews, 645 W. 33d St., N. Y... .186-187 

Richard Vose, 13 Barclay St., jf. Y 162 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart. Building-, New York. ..162 
The A. French Spring Co., Limited, Pittsburg, 
Pa., Pugh & Russell General Agents 176 

CAR SEATS. 
Hale & Kllburn Mfg. Co., 48 & 50 N. 6th St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 162 

Gardner & Co., 643 to 657 W. 48th St., N.Y 161 

CAR SASH. 
Ayers' Patent Sash Holder Co., Stewart Build- 
ing, New York City 165 

CAR CEILINGS. 

Gardner & Co., 643 to 657 W. 48th St., N.Y lfll 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 178-179 

CASTINGS. 

Bowler & Co., Cleveland, O 160 

F. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty st., N. Y 165 

A. Whitney & Sons, Philadelphia. Pa 167 

Lewis & Fowler. Brooklyn, N. Y 178 179 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 186-187 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa .. 171 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phlla., Pa.. 169 

CURVED RAILS. 

Frank H. Andrews. 545 W. 33d St.. N. Y 186-187 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York. ..162 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 160 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Jolinstown, Pa ... 188 
Wm. Wharton Jr.. & Co.. Limited, Phlla., Pa.... 171 
Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 178-179 

CROSSINGS. 
Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y...186-1S7 
Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 162 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa.. 171 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 178-179 

Bowler & Co., 10 to 24 Winter st., Cleveland, O..160 

CURVED RAILS— Pat. Steel Groove*. 
Wm. Wharton Jr. & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa 171 

CHANNEL PLATES. 
Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y.... 186-187 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 160 

Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa.... 171 



CABLE ROADS. Page. 

D.J. Miller, 234 Broadway, N. Y 165 

Frank H Andrews, 515 W. 33d St., N. Y 186-if-v 

Poole & Hunt, Baltimore 170 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa... 171 
jOhnston Frog and switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 162 

Neftel & Oothout, 41 Liberty st. N.Y. City.... 159 
J. H. Gould, 9th and Market sts., Phila., Pa. ..172 
John A. Roebllng's sons Co., 117 <fe 119 Liberty 

St., N. Y 175 

O. W. Meysenburg & Co., 1S5 Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago, 111., and 204 N. 3d St., St. Louis, Mo ....175 

ELECTRIC RAILWAYS. 

Van Depoele Electric Manufg. Co 183 

FEED CUTTERS. 

Nordyke & Marmon Co., Indianapolis, Ind 167 

Belle City Mfg. Co., Racine, Wis 159 

Appleton Mfg. Co., 22 So. canal St., Chicago, 111.167 
The II. C. Staver Implement Co., 38 40 So. Canal 

tt., Chicago, 111 159 

FEED MILLS. 

Kdward P. Allls & Co., Milwaukee, Wis 157 

Nordyke & Marmen Co., Indianapolis, Ind 167 

Appleton Mfg. Co , 22 So. Canal st, Chicago, 111. .167 
The H. C. Staver ImplementCo.,38-40So. Canal 

St., Chicago, ill 159 

FROGS. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 186-187 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York. .162 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa... 171 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phlla., Pa.. 169 
Johnston Frog and switch Co., 307 Walnut st., 

Philadelphia, Pa 162 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 178-179 

Bowler & Co., 10 to 24 Winter St., Cleveland, O. 160 

FARE BOXE«. 
Wales Manuf. Co., 76 and 78 East Water St., 

Syracuse, N. Y 104 

Tom L. Johnson. Indianapolis, Ind 169 

Lewis &, Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. . .178-179 

J. B. Slawson, 16 W. 46th St., New York 168 

John Stephenson Co., New York 192 

FARE ENVELOPES. 

Morgan Envelope Co., Sprlngfleld, Mass 156 

Sam'IRaynor « Co., 117 William St., New York. 175 

FARE REGISTERS, STATIONARY. 

Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn. N.Y 178-179 

Standard Index and Register Co, 138 Fulton st. 

New York 181 

Railway Register Mfg. Co., 1193 Bdy., N. Y.. 180 

FARE COLLECTORS. 
Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co., Brooklyn.N. Y 178-179 

GUTTERS. 

Bowler & Co., Cleveland, O 160 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa... 171 

GROOVED CURVES. 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N.Y 156 

FraDk H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 186-187 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York... 162 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty st., N. Y 160 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa 188 

Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa.... 171 

HARNESS. 

Charles E. Berry, Cambridge, Mass 164 

Rufus Martin & Co., 13 Park row, N. Y 149,167 

HYDRAULIC JACKS. 
Watson & Stlllman, 204-210 E. 43d st , N. Y 166 

HORSE SHOES. 
P. F. Burke, 860 Dorchester ave.. South Boston 165 

F. P. Roberge, 1741 Broadway, N. Y 166 

Bryden Forged Horseshoe Co., Catasauqua, Pa.185 

HOKSE NAILS. 

Champion Horse Nail Co., Appleton, Wis 157 

Putnam Nail Co., NeponsetP. O., Boston, Mass 163 

KNEES. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33d st., N. Y. 186-187 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty st.. New York :eo 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, New York... 162 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa. ..171 
Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia. Pa 162 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 178179 

LUBRH 'ANTS. 
The Lelb Lubricating Co. , 196 Chicago St., Buf- 
falo, N. Y 158 

Rufus Martin & Co., 13 Park row, N. Y 149,167 

METALLIC RAILWAY. 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa 171 

Metallic Street Railway Supply Co., Albany N.Y 165 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 156 

D. F.Longstreet, Providence, R. 1 160 

MATTING. 

Warneck & Tomer, 211 E. 22d St., N. Y 167 

Lynn & Pettlt, 707 Market St., Phlla. 165 

Edward Beadle, 1193 Broadway, N. Y 175 

MOTORS. 

Pole St. Car Motor System, 150 So. Fourth St., 
Philadelphia, Pa 174 

MOTORS— Elecric. 
Van Depoele Electric Mfg. Co., 203 Van Buren 
St., Chicago, 111 is3 

PEDESTALS. 

John Stephenson Co., New York 192 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33d St., N. Y. .186-187 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa... 171 

PANELS. 

Gardner & Co., 643 to 657 W. 48th St., N. Y 161 

RAILS. 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N.Y 156 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Building, N. Y 162 

F, W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty st., N. Y 165 



Page 

Pennsylvania Steel Co., 160 Broadway, N. Y 173 

Carnegie, Phlpps & Co., Pittsburg, Pa 166 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N. Y 186-187 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 160 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa 188 

Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co. Limited, Phlla., Pa.. . .171 
O. W. Meysenburg & Co., 185 Dearborn st., Chi- 
cago, 111 , and 204 N. 3d St., St. Louis, Mo 157 

Cambria Iron & Steel Works, 218 So. Fourth St., 
Philadelphia, Pa 157 

SAND BOXES. 
Car irack Friction Appliance Co., 19 Tremont 
row, Boston, Mass 159 

STEEL RAILS. 

Carnegie, Phlpps & Co., Pittsburg, Pa 166 

Cambria Iron & Steel Works, 218 So. Fourth St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 157 

Humphreys & sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 156 

F. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty St., N. Y 165 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa ...171 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa 188 

Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut St., 

Philadelphia, Pa 162 

O. W. Meysenburg & Co., 185 Dearborn St., Chi- 
cago, 111., and 204 N. 3d St., St. Louis, Mo 157 

SEATS «fc SEAT SPRINGS. 
Hale & Kllburn Manufg Co. Philadelphia, Pa.. .162 

SWITCHES. 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., 25th st. & Wash- 
ington ave., Philadelphia, Pa 171 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 156 

M. M. White * Co., 531 West 33rd st, N. Y 160 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd st., N. Y.l86-if7 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 178-179 

Johnson Steel Rail Co., Johnstown, Pa 188 

Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut st., 

Philadelphia, Pa i<2 

Bowler & Co., 10 to 24 Winter st., Cleveland, O. 160 

STREET RAILWAY BUILDERS. 
Metallic St. Railway Supply Co., Albany, N. Y. 165 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Phlla., Pa 171 

Delano & Richardson, 47 Broadway, N. Y 166 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 160 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. Y if 6-187 

A. J. Hutchinson, 95 Liberty St., N. Y 165 

Neftel & Oothout, 41 Liberty st.N. Y.Clty 159 

M. W. Conway, 487 Monroe St. Brooklyn, N.Y.. 159 

STREET RAILWAY SUPPLIES. 

John Stephenson Co., New York 192 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y '156 

Metallic St. Railway Supply Co., Albany, N. Y. 165 

Pugh & Russell, Stewart Bidg., N. Y 162 

F. W. Jesup & Co., 67 Liberty St., N. Y 165 

Wm. P. Craig, 95 Liberty st., N. Y 160 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. V 178-179 

Frank H. Andrews, 543 West 33rd St., N. Y. J86-1S7 
Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa. 171 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phlla., Pa.. 169 
Brooklyn Railway Supply Co., 37 Walworth St., 

Brooklyn 1^4 

Fulton Foundry Co., 202 Merwin st. Cleveland.O.171 
M. W. Conway, 487 Monroe st. Brooklyn, N.Y. 159 

Edward Beadle, 1193 Broadway, N. Y. City 175 

Rufus Martin & Co., 13 Park row, N. Y 14°,167 

O. W. Meysenburg & Co., 185 Dearborn st., Chi- 
cago 111., and 204 N. 3d St., St. Louis, Mo 157 

Cambria Iron & Steel Works, 218 So. Fourth st., 
Philadelphia, Pa 157 

STREET RAILWAY TOOLS. 
Wm. Wharton Jr. & Co. Limited, Phlla, Pa 171 

SNOW PLOWS. 
Frank H Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. Y 186-187 

Augustus Day, Detroit 168 

Brooklyn Railway supply Co., 37 Walworth st., 
Brooklyn 134 

TURNOUTS. 
Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co., 25th st. & Washington 

ave., Philadelphia, Pa 171 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. Y . 186-187 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phila., Pa 169 
Bowler & Co., 14 Winter st., Cleveland, 160 

TURN TABLES. 
Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd st., N. Y. 186-187 
Way Foundry Co., 23d & Wood sts., Phlla., Pa. .169 

Bowler&Co., 14 Winter st.. Cleveiand.O leo 

O. W. Meysenburg & Co., 185 Dearborn st., Chi- 
cago, 111., and 204 N.3d St., St. Louis, Mo 157 

TRACK CASTINGS. 

Humphreys & Sayce, 1 Broadway, N. Y 156 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd st , N. Y. 186-187 
Wm Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phila., Pa.. .171 

Augustus Day, Detroit 168 

Way Foundry Co.. 23d & Wood sts., Phila., Pa. 169 
Johnston Frog and Switch Co., 307 Walnut st., 

Philadelphia, Pa xcs 

Bowler & Co., 14 Winter st., Cleveiand.O 160 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N. Y 178-179 

O. W. Meysenburg & Co., 185 Dearborn st., Chi- 
cago, 111., and 204 N. 3d St., St. Louis. Mo ....157 

TRACK SCRAPERS. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 W. 33d St., N.Y 186-187 

Brooklyn Railway Supply Co., 37 Walworth St., 
Brooklyn 184 

TARNISHES. 
John Babcock & Co., 2 Liberty sq., Boston Mass.157 
Parrott Varnish Co., Bridgeport, Conn 157 

WHEEL PRESSES. 

Watson & Stlllman, 204-210 E. 43d st., N. Y 166 

Wm. Wharton, Jr., & Co., Limited, Phlla., Pa.. 171 

VETERINARY REMEDIES. 

Lawrence, Williams & Co., Cleveland, O 157 

Wm. Somervllle & Sons, 127 Erie St., Buffalo,. . .159 

WHEELS. 

Frank H. Andrews, 545 West 33rd St., N. Y .186-187 

Lewis & Fowler, Brooklyn, N.Y 178-179 

A. Whitney <£ Sons, Philadelphia, Pa 167 

Bowler & Co., 14 Winter st., Cleveland, O 160 



January, 1887. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



155 



PERSONAL DIRECTORY OF STREET 

SUPPLY MEN. 



RAILWAY 



Page. 

Allls, Edw. P. and Co., Milwaukee, Wis. Edw. P. 

Allls, Prop.; Edw. Reynolds, Supt 157 

AUyn, Chas. B., Pres. Brooklyn Railway Supply 

CO 184 

AUyn, Jno., Sec. and Treas. Brooklyn Railway 

Supply Co 184 

Anders, D. B., 2,313 Ridge ave., Pn.Ua., Pa 177 

Anderson, A. A., Tom. L. Johnson, Indianapolis, 

Ind 169 

Andrews, Frank H., P. T. Lerned, General Agent, 

545 West 33d St., N. Y 186,187 

Appleton Mfg. Co., 22 So. Canal St., Chicago, 111. 167 
Ayers Pat. Sash Holder Co., Stewart Bldg., New 

York 165 

Baldwin, A. L., Sec. and Treas. Standard Index 

and Register Co 181 

Baldwin, Ell, Pres. Standard Index & ReglsterCo 181 
Beadle and Courtney, Edw. Beadle, Chas. Court- 
ney, 1193 Broadway, N. Y 180 

Beadle, Edw., Beadle and Courtney 157,180 

Belle City Mfg. Co., Racine, Wis 157 

Bemls, S. A., Pres. The Bemls Car Box Co 170 

Bemls Car Box Co., The. S. A. Bemls Pres.; Geo. 
B. Hewlett, sec. and Treas.; Geo. M. Hoadley, 
Supt.; Chas. G. Stearns, Agent (20 Piatt St., 

New York,) Springfield, Mass 170 

Berry, Chas. E., Cambridge, Mass 104 

Blnns, D. W., V.-Pres. Brooklyn Ry. Supply Co. 184 

Bowler and Co 160 

Braden, Oliver, 119 So. 4th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 160 

Brill, G. M., J. G. Brill and Co 190,191 

Brill, J. G. and Co. J. G. Brill, G. M. Brill, Jas. 

Rawle, Philadelphia, Pa 190,191 

Brill, J. G., J. G. Brill and Co 190,191 

Broadwell, C. B., New Orleans, La 160 

Brooklyn RaUway Supply Co. Chas. B. AUyn, 
Pres.; D. W. Blnns, V.-Pres.; Jno. AUyn, 

Sec. and Treas 184 

Brownell and Wight Car Co. B. F. Brownell, 
Pres.; A. S. Partridge, Sec. and Treas. St. 

Louis, Mo 173 

Brownell, B. F. Pres. Brownell and Wight Car Co. 173 
Bryden Forged Horse Shoe Works, Ld. Oliver 
Williams, Treas.; T. F. Frederick, Supt.; 
J. B. White, General Sales Mang. (288 Green- 
wich St. New York) Catasauqua, Pa 185 

Burke, P. F. 360Dorchesterave. So. Boston, Mass. 165 
Butler, W. T., Gen. Mgr. Car Track Friction Ap- 

pUance Co., 19 Tremont row, Boston, Mass.. 159 
Cambria Iron & Steel Works, 218 So. Fourth st., 

Philadelphia, Pa 157 

Carnegie, Phlpps and Co., Pittsburg.Pa 166 

Carpenter, S. M. Prop. Fulton Foundry, Cleve- 
land, 171 

Car Track Friction Appliance Co., W. T. Butler, 
Gen. Mgr., 19 Tremont row, Boston, Mass. ... 159 

Champion Horse Nail Co., Appleton, Wis 157 

Chaplin Mfg. Co., The, Bridgeport, Conn. IX c. 
Knowlton, Pres. Boston, Mass., W. C. Mead, 

Sec. and Treas., H. McKenzle, Supt 164 

Clute, Geo. M. West Troy, N. Y 166 

Conway, M. W. 487 Monroe st., Brooklyn, N. Y. 159 

Courtney, Chas., Beadle and Courtney 157 

Craig, Wm. P. 95 Liberty st., N. Y 160 

Day, Augustus, Detroit, Mich 168 

DeLamater, L. M. Sec. John Stephenson Co. Llm. 192 

Delano, F. M. 47 Broadway, N Y 166 

Egerton, Alfred, Metallic St. Ry. Supply Co 165 

Emerick, John A. Pres. Johnston Railroad Frog 

and Switch Co 162 

Felgel Car Co., — Feigel, Rogers, Mew Ut- 
recht, N. Y., and 108 Wall st., N. Y 167 

Fowler, Geo. L. Editor St. Ry. Journal 140 

Fowler, J. W. Pres. Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Coi78,i79 
Frederick, T. P. Supt. Bryden Forged Horse 

Shoe Works 185 

French, A.. Chairman The A. French Spring Co. 176 
French, J. E., Vice Chairman The A. French 

Spring Co 176 

French Spring Co., Llm., The A. A. French, 
Chairman; J. E. French, Vice Chairman; Geo. 
W. Morris, Gen. Mgr.; D. C. Noble, 

Secy, and Treas. Pittsburg, Pa 176 

Fulton Foundry, S. M. Carpenter, Prop. C. J. 

Langdon, Sec, Cleveland, 171 

Gardner and Co. Wm. Gardner, John M. Gard- 
ner, Samuel H. Gardner, 643-657 W. 48th st. 161 

Gardner, John M. Gardner and Co 161 

Gardner, Samuel H. Gardner and Co 161 



Page. 

Gardner, Wm., Gardner and Co 161 

Gibbon, T. H. MetalUc St. Ry. Supply Co 165 

Glazier, H. A. Jarvls Engineering Co 173 

Gould Cable System, J. H. Gould, 9th and Market 

sts., Philadelphia, Pa 172 

Grant, J. A. Sec. Jarvls Engineering Co 173 

Gould, J. H. Gould cable system 172 

Gulbert, J. S. Richard Vose 182 

Hale and Kllburn Mfg. Co., Cheney Kilburn, 

Pres., H. S. Hale, Treas., J. Warren Hale, 

Sec, 48 and 50 N. Sixth st. Philadelphia Pa. . 162 
Hale, H. S. Treas. Hale and Kllburn Mfg. Co.... 102 
Hale, J. Warren, Sec. Haleand Kllburn Mfg. Co. . 163 

Harris, E. P. Gen. Man. St. Ry. Journal 140 

Hewlett.Geo. B. Sec. and Treas. Bemls Car Box Co 170 
Hoadley, Geo. M. Supt. The Bemls Car Box Co.. 170 
Holwell, A. K. Treas. Nordyke and Marmon Co.. . 167 

Humphreys and Sayce. 1 Broadway, N. Y 156 

Hutchinson, A. J. 95 Liberty st. N. Y 165 

Jarvls Engineering Co. K. M. Jarvls Pres., A. F 

Upton, Treas. andG. Man., J. A. Grant, Sec, 

H. A. Glasler, (Chicago) Western Manager ... 173 

Jarvls, K. M. Pres. Jarvls Engineering Co 173 

Jesup, F. W. and Co., 65 Liberty st., N.Y 165 

Johnston, Edw. H. Man. Johnston Railroad Frog 

and Switch Co 162 

Johnson Steel St. Rail Co., Wm. Wharton, Jr., 

and Co., Ld., Pugh and Russell Agents, A. J. 

Moxham, Pres., Johnstown, Pa 188 

Johnson, Tom L 169 

Johnston Railroad Frog and Switch Co., Jno. 

A. Emerick, Pres., Edw. H. Johnston, Man., 

Samuel Lees, Treas . Chester, Pa 162 

Jones, R. H., Pres. B. C. Pole Motor Co 174 

Jones' Sons, J. M. Walter A. Jones, Jones 173 

Jones, Walter A. J. M. Jones' Sons 173 

Kllburn, Cheney, Pres. Hale and Kilburn Mfg.Co 162 
Knowlton, D. C, Boston, Mass., Pres. Chaplin 

Mfg. CO 164 

Langdon, C. J. Sec. Fulton Foundry 171 

Lawrence, Williams and Co., Cleveland, 157 

Lees, Samuel, Treas. Johnston Railroad Frog and 

Switch Co., Chester, Pa 162 

Lelb Lubricating Co., Buffalo, N. Y 158 

Lerned, F. T. Gen. Agt. Frank H. Andrews.. 186, 1S7 
Lewis Danl. F. Treas. Lewis & Fowler Mfg. Co.178,179 
Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Co., J. W. Fowler, Pres., 

Dan'l F. Lewis, Treas., H. C. Simpson, sec, 

E. Packer, L. E. Robert 178,179 

Lynn & Pettit, 707 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa. .165 

Lynn, , 707 Market St., Philadelphia, Pa 165 

McGraw, J. H., Sec. St. Ry. Journal 140 

McKenzle, H. Supt. Chaplin Mfg. Co 164 

Mallinckrodt Street Car Brake Co., St. Loute, Mo. 159 
Martin, Rufus and Co., 13 Park row, N. Y.. ..149,167 

Marmon, D. W. Sec. Nordyke and Marmon Co 167 

Mead, W. C. Sec. and Treas. Chaplin Mfg. Co.... 164 
Metallic St. Ry. Supply Co., Alfred Egerton, T. 

H. Gibbon, Albany, N. Y 165 

Masson,JMilton I., Estate of J. B Slawson 168 

Meysenburg, O. W., O. W. Meysenburg and Co. . 157 
Meysenburg, O. W., and Co, O. W . Meysenburg, 

A. J. Soderer. 185 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111., 

and 204 N. 3rd st., St. Louis, Mo 157 

Miller, Chas. B.,2VCoentles slip, New York City. . 166 

Miller, D. J., 234 Broadway, N. Y 165 

Morris, Geo. W., Gen. Mgr. The A. French Spring 

CO 176 

Moxham, A. J., Pres. Johnson Steel St. Rail Co.. iss 
National Stove Co., J. R. Thomas, Treas., 243 

Waterst., N.Y 175 

Neftel and Oothout. 41 Liberty St., N. Y 159 

Noble, D. C. Secy, and Treas. The A. French 

Spring Co 176 

Nordyke, A. H., Pres. Nordyke & Marmon Co. 167 
Nordyke and Marmon Co , Indianapolis, Ind., 

A. H. Nordyke, Pres.; D. W. Marmon, Sec; A. 

K. Hollowell, Treas 167 

Packer, E., Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Co 178,179 

Parrott Varnish Co., Bridgeport, Conn 157 

Partridge, A. S., Sec. and Treas. Brownell and 

Wight Car Co 173 

Pennsylvania Steel Co., 160 Broadway, N. Y., and 

208 So. 4th St., Philadelphia 173 

Pettit, , 707 Marketst., Philadelphia, Pa. . . . 165 

Pole, BenJ. C, Engineer B. C. Pole Motor Co 174 

Pole Motor Co., The B.C. R. H. Jones, Pres., 

Benj. C. Pole Engineer, Jules viennot Sec. 

and Treas. 150 So. Fourth st., Philadelphia... 174 
Poole and Hunt, Baltimore, Md 170 



Page. 

Post and Co., Cincinnati, 161 

Powers, E. L., N. W. Mgr. St. Ry. Journal IU0 

Pugh and Russell, D. W. Pugh, J. S. Fugh, F. D. 
Russell, Stewart Building, N. Y., Adams Ex- 
press Building, Chicago 162 

Pugh, D . W., Pugh and Russell 162 

Pugh, J. S., Pugh and Russell 162 

Pullman, Chas. E-, Pullman's Palace Car Uo.... 189 
Pullman's Palace Car Co. Chas. E. Pullman Mgr. 
St. Car Dept. Chicago, 111., Pullman, 111., and 

Detroit, Mich 189 

Putnam Nail Co., Neponset P. O., Boston 163 

Railway Register Manufacturing Co., James 
McCredle, Pres., Beadle and Courtney, 1193 
Broadway, New York), General Agents; Buf- 
falo, N. Y 180 

Rawle, James, J. G. Brill and Co 190,191 

Raynor, Samuel, and Co., 117 William St., N. Y.. 175 

Reynolds, Edward, Supt. E. P. AUis and Co 157 

Richardson, Philip, 47 Broadway, N. Y 166 

Roebllng's, Sons, John A. Trenton, N. J., 117-119 

Liberty st., N. Y 175 

ltoberge, F. P., 1,741 Broadway, N. Y 166 

Robert, L. E., Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Co 178,179 

Russell, F. D., Pugh and Russell 162 

Shlppy, H. L., Manager N. Y. Warehouse Jno. A. 

Roebllng's Sons Co 176 

Simpson, H. C, Sec. Lewis and Fowler Mfg. Co.178,179 

Silver, John S. Richard Vose 182 

Sliver, Wm. S. Richard vose 182 

Slawson, J. B,, Estate, Milton I. Masson,Agent, 
John Stephenson Co., Llm.,Agents,365 Avenue 

A, New York 168 

Sleeper, Joseph A., Pres. Van Depoele Electric 

Manufacturing Co 183 

Smith, Charles G., Josephine D. Smith 163 

Smith, Josephine D. Josephine D. Smith, Chas. 

G. Smith 163 

Somervllle, Wm., and Sons, Buffalo, N. Y 159 

Soderer, A. J., O. W. Meysenburg and Co 157 

Standard Index and Register Co., EU Baldwin, 
Pres.; W. S. Baldwin, Sec. and Treas.; A. L. 
Baldwin, C. B. Baldwin, representatives, 138 

Fulton St., N. Y 181 

Staver Implement Co., The H. C, 38 and 40 So. 

Canal st., Chicago, 111 159 

Stearns, Chas. G., 20 Piatt st. N.Y.Agents, Bemls 

Car Box CO 170 

Stephenson, John, Pres. John Stephenson Co. Llm. 192 
Stephenson, John, Co., Llm., John Stephenson, 
Pres., L. M. De Lamater, Sec, Henry C. Val- 
entine, Treas., 47 E. 27th St., N. Y. (Pugh 
and Russell General Representatives, which 

see.) 192 

Stiles, A. K., Manager Van Depoele Electric Man- 
ufacturing Co 183 

Street Railway Journal, E. P. Harris, General 
Manager; George L. Fowler, Editor; J. H. 
McGraw, Sec; H. M. Swetland, Treas.; E. L. 

Powers, N. W. Manager 140 

Swetland, H. M., Treas. Street Ry. Journal 140 

Thomas, J. R., National Stove Co 175 

Upton, A F., Treas. and General Manager, Jarvls 

Engineering Co 173 

Valentine, Henry C, Treas. Jno. Stephenson 

CO. Ld 192 

Van Depoele, Chas. J., Electrician, Van Depoele 

Electric Mfg. Co 183 

Van Depoele Electric Mfg. Co., Jos. A. Sleeper, 
Pres.; A. K. Stiles, Mang.; W. A. Stiles, Treas. 
C. J. Van Depoele, Electrician, Chicago, 111.. 183 
Viennot, Jules, sec. and Treas. B. C. Pole Motor 

Co 174 

Vose, Richard, J. S. Gulbert, Jno. S. Silver, Wm. 

S. Silver. 13 Barclay st. New York 182 

Wales Mfg. Co., W. S. Wales, Treas., Syracuse, 

N. Y 164 

Wales, W. S., Treas. Wales Mfg. Co 164 

Warneck and Toffler, 111 East 22d st. New York. . 167 
Watson and Stlllman, 204-210 East 43d st. N. Y.. 166 
Way Foundry Co., Way, Rhodes and Blankley, 

23d and Wood sts. Philadelphia, Pa 169 

Wharton, Wm., Jr. and Co. Ld 171 

White, E. C, 531 West 33d st, New York 159 

White, J. B., 288 Greenwich St., General Sales- 
man Bryden Forged Horse Shoe Works, Ld... 185 

White, M. M. and Co. 531 West 33d st 160 

Whitney, A. and Sons, Philadelphia, Fa 16; 

Williams, Oliver, Treas. Bryden Forged Horsa 
Shoe Works 185 



156 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 1881 



St. Louis Matters. 

Received too late for classincation under "Notes 
anl Items." 

Winter Las arrived since I wrote to you, 
and I find the ice and snow just as cold 
and disagreeable as ever. Our street rail- 
road friends get their share of it and it's a 
tolerably good share too. If it snows to 
the depth of an inch it mixes with the dirt 
and swells up like yeast until it covers 
everything; then when the railroad com- 
panies scrape it from their tracks tbey 
must carry it away. The mayor has just 
called the attention of the police to the 
matter, to see that the ordinance is compli- 
ed with. Of course this is the way it is done 
in New York, and everybody has been 
there, especially when it snowed. We are 
not supposed to be behind you in auy thing 
if we can help it and can make the horse 
railroad people pay for it. The bill for the 
elevated road in St. Charles street passed 
our House of Delegates last week but it 
has to go through the Council yet and there 
is no doubt but it will receive its quietus 
there. The Missouri Railroad Company have 
received permission to change theirmotive 
power from horse to cable or electricity. 
The other ordinances mentioned in my last 
letter for new street railways stand about 
as they were. On the night of the 5th inst. 
the car house of the cable line went up in 
smoke; all the summer cars were destroyed 
and their grips and close cars except ten 
of each on the road at the time. The power 
house was not injured so there was compara- 
tively speaking no stoppage of business 
except from lack of cars. Mr. Maffit of 
the Missouri line very kindly helped them 
out by giving them some of his cars to 
bridge over with. Messrs. Brill & Co. of 
Philadelphia, Brownell& Wight of St.Louis 
and others are rebuilding and making new 
cars for them to replace those lost and 
damaged, and in a short time the company 
expect to be better prepared than ever to 
handle their growing business. Rumor 
has it that a Boston syndicate has purch- 
ased the road and will take possession next 
March. Our good-looking friend Simpson, 
Secretary of the Lewis & Fowler Manufac- 
turing Company, has captured the cable 
line with his stove; their cars, what they 
have left, are now being fitted with them. 
I suppose the other lines will have to follow 
suit, but I think a stove in a street car is a 
terrible nuisance; the air becomes vitiated 
as a rule, and if you are near the stove you 
are roasted and opened right up for a first 
class cold. If it is under the seat and you 
try to hold it down, which you can't, then 
you are made the laughing stock of the 
oar, but it seems to me that is the only 



place for it if it is at all practical and can 
be arranged so that a man won't burn his sit- 
down. Simpson's friends will be sorry 
to hear that he has been laid ap sick in 
bed at Barnum's Hotel, this city, for about 
a month. They need not all write at once. 
He is convalescent now. 

I understand Mr. Maffit will place about 
ninety open cars on his lines next summer. 

Mr. Walsh will place about thirty on 
his recent purchase and the cable folks will 
require about as many. Wishing you 
a merry Christmas, I remain yours, etc., 

St. Louis. 

A Tramway in China. 

At Hongkong a cable tramway is con- 
structed from the town to the Peak, a range 
of very steep hills, on which are fine villa 
residences, and where the climate is more 
salubrious than near the harbor. The in- 
cline where they have to work is 4,800 feet 
long, and the line, which is partly single 
and partly double, is laid with 35 pound 
steel rails on steel sleepers. The gradients 
vary between 1 in 2 and 1 in 10, closely 
following the natural contour of the ground. 
The total height to which carriages have to 
be raised is 1,300 feet, and the ropes, of 
which one is the working rope and the other 
the safety rope, run on separate sets of 
friction rollers. The carriages are attached 
to each end of the ropes, and as one pair 
of carriages ascends the incline the other 
pair descends. Each car is to contain sixty 
passengers, the maximum load being 7J 
tons at each end of the ropes. The working 
rope is passed over a pair of drums 8 feet 
io diameter, and the safety rope over one 
drum, the drums being fixed at the top of 
the incline and driven by two compound 
steam engines, 40 nominal horse power each. 
The speed of the cars is to be six miles an 
hour. 



Business Notes. 

Magnolia Metal— F. Jordan writes: 
Chas. B. Miller, Esq., 2 j . Coenties Slip, City. 

Dear Sir: I take pleasure Instating that during my 
connection with the Mobile & Ohio Railroad as Pur- 
chasing Agent, I ordered for trial a lot of your " Anti- 
friction Metal,'' which was thoroughly tested by the 
Master Mechanic, and It gave such satisfactory re- 
sults that he ever afterwards made requisitions upon 
me from time to time for this metal, and pronounced 
It the best of the kind he ever used. 

Yours very truly, 

F. Jordan. 

Suit. Duty of the East Cleveland road. speaklDg 
of the treatment of car horses, writes as follows: 

Cleveland, Dec 1, 1S86. 
Lawrence, Williams & Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Gentlemen:— In reply to your inquiry as to our 
opinion of Gombault's Caustic Balsam, we have been 
using it for three or four years in our stables. Have 
now 550 horses and have probably treated nearly or 
quite a hundred horses In the past year; using It for 



all kinds of leg or shoulder lameness, strplns, diph- 
theria, pink eye, etc., and must say that for any 
case where blistering Is necessary we find It to be 
just what we need and to do what you claim for It 
and a perfectly safe remedy to use. We could not 
well «lo without it, and can freely recommend It to 
horsemen. 

(Signed) Ed win Duty, Supt. 

East Cleveland K. R. 
The above company have used over six dozen bot- 
tles during tne past year and which speaks pretty 
plainly tor itself as to what they think of It. 



SPECIAL NOTICES. 



Rates for Special Notices. 

Advertisements of Street Railway Property 
"Wanted "or "For Sale," " Positions Wanted " or 
" Men Wanted," or similar matter Inserted under 
this heading at 10 c. per line, eight words to a line. 



WANTED— A capable man to manage a line of 
Street Railroad now in operation. Glverefer- 
ence, experience and extent of roads managed, and 
state salary expected. W. T. H., Care Street 
Railway Joubnal, 113 Liberty st., New York. 



FOR SALE. — Thirty-five second hand Toledo 
Heaters In good condition at $10 each, f. o. b. In 
New York City. Lewis & Fowler Manufacturing 
Co., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



ANTED— Capitalist to Invest money in the 
best Cable Grip yet invented. First-class 
inducements and best of references. Reliable, care 
Street Railway Journal. 



ANTED— Second hand, reversible seats, open 
cars in good condition. Address, stating 
name of manufacturer, price, etc., Geo. W. Hersey, 
S. R. & B., 87 Summer street, Boston, Mass. 



ANTED— Position as superintendent or Fore- 
man with some good street railroad, by a 
thoroughly practical and experienced street railroad 
man who has had 15 years' experience In the busl- 
n( ss; can refer to some of the most prominent street 
railroad men of the country. Address R. P. A., care 
Street Ry. Journal, 113 Liberty St., New York. 



ANTED— Position as Superintendent on a 
street railroad by an experienced man. N. 
Y. City references. Willing to go South or West. 
Parties wishing a good, steady man, and one able 
and willing to look sharp after all the minute details 
of a road will please address Superintendent, care 
Street Railway Journal, 113 Liberty St., New York. 



SUPERINTENDENT.— Advertiser of ability and 
good managing capacity desires an engagement 
as superintendent of surface railroad; experienced 
In European and New York systems; would take full 
charge, Including stables and treatment, of sick 
horses if desirable ; first-class references. Address 
MANAGER, care Street Railway Journal, 113 Lib- 
erty stieet, New York. 



Second Hand One-Horse Street Cars 
in good condition. 

HUMPHREYS & SAYCE, 
1 Broadway, New York. 



FOR SALE. 

Steel Rails, T and Street Patterns, all 
weights ; Spikes, Fishplates, Bolts, 
Wrought Iron Knees, Etc, 
Light Steel T Rails always on hand. 
Old Rails taken in trade, or purchased 
for remanufacture. 

HUMPHREYS & SAYCE, 

No. I Broadway, New York. 



w 



w 



w 



w 



STREET RAILWAYS AND PAVING. 

T. WILLIAM HARRIS, 

Contracting Engineer for Public Works, 

Water and Gas Works, Sewerage, St. Railways & Paving. 

Headquarters at office of Arthur Hodges, Civil Engineer. 

19 EXCHANGE PLACE, BOSTON, MASS. 




AMERICAN RAILWAY PUBLISHING CO., 



Lakeside Building, Chicago. 



1 13 Liberty Street, New York. 



Januahy, 188V 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



15" 



The Best Roller Feed Mill 

ON THE MARKET. 

'\fM-f'ki „ "The Milwaukee Granulator." 

||||S^^^s')5|^S \ . ■ .- .. .IiimI iIm- riling '«>>' Ktreel Railway 
«BSB^MmZ-|!^^^^^^ Write for Descriptive Circular, Triers, etc. 

iMFf. Edw - p - A||is & c °- 

Either Geared or Belt DrlveD. Reliance Works, Milwaukee, W is. 


CAMBRIA Qjrri 

Street Rails U 1 LLL 

Address, 

CAMBRIA IRON CO., 

218 SO. FOURTH ST., PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


PRG AN ENVELOPE f,0., 

^^^^^ ftfl A ill i r~ a oti mrno /-y"r^ XX "^^ 

MANUFACTURERS OF 


M Parrot! Varnish Go,, 

# ""Is" VARNISHES. 

/ \ Bridgeport, Conn., U.S.A. 

YSEPARROTT r 


FARE ENVELOPES, 


0. W, MEYSENBURG & CO, 

n i i x\ m 1 HIT k 1 1 

Street Ry. Track Material. 


204 No. Third St., St. Louis. 185 Dearborn St., Chicago. 


Springfield., Mass. 




CHAMPION HORSE NAILS. 

Manufactured from very best Swedish Metal. Will 
not split. Are accurately pointed, tough, strong 
and hold the shoes. Soft enough to clinch readily ; 
stiff enough to drive without tending. All nails 
uniform and perfect. They are used in thousands of 
shops with the best of satisfaction, and are especial- 
ly liked by " floor-men " for their good reliable driv- 
ing. Made In two patterns, "large heads" and 

" CITT HEADS." 

QUALITY GUARANTEED. 

Nos. i, 50c; 5,28c; 6, 25c; 7, 23c; 8, 22c; 9, 21c; 10, 20c. 

Champion Horse Nail Co., Appleton Wis, 




° s to 



JOHN BABC0CK& C? 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

RAI LWAY C AR VAR NISHES 



ForLame and Strained Horses use Gombaulfs Caustic Balsam 



THE GREAT FRENCH VETERINARY REMEDY. 



ST REST CAR BARN SUPERINTENDENTS will find this to be a safe, speedy and reliable remedy for Curb. Splint, Sweeney, Poll Evil, Grease Heel, 
Capped Hock, Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, Mange, Skin Diseases, Old Sores, Dropsical Affections, Inflammations, Throat Difficulties, Swellings or 
Ulcerations, Lameness from spavin, Ringbone and other bony tumors, and many other diseases or aliments ot horses or mules. Will quickly remove all bunches 
or blemishes, without leaving any scar or other injurious effects. It can also be reduced with sweet or raw linseed oil, and used as a most valuable liniment for 
all kinds of simple lameness, strains, etc. It surpasses all Liniments, P.listerinu or Firing, never leaves ant scar or blemisu, very rapid In Its action, giv- 
ing Immediate beneficial results, and is as convenient to use as a liniment. 

Price $1.50 per bottle, sent by express, charges paid. Special prices for orders of half dozen or over. TRY IT. 

LAWRENCE, WILLIAMS & CO., SOLE IMPORTERS, CLEVELAND, OHIO, 0. S. A. 



158 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL 



Jantjaby, 1887. 




DUX LUBRICANT. 




Trade Mark Pat. Mar. 13, 1683. 



Trade Mark Pat. Mar. 13, 1883 



The Leading New Grease for Street Railways. 



The Best Lubricant for Street Railways known. 



Try it and you will use no other Lubricant. 



WILL RUN FOR 
ONE YEAR ON 

ONE PACKING. CARS WILL RUN EASIER PACKED WITH DUX, THAN WITH OIL AND 
WASTE. WHY 1 ? BECAUSE WE GIVE YOU A BETTER LUBRICANT. NO DRIP FROM 
CAR BOXES WHEN PACKED WITH DUX, AND, THEREFORE, KEEPS THE CAR BOXES 
AND TRUCKS 
CLEAN. 



DUX FOR STREET RAILWAYS. 

Office Buffalo Street Railroad Co., Buffalo, Sept. 12, 1883. 
Lelb Lubricating Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Gent'n:— Your Railroad Dux Is the best lubricant we have ever used. In the 
points of endurance, cleanliness and easy running it more than sustains your 
guarantee. From present appearances a car-box well-filled will last six months 
or more, which would indicate considerable saving in cost over all other lubri- 
cants we have used, we also like Dux because it Is easily applied, needs little 
care, and dispenses with the frequent inspections which consume much time 
and often are unsatisfactory. Respectfully yours, 

Edw'd Edwards, Supt. 

Office of Camden Horse Railroad Co., Camden, N. J., May 25, 1885. 
Lelb Lubricating Co., 196 and 198 Chicago st., Buffalo. 

Gentlemen— Please send this Company to the above address one barrel of 
"Wool Compound Dux Lubricant." 

Your agent sent us sufficient to pack one car In September last, and that car 
has been running steadily six days in the week since September 15, 1884, making 
from 43 to 50 miles per day. The car referred to looks as if it would not require 
repacking for a year. Yours Respectfully, 

John Hood, Supt., etc. 

Pittsburg, Allegheny & Manchester Ry. Co., Pittsburg, Pa., Aug. 13, 1885. 
Lelb Lubricating Co.: 

Gentlemen— We have used Dux Lubricant for the past nine months. It has 
given entire satisfaction; in fact, it is the best I have ever used. Think It fully 
as good as represented. Yours Truly, 

J. C. Cotton, Supt. 



Faulkner Mills.— F. J. Hastings & Co., Millers. 

So. Acton, Mass., Dec. 23, 1886. 

Lelb Lubricating Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Gents:— Your favor of the 17th Inst, duly received. In reply we would say, 
that for several years we had much trouble and annoyance to And a lubricant 
for our heavy bearings that would stand, and tried various articles on the mar- 
ket without being satisfied, until a friend connected with a large manufactur- 
ing concern gave us a few pounds of the Dux Lubricant to try. It worked so 
much better than anything we had ever had that we ordered enough from you to 
give it further trial, and as a result have used it ever since, and can truly say it is 
the best lubricant we ever used. It will stand heat, gives off no drip and Is econo- 
mical, and we are very much pleased with it and do not hesttate to declare that 
It Is our firm belief that there can be nothing ever made to equal It. Our ex- 
periment on wagons has been equally satisfactory; our first attempt being on 
a hea vy wagon used every day, heavily loaded, ran 21 days when it went into the 
shop to be painted, and then was in a good condition to run longer. The only 
thing we regret Is that we did not at once try and arrange to sell it in this 
locality, still one of our townsmen to whom we gave your address, Mr. Little- 
field, has since obtained the agency, we learn, and we can obtain it through him. 

Yours Truly, 

F. J. Hastings & Co. 

Niagara Falls Paper Manufacturing Co., Niagara Palls, Sept. 16, 1882. 
To the Lelb Lubricating Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Gentlemen— We hive been using your Dux Lubricating Compound in our 
mill for some weeks past, and so far, regard it superior to any lubricator we 
have ever used, In particular on bearings or trunnions that are constantly 
heated by the steam passing through them, such as the Cylinder Dryers and 
Revolving Boilers, etc. No drip as from oils. 

Yery respectfully, 

S. Pettebone, Treasurer. 



MANUFACTURED BY 

THE LEIR LUBRICATING COMPANY 



196 and 198 Chicago Street, Buffalo, N.Y 



January, 1887. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



169 



NEFTELfcOOTHOUT 

ENGINEERS & CONTRACTORS, 



W. CONWAY, 

STEAM & STREET RAILWAY CONTRACTOR, 



41 Liberty Street, 



- New York. 



AND DEALER IN 



We make a specialty of street railway work, acting as engineers, or will 
contract for the construction of new lines. Repairs promptly executed on 
out of town work. Estimates for warehouse tramways promptly furnished. 



Estimates given. Curves and switches laid at short notice. Office and Res- 
idence 

487 Monroe Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



THE CAR TRACK FRICTION APPLIANCE CO., 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




THE PAT. RELIABLE SAND BOXES, 

W. T. BUTLER, General Manager. No. 19 Tremont Row, Boston. 

These boxes are guaranteed to distribute upon the rail SAND, SALT or GRAVEL, WET or DRY. 

WM. SOMERVILLE * SONS, 

CELEBRATED 

ANTI-FEVER MEDICINE. 

The Anti-Fever Medicine has now been In use for over 30 years as a specific In all Diseases of an Inflammatory Character In Horses and Cattle. Antl- 
Fever Medicine is a Certain Cure for Chills and Fever, Sore Throat, Inflammation of Lungs, Coughs, Staggers, Inflammation of the Bowels, Spasmodic Colic, and 
Pleuro- Pneumonia In Cattle. This valuable Medicine is now used by the Principal Stables in the Country, by the U. S. and American Express Companies, and many 
of the Street Car Companies. Try one bottle and you will be convinced of its value in your stable. Sold by all Druggists. PRICE $1 per bottle. Discount to 

Wm. Somerville & Sons, Buffalo Horse Infirmary, 127 Erie st. Buffalo, N.Y. 

The Belle City Feed and Ensilage Cutter. 

IS THE BEST FEED CUTTER. IS THE STRONGEST, MOST DURABLE, AND ON THE WHOLE 
IT IS THE BEST FEED CUTTER IN THE WORLD. 

OUR TWO LARGEST SIZES HAVE SELF-FEEDING ARRANGEMENTS, AN ADVANTAGE NO 
OTHER CUTTER HAS. 

THEY CAN BE FED WITH A PITCHFORK AND ARE GUARANTEED TO SUIT EVERY TIME. 
WRITE FOR CATALOGUE, PRICE LIST, ETC., TO 

THE BELLE CITY MANUFACTURING CO., Racine, Wis., U. S. A. 

THE H. C. STAVER IMPLEMENT COMPANY, 

38 & 40 SOUTH CANAL STREET, CHICAGO, ILL, 



Manufacturers and Jobbers of 

FEED MILLS, FEED CUTTERS, 

HORSE POWERS, TREAD POWERS, 
WOOD SAWS & CORN SHELLERS. 




Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Prices. 




THEDAVIS METAL 



forCAR JOURNAL BEARSNGS 

EDWARD C. WHITE, SOLE MANUFACTURER 

531 WEST 33D STREET, NEW YORK. 



160 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 1 88*7 . 



Cleveland 
Foundry. 



Manufacturers ot 



Car and Locomotive Wheels either Chilled or 
Steel Tired ; with or without axles. Street 
Railway Wheels, Turnouts and Turntables 
Patent Chilled Face RR. Frogs. En- 
gine & Heavy Castings a Specialty. 





Graded Stable Cutter with Straight or Curved Cover 

Descent % inch per foot. Pieces 5 feet lengths; short pieces furnished to suit 
any length. Spouts to connect with sewer. 

They control aud make N. P. Bowler's Patent Street Eail 
road Wheel. The lire of this wheel is cast separately from the 
hub and spokes ; the latter is made of soft strong iron, nnd is 
perfectly free from strain — therefore can lie made much lighter 
and more durable. The tires aud the spokes or center of the 
wheel are made perfectly interchangeable so that when the tire or 
rim is worn out another can be put in its place by any employee 
with no other tool than a common wrench. 

Bgwjgr&Cg. winfirit. Cleveland, 0. 

M. M. White & Co., 

531 WEST 33d STREET, 



NEW YORK. 




OWNERS AND BUILDERS OF 

H. DOUGLASS' 

Patent Automatic Switch 

FOR STREET RAILROADS. 

FRANK H. ANDREWS, Sole A*rent, 545 West 33d St.,N.Y. 




ALL IRON AND STEEL. 

The most permanent and very best form 
of railroad construction for public streets. 
Fully endorsed by city and town authori- 
ties. Send for circular. 

Trices furnished on application to 

Wm. Wharton, Jr. & Co., Lim., Phila., Pa., General Agents, 
Or D, F. Longstreet, Providence, R. I, 




OLIVER BRADEN, 

STEA3I POWER 

Book and Job Printer, Lithographer and Engraver. 

P. S. Estimates furnished for all kinds of Wood Engraving and Electrotyplng. 
Printing of Descriptive Circulars or Catalogues In the very best style. 

Having had twenty years experience in the business I feel competent to attend 
to your wants. Address, 

OLIVER BRADEN, 119 So. Fourth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

The "BROAD WELL CAR STARTER," 
having been subjected to practical tests, is now 
placed on the market at a very low price. 
C. B. BROAD WELL, 

169 Laurel Street, - New Orleans, La. 

WM. P. CRAIG, 

Street Railway Builder, 

and Dealer in Supplies. 
Office 95 Liberty St., N. Y. 

rniAAur Bill PAD fTTDUP constantly on hand, Straight or Curved to 
(jKUOVd KAIL rUa liUIUri any radius or length, at short notice. 

CURVING MACHINES of Best Style and Make. 

CnUPTIT D XTPQ given on AUTOMATIC SWITCHES, TURNTABLES, 
SPfciUAL KAlfciO b TRACK CASTINGS, KNEES, JOINT PLATES, 
spiKES and all other material for Railway Construction. 

navinff bad over 25 years' practical experience in Street Railway Construction 
foel confident in saying to parties who contemplate toutldlng will And it t their 
interest to correspond with me before making contracts or ordering material. 



January, 1881. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



Ifll 



JOS. KINSEY, Prest. E. V. CHERRY, Vice-Prest. OLIVER KINSEY, Secy. 

POST & CO., Cincinnati, O., U.S.A. 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Street Railway Supplies and Equipment. 



MANUFACTURERS OP 

Center Lamps, all sizes. 
Globe Brass End Lamps, 
Tin Box Lamps, 

Cable Car Head Lamps, 
Office Lamps. 

CAR TRIMMINGS, 

ALL STlLES. 

Street Car Gongs, 

Journal Bearings, 

Deck Lights. 




DEALERS IN 



Burners, Chimneys, 
Wicks, Lenses, 
Globes, Etc. 

TRACK MATERIALS. 

Spikes, Bolts, 
Rails, Shovels, 
Picks, etc., etc. 



Center Car Lamp. 



SPECIA.L TRIMMING- > MADE TO ANY ORDER TO ANY DESIGN. ESTIMATES FURNISHED. 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 



STREET CAR SEATS & BACKS. 




MAIN PANEL. 

3- ! u' In. w.w. 



FOOT PANEL. 
3- Jain. w.w. 



THREE-PLY CAR SIDES. 

Having given o\ir three ply white wood car sides a thorough trial for a 
number of years in our city street and railway lines, which test has left them as 
firm and good as the day they were put in, we unhesitatingly place these sides 
in the market as a superior article. They are composed of three white wood (or 
poplar) veneers, each inch thick, the grain ot the center layer running at right 
angles with the two outside layers. Hence they derive all the special and well- 
known advantages of glued up wood over single ply, namely : 
1st. They are fully 75 per cent stronger, for they brace and stiffen the 
car. 

2nd. They are lighter, being only 3 8 inch thick, and so do ot add so 

much dead weight to the car. 
3rd. They will not check or split by change of atmosphere. 
4th. They will not split or crack when nailing into pi ace , even though 

the nail be placed near the edge. 
5th. Being laid over a form to suit the shape of the car frame or post 

they cannot buckle or twist, a feature which also adds strength to the 

car. 

For repairing cars these sides have no equal. 

Our Three I'ly Car Seats and Backs, SO well known all over the world, 
are now the moat popular seat and back in I he market, and recommend t hem- 
selves especially for their Lightness, Cleanliness, Healthfulnessand Beauty, as 
also their Cheapness and Durability- For they are Indestructible by moths'itue 
great enemy ot upholstering), and will not harbor vermin or insects, or carry or 
communicate contagion or disease. Our trade in this line hasgrown in thirteen 
years to vast, proportions, which in itself is a sufficient guaranteeof their merits. 
They are made either perforated or plain to suit customers. Birch is the wood 
most generally used. Today fully one half the railroads In the country are u^ln-' 
these seats and backs. We would also call attention to our Veneer Oilina for 
cars. They are made either plain, perforated or decorated, and greatly add to 
the beauty of the car. For repairing cars they have no equal; for they are placed 
over the carllnes and cover all the old paint and wood work. The woods general- 
ly used are Birch, Birdscyc Maple, Oak and Mahogany. 



G-ABDITEE Sz CO., 

Manufacturers of Car Seats and Ceilings and Depot Seating, 

OFFICE AND FACTORY : 643, 645, 647, 649, 651, 653, 655 and 657 West 48th St., New York. 
Sample and Salesroom ; 206 Canal St., cor. Mulberry, 
Send for Catalogue. ^Address all Communications to Office. 



162 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 1887. 



ESTABLISHED 18u 



INCORPORATED 1875. 



7 



CAR COMPANY, 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

BUILDERS OF 

Street Oars 

OB EVERY STYLE AND SIZE, 

For Horse, Cable or Other Motive Power. 

EXCLUSIVE MANUFACTURERS OF 

BROWNELL'S PATENT 

COMBINATION CARS 

FOR SUMMER AND WINTER SERVICE. 

JARVIS ENGINEERING CO., 

Engineers & Contractors 



J. M. JONES' SONS, 



AGENTS, 



Street Railway Car Builders 



WEST TROY, 



NEW YORK. 




FOR ERECTING STATIONS 



For 



ELECTRIC POWER AND CABLE RAILWAYS, 



USING 



Jarvis Patent Furnace 

For Setting Steam Boilers to Burn Cheap Fuel, such as Wet Saw- 
Dust, Coal Screenings or Slack Coal. 

ALSO 

AHMINGTON AND SIMS ENGINES, 

Belting direct to Power Dynamos without using Shafting. 

NO. 61 OLIVER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 

SEND FOR CIRCULAR. 



PENNSYLVANIA 

STEEL COMPANY. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Steel Rails 



Of T patterns, weighing from 16 to 76 lbs. per yard. 
CENTRE BEARING- Street Patterns, 42 to 60 lbs. per 
yard, TRAM Street Patterns 45 to 47 lbs. per yard, 
and Street Patterns for STEAM ROADS. 



WORKS AT 

STEELTON, DAUPHIN CO., PENN. 



NEW YORK OFFICE?. - 1 60 Broadway. 
Philadelphia Office 208 South Fourth St. 



January, 1887. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



163 



JOSEPHINE D. SMITH, Successor to the late WILLARD H. SMITH, 

350 & 352 Pearl Street, New York, r 





No. 10. 



-Two-light C ar Lamp as used on Tenth 
Avenue (N.Y.)Caole road. 





No. 8.— Center Car Lamp as used on Tenth Avenue 
(N. Y.) Cable road. 




Small Head Light lor Grip Cars and Stages. 

. . . . . No. 1.— Center Car Lamp in general use throughout 

No. 3.— Box Lamp with drip cup. AH kinds of trimmings pertaining' to car lamps. the United states and Canada. 

MANUFACTURER OF W. H. SMITH'S PATENT RAILROAD CENTER LAMPS AND REFLECTORS. 

The Putnam Nail Co. 



Highest 
Award at the 




TO YOUR 





Fig. ] . 



Fig. 2. 




Centennial 
Exhibition. 



HORSES' FEET 



These drawings show how many horses are made lame and permanently In- 
jured by the use of the cold cut and sheared- pointed Nails. This process ot 
manufacture produces lamination, causing the Iron to form In layers, and when 
driven into the foot, the horny libers of which the hoof Is composed cause the 
nail to separate at the point, ana one portion passes into the foot. 

No. 4 represents one of these nails which was driven into the hoof and sliv- 
ered In driving, one thin blade passing into the quick or sensliive sole; No. 5 
the thick blade of the nail passed out of the wall of the hoof for clinching . 
After a few days the horse was returned lame, and upon the removal of t lie shoe, 
a nail similar to the above was broken off, leaving the sliver In the foot : lock- 
jaw ensued, from which the horse died. Upon dissecting the foot a portion of 
the nail was found to have penetrated through the coffin bone, as seen in i< ig. 2, 
letter A, thus sacrificing the life of a valuable animal. 

It requires but little observation and reflection, one would think, to arrive at 
the conclusion as to the kind of nails to be used in the horse's foot, whether a 
mangled piece of iron rendered DANGEROUS by the Cold Rolling and Shearing 
process, or one made from the rod at a welding heat, where all the fibers remain 
intact and a perfect oneness maintained and being pointed by the hammer, ren- 
dering such an accident as silvering utterly impossible. 

The foot is the most important member of the animal's body, to which the 
greatest care and attention should be directed; for when it becomes injured or 

Address for Circulars, etc., 



diseased, no matter how perfect the other parts may be, the horse's services aie 
diminished or altogether lost. Hence the value of a horse depends upon thecon- 
! dition of his feet. 

The horse at every step brings an immense power and weight to bear upon the 
foot. The hoof is a thing of life and yields to the pressure. The Putnam Nail 
being forged accommodates Itself to the pressure of the hoof. It is far other- 
wise, however, with stiff rolled and cut nails. They remain rl°-id and their 
sheared edges are therelore pressed like sharp knives against the horny 
fiber. This Is what causes the broken and rotten appearance so frequently seen 
in horses shod with cheap cut nails. Can a horse owDer afford to attempt, to 
save a few cenls In price of nails and ruin his horse? surely not, for the old 
adage is true as ever 

"NO FOOT, NO HORSE." 

As the remedy lies with the owner of the horse, it is for him to prohibit any 
cold-rolled or sheared nails being used in his horse's feet. 

The only Hot-Forged and Hammer-Pointed Horse-Shoe Nail in llio 

World 

that Is not cut, clipped or sheared upon the point, and will not split in driving Is 

1 THE PUTNAM NAIL. 



THE PUTNAM NAIL CO., NEPONSET P. O., BOSTON, MASS. 



184 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 1887. 



"PAY HERE. 



If 



Fare Boxes and Change Receptacles 

FOR STREET CARS. 

OUR NEW FARE BOX NO. 3 

Is pronounced by the many Street Car Companies using it to be the best. 




The following- are some points of su- 
periority In tills box over others: 

Simplicity of Construction, 
Quickness and Convenience of 
Cleaning, Security of Money 
Drawer, Beauty of Finish and 
Much Cheaper in Price. 




Descriptive and Illustrated 
Circular on application. 

Examine the merits of this 
box and get our prices before 
buying. 



Box No. 3. 

Front or Passengers' 
View. 



Change 
Receptacle. 

The only satisfactory arrangement in use for making change with the driver. 




Box No. 3. 
Back or Driver's 
View. 



WALES MANUF. CO.. 76 & 78 E. Water St., Syracuse, N.Y. 

—The Chaplin Roller Bearing Tramwav— 

CAR BOX AND GEAR. 




LIGHT DRAFT EASY RIDING DURABLE 
POSITIVELY DUST PROOF AND OIL TIGHT 

Boxes Hold Sufficient Oil for One Year» No Waste Used 
for Packing nor Babbitting for Boxes. 
Overcomes Friction in Taking a Curve 

Superintendent's Office, Highland Street Railway, 

No. 827 Shawmut Ave., Boston, August 19, 1886. 
Chaplin M'f'g. Co., Messrs:— In reply to your note I will say we have had a set of your 
Gear under car, "Gov. Rice," for the past four years and it has proved very acceptable, so 
much so that we have decided to put on 50 sets of your improved pattern. The wear on the 
Journal is Imperceptible, and it is beyond question the easiest running gear in the market. 

Respectfully, J. E. rugg, Sup't. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



THE CHAPLIN MANF. CO.. Bridgeport, Conn . 

Berry's Patent Hames and Regan Snap. 

1 




They have the advantage of easy adjustment. No buckles o" straps are used. They can be applied in an instant, being fastened to the collar. The collar is 
divided and there is no strain upon the collar or the eyes of the horses. 

In case of accident the whole harness can be removed at once. They are adapted to the use of Fire Departments, Horse Railroads, Express WagODS, Teams and 
Light Carriages, and are in use in over one hundred cities and towns In the United States and Canada. 



ATEITT SUAP. 



They are made of the best gun mstal and malleable iron, with a brass 3prlng which lslnclo3el In a water-tight soctet and made rust and dust proof. It Is an 
Impossibility tor It to besome detached. Write tor illustrated catalogue and prices. CHARLES E. BERRY, Cambridge, Mass. 



Jan»akt, 1881. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



165 



Clark's Tramways. 

Tramways Their Construction and Work- 
ing. Embracing a Comprehensive His- 
tory of the System; with an exhaustive 
Analysis of the various Modes of Trac- 
tion, including Horse-Power, Steam, 
Heated Water and Compressed Air; a 
Description of the Varieties of Rolling 
Stock; and ample Details of Cost 
and Working Expenses: the Progress re- 
cently made in Tramway Construction, 
&c. , &c. By D. Kinnear Clark, M. Inst. , 
C. E. With over 200 Wood Engravings, 
and 13 Folding Plates. Two Vols. , large 
crown 8vo, 30s. cloth. Price $12. 

AMER, RAILWAY - PUBLISHING CO., 

113 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK. 



Ayers' Anti Rattler, 

FOIt RAILROAD CAR WINDOWS. 




The Best and Cheapest 



ANTI-KATTLER IN TUB 
MARKET. ALSO, 



Ayers' Pat. Sash Holder, 

FOR HOLDING CAR WINDOWS AT ANY 
HEIGHT. 
Manufactured by the 

AYERS' PAT. SASH HOLDER GO. 

Room 242, Broadway & Chambers St. 
STEWART BUILDING, NEW YORK. Send for C ircu I a rs . 




F. W. JESUP & COMPANY, 

67 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK. 

STREET RAILWAY SUPPLIES 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Steel Ralls, all patterns; Cars; Automatic switches; Turntables; Curved Kails. 
Channel Plates; Frogs ; Crossings and other Track Castings, Knees, &c; 
Countersunk Spikes, specially adapted for Center-bearing Ralls. 




P. F. Burke, 



Patent Steel Toe-Calks. 

Cold Iron Punching;, Chain Links, 
Washers, etc. 



360 DORCHESTER AVENUE, 

SO. BOSTON, MASS. 

Send for Circulars. 




Prest. & Treas., l!o - . 
A. Bi.eekeii Banks. 
Sec, A. EGEItTON. 
Engr. & Supt., O. 11. 
Gibbon. 



The Metallic Street Railway Supply Co. 



GIBBON' 



ALBANY, NEW YORK. 

Cheapest, quickest laid and most durable track known. Dispenses with all 
timbers, butts, S'llkes, knees, &.O. Estimates for building and relaying street-rail- 
way tracks and full particulars sent on application. 

N.Y. Office, 1 Broadway, Humphreys & Sayce, Contracting Agents. 



A. J. HUTCHINSON, 

CONTRACTOR 

And PRACTICAL BUILDER of STREET RAILWAYS. 

Roads Relaid, Switches, Turnouts, Warehouse Tracks. Materials Furnished. 

ROOM 11, - 95 LIBERTY STREET, N. Y. 

LYNN * PETTIT, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Machine Braided Cocoa Car Mats. 

707 Market Street, Philadelphia. 



A Sample 

Order 

Solicited. 




CABLE ROADS. 

Am. System Traction Rope Railway, operated by Independent Duplicate Cable. 

KUI.l.Y PKOTKCTlil) BY PATENTS i.. iVi:vi» 

COUNTRIES. 



UNITED STATES, 

ENGLAND, 

HERMAN Y, 

AUSTRIA, 

SPAIN, 

ITALY, 



FRANCE, 
BELGIUM, 
DENMARK, 
i VICTOIUA, Australia, 



NEW SOUTH WALES, Australia. 



D. J. MILLER, ENGINEER, 
234 HUOAinVAY, NEW YORK. 



166 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 1881. 



USE PROF. ROBERGE'S PATENT HOOF EXPANDER. 

Which Cures Corns, Contrac" 
tion, Quarter-Cracks, &c. 

It is the best invention for expanding a con- 
tracted foot, or keeping a sound fcot in its 
fc natural shape. 

It is used and approved by tlie leading 
horse owners of the New York Driving Park, 

such as 

Robert Bonner, Frank Work, 

and hundreds of other gentlemen of repute. 

In ordering, send diagram of foot with 
price. Same will be forwarded free by mall. 

F. P. ROBERCE, 

VETERINARY SURGEON, 

1,741 BROADWAY, NEW/YORK. 

Lloeral discount to the trade. They are kept by all first-class Horseshoers, 




Saddle and Hardware men. 



HAND POWER, LEVER AND HYDRAULIC PRESSES 




See page l'JT, July, 1885. 



Screw and Hydraulic Jacks. 

"Watson cSz Stillraan. 
204 to 210 Fast 43d Street, N. Y. 



Wilson Brake Shaft. 

ENTIRELY NEW & NOVEL IN CONSTRUCTION. 
POSITIVE AND SURE IN ACTION. 

BRAKES SET WITHOUT COMPLETELY TURN- 
ING THE HANDLE. 

MADE ON THE PRINCIPLE OF A FRICTION 
CLUTCH, 
SIMPLE IN DESIGN. 

Saves Room, Adds to Available Braking Power, 
and Gives the Driver the Best Possible 
Control over the Car. 

Mordecai M. Wilson, Agent. 

TROY, N. Y. 



F. M. DELANO. PHILIP RICHARDSON. 

47 Broadway, New York. 

Organizers, Promoters & Builders 

OF 

STREET RAILROADS. 

Dealers in Street Railroad Securities. Correspondence invited. 

STEEL STREET RAILS. 

CARNEGIE, PHIPPS & CO., LIMITED 

48 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA. 



Section No. 17 
40 tos. per Yard 



Clute's Patent Double 

Bottomed 

Street Car 

LAMP, 

Is one that assures safety, 
durability, and is perfect 
in regard to leakage. 

GEORGE M. CLUTE, Sole Manufacturer; 

Also Dealer in Car Reflectors, Chimneys. Burners, Etc. 
WEST TROY, N. Y. 




Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal. 




Best Anti-Friction Compound Discovered 

FOB CAR, LOCOMOTIVE AND MACHINERY BEARINGS. 

1. Prevents HOT BOXES. 

2. Adapted to HIGH or LOW Speed Machinery. 

3. It will stand the Heavy Work of SUGAR, 

SAW, ROLLING and WIRE MILLS. 

4. Is the ONLY metal that protects and does 

not wear Journals. 

See December number, pages 94 and 95, for Tests. 

New York Depository, E. S. GREELEY & CO., 

F. JORDAN, 200 Broadway, State Agent, outside 

city. 

CHARLES B. MILLER, Manufacturer, 

No. 2 1-2 Coenties Slip, New York. 



January, 188*7. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



167 



Portable Grinding Mill Manufactory. 

EjSta.1olIsln.ed_ 1351- 



Mills expressly adapted for use in 

STREET CAR STABLES. 

4-1 different sizes and styles. 

Feed Cutters, 
Corn and Cob Crushers, 
Corn Shellers, 

Roller Mills. 




Portable Engines 

AND BOILER, 

TREAD AND 
SWEEP HORSE POWERS. 




Complete Outfits a Specialty. 

Describe Wants and send for Illustrated 

Price List and Circulars. 



Nordyke $c Marmon Co., Indianapolis, ind. 





RUFUS MARTIN &, CO., 

13 PARK ROW, 5T. Y. 

Manufacturers and Dea'ers in Every Variety of 

STREET RAILW AY SUPPLIES. 

WARNECK & TOFFLER, 

211 East 22d St., New York, 

yole Manufacturers and Patentees 
of the only 

"ROLLING WOOD MAT" 

In the market. This matting, either 
I n round, square or flat slats, Is the 
most convenient one for horse cars, as 
it is a self cleaner and can easily 18 
repaired. 

Price, a running foot, 3 feet wide, 
only rnc. ordern respect fully solicited. 

THE OLD RELIABLE AMERICAN GRINDING MILLS. 

21 Sizes and Styles. 
20,000 in use. 

Our Nos. 3, 4 and 5 Mills especi- 
ally adapted for street car com- 
panies to be run with tread, 
sweep or overhead powers. 

We also Manufacture 

Tread Powers, Sweep 
Powers, Feed Cutters, 
Heating 1 Boilers, Corn 
Shellers, etc. 

Send for illustrated catalogue. 

Appleton Manfg. Co., 

22 So. Canal Street, 
CHICAGO. 



ESTABLISHED 1847. 




A. WHITNEY & SONS, 

CAR WHEEL WORKS, 

PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

CAST CHILLED WHEELS, 

A2ZX.ES ANS BOXES 

FOR EVERY KIND OF SERVICE. 

Street Railway Wheels of all Sizes. 



Established 1856. 



Incorporated 1883. 



e Feigel Car Co., 



BUILDERS OP 



ars for Street Railways. 



FACTORY 



OFFIUK 



New Utrecht, N.Y. 



So. 108 Wall Street, N.Y 



168 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



DAY'S IMPROVED STREET RAILWAY TRACK CLEANERS. 



The cut represents a part of one end of the frame 
work of a 16-foot car with cleaners attached. 




These Track Cleaners need no extended statement of their great superiority 
over all others invented. The fact of over three thousand pairs being' now In use is 
sufficient evidence of their necessity and ut ilit.y. Are adaptable to all kinds of 
rails and styles of cars. Clean Srow. Ice. Mud and Stones from the rail. The 
driver can raise or lower them Instantly with one hand. To secure the largest 
benefit theyshouH be attached to every car. 

No estimate can be made of their advantage In saving of horseflesh hand labor, 
salt, and t he making of time in stormy weather. Since their Introduction new 
and valuable Improvements have been made In their construction, mode of at- 
tachment, and convenience of handling. They are finished in a thorough, work- 
manlike manner of the be-t material obtainable, the design being to manufac- 
ture the most efficient article in preference to other considerations. Price in- 
cludes right of use and is less than heretofore. 

itererence Is made to a few of the roads using thee* Cleaners. 

Detroit City Ry., Detroit, Mich 154 Pair 

Chicago City Ry , Chicago, 111 400 " 

Rochester CItv & Bris-hton R. R. Rochester, N. Y ICO " 

AibmyRy., Albanv, N. Y 75. '• 

Lvnn& Boston It. R., Boston, Mass 08 •' 

Boston Highland Ry , Boston, Mass 40 " 

Or md Rapids Street Ry 4« " 

>( linker; Street Rv., Salem, Mass CJ " 

Bridgeport Horse Hv., Bridgeport, Conn 4H " 

cream city Ry., Milwaukee, Wis 40 " 

Milwaukee City Rv., Milwaukee, Wis 50 " 

Buffalo Street Ry., Buffalo, N. Y 32 " 

AUGUSTUS DAY, 76 State Street, cor. Park Place, 



This cut represents my Snow Plow, 23 of 
which are now In use. With four horses 
and two men they have handled two feet 
of snow, distributing It nine feet from the 
outside rail. 




It is adapted to single or double track roads, adjustable where necessary; built 
in the most thorough and substantial manner of the best matereial. The Plow 
is not intended to supply the place of t he small Track Cleanrs, but be auxiliary 
to them. For execution in deep .snow, ease, and convenience in handling, it sur- 
passes all others In use. ordeis -hould be given three month in advance 

Reference is made to the following roads that use them:— Detroit city Ry-. De- 
troit, Mich. (Two plows.) Rochester (liy & Brighton R.R , Hoehesier, N. V. 
(Two plows.) cream City Rv., .Milwaukee. Wis. West Side Street Ry , Mil- 
waukee, Wis. Chicago city Ry., Chicago, 111. (Three plows.) Grand Rapids 
street Ry.. Grand Rapids, Mich. Highland St. Ry., Boston, Mass. Buffalo St.. 
Ry., Buffalo, N. Y. (Two plows.) Johnstown Pass. Ry., Johnstown, Pa. Min- 
neapolis St. Ry., Minneapolis, Minn. (Two plows, i st. Paul --t. Ry., St. Paul, 
Minn. (Two plows.) Kalamazo oSt. Ry,, Kalamazoo, Mich. Worcester St. Ry., 
Worcester, Mass. south Bend Ry., South Bend, Ind. Milwaukee City Ry., 
Milwaukee, Wis, 

For Further Information and Price, Address: 



Detroit, Michigan, U. S. A. 



LAWSON S PATENT FARE BOXES 



These Boxes are of the latest, ai.d most approved 
pattern, and contain a front, door, by opening which all 
or the glass Inside can be conveniently cleaned. This is 
a late patent, and is a very valuable Improvement over 
the old method of taking the boxes apart fur that pur- 
pose. They are w ell made and not liable to get out of 
order, cannot possibly be picked, and even if all the glass 
Is broken no fare can be extracted from the drawer. 

The late J B. siawson originated the "Fakk Box svs- 




C. Front View. 



tem," and all of his Boxes, Change Gates and Drivers' 
Change Box are protected by several patents, and par- 
ties using them are not liable to claims for Infringe- 
ments, as may be the case witli some boxes which are 
now being offered for sale. - 

These Boxes, etc., are now in use not only In the 
United States and Canada, but in Mexico, South Ameri- 
ca, Kurope, Asia, Africa and Australia— In fact, nearly 
all places where street cars are used. 




Change Slide. Outside 
View. 





- -1 








- <s 



C. Back View. 



Change Gate. Outside 
View. 

The prices have been great- 
ly reduced, and are made to 
fit the times. Orders will be 
promptly filled by addressing, 




D Front View. 



D Rear View. 



MILTON I. MASSON, Agent, 365 AVENUE A, NEW YORK, 

or the JOHN STEPHENSON COMPANY, Limited, 47 EAST T1EKTY-SEM1H SQEEET, New Toik. 



Jandaby, 1881. 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



169 



Castings for Crossings, Frogs, Switch- 
es, Curves, Turnouts, &c. Joint 
Plates, all sizes of Knees, and Standard 
Castings always on hand. 



II. B. WAV. 

war. s. khodes 



J. B. BI.AMvl.KY. 




c 



k ontracts taken and Estimates given for Construction 
of Street Railways and Supplying of all Materials 
used. Steel Crooved and Tram Rails Furnished at 
Special Rates. 





TOM L. JOHNSO 

IMPROVED FARE BOX 




NOW IN GENERAL USE IN CITIES THROUGHOUT THE U, S, 




FAKES CANNOT BE EXTRACTED OH BOXES 
BOBBED WITHOUT VIOLENCE. 



f' SPECIAL SIZES BUILT TOORDER. 

ROADS EQUIPPED WITH BOXES ON TRIAL, 
AM) IF NOT SATISFACTORY, RETURNED WITHOUT 
ANY EXPENSE TO THE COM PA NY TRYING THEM. 
Patented Oct. 14, 187:5. 



CHARIOT PATTERN. 



REDUCED PRICES. 



Write for Descriptive Circular and Price List. Address all correspondence to 
A. A. ANDERSON, INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



170 



THE STREET RAILWAY JOURNAL. 



January, 1887. 



THE BEMIS CAR BOX COMPANY, 




Manufacturers of 



The Bemis Patent 



Journal Box. 



Light Draft, Easy Hiding, Durable, Economi- 
cal. Brasses are warranted for 10 years, and 
Journa